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Title:
The Florida times-union and citizen. : (Jacksonville, Fla.) 1897-1903
Alternative Titles:
  • Sunday times-union and citizen
Place of publication:
Jacksonville, Fla.
Geographic coverage:
  • Jacksonville, Duval, Florida  |  View more titles from this: City County, State
Publisher:
[The Florida Pub. Co.]
Dates of publication:
1897-1903
Description:
  • Vol. 32 (Sept. 9, 1897)-v. 38 (Jan. 19, 1903).
Frequency:
Daily
Language:
  • English
Subjects:
  • Duval County (Fla.)--Newspapers.
  • Florida--Duval County.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01205260
  • Florida--Jacksonville.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01205259
  • Jacksonville (Fla.)--Newspapers.
Notes:
  • George W. Wilson, editor.
  • In post-Civil War Florida, when most papers were avowedly Democratic, the Jacksonville (FL) Florida Times Union and Citizen [LCCN: sn87062267] maintained a Republican editorial stance. The newspaper was formed through the union of the Florida Times-Union [LCCN: sn83016286] (1883-1897) and the Daily Florida Citizen [LCCN: sn86063026] (1893-1897) both publishing in Jacksonville. In 1903, the Florida Times Union and Citizen was succeed, through title change, by the Jacksonville (FL) Florida Times-Union [LCCN sn83045831]. Whatever its title, the newspaper enjoys the reputation of being the oldest continuously published newspaper in Florida; this fact's even been solicited for inclusion in contest questions for the television game show, Jeopardy. It has had, however, multiple changes of title during this time. It began publication as the Florida Union [LCCN sn83016252] in 1864. The newspaper went several iterations of this title as it went through changes between variant titles. In 1883, the two existing Jacksonville (FL) newspapers, the Florida Daily Times [LCCN sn83016248] and the Daily Florida Union [LCCN sn83016241], combined. The combined title, too, published under several variant titles, some in several iterations as well. The birth of the Florida Times Union and Citizen in 1897 seemed almost inevitable. A detailed listing of the mergers and acquisitions and assorted editors during the 19th and early 20th centuries may be found among the Elmer J. Emig Papers in the Special and Area Studies Collections at the George A. Smathers Libraries on the campus of the University of Florida in Gainesville (FL). At any rate, in 1903, the Florida Times-Union and Citizen [LCCN sn87062267] became the Florida Times-Union, again and has continued under the same title through current day (ca. 2008). Until 1983, when Morris Communications purchased Florida Publishing Company, the newspaper had been one of Florida's largest and most widely circulated independent newspapers. The Florida Times-Union became the largest newspaper of this chain, which (ca. 2008) owns a number of newspapers around the country. For a considerable period the Florida Times-Union was owned by the Florida East Coast Railroad. Displaying an unrelenting partisanship, the paper was well known for back page coverage of rail accidents and invariably giving the front page to trucking accidents. An oft repeated joke around Jacksonville was that "In North Florida, trains don't hit cars. Cars hit trains." In 1959, Florida Publishing Company, then its parent company, purchased Jacksonville's evening newspaper the Jacksonville (FL) Journal [LCCN sn84009348]. The Jacksonville Journal, itself, was heir to another of Florida revered ancient titles, the Metropolis (Jacksonville, FL) [LCCN sn82014370], later the Florida Metropolis [LCCN sn95026764], which published independently in Miami (FL) as well under the same titles. The Florida Times-Union and the Jacksonville Journal remained sister publications until 1988, when the Jacksonville Journal ceased publication. Jacksonville is the seat of county government for Duval County (FL). Between 1897 and 1903, Jacksonville was undergoing moderate growth. The largest event of this time was the Great Fire of Jacksonville in 1901, which nearly put the city out of business. While other Jacksonville newspapers moved south to temporary locations in DeLand (FL), the Florida Times Union and Citizen, true to its independence, stayed in Jacksonville. Issues published in the days following the fire are storied to have been published in the back of a horse drawn cart. The growth of a modern Jacksonville, a city serving as an important hub for commerce, would be spurred on by the fire.--E. Kesse, University of Florida Digital Library Center.
  • T.T. Stockton, business manager.
LCCN:
sn 87062267
OCLC:
16269164
Preceding Titles:
Succeeding Titles:
Related Titles:
Holdings:
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The Florida Times-Union and Citizen and The Florida Times-Union

After the Civil War, when most state papers were avowedly Democratic, Jacksonville’s Florida Times-Union and Citizen maintained a Republican editorial stance. Founded in 1897, it represented the union of two Jacksonville papers: the Florida Times-Union (1883-97) and the Daily Florida Citizen (1893-97).

Among the topics the Florida Times-Union and Citizen covered during its brief existence was the Great Fire of 1901, which nearly put Jacksonville out of business. While other newspapers moved to temporary locations after the conflagration, the Florida Times-Union and Citizen, true to its reputation for independence, remained in Jacksonville. Issues of the paper appearing in the aftermath of the fire are storied to have been published in the back of a horse-drawn cart.

In 1903, the Florida Times-Union and Citizen was succeeded by the Florida Times-Union, which (despite many title changes) enjoys the reputation of being the oldest continuously published newspaper in Florida. Its origins go back to the 1860s, and its predecessors include the Florida Union, the Florida Daily Times, the Daily Florida Union, as well as the Florida Times-Union and Citizen.

For many years, the Florida Times-Union was owned by the Florida East Coast Railroad. Displaying an unrelenting partisanship, the paper was well known for back page coverage of rail accidents and for invariably giving the front page over to reports on trucking accidents. An oft repeated joke around Jacksonville was that "In North Florida, trains don't hit cars. Cars hit trains."

Provided by: University of Florida