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Seward daily gateway. [volume] (Seward, Alaska) 1923-1933, January 24, 1925, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062169/1925-01-24/ed-1/seq-3/

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Insuring the Perpetuation
of the Industry
W
WO lines of action are essential to the perpetuation of the salmon fishing
industry of Alaska—legislation designed to temporarily decrease the pack
and constructive effort toward increasing the supply.
For many years the more responsible and representative element in the Salmon
Canning Industry has been working ceaselessly to procure legislation which would
insure sufficient escapement to the spawning beds to adequately stock them and at
the same time work the least possible harm to themselves and the fishermen of
Alaska.
In addition to lending their influence to the passage of such protective legislation,
the packers have expended and are still expending large sums of money annually
in fighting the natural enemies which beset the salmon at every side. Experts have
repeatedly stated that the Dolly Varden trout and the tern each year, destroy
more salmon than are packed in all Alaska’s canneries.
A group of canners, which spent $25,000 during 1922 in the extermination of these
enemies to the industry, found that the stomach of the average three pound dolly
contained 150 salmon fry, and later, during the migration period, twenty yearling
salmon. These twenty yearling salmon at maturity would have been worth approxi
mately $16.00 on the market when canned.
Some of Alaska’s salmon packers have for years been carrying on a crusade against
these deadly enemies and many more are becoming interested along these lines.
In addition, they have been active in clearing the streams of obstructions, have
worked in conjunction with the U. S. Bureau of Fisheries in charting and cleaning,
out the spawning beds, and have furnished boats to the Bureau for the patrolling of
the ground and protection of the spawning salmon.
Between the practical packer with an investment to protect and the intelligent
Alaskan with a great natural resource which he desires to see perpetuated, and at
the same time producing wealth for the community, there can be no point of
difference.
All that is required to bring about closer co-operation
is closer acquaintance--more complete understanding.
The Canning Industry of Alaska
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
U. S. Non-Mineral Survey ..
No. 1420.
Serial No. 054? 8
United States Land Office, Anchorage,
Alaska.
In the matter of the application oi
Wilbur J. Erskine, for leave to en
ter as a Soldier’s Additional Home
stead a tract of land situated on the
north-east shore of the north-easi
arm of Uganik Bay, Kodiak Island
Territory of Alaska, and containing
21.03 acres.
Notice is hereby given that Wilbui
J. Erskine, a citizen of the Unitec
States, whose Post Office address is
Kodiak, Alaska, as assignee of James
M. Wyrick, a beneficiary under Sec
tion 2306 or 2307, United States Re
vised Statutes, has filed applicatior
to enter the lands embraced in U. S
Non-Mineral Survey No. 1420, whicl
are sit'iated on the N. E. shore of the
N. E. arm of Uganik Bay, Kodiak Is
land, in the Territory of Alaska, Lat
57 deg. 46 min. 30 sec. N., Long. 15c
deg. 23 min. 30 sec. W., containing
21.03 acres, and more particularly des
cribed as follows, to-wit:
(Mag. Var. 23 deg. 45 min. E.)
“Commencing at Corner 1, whence
U. S. L. M. No. 1420 bears S. 41 deg
20 min. 16 sec. E. 9.96 chs., thence me
andering mean high tide line N. 7£
deg. 17 min. W. 1.29 chs., N. 87 deg
12 min. W. 4.74 chs., N. 53 deg. 47 min
W., 1.39 chs. N. 36 deg. 40 min. W
3.27 chs., N. 84 deg. 50 min. W. 4.94
chs., N. 52 deg. 58 min. W. 2.61 chs
N. 22 deg. 43 min. W. 1.78 chs, tc
Cor. 2; thence N. 7.57 chs. to Cor. 3
thence E. 16.72 chs. to Cor. 4; thence
S. 15.27 chs., to Cor. 1, the place ol
beginning.
Any and all persons claiming anj
portion of the above described tracl
are required to file in the Unifec
States Land Office, at Anchorage. Al
aska, their adverse claim or claim.'
during the period of publicat’on, oi
within thirty (30) days thereafter.
Dated this 1st day of May, 1924.
J. LINDLEY GREEN,
Register U. S. Land Office.
First publication Nov. 14, 1924.
Last Publication Jan. 27, 1925.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
No. 22.
