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The Seward gateway and the Alaska evening post. [volume] (Seward, Alaska) 1917-1918, February 20, 1917, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062015/1917-02-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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—-- “ GOLD, COAL
* LAND copper
OF THE LAST AND FISH
FRONTIER and II 1.
- THE ALASKA EVENING POST
, , VI v . ~^ “^“ " “sEWARD, ALASKA, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20,1917 Ten Cents the Copy
Volume XL Number 80___k___ . ____
FORTIFICATIONS TO BE TAKEN UP BY
CONGRESSMEN VISITING ALASKA
Fortifications for Resurrection bay
and Cook’s inlet in defense of the
government railroad terminals, pro
posed naval coaling station and line
V> the coal fields will be one of the
most important subjects considered
by members of the committees of
congress on appropriations, who un
expected to visit Alaska this summer.
That high officials of the govern-j
meiu are thoroughly aware ot the^
need of these forts is shown in let
ters received in the last mail addesar-,
ed to the Seward city council, in re-|
ply to the telegrams sent by the i
council and commercial bodies, en-j
dorsing General Weaver’s report on
Alaskan defense.
FROM SKN. CHAMBERLAIN
Senator George E. Chamberlain,
chairman of the committee on mili
would give the measure his closest at-,
tention when it comes up.
Delegate Wickersham went into de
tails in his reply, urging that data be
prepared by local people for present
ation to the members of the joint
party, which he is endeavoring to
h^ve visit Alaska in connection with
the semi-centennial celebration this
year.
The delegate’s letter stated in part:j
“You will notice that provision ts J
made tin the joint resolution for a
junketing part yto visit Alaska and
inspect the government railroad, the
cost of the trip, not to exceed $2f>,000.
to be deducted from the railroad ap- j
propriation) of three of the commit-j
tary affairs replied that he was ad
vised of the importance of protect
ing Seward and Cook inlet points anti
tees on appropriations as a part of
this joint committee.
Must Have Data Ready
■j “The committee on appropriations
has entire control of appropriations
for fortifying Resurrection bay and|
Cook’s inlet and of putting forward
other plans of fortifying the coast of;
Afeska and the very purpose of se
curing the appointment of this joint j
committee and bringing them to Al- j
aska is to bring to their attention the |
matters you mention.
“There is much interest taken in
these resolutions and it looks now as
if we might secure favorable action
thereon and* that sometime during
this summer you may have with you
the gentlemen who are able to matte
appropriations for the purposes you
* mention.
“In that case you ought to be pre
pared with us much data as possible
to convince the members of the ap
propriation committee of the import
ance of doing the work you mention.’’
Provision is made in the joint reso
lution for the three senior members
in four comittees from the house and
four from the senate to make the trip.
The senators and representatives who
will form the party to visit Alaska.
BOATS AND TRAINS J
The Admiral Farragut sailed west
from Juneau at 2 o'clock this morn
ing.
The Alaska sailed from Juneau at
10:30 o’clock last night.
The trail will leave for Mile 40
Thursday morning at 8:30 o’clock.
The Admiral Watson will sail from
Seattle Sunday for Seward and way
ports and will go to the westward be
fore returning south.
*4
should the resolution pass, will there-;
fore included the following:
FROM SENATE COMMITTEES
Appropriations—Thomas S. Martin
of Virginia, George B. Chamberlain
of Oregon, Ellison B. Smith of South
Carolina.
Commerce—Duncan V. Fletcher of.
Florida, George B. Chamberlain of
Oregon, F. M. Simmons of North
Carolina.
Territories — Key Pittman of
Nevada, Gilbert M. Hitchcock of Ne
braska, Thomas J. Walch of Montana.
Public Lands—Harry B. Meyers of
Montana, Marcus A. Smith of Ari
I
I
- »
I
I
WASHINGTON, Tuesday, Feb. 20. — Appearing inj
behalf of the President, Sec. of State Lansing and Atty.
Gen. Greggory, went in person before the judiciary com
mittee of the senate today and asked for the passage of a
bill which will give the president power to handle the ex
isting international situation as far as possible without
recourse to war.
