OCR Interpretation


The Seward gateway daily edition, and the Alaska weekly post. (Seward, Alaska) 1918-1920, January 18, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062016/1918-01-18/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

!, j | j! food will win the
!! RE WHO WASTES A I j WAR — DON'T WASTE
CRUST OF BREAD PRO- J IT
.. Daily Edition, and The Alaska Weekly Post _
SEWARD. ALASKA, FRIDAY, JANUARY is, His. TEN CENTS PER COPY
x N’umbci 227. _ ____ —■ - - ■ -
PREMIER LENIN:
AND TROTSKY AR£
SPLIT DN POLICY
STOCKHOLM, Jan. 18.—Relations between the two
Bolsheviki leaders, Premier Lenine and Foreign Minister
Trotsky are strained. Premier Lenine is greatly displeas
ed. according to official advices, because Trotsky occupies
the public eye to such a great extent and because I rotskx
formulates his own foreign policy not consulting Lenine.
It is stated that Premier Lenine is to resign to force
a vote of confidence or unconfidence.
ASSEMBLY OPPOSES BOLSHEVIKI
BERNE, Jan. 18.—The Russian Bolsheviki is facing
an apparent deadlock in the peace negotiations is the of
ficial report received here. Russia is now threatened
with war with Roumania; hostility of the l kraine constit
uents and other disturbances. The Assembly which con
vened today is controlled by parties opposed to the Bolshe
viki. Lenine must intervene it is stated to save the Bol
sheviki.
CONGRESS TO BE
SPEEDED UP FOR 1
AN ADJOURNMENT
FISH HEARINGS
ARE STARTED IN
UNITED STATES
WASHINGTON. Jan. 18. — Hear
ings at which all persons interested
in the fishing questions ma\ appeal
ami b* hoard, will be held at Atlantic,
Pacific and Great Lakes ports by the
American and Canadian commissions.
The members of the commissions are
meeting here now for preliminary
hearings on questions at issue be
tween the United States and Canada.
One conference will be held at Seat
tle and possibly the commissions may
go to Ketchikan and Juneau.
--—«
WARNING WILL
BE GIVEN ALL
HUN TRADES
WASHINGTON, Jan. 18. — A ref
erendum has been submitted by the
Chamber of Commerce of the United
States asking that the American busi
ness men pass upon a proposed warn
ing to German industrial leaders. This
warning will say that the German In
dustrial leaders cannot hope to re
sume friendly commercial relations
with America after the war unless
the German government is respon
sible to the German people.
--
INDEPENDENT HUNGARIAN
ARMY PLAN IS REJECTED
AMSTERDAM, Jan. 18. — A Vien
na dispatch says that Emperor Char
les, of Austria, has rejected the
scheme to establish an independent
Hungarian Army, which has been pro
posed by the Hungarian Premier.
WASHINGTON, Jan. IS. — Speak-j
or Champ Clark and Leader Claude j
kitchin chairman of the leading house
committees, today agreed to speed up
the appropriation measures by avoid
ing unnecessary delays and hearings
with the view of concluding the busi
ness of the House by May 15th, and
in readiness for an adjournment of
Congress on June 1st.
U. S. DESTROYER
SETS A RECORD !
FOR ENDURANCE
WASHINGTON, Jan. 18. — A new
record for sustained endurance has
just been established by one of the
two new Flush destroyers. The des
troyer made a voyage from the Paci
fic to an Atlantic port in ten and a
half days and maintained an average
speed of nineteen knots.
AMERICAN BOAT
i SUBMARINED IN
ATLANTIC OCEAN
LONDON, Jan. 18. — The Ameri
can sailing vessel Monitor was sub
marined near Fureteventum on the
Canary Islands according to a dispatch
received this afternoon from Las Pal
mas. The dispatch says that the crew
was all saved by escaping in the life
boats.
-*
The people who are slow to see a
joke may argue that he laughs best
who laughs last.
-+-7'
Maybe you have also noticed that it
takes a ’ot of rouge to fill up a wrin
i kle.
