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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, April 17, 1912, Image 1

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Official Weather Forecast.
10 PAGES TO-DAY.
Shower Wednesday and Thursday,
except fair in extreme south portion
light to moderate variable winds.
The Journal's Want Ad Way is the
the Easy Way for You
VOL. XV. NO. 92.
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY MORNING, APRIL 17, 1912.
PRICE. 5 CENTS.
FLOOD CONDITION
APE Pf pi
Si
m
If lit J
it
The Carpathia is Proceeding to New
York With 866 Survivors of
- the Titanic Aboard.
JNO. JACOB ASTOR AND
MAJ. BUTTS ARE MISSING
WIRELESS FROM THE PARISIAN AND VIRGIN
IAN SAYING THEY HAVE NO SURVIVORS OF
THE TITANIC DISASTER ABOARD EXTIN
GUISHES LAST RAY OF HOPE THAT SOME
OF PASSENGERS MAY HAVE SEEN PICKED
UP.
By Associated Press.
New York, April 16. That the final roll of rescued
from Titanic disaster had practically been made up was the
impression that grew almost into conviction tonight as the
hours wore on without a revision of the list adding meas
urably to the total known survivors. - Down the Atlantic
Coast fog enveloped many places, as reports showed, crept
the Cunarder Carpathia, bearing the 868 lives that had
been snatched from the waters when the Titanic's, life
boats, laden to limit, one by one, made their way from the
giant liner as it became known she was ; soon to take the
final plunge. lv ,
But; although the ship was . reported within wireless
, range of Cable Island station at an early hour, and every
wireless ear was waiting to catch the snap of the receiver
which might mean that the great secret of the liner's death
was about to be given up, midnight came and went and
night began to grow old, and still the word had not been
spoken. , , , " ' x ' '
Carefully compiling the available lists, records and
names of survivors of the disaster, stand significantly thus:
men 79, women 233, children 16, total 328. Of the remain
ving 540 known survivors it is estimated that not more than
one hundred were seamen required to man the boats. This
would leave approximately 440, and in the ordinary "pro
, portions women and children in the steerage, where the
passengers in the Titanic's .care, nunibered 710, it seems
probable the greater part of these, 440 women were little
ones.
Nothing could. show more plainly the heroism of the
crew and men passengers who stood by the doomed ship,
facing practically inevitable death and who sent the women
and children away in lifeboats.. Some had to be left, that
was a certainty. But, to'all appearances the men who were
left staid behind deliberately, calmly stepping aside to let
the weaker ones take the way to safety. ,
FAINT HOPE VANISHES.
Only faint hope remains tonight that any of the 1302
passengers and crew who have been missing since the
Titanic sank,' have been picked up by trans-Atlantic liners.
The 866 survivors rescued' from lifeboats by the Cunarder
Carpathia, now on the way here, are the only known saved.
Brief and meager wireless messages received today pract
ically extinguished the hope that some of the ill-fated pas
sengers may have been picked up by the steamships, Vir
ginian and Parisian of Allan line, butrboth of the steamers
sent word they had none of. the Titanic's survivors aboard.
Of the 868 persons rescued, by the Carpathia the
names of 326 passengers were received bv wireless uo to
' four-thirty o'clock p. m. The Carpathia then evidently got
out of wireless range, for after that, efforts to reach her
with wireless communications were futile. Captain Bos
tron of the Carpathia, reported in his last wireless report,
that his vessel was proceeding slowly through a field of ice
tovNew York.
President Taft, late this afternoon, directed the sec
retary of the navy to order the scout cruisers Salem and
Chester to the scene at once from Hampton Roads to meet
the Carpathia and send by wireless to the government a
complete list of the Titanic's survivors. The Chester was
caught by wireless forty miles off the Chesepeake Capes
and by 4 o'clock was steaming northward to get as soon
as possible, in touch with steamers beanng news of the
disaster. Revenue cutters were notified to be ready to pro
ceed to the Carpathia if necessary.- All day tearful and
anxious throngs swarmed the offices of the White Star line
(Continued on
Bitter Attack Made in House
On Minority Leader Marin
By Associated Press.
