OCR Interpretation


The Coconino sun. (Flagstaff, Ariz.) 1898-1978, November 01, 1912, Image 8

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062055/1912-11-01/ed-1/seq-8/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for PAGE EIGHT

7"8 JFJff
SK.'lw'V
' &
.PAGE EIGHT
THE COCONINO SUN
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, J912,
t -
Ailvertisement
K
flB "
m
f a
! "I'
fx
V
s?
S
fl
1
I'
'
i
J
Ft
i
ft
l-tft .
w
?
Which is Better for Arizona
Prosperity or Experiment?
What Every Arizona Voter Should Know and Why.
Arizona has hundreds of thousands of acres of land that should be
tapped by railroads.
Oro running from $10 to $40 a ton Is being thrown on the dump
because It costs too much to haul It to a railroad.
What Arizona needs most to develop her resources is Railroads.
Under the laws of the State and the rules of the Interstate Com
merce Commission, railroads cannot make Improvements or extensions
except with borrowed money. (See Laws of the First Legislature of
the State of Arizona, Chap. 90. Sec. iS, and Rules cf I. C. C.)
By reason of the nbsolntely unnecessary expense and unfair reduc
tlon of earnings, It will cost the railroads about one and a half million
dollars a year. If the bills submitted to tbe people to be oted on
November 5th become laws.
One and a Half Million Dollars will pay Interest, at 5, on Thirty
Million Dollars. Theso bills will exclude just that much capital from
the stnte, which could it be invested, would develop the country and
give employment to thousands of people.
THE MEN WHO HAVE SUBMITTED THESE BILLS HAVE CON
FIDENCE THAT THE PEOPLE WILL GIVE THE RAILROADS A
SQUARE DEAL. THEREFORE, THE RAILROADS HAVE REFUSED
HERETOFORE TO TREAT WITH SELF-SEEKING POLITICIANS
AND HAVE APPEALED THEIR CASE TO THE PEOPLE OF THE
STATE OF ARIZONA.
PROSPERITY FIRST, EXPERIMENT SEC
OND, THEREFORE, DEFEAT THESE BILLS
NOVEMBER 5TH.
"AN ACT REGULATING THE NUMBER OF
ALEN TO BE EMPLOYED ON TRAINS AND
ENGINES."
(On Official fiallot, Nos. 304 and 303 House Bill No. 44.)
This is a useless expenditure of money and against public policy.
It requires an extra man on light engines', that Is. engines that arc
not pulling cars. Of what earthly use is such a man? Where would
he sit? What would he do? Just draw pa. Do you think that Is
fair? Certainly you don't. The fewer men on an enqlne the better.
There is less chance of their talking Instead of attending to business,
and causing a wreck.
"AN ACT REGULATING HEADLIGHTS ON
ALL LOCOMOTIVES." :
(On Official Ballot, Nos. 306 and 307 House Bill No. 42.)
It practically creates a monopoly. One company, the Pjle Co,
virtually controls all high candle power electric headlight patents.
What was the power behind the throne? Experiments have shown
conclusively that electric headlights are dangerous on double track.
Inventions are coming so thick and fast that this form of light may
l a back number In two or three years. Why tie the railroads down
with a law and prevent them from taking advantage of new inven
tions? Even now, competent authorities disagree as to the best form
of headlight. i
"AN ACT REQUIRING ALL ENGINEERS
AND CONDUCTORS TO nAVE THREE YEARS'
EXPERIENCE BEFORE BEING ELIGIBLE TO
HOLD SUCH POSITION."
(On Official Ballot. Nos. 308 and 309 House Bill No. 50.)
It is class legislation that forces every man who now holds a
position as an engineer or conductor, if he did" not have three years'
experience as a fireman, or a brakernan, to give up his Job. Experi
ence won't make brains. Seme men inisht be firemen, or brakemen,
for years and still be unfitted for promotion, and others, after one
jcar's experience would be perfectly competent to handle a train.