IN THE PROBATE COURT FOR
THE SELDOVIA PRECINCT 3RD
DIVISION, TERRITORY OF AL
ASKA, AT SELDOVIA.
In the matter of the estate of James
E. Hill, deceased.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned has been appointed
and has qualified Executrix of the
estate of James E. Hill, deceased. In
accordance with an order duly made
therefor, Notice is hereby given to the
creditors of and all persons having
claimms against said deceased, to ex
hibit such claims, with tne necessary
vouchers, within six months from the
i date of this notice to the said Execu
! trix at her place of residence at Sel
idovia, Alaska.
, | Dated at Seldovia, Alaska, this 1st
day of January, 1925.
MINNIE LOUIS HILL,
; Executrix of Estate of James E.
I Hill, Deceased.
| Published,, Jan. 10, 17, 24, 31, Feb.7.
Yon May Win $1000
If you are able to make the most
words out of the letters contained in
! the two words, “TOILET NECESSI
’ TIES.” A total of $3,000 in Cash
prizes will be awarded to competitors
in this
■ GREAT WORD-BUILDING CONTEST
’ Send stamp for circular and rules.
, Address Sheffield Laboratories, Dept.
, 12, Aurora, Illinois. tf
British to Enact New Law
to Curb Reckless Driving
(By Associated Press)
LONDON, Jan. 24.—The increasing
number of accidents, fatal and other
jwise to pedestrians as a result of
\ careless motor driving has caused the
authorities seriously to consider fram
ing new laws for the protection of
the general public.
The bill has not yet been drafted,
but the motoring authorities antici
pate that it will contain recommenda
tions set down in the departmental
committees report of 1922 which in
cluded abolition of the speed limit of
20 miles an hour but. initiating rigid
enforcement of regulations against
dangerous driving, abolition of fixed
j reduced speed limits in populous
areas and heavier and sharper max
imum penalties including prison for
second offences.
Further regulations are expected to
include a declaration in regard to
physical fitness from each applicant
for a driving license.
Tacoma Man Possesses
A Giant Scrap Book
(By Associated Press)
TACOMA, Wn„ Jan. 24.—What is
believed to be the greatest scrap
book in the world is kept by W. H.
Martin of this city. The pages are IS
feet long and 30 inches wide. The
fifty-fourth page has been completed.
Pictures and news items on all sub
jects are preserved.
Mu:1 in has worked on the book 25
years and placed in it material col
lected from the 36 states in which he
i.as lived. The book is classi'ied in
to sections devoted to war, athletics,
j j’itics, a:t. crime an i other sub
jects.
Energy Brings Results
Despite Prison Bars
(By Associated Press)
HARBIN, Manchuria, Jan. 24.—For
the last two years M. Krasnoshekoff,
once premier of the Far Eastern Re
public, has been in jail; he was found
guilty of embezzlement.
But prison life has not succeeded
in curbing the former statesman’s
energy. He has written four books
on banking, for which he received $4,
000; he has organized among his pri
son mates a lucrative business and
making woodcuts and engraving on
copper, and altogether he is doing
so well that he has declined a re
lease from confinement and the of
fer of a position with a local bank.
Mrs. W. A. Taylor and baby return
ed to Cordova on the Alaska, follow
ing a visit to the states.
MENACE TO FORESTS
SEEN IN HEAVY CROP
OF CHRISTMAS TREES
(By Associated Press)
OLYMPIA, Wash., Jan. 24.—With '
commercial cutters taking an estim
ated toll of 1,000,000 Christmas trees 1
annually from privately owned logged
off lands in the state of Washington,
their activities are becoming an im- 1
portant factor in the already serious
problem of reforestation, according to
Fred E. Pape, state supervisor of for
estry. The Christmas tree cut, he de
clared, now equals the number of ma
ture trees ordinaryily felled each sea
son in lumbering operations.
“The menace of the annual holiday
onslaught is all the more serious,” Su
pervisor Pape stated, “when the class
of trees selected and the manner in
wrhich the cutters proceed is taken in
to consideration. If they followed a
thinning out process, their activities
might even be beneficial, but, because
of the economic problems involved,
the method followed by the cutters is
one which is most destructive to the
growing timber.
“Purchasers demand trees which
are well formed and this kind can be
secured in large quantities only
where the growth is rather scattered
and needs no artificial thinning. In
order to render their operations pro
fitable, the cutters select such tracts
and then make a clean sweep, as
their ratio of profits is increased
largely by the number of marketable
trees taken from a given acreage.