Washington, April 18. For the pur
pose of making the flat charge that
Mr. Mann, the minority leader, "know
ingly" had uttered & deliberate false
hood In an effort to discredit. Repre
sentative Graham of Illinois, chairman
of the house Interior department ex
penditures committee, took the floor
today and delivered a bitter assault on
his colleague. The attack grew out of
Mr. Mann's allegations of a few days
ago that Chairman Graham had be
friended and advised Mrs. Helen
Pierce Gray, alleged by blna .to be a
Second Ps.se)
woman lobbyist, active In Indian liti
gation. 1
An affidavit which Mr. Mann had
said roved his allegations, was read
vr nraham who said it was neither
proof nor even an effldavit as Mr. Mann
had aiiegeo- .
Mr. Graham, shaking his clean ched
first at. Mr. Mann, declared that he
was justified in the belief that Mr.
Mann "was trying to get these charges
before the country when he had knowl
edge that they were absolutely false."
Mr. Graham charged that Mr. Mann
virtually had falsified the records In
the case. While Mr. Mann was pil
loried, he sat grimly in his seat and
i feigned no interruption.
LAST MESSAGE
FROM TITANIC
By Associated Press.
New. York, April 16.-"Sinking by
the head. . Have cleared the boats
and filled them with women and
children' - ...
This -wfe-s th final message the
brave men sent, the world from the
Titanic, for it was directly after
wards - that their wireless signals
sputtered and .then etopped al
together. The 'picture that inevitably pre
sents itself, In view, of what is
known, is of men like John Jacob
Astor. master of scores of millions;
BenJ. Guggenheim, of the famous
family of bankers; Isador Straus,
the merchant prince; William T.
Stead, veteran journalist; Major
Archibald Butt, solider, and Wash
ington Roebling, noted engineer, of
any, or all of these men stepping
aside and bravely and gallantly re
maining to die that the place he
otherwise might have filled could
perhaps be taken by some sabot
shod, illeterate and penniless peas
ant woman of Europe.
The stream of women with
toddling infants, babes in arms,
perhaps most of them soon to be
widowed, filed up from cabins and
over the side and away to life.
Men, by far greater, remained to
die millionaire and peasant, and
man of middle class alike, bravely,
it must have been, sharing each
other's fate" and going to a com
mon grave. .
AGENTS OF GULF
PORTS CONFER
Steamship Companies From Pensacola
and Other Points Represented in
New Orleans.
By Associated Preea.
New' Orleans, April 16. Steamship
companies of a number of Atlantic
end Gulf ports were represented at a
conference which is being held here
for the purpose of discussing the ques
tion of "country damage" to cotton, or
cotton that is alleged to be damaged
before it reaches shipboard.
There were about thirty-five agents
at the meeting; among the ports rep
resetned being Galveston, Port Arthur
end Texas City, Tex.: Gulf port. Mo
bile, Pensacola, BrunswtcK, Ga., and
New Orleans. The sessions are being
held behind closed doors, but It was
stated yesterday that one of the re
sults the conference would be the
formation of a steamship agents asso
ciation for the purpose of devising
plans to avoid claims for damage done
to cotton, which annually are said to
aggregate hundreds of thousands of
dollars.
WILSON CLUB WILL BE
ORGANIZED AT THE COURT
HOUSE TOMORROW NIGHT
Tomorrow night at 7:30 o'clock at
the court house a Woodrow Wilson
club will be organized. Everybody Is
Invited to attend.
The Woodrow Wilson supporters in
Peneacola are not supplied with a
campaign fund with which to carry on
their work in Pensacola and conse
quently no brass band will be hired
and the opera house will not be rented.
Neither will it be possible to engage a
United States senator to make an ad
dress. All of these things cost money
and the "Wilson campaign is not being
conducted with money.
But what the Woodrow Wilson sup
GIANT LINER, TITANIC, WHICH
CARRIED 1302 SOULS DOWN
7
-fl" 4
it4' ... i '
New York. April 6. Statistical In
formation of the life saving apparatus
of the Titanic, was given out today by
the bureau of inspection of steam ves
sels. . The Titanic had sixteen life boats
calculated to accommodate 1,171 pe
ple. This means about one-third of
the total number of passengers and
crew together, which was 3,447, could
be accommodated. It was stated at
:'V.,. J., T. B.V . :"'
MAJ. "ARCHIBALD
3UTT MISSING
Washington, April ld.4-The flickering
hope that Major Archivald Butt, the
rr llitary aid to, President Taft and
former President Ruosevelt, and
Clarence Moore, theAWehirigton capi
talist and social leader, have been
ssved from -the wreck of the Titanic
fied from Washington today when the
list ' of rescued was Vmade public
1 he names of neither Butt nor Moore
appeared.