The law robs the sons of Arizona of their birthright and forces them
to give way, because of lack of oppo tunlty, to tl'e trarpp engineer, or
conductor men who are able to produce letters s:h w,.ig they have
had three years' experience, letters that may be forged.
"AN ACT LIMITING THE NUMBER OF
CARS IN A TRAIN."
(On Official Ballot, Nos. 310 and 311 House Bill No. 43'.)
The development of the State will be held back because the rail
roads will not be allowed to work up to their full capacity. What
Inducement is there to a railroad to improve Its lines by eliminating
curves, reducing grades, putting in heavier rails and better equipment,
If It is not going to be allowed to reap the benefits. It is claimed
that It Is dangerous to handle long trains. Where does the dajiger
lie, with modern airbrake equipment? On the Southern Pacific, there
has not been a man even injured in more than three years as the
result of handling long trains. Mn Cattleman and Mr. Farmer, It
means that your products must wait. If the train has seventy cars,
when It reaches the station where your cars are, even though tho
engine might be capable of handling ten or fifteen cars more with
case. What you want Is service, and you don't want that service
restricted by law, as long as It is safe.
"AN ACT PROVIDING THAT RAILROADS
SHALL NOT CHARGE MORE THAN THREE
CENTS A MILE."
(On Official Ballot, Nos. 312 and 313 Senate Bill No. 24.)
The population 'of Arizona is less than two to the square mile.
Passenger traffic Is so light that this law will make a drain of about
$320,000 a year on the railroads. It will limit their borrowing power
by just that much, will force them to curtail present high class service
and will inhibit expansion In the future. The Southern Pacific took
in, last j ear, from sources in the State of Arizona, $501,474.44, and
spent $3,818,033.51. Docs that look as if It were charging the people
too much? The three-cent fnre law will force the restriction of excur
sion and homeseekers' rates, that are doing so much to bring people
Into the State. In proportion to population, the rates In Arizona are
now lower than any State In the Union. Texas has tried these re
strictive laws with the result that railroad construction has about
come to a standstill only 12 miles of road built in the first six months
of 1912, and no promise for the second six montbB. Remember
$320,000.00 will pay Interest, at 5, on $6,400,000.00 that the railroads
will not be able to Invest.
"AN ACT PROVIDING
MONTHLY PAY DAY."
FOR A SEMI-
. (On Official Ballot, N03. 314 and 315 Senate BUI No. 19.)
It will put a burden on the State by Increasing poverty, beqause
the temptation to spei'd money foolishly when one has It In hist pocket
Is too great for the averPGe man. We are usually broke the day after
pay day. It would be twice as bad with two pay days. The work
lngmcn don't want it, as shown by the petition sent in to the Corpora
tion Commission against the law by the railroad men. This law
would play into the hands of that class of business that lives by induc
ing the working man to spend all ho has on pay day. It will increase
the cost of doing business for both the merchants and the railroads,
without benefiting either. Nor will it benefit the working man.
FINALLY: The people of this State established a Corporation
Commission to take care of Just such questions as these. (See Chap.
90, Laws of tbe First Session of tho Legislature of the State of Ari
zona.) Here the railroads and the people might be heard and equal
jubtice done. Why not let this body attend to these matters? Why
enact laws that are not needed?
THE PANICS OF
AND
1
DEMOCRATIC PARTY RESPON-
6IBLE FOR THE DISTRESS
WHICH MARKED ITS AD-
MINI8TRATION.
FACT IS CLEARLY SHOWN
The Financial Disturbance of Five
Years Ago Not Due to Adverse
Republican Legislation Nor to Any
Cause for Which the Republican
Party Mutt Answer.
With an audacity which can only be
explained by the desperate situation
which makes a resort to even the
most Improbable of theories a polit
ical necessity, the Democratic cam
yalgn text book charges the Repub
lican party with responsibility for the
panic of 1893 and the hard times that
ensued. "The Republicans have been
trying to make tho country believe,"
ays the text book, "that the panic of
1S93 was brought about by the Demo
cratic bill which was passed In 1894."