The terms of the bill would empower the president to
employ land and naval forces to enforce compliance with
and prevent violation of the obligation of the United
States under the “laws of nations” or so called interna
tional law, the plan being to use the military power in de
fense of American rights but not to wage war or take the
offensive.
Because of serious doubt in the mind of the president
regarding the real intention ot ollicials at the head of the
German submarine activities, no action has been taken to
relieve the ship blockade oi American ports.
The president believes the next few days will show
how far Germany intends to press hostile measures
against neutrals.
URGE COMPLETION OF
DEFENS [S AT PANAMA
WASHINGTON, Tuesday, Feb. 20.—The administra
tion is urging upon congress the importance of immedi
ately completing the fortifications at the Panama canal
and on the islands guarding the approaches. The natur
alization of all Porto Ricans is also considered essential.
USE THAWER TO
PREPARE FOR
STORAGE PLANT
- I
Frost in the ground has made it
I
necessary to thaw holes in which pil
ing will be driven for the foundation
of the Saun Juan Fishing & Packing
company’s cold storage plant at Pow
der House point.
The freighter Juneau with cap
and stringer timbers for the dock »s
expected today or tomorrow from Se- j
attle so there will be no further de
lay in constructing the dock.
The dock site is considered the best
on Resurrection bay for use by fish
ing boats as it is protected from both
north and south blows. It is so close I
l
to the head of the bay that northers
will not kick up sufficient chop to
cause trouble. The sand spit built out
at the foot of Lowell creek is suf
ficient to break up any chop created
by the occasional stiff southeasters.
The cold storage site is located ad
jacent to the main line right-of-way,
which makes possible the construction
of a spur track at a minimum cost
when demand for fish in the interior
becomes sufficient to warrant car load
shipments.
MEXICAN CONSUL
DOUBTS REPORT
VILLA IN JAPAN
EL PASO, Tuesday, Feb. 20.—Con
sul Bravo for Mexico, located here
stated today that he doubted the re
port that Pancho Villa, bandit chief,
had sailed for Japan.
“Villa has not been accounted for
since his defeat at Jiminez,” said
Bravo but I rather scout the idea of
his going to see the Japanese in the
face of their friendship to the provis
ional government.
NEW UNITED STATES
AMBASSADOR NOW
ON JOB IN MEXICO
MEXICO CITY, Tuesday, Feb. 20.
—Ambassador Fletcher has arrived
and taken up affairs relating to the
Mexican-American situation.
i
1
zona, Chas. S. Thomas of Colorado.
FROM THE HOUSE COMMITTEES
Appropriations—John J. Fitzgerald
of New York, chairman, Swager
Sherley of Kentucky, Robert N. Page
of North Carolina.
Merchant Marine and Fisherle®—
Joshua W. Alexander of Missouri,
Rufus Hardy of Texas, Micheal E.
Burke of Wisconsin.
Territories—William C. Houston of
Tennessee, James S. Davenport of
Oklahoma, John T. Watkins, of
Louisiana.
Public I^ands—Scott Ferris of Okla
homa, Edward T. Taylor of Colorado,
John E. Raker of California.
SEWARD WILL HAVE
LEADING PAPER OF
SOUTHWESTERN ALASKA
Organization of the Gateway
Publishing company, formed to
purchase the assets of the Post
Publishing company and the old
Seward Gateway Publishing com
pany, for the purpose of giving
Seward the best newspaper in
Alaska, was completed last night.
The board of directors for the
ensuing year elected Harry V.
Hoben, president, Frink L. BaJ
laine, vice-president, and Erich
Lucas, treasurer. The company
has authorized a five year, eight
per cent gold bond issue, which
will put the paper on a firm
foundation and it will be made
the representative publication for
all Southwestern Alaska.
Seward's business and financial
institutions stand solidly behind
this paper, and it will be conduct
ed for the best interest of every
person in the community.
SKATING PARTIES
ENJOY SPORT
ON ICY STREETS
Impromptu skating parties were
held on many of the streets of Sew
ard last night, and the children are
skating to and from school.
Delivery boys make phenominal
speed with parcels on ice skates now
that the going under foot is glare ice.