JUDGE WHITTLESEY
IS ADMINISTRATOR
OF FOOD IN CITY
T
QUIT ON
ACCOUNT
OF COLD
CH1UAOO, Jan. IS. — One hundred
telegraph operators <iuit work this
forenoon on account of the extreme
cold weather when the Board of Trade
opened for business. Trading practi
cally stopped when the men left their
keys. The traders themselves wore
their overcoats, caps and mittens. The
temperature was below 45. Coal is
expected here soon to relieve the sit
uation.
MEATLESS DAYS MAY
BE INCREASED NOW
SAX FRANCISCO, Jan. IS. —
* Several days ago the Associated
Press sent out a story on the wire
* that meatless days may be dis
continued on the Pacific Coast.
This was an error and instead of
neing discontinued should have
lead “more than one meatless .
day a week will probably be en
forced by the United States Food
Administration throughout the 5
* nation.
******$$*****.*♦$
WAR SECRETARY
FOR RELEASING
OF MEN DRAFTED
WASHINGTON, Jan. 18. — Secre
tary of War Baker today advised the
Senate military committee that the
War Department favors discharging
from the draft liability the men who
passed their thirty first birthday and
who registered last June fifth, and
who have not been called to the col
ors.
-A
SHIP RAMMED
ON OCEAN BY
U. S.WARSHIP
AX ATLANTIC PORT,, Jan. 18. —
The American-Hawaiian steamer Tex
an, enroute to France loaded with ni
trates and which sent out wireless
calls for help last Monday, arrived
under her own steam today. She was
convoyed here by warships. A war
ship which was convoying her across
(the Atlantic rammed the Texan dur
i ing a heavy gale, punching a large
hole in her side. The warship was
not damaged.
-' -
As some see it, a candidate is a
person who stands on his platform ami
‘Mays down” on his promises.
-*
If vou arc going to skace over thin
ice be sure and not make a break.
Territorial Food Administrator Is
Sending Out Regulations to All
Communities Concerning the
New Food Regulations
St GAR SALES ARE AFFECTED
Flour Will Be Sold in Small Lots to
Consumers—Special Permits
\re to be Obtained to do
Business From Now On
United States Commissioner W. H.
Whittlesey has been appointed local
Food Administrator. This appoint-1
ment was received this morning and I
came from Judge Royal A. Gunnison,'
of Juneau, who is the Federal Food
Administrator for Alaska.
The cablegram received by Judge _
Whittlesey, after announcing his ap-j
j pointment says:
“Please call all wholesale and retail
food commodity dealers in your sec
lion together and 10 prevent hoarding
ami to conserve essential foods an
nounce regulations effective forth
with continuing until further notice:
“White sugar to he sold to consum
ers in cities and towns and immediate j
j environs in quantities not to exceed j
| five pound per household per week.
-To consumers or other dealers out
side of cities or towns and immediate
invirons in quantities not to exceed
l fifty pounds without permits from
Federal Food Administrator.
“Wheat flour not to be sold by deal-i
ers to consumer or other dealer either,
in or out of cities or towns in quanti-!
ties exceeding forty nine pounds with
out first obtaining federal food ad
I ministraters permit.
“To prevent duplication of sales
I and eliminate hoarding request all
dealers as far as possible to confine;
flour and sugar sales to regular cus
tomers.
“Invite all to become members of.
[the United States Food Administra-j
tion dealers. Pledges and posters;
forwarded shortly. Forward names of;
all invited and all accepting, all re-,
fusing. Urge dealers in food com-j
modifies and meat to encourage the,
cannot think any local citizen will re-1
use of food and meat substitutes. I
fuse to conform to regulations which i
are for the benefit of our country and
the common cause. If. however, any
refuse to abide by or violate the re
gulations wire name and circum
stance.
“Regarding excess sugar and flour
sales, you are authorized in my name j
over your signature to issue a written
permit directed to the applicants and;
dealer for a particular sale specify-:
ing the amount allowed to any appli
cant for excess purchase when the ap
plicant satisfies you of his good faith
and that he is not hoarding. Hotels,
restaurants and boarding houses are;
to be allowed to purchase fifty pounds,
of sugar at one time without permit.