And then tbe text book writer pro
ceeds to make merry over the absurd
ity ot charging an effect in one year
to a cause that did not transpire until
the year after.
Well, here are the facts: The last
year ot the Harrison administration,
1892, was the moat prosperous the
country had enjoyed up to that time.
Labor was fully employed, capital was
actively seeking investment, and the
farmeu were getting a good price for!
si big crop. So far as industrial and
commercial conditions were concern
ed, there was not a cloud In the sky.
Republican speakers and newspapers
tried to persuade the people that they
should let well enough alone and that
Democratic success might bring dls
cter. Vvl tiiey would. not. listen. The
prices of some things were pretty
high. The Democrats declared it was
because of the high tariff and prom
ised that If put Into power they would
revise the tariff "In the Interest of the
plain people" There was little ex
pectation throughout the country that
Harrison would be defeated, and busi
ness boomed right up to election day.
But Harrison w'as defeated.
HoW the Panic Came.
And then what happened? Why, In
stantly, men who had monev which
they were about to Invest locked it up
in the vaults and said "We will Just
wait a while to see what happens."
Manufacturers engaged in producing
protected articles, rrallztng that as
soon as the Democratic congress could
get at It their protection would be
reduced. Immediately began to cut
their output to current demands. Who
could blame them for refusing to go
ahead and pile their warehouses full
of goods which might have to be sold
In competition with similar products
made In countries where the factor
wago scale was one-half or one-fourth
of the factory wage scale which they
had been paving? Jobbers and whole
salers cut their orders to the manu
facturers in the same way and for the
same reason. Retailers all over the
country bought their supplies from
day to day, fearing to be caught with
high-priced goods when the low-priced
flood came.
And so it happened that although
the Wilson bill was not actually pass
ed until late In 1894 the panic began
the day after the election of 1892. II
was not what the Democratic presl
dent and congress had done, bul
what everybody knew they Intended
to do that wrought the havoc Indeed,
If the Wilson bill could have beer,
passed the day Cloveland was lnaugu
rated the damage to the country woul
have been far less than that which
actually occurred.
The Danger of Uncertainty.
This country Is big enough and rich
enough and resourceful enough to ad
Just Itself to nearly any tariff law, no
matter how bad it may be, if it only
knows what it Is. But during all the
long months of debate over the bill
tho business ot the country was, as it
were, hung up In the air If maii "had
known that the duty on articles In
which they were Interested was to be
reduced ten per cent they corll have
figured accordingly. If the) had
known the duty was to be reduced 50
per cent or 100 per cent they would
have had seme tasis inon which to
adjust themselves. But they did not
know what the reduction would be,
so they had absolutely no basis upon
which to do their figuring. They sim
ply had to wait and wait and wait,
kee Ing Just as close to shore as they
possibly could until the leng arony
was over. That Is the analysis of the
panic from 1SP3 to 1897, and no mat
ter how vigorously tho Democratic
text book may dispute It, it cannot
deny or refute it.
Two Kinds of Panics.
There is some reason, of course
why the unthinking should charge the
responsibility for the panic of 1907
upon tho Republican party, because
that party was In power when the
panic occurred. But It is to bo re
membered that there are two kinds of
panics, one due to loss of confidence
In measures and the other due to loss
of confidence in men. A political
party Is Justly chargeable with a busi
ness disturbance due to bad measures
or the fear of bad measures; but It Is
not chargeable wfth responsibility for
a disturbance brought about by the
conduct of men. It was the fear o(
Injurious legislation that brought upon
the country the disaster of 1893-7.
And therefore these disasters are
chargeable to the Democratic party.
But the money stringency of 1907 was
due absolutely to the frenzied finan
ciering of a group of men operating
entirely outside of politics and hav
ing no connection whatever with the
government. It was nowhere charged
that the panic of 1907 was brought
about either by legislation which the
Republican party had enacted or that
It was threatening to pass. Neither
then nor at any time since then has
any Republican measure been charged
with having brought it about, and the
only new legislation which was de
manded as the outcome of It was the
emergency currency law, the need of
which had nv.ec. before been, demon
strated so plainly, and which" was
promptly passed.
