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The Seward gateway daily edition, and the Alaska weekly post. (Seward, Alaska) 1918-1920, January 22, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062016/1918-01-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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| jj " FOOD WILL WIN THE Jj
HE WHO WASTES A WAR - DON’T WASTE jj
| CRUST OF RREAD l’RO- jj jj IT
I LONGS THE WAR. jj jj
‘ Daily Edition, and The Alaska Weekly Post_ _
~ v SEWARD, ALASKA, TUESDAY. JANUARY 22,1918 TEN CENTS PER COPT
Volume XI. Number J O. __—_-___ -___
ROOSEVELT
IS ROASTED
YSENATOR
Senator Stone Makes Sensational
Speech and Flays Roosevelt As
Man Who Is Most Seditious
In the I'nited Stales
ROASTS REITBMCAN FARIA
Missourian Claims the Republicans
Are Attempting to lake 1 harge
of the Government—Takes Rap
At Political Opponents
WASHINGTON. Jan. 22.
acterizing Theodore Roosevelt as the
most potent and willing friend of
kaiser William, and the most sedi
tious man of consequence in the l nit
ed States. Senator William J. Stone,
of Missouri, made an address in the
Senate this forenoon ami boldly eha
ed that the Republican leaders wei
•'Mgagcd in an eJlort to make polkivv
out of the war.
Senator Stone declared that the R -
publicans aimed to take the govern
ment into their own hands by parti
san criticism of the war.
Senator Stone’s address is consul
ted the fore runner of a bitter pui '
san strife which is siated to sooi: ap
p^a r.
Pining his speech the Senator rx
coiciated partisanship n th ‘ war and
referred to Chairman Wilcox an«
Senator Pen ms e as witnesses to the
plot against the government. II said
that the Republicans had launched al
most all of the congressional investi
gations for partisan putpo e .
Democratic leaders tried to dissuade
bv>nc from speaking, out lie ;nsu*ted.
It was announced late today that
the partisan debate pro* *pit;U d by
Stone in his attack on Roosevei* a ra»
the Republicans will begin Iharsiui/.
-a
SAND POINT IS
HELPING FUND
OF RED CROSS
Sand Point i* composed of patriotic
citizens and th^'y are joining tin* Red
Cross. George Sexton received in the
mail on the Dora the first results of
the Ked Cross Christmas campaign at
that place. Thirty-one dollars was
raised for tne following memberships:
William Gibbons, $2; Otto Henviksen,
.»2; Alel Samuelson, £2; Katie Gros
void, $5; Andrew Grosvold. $•*>; Frank
Mic heel sen. $5; Nellie Grosrold, ,
and Ralph Grosvold, $;>.
GERMAN AIRPLANE ABLAZE IN MIDAIR
_ — — . —— n
This wouderful picture ol a Boche plane blazing In midair in* It hurtled
downward is one «.f lio* most remarkable photographs made in the war. The
German battleplaue was flying above the lines “somewhere in France," when
a French airman got directly overhead. He dropped a bomb, hitting the Boche j
machine squarely In the middle. It fell a flaming mass us this photograph
was made.
FIRST PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN DURING BVNG’S ADVANCE
\I,a111* machine uisti-. i*: c\ liors“*» ami cavalry ntlvuiichip on a reserve lint* road over newly captured territory
,. • < •, which the It 1 id ill 11 i stored a tern He hentlltjf to the Fenton forces. 3 hit
pb.anijniph is *!»«• iin-a t«* arrive ^howim; the aetttal movent *nt^ in tin* I'ritixli victory.
THREE BANDITS
MAKE BIG HAUL
OF VALUABLES
DETROIT, Jan. 22. — Three ban-1
dits this morning entered the jewelry
store of Ralph Dewey, in the down
town district, bound the proprietor
and two clerks and escaped with $(»(),
OOO worth of valuables. The robveryj
occurred shortly alter s o clock inr
was not discovered until U:1»0 when ;i|
customer went into the store.
LIEUTENANT IS !
FOUND GUILTY ;
OF DESERTION
TACOMA, Jan. 22. — round guilt\
of deserting the auny while on duty
on the Mexican border last year,
Lieut. Jiseph \S. Conroy has been
sentenced to two anti a half years to
government discipline in the govern
ment barracks.
He will be dishonorably discharged
at the end of his term.
He is the first American commis
sioned officer tried and convicted at
Camp Lewis.
til KM ANY MAY YIKLD
A MSTEKDAM, Jan. 22. —
Maximilian Harden, the famous
editor, in the latest edition of his
newspaper, says that Germany
may surrender Alsace and Lor
raine as a starter for peace nego
tiations.
A**.* t **********
MORE HERRING |
PLANTS TO BE
ERECTED SOON
\Y. P. Studdert, rish commissioner,
ga\e a most interesting talk on the*
•inning industiy at the noonday iun-i
choon ot the Chamber of Commerce,
today. .Mr. Studdert has just return-1
•mI from Soldovia and other nearby,
localities and states that the herring
industry is just in its infancy and will
grow from year to year. Several her
ring plants will be erected this sum
mer, according to Mr. ^tgddert, and
St ward \\ ill be the si »}dng • oint and
the center ot the tnuu t.v

ADVERTISING
FOR HELP IS
DISCOURAGED
WASHINGTON, Jan. 22. — The
Department of Labor today issued
preemptory directions to many large
industrial concerns to cease thv'ir wide
spread advertising for help. This is
thought to be unsettling the labor
supply and working hardships on the
individuals who are answering the
advertisements.