State laws prevent the cutting of
Christmas trees on state property.”
There is now, however, a growing
belief on the part of some legal au
thorities, Supervisor Pape said, that
such cuttings on privately owned
lands can be prevented on the gener
al principle that private interests
must always be subservient to public
welfare.
In addition to supplying Yuletide
decorations for state residents, Wash
ington Christmas trees are now being
shipped to many other state and even
to the American island possessions.
UNITED STATED AND TURKEY
RESUME DIPLOMATIC WAYS,
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, D. C., Jan. 23.—At
the Lausanne treaty yesterday pro
visions were made for the resump
tion of diplomatic relations between
the United States and Turkey. This
news emanated from the White
House after a conference of member
of the Senate Foreign Relations com
mittee. The treaty was discussed last
night at the White House with
Richard Washburn Childs, the former
ambassador to Italy who represented
the United States at the recent ne
gotiations.
KID LEWIS GETS K. O.’d
(By Associated Press)
PITTSBURGH, Pa., Jan. 23.—Grebe
knocked out Kid Lewis of Detroit
here last night in the first round of
their scheduled three rounder.
EU.X5 BALL'CHILI HI LI
ELLIS BALL
CfflU MILL
The mill that takes the pros
pector off the labor market.
Cheaper than an trastra, more
efficient than a stamp mill.
MADE IN SIZES FROM
TWO TO FIFTY TONS
DAILY CAPACITY
Priced $150 to $1989
Investigate the Ellis Mill First
NELS HAGEN
ALASKA AGENTS
Write for information to
P. O. Box 1105
SEWARD. ALASKA
SWINDLER OF $4,000,000 IS
IN TOILS OF THE LAW
LOS ANGELES, Cal., Jan. 24.—Ray
mond J. Bischoff, whom the authori
ses have been searching for, for* over
;hree years, under the charge of
swindling over five thousand Chicago
people, out of nearly four million
lollars by promising them fabulous
'eturns on investments, which he
promoted was arrested here yester
lay.
He was living in a fashionable dis
:rict of this city with his mother and
sister when apprehended.
B. C. RIVERS RISE
VANCOUVER, B. C., Jan. 23.—The
rise of Biitish Columbia rivers brings
flood menace. Rains and mild weath
2r add depth and width to British Co
lumbia main land streams. The Cap
ilans river, Lynn Creek, and Sey
mour creek north shore of Burrard
inlet is approaching the danger zone.
The officials are watching the roads
ind bridges closely, to prevent acci
dents.
FRATERNAL ORDERS
5EWARD LODGE NO 219, F. & A. M.
JL Stated communications first
and third Wednesdays of each
/yr\month; visiting brethren wel
come, J. P. Hannon, W. M.; Harold
Painter, Secretary.
RESURRECTION J.ODGE NO. A-7,
I. O. O. F.
Meets every
8:00 p. m. in
Thursday at
Odd Fellows’
Hall, next to the postoffice. Visiting
brothers welcome. Fred Martineides,
N. G.; Chas. Lechner, Secretary. __
AMERICAN LEGION, SEWARD
POST NO. FIVE
Meets the second and Fourth
Tuesdays of each month,
at Fisher’s Cafe. Visiting
members are always wel
come. J. S. Bogart, Commander; L.
W. Olson, Adjutant.
IGLOO NO. NINE, PIONEERS OF
ALASKA
Meets every Second and Fourth Fri
day nights in Odd Fellows’ Hall; John
Flowers, President; Coll A. McDou
gall, Secretary.
SEWARD CHAPTER NO. 10, ORDER
OF EASTERN STAR
Meeets the second and
fourth Mondays of each
month in Odd Fellows’
Hall at 8 p. m. Visiting
members always wel
come; Goldie Blue W. M.
Mrs. Viola T. Swetmann, Secretary.
SEWARD REBEKAH LOGE NO. 6-A,
I. O. O. F.
Meets the first and
third Mondays of
each month in Odd
Fellows Hall at 8:00
p. m. Visiting mem
bers are always wel
come. Mrs. John
Rosness, N. G.
0. K. BARBER SHOP
Clean, Santiary Baths, Expert
Barbers and Reasonable Prces
Keep Us Busy.
Thomas Jasper, Propr.

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