Theso sre the facts In relation to
the panics of 1893-7 and of 1907. That
Democratic legislation was directly
responsible for the ormer cannot be
successfully denied. That Repub
lican legislation was responsible, di
rectly or indirectly, for the latter can
not be successfully maintained.
WANTED TO SHIP
WOOL TO THE U. S.
Australian Sheep Raisers Anxious for
Democratic Victory.
From the Glasgow, Mont., Indepen
dent. Tho Hon. James Bryce, British am
bassador to the United States has
been in Australia this summer, and in
a recent speech at Melbourne he cheer
ed the hearts of the Australian wool
growers by telling that there was pros
pect of an early reduction In the
American wool tariff. This, he pre
dicted, would mean a large Increase in
the wool exports from Australia to
tbe United States.
The ambassador Is right. That is
Just what will happen If the wool tariff
Is lowered, and the Montana sheep
men know, because they remember
what happened in 1891 when wool
wasn't worth nnythlng and when sheep
were worth even less. When the Dem
ocratic members of the ways ana
means committee of the house. In the
recent session of congress, presented
their wool bill for consideration, thej
claimed that It would increase the Im
ports of wool into America by ISO.
000,000 pounds.
But there can be no increase In the
consumption of wool and the Amer
ican grower Is. wondering what would
become of 190,000,000 pounds of his
wool under the Democratic tariff laws.
Nearly 30,000,000 of that 190,000,000 is
grown right here In Montana. It is no
wonder that England is urging the
election of a Democratic congress and
that London looks with favor upon the
candidacy of Woodrow Wilson.
Whic, We Beg to Say,
Is what the Good House
wise must do
On every baking day
Why work thus exert your
strength,
Why not this burden shirk?
There's a better and far
easier way,
Let the Baker Do the Work
Confection Den
Phone 210
Millinery Parlors
MRS. S. J. WATSON
New and Up to Date Things
of Every Description
I will be pleased to talk hats and trimmings with
you at any time. .
Prices Reasonable
Phone 225 Parlors just west of Majestic Theatre
Majestic
One Night, Thursday, Nov. 7th
JJ
Gaskill & Mac Vitty, Inc., offers
"The Rosary
A Play of Human interest. Founded upon an emblem
of Purity
By Edward E. Rose
Author of Janice Meredith, Alice of Old Vincennes, the
Prisoner of Zenda, David Harum, The Spenders, Etc.
he Great New York, Chicago
and Boston Success
SYNOPSIS OF PLAY:
Act 1. Lawn in front of Bruce Wilton's Country Home, West
Chester, N. Y.
"The hours I spent with thee, dear heart
Are as a string of pearls to me."
xct 2. One hour later. Bruce Wilton's study.
"I count them over, ev-'ry one a-part
My Ro-sa-ryl My Ro-sa-ryl"
Act 3. Bruce Wilton's Study the next morning.
"I tell each bead unto the end,
And there a cross is hung."
Act 4. Outside the Chape! one year later.
"I kiss each bead and strive to learn
To kiss the Cross, sweetheartl to kiss the Cross"
Text by Robert Cameron Rogers. Complete magnificent pro
duction. Gorgeous Electrical Effects.
-rf"" THADt -HARK
Exclusive
Dealers Wanted For
Thoma
s I I
sons
(Xtdvsotu
Edison Home Kinetoscope
Latest and Greatest
Invention
Pleasure Made an Education
The Home Kinetoscope Motion Pic
tures for the Home, Schools, Y. M.
C. A. and Clubs. A Profitable busi
ness for the man with small capital
GEORGE BRECK
Pacific Coast Distributor, 70 Turk Street,
San Francisco, Calif.
Coconino Sun for Job Printing
VT
r
- " J
&'
i
rf
. .tjMfcMf flur l lrt r' -" J5 WR.
itmm v."

xml | txt