-o
MEAT INDUSTRY
MAY BE TAKEN
BY GOVERNMENT
WASHINGTON. Jan. 22. — De
mand; of the Chicago packing house
employees lor the government to take
control <>f the meat industry during
the war has now broadened to in
clude all packing plants in the Unite*!
States. The employees claim that 4 he
present wage scales are unjust and
that the government can handle the
situation in such a manner that will i
prevent strikes and also give betteri
working conditions.
MURDERERS IN |
PETROGRAD ARE
TO BE ARRESTED
PfiTUuGKAD, Jan. 22. — Premier
Lonine today ordered the arrest of the
murderers of ChungaioiT and Kokosh
ki, former ministers in Kerensky’s ca
binet who were killed in their beds in
the marine hospital yesterday. Th
murder of the former ministers has
created a feeling of protest among j
the Bolsheviki officials who are an- j
xious to prevent the present situation j
from getting beyond control.
1 ♦'
MINE WORKERS
ARE ASSEMBLED |
IN CONVENTION
INDIANAPOLIS, 1ml., Jan. 22. —
With addresses of welcome by cfiT-j
cials of the state and city, and the |
reading of a letter from President
Wilson, expressing good will toward
the country’s diggers, the Biennial
Convention of the United Mine Work
ers* of America has beer, opened here.
Delegates representing over 400,
uOO organized men, some of them who;
are represented for the first time in |
many years, aie considering business
matters. *lhe increase of wages will
not be the chief business before the
meeting, although many phases of la
bor, relating to the present standard,
will be discussed.
An unusual feature is the absence
of a wage scale committee which here-j
to fore always has brought in a re
port for higher wages. While the;
delegates will make no direct requests
for higher wages, it is expected they
will take some action looking to the
maintenance of the present standard,
at least until the end of the war.
-*>
INACTIVITY IS
REPORTED FROM i
ALL THE FRONTS
LONDON, Jan. 22. — Almost com-j
plete inactivity persists on the Ital-;
ian and French fronts. The Bui gars I
heavily attacked the French positions;
on the Macedonia front late yesterday
but they gained no advantage.
AUSTRIA IS ING
TORN BY A REVOLT
AND MANY STRIKES
BERNE, Jan. 22.—It is reported here from authentic
sources that Austrian Premier Seydler today issued a
statement to the Austrian workmen who are on a strike
for peace, that Austria-Hungary will continue to strive
for peace along the terms previously offered. Several
hundred thousand workmen in other sections of Austria
today struck joining 200,000 men already on a strike forc
ing the government to conclude peace with Russia and oth
nations.
BERLIN, Jan. 22.—Newspapers here this afternoon
printed reports that the Austrian ministry has handed in
their resignations, effective immediately. There is no
confirmation however to these reports.
LONDON, Jan. 22.—The Austrians cry for peace ac
companied by incipient revolts, are featured by the news
papers here today as a fact which is hurrying the dual
monarchy to a crisis.
Amsterdam dispatches indicate that the workmen
have become desperate owing to lack of food and general
weariness of the war.
OPPOSITION OF
PRESIDENT TO
KILL MEASURE
WASHINGTON, Jan. 22. — Pros
pects for the enactment of legislation
for contiol of war munitions under a
new official went glimmering today
owing to President Wilson’s denun
ciation of the provram. While it is
not admitted that the resolution is
lead, various senators claim that the
measure will never pass.
SNOW STORMS
IN EAST STOP
RAIL TRAFFIC
WASHINGTON, Jan. 22. — Heavy
snow stoims are reported today over
the entire west and has compelled the
abandonment of scores of schedules
of passenger trains.
Hundreds of locomotives have been
released from passenger train service
during the past four days and divert
ed to the coal traffic. There are now
plenty of cars and these are being
sent to the mines.
CHINESE FIRE
UPON GUNBOAT
OF THE U. S.
_______
WASHINGTON, Jan. 22. — Chin
oy<» rebels today fired upon tne Amer
; ican gunboat Monocacy at Pekin and
one sailor was killed and two wound
ed. The commander of the Monocacy
1 is reported to have returned the tire
, and silenced it. The Japanese steam
; er Tnyuen was also subjected to a fu
siladc accoidiny to dispatches receiv
ed bv the State Department.
_»_
‘BLANKS HLRE
FOR RETURNS
FOR INCOMES
United States commissioner Whit
tlesey has received a supply of the
; “individual income tax return” blanks
i which will be distributed upon appli
cation. The returns are for the year
of 1917 and for the net incomes of not
more than $.’*000.
-*
Head the Gateway.
LARGE VESSEL TORPEDOED AND SINKING
tTnusual photograph of a large six-masted sailing vessel sinking in the I
north Atlantic after being torpedoed by a German submarine. Owiug to their 1
slowness sailing vesstls are comparatively easy prey for the U-boaU. 4|
. yy --f •* » rr» '» .»■»—* -T IV

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