URGE PROTECT
) OF WATERWAYS
Kevanaugh Wants Congress to Pro
vide Millions of Dollars for Lakes-to-Gulf
Waterway.
By Associated Press.
"Washington, April 16. Immediate
congressional action to provide mil
lions of dollars for the project of con
necting the Great Lakes and the Gulf
of Mexico was urged on. the senate
committee on commerce today by a
delegation, of " the Lakes-to-the-Gulf
Deeper Waterways Association, headed
by President W, K. Kavanaugh.
Isham Randolph and Lyman E.
Cooley, of Chicago, and others pointed
out that the Ohio,. Missouri and Mis
sissippi valleys would be vastly bene
fited, practically by linking the com
merce of the inland waterways and the
Panama canal, now approaching com
pletion. porters lack In the way of a campaign
fund, they make up in numbers and in
enthusiasm.
The club will be organized Thurs
day night and it will then get busy as
an organization In carrying on the
campaign, which Its Individual mem
bers have heretofore been conducting
Individually.
Woodrow Wilson will carry Escam
bia county by a substantial majortty
and the work of the club will be to
make that majority even bigger than
Is now indicated.
the bureau that no ship fs required to
have sufficient coat room to accom
modate all Its complete passenger and
crew list.
The Titanic carried 3.45o lite pre
servers and 48 life-buoys and these
equipments . are made in compliance
with the regulations of the British
board of trade. The United States bu
reau has no power except to see that
each steamship meets the requirements
of its home government. . .
'86 ' ' :.v
GROWING WORSE
DISASTER THE
GREATEST EVER
TOOCGURATSEA
Some Facts as Sifted From
Wireless Reports of Ti
tanic's Sinking. -
STEAMSHIP VALUED AT $10,000,000
AND CARGO AND JEWELS
WORTH PERHAPS MORE THAN
$10,00000 A TOTAL LOSS CAPT.
SMITH PROBABLY MET DEATH
AT HIS POST" AS A GALLANT
SKIPPER SHOULD.
By Associated Press.
New York, April 16. These pin
nacles of fact concerning the world's
greatest steamship disaster the sink
ing oX the great White Star liner Ti
tanic off the bariks of New Foundland
stood out prominently early today as
sifted from the wireless reports:
Revised estimate loss of life, 1,302
souls.
The $10,000,000 steamship with cargo
and jewels worth perhaps $10,000,000
more a total loss.
No mention among the survivors of
Colonel John Jacob Astor. His bride,
nee Miss Force of New York, has been
saved. Major Archibald Butt, Presi
dent Taft's aide, is still unaccounted
for as are many other persons of in
ternational Importance. J. Bruce la
ma y, president of the International
Mercantile Marine, owners of the White
Star Line, is among the survivors, as
is his wife.
Captain E. J. Smith, commander of
the Titanic, probably went to his grave
with his. ill -fated vessel' without once
being able to communicate direct with
the agents of his line. Aside from the
C Q. D. message by his wireless op
erator not one word from him was re
ceived np to the time the Titanic sank
bow foremost In the ocean.
The presumption is that he met
death at his post as a gallant skipper
should.
ENFORCED UNWRITTEN LAW.
That he and his crew enforced rigid
ly the unwritten law of the sea wom
en and children first is plainly indi
cated by the preponderance of women
among the" partial list of survivors
that the wireless has given.
Although rated aa one of the most
able . commanders since the advent of
the modern steamship. Captain Smith's
career had been recently marred with
111 luck. He was in command of the
Titanic's sister ship, Olympic, when
that vessel was in collision with the
British cruiser Hawk. Exonerated of
all blame of this occurrence, he was
placed in charge of the Titanic only to
graze disaster when his new charge
fouled the steamship New York in the
Solent after leaving Southampton on
her maiden voyage which has ended so
disastrously. He had been in the line's
employ for more than thirty years.
His first important command was the
Majestic.
Although 868 souls are reported to
be on the Carpathia, It Is apparent
that all of them are not passengers
for it was necessary for members of
the Titanic's crew to man the life
boats which set out from the sinking
liner. How many of the , crew were
assigned to each boat -is a matter of
conjecture. A similarly unsettled mat
ter is the percentage of first class
passengers among those saved. While
the names' of survivors obtained are
largely those of salon passengers, the
rule "women first" should apply equal
ly to wie second cabin and steerage, a
regulation which may have cost the
lives of many prominent men above
decks. It Is natural also that the
names of the more obscure survivors
would be slower In reaching land.
CROWDS BESIEGE BULLETIN.
False news and false hopes and ar
international belief that the palatial
Titanic was practically unslnkable fol
lowed the slowly unfolding accounts of
her loss in a way without precedent.
Eager crowds In a dozen cities in the
United States besieged bulletin boards
when it became known that the giant
liner had really sunk with terrible loss
of life and In New York city hysteri
cal men and women crowded Into the
White Star Line offices seeking news
of relatives. Vlnoent J.l tor. Colonel
Aster's son, spent the entire night
waiting for some wireless tidings of
his father, alternately visiting the
White Star Line headquarters and the
newspaper offices.
The speed at which the Titanic was
going when she shattered . herself
against the Iceberg will perhaps not
te known until the first of her sur
vivors reach port. Whatever her rate
of progress, however, shipbuilders here
and abroad must admit that while the
modern steamship may defy the wind
and weather. Ice and fog remain an
ever present element of danger. No
ship, they point out. no matter how
staunchly built nor how many water
tight bulkheads protect her, m.ty
plur.jre headlong against a wall of Ice
without grave results. The general
opinion is that the Titanic's equipmeM
was put to an extraordinary test which
no vessel could have withstood.
"Under ordinary circumstances these
watertight compartments will preserve
a ship from sinking, said A. L. Dop
kins. vice-president of the Newport
News Shipbuilding and Iry Bock Co.
in New York, "but smashing into an
Iceberg could produce shattering ef
fects that would render a ship help
less beyond the protection of any de
sign yet known- In fore and after
J collision where the comportments are
C Continued on Page Nine)
In Some Sections Communi
cation is Suspended and
Supplies Exhausted.
A DOZEN OR MORE PARISHES IN
NORTHERN LOUISIANA ARE UN
DER FROM FIVE TO TEN FEET
OF WATER, AND UNLESS ATD IS
RENDERED AT ONCE THERE
WILL BE UNTOLD SUFFERING,
ESPECIALLY AMONG NEGROES.
By Associated Press.
New Orleans, April 16. Although
the general flood situation along the
Mississippi river south of Vlcksburg
has materially Improved, conditions In
the vast territory of northern Louis
iana, where a dozen or more parishes
are partly under from five to ten feet
of water, are steadily growing worse.
The Salem crevasse near Alsatia,
La., continued -to empty its eighteen
foot wall of muddy water over some
of the finest grazing and farming lands
in the state. At Tallulah the flood
had spread to practically all parts of
the town and Is still rising. Rail com
munication Is suspended and provis
ions are about exhausted. Unless aid
is received immediately there will be
untold suffering among the negroes,
who, as a rule, are destitute. For al
most the entire distance between Tal
lulah and Lake Providence the tracks
of the Iron Mountain Railroad are
washed out. Three hundred people
were rescued yesterday at Sondheira
and brought to the levees to await
boats to take them to emergency
camps along the river.
HEAVY RAINS FALL ALL
ALONG MISSISSIPPI RIVER
Vicksburg, Arril 16. Rain fell in
volume along the southern stretches
of the Mississippi river today, adding
to the discomfort and peril of those
marooned in the overflowed sections
of southeastern Arkansas and north
ern Louisiana, but without materially
affecting the dikes in the district. Re
ports as far south as Natchez tell of
the levees holding and general im
provement In the situation. Rescue
parties from the territory inundated
by water coming through the Panther
Forest. Ark.. crevasse report the
drowning of seven negroes in too vl
clnlty of Lake Village, Ark.
GREAT CROWD
HEARS WILSON
In Atlanta the Governor Speaks sod
Calls for a Return to Democracy in
Fact as Wall as Name.
ty Associated Press.
Atlanta, April 16. Woodrow Wilson
repeated his attack on the social In
terests, their control of the govern
ment, called for a return to Democ
racy in fact as well e in name and
lauded the south's Industrial and po
litlcal rejuvenation In a speech before
a great crowd here tonight.
MORE MONEY FOR
FLOOD DISTRICT
Congress Appropriates $300,000 More
and President Taft Approves Meat