Repeated thaws and freezing dur
ing the winter has turned the snow
near the ground to a glassy like coat
and the last wind having swept it
clear the town has somewhat the ap
pearance of a Venice with the streets
frozen.
i
Tobogganing on Broadway was en
joyed by a number of the young folks
last night
Charles Hubbard, owner of the Blue
Bell mine was seriously hurt last
week by being struck in the face by a
stick of wood he was splitting. For
a time he feared the sight of one eye
would be lost.
___—
THE WEATHER
" ■
Yesterday.
Maximum ... *. w
Minimum . 15
Current .
Weather . Clear
Wind . North
WEATHER TOMORROW
Fair with increasing winds.
! Trails
Trails are good with a temperature
of 8 below zero at Mile 34, 2 above
at Mile 52 and 16 aboye at Mile 71.
i
SOLDIER OF FORTUNE AND
HERO OF PHILIPPINES IS
SUCC RY PERSHING
SAN ANTONIO, Tex., Tuesday, Feb. 20. — Major
General Frederick Funston, ranking field officer of the
American border army, died suddenly last night of acute
indigestion. He collapsed a short time after supper,
while playing with a child in the corridor of the hotel in
which he resided. Medical aid was summoned but all ef
forts to save him failed.
Brigadier General J. J. Pershing, commander of the
expedition recently returned from Mexico, assumed tem
porary command on the border and issued orders from El
Paso during the day.
The sudden death of General Funston is a severe blow
to the general staff as he was considered a most efficient
commander.
Word has been received from the Funston home at
the Presidio, near San Francisco, that Mrs. Funston is
prostrated over the news of her husband’s death, having
suffered a nervous collapse.
Funston’s mother, Mrs. Edward H. Funston, is ill at
Emporia, 111., and was seriously affected by the news.
General Funston started life as a typical soldier of
fortune and his was a strenuous military career. He was
born at New Carlisle, 0., in 18(15, raised on a Kansas farm,
and was appointed agent for the bureau of agriculture in
1891. He made a trip to Death Valley, toured Alaska,
crossed it both ways, voyaged up the McKenzie river in
the Yukon and down the Y'ukon river in a canoe, and fin
ely resigned from the service in 1894, going to Mexico to
travel. His first debut in military life was when he join
d the Cuban insurrection as captain of artillery in 1895,
where he advanced to lieutenant colonel under Gomez.
When the Spanish-American war broke out he re
turned to the United States, and in 1898 went to the
Philippines as colonel of the 20th Kansas, where he served
in Northern Luzon under Gen. McArthur.
For crossing the Rio Grande river at Calumpit on a
oamboo raft and establishing a rope ferry, while under
heavy fire, thus enabling the American troops to win the
battle, he was promoted to brigadier general of volun
teers, and on May 1,1899, was awarded the congressional
medal of honor. ’ He continued in command and in 1900
while in charge of the Fourth District, encompassed the
capture of Aguinaldo, head of the Philippine insurrection.
In 1901 he became a brigadier General of the regular army
and has served at various post since, advancing to major
general in 1914.
ESPIONAGE BILL PASS
BY THE SENATE TODAY
WASHINGTON, Tuesday, Feb. 20. — The espionage
bill providing severe penalties for spying on works and
plans for national defense and conspiracies to violate
American neutrality was passed today by the senate.
ALASKANS ARE GUESTS AT LUNCHEON
SEATTLE, Tuesday, Feb. 20.—Members of the Alas
ka legislature now here, were given a luncheon by the Al
aska bureau of the Chamber of Commerce today. Among
the Alaskans present were: J. J. Daly and J. R. Heckman
of Ketchikan, Daly and Sundabek of Nome, D. Sutherland
of Ruby, Jack Ronan of Seward, Andrew Nerland, Frank
Manly, C. J. Hurley and Jack Price of Fairbanks Elmer
Ritchie and J. L. Reed of Valdez and Capt. A. E. Lathi op
The solons will leave for Juneau on the City of Seattle.
REPORT CUBAN REVOLT WANING
HAVANA, Tuesday, Feb. 20. —Attempts to further
the revolt in Cuba have been checked and the uprising is
reported on the wane today.___ _____
U S. CONSULS ARE LEAVING GERMAY
COPENHAGEN, Tuesday, Feb. 20.-American con
sular officers who did not go to Switzerland with Gerard,
are leaving by that route today. ..
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