Forms application permit are being;
printed‘and go forward in the first
mail. ,
“Give these regulations widest pos
sible publicity. Same regulations ef-,
fective over the territory today. I i
look to you to see that those regula-;
tions which are for the entire terri-;
tory are made effective in all com-j
munities tributary to your city forth-;
with”
EVANS IS EXPECTED TO
REACH HERE TOMORROW
Steamer Admiral Evans sailed from
i Juneau for the westward last Wed-;
nesday afternoon at .‘1 o'clock and,
should be in Cordova today. Agent.
Blue believes that the Evans will ar-,
rive here tomorrow night or early on
Sunday morning.
INDUSTRIES STOP
|WORK-PRESID NT
APPROVES ORDER
WASHINGTON, Jan. 18.—America felt the war’s
pinch perhaps for the first time when thousands of indus
tries were stopped at midnight under the i uel Adminis
tration’s orders, despite the protests predicting disastrous
consequences and the formal request from the Senate of
the United States to stay execution temporarily.
Fuel Administrator Garfield signed the order last
night and signed it with the full consent and approval of
President Wilson.
The President stated that he did not intend to inter
fere and said that he believed that the people of the United
States will shortly be convinced, if they are not now, that
the order is necessary. All principal munition plants
were not included in the order to suspend for five days ow
ing to the fuel shortage.
At 5:30 o’clock yesterday afternoon the resolution of
Senator Hitchcock requesting the fuel administration to
suspend for five days the coal conservation orders closing
down industries east of the Mississippi river, was adopted
by the Senate by a vote of 50 to 10. The resolution did not
require any action by the House. The fuel order was
signed by Garfield at 6 o'clock.
When Congress assembled this forenoon attacks on
the fuel restriction burst forth anew in the Senate, the
members of which are resentful because the f uel adminis
tration ignored the resolution for a five day’s delay. Sen
ators described themselves in>a state of impotent indigna
tion. Senator Smith, of Michigan, declared that the Sen
ate should clip the wings of those who seek such authority
which was never intended to be given. Representative
Snyder, of New York, said that President Wilson made a
fatal mistake in permitting Administrator Garfield to is-,
sue the order which meant utter chaos, want and suffer
ing.
Other representatives came immediately to the de
fense of the President and said that he had shown a splen
did guiding hand so far and if the Senators and disgrunt
led representatives would stop chewing the rag on things
they knew nothing about it would be better for the coun
try.
MANY FIRMS ARE EXEMPTED.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 18— Shortly after noon today
Fuel Administrator Garfield issued an order exempting
over one thousand firms from the restrictions of the tuel
order because their products were necessary to the nation
al interests. The Ford and Packard plants at Dctioit
were exempted insofar as they were used for the manu
facture of air craft and signal corps necessities. Also on
the list are many makers of army cloth.
STATEMENT BY THE PRESIDENT
WASHINGTON, Jan. 18.—President will issue a
statement for publication tomorrow supporting the Fuel
Administration’s restriction order which was issued by
Administrator Garfield.
NEW HUNGER DISEASE
FAMINE-DRO. -OVES
FATAL TO GREAT MANY
AMSTERDAM, Jan. 18. — The
ravages of the new hunger disease,
called in Germany “famine dropsy/’
are described in the Budapest news
paper Nepszava. Men are attacked
by it chiefly between the ages of 40
and 50, and unless the patient can be
given plenty of nourishment, the di
sease is very likely to prove fatal. In
ihe small town of Asch 900 cases hav
been reported, 3 per cent, of which
have already proved fatal,
i
PROFITEERS WILL SEND
MEN’S CLOTHING I P
j CHICAGO, Jan. 18. — Prediction
; of a radical advance in the price of
men’s clothing, an allegation that
wool growers, not satisfied with an
advance in the price of wool from 18
cents before the war to 75 and 80
cents a pound at present, are hoard
ing for still higher prices and plans
to memorize congress for government
control of both wool and cotton prices
were outstanding features of a meet
ing here of the National Association
of Retail Clothiers.

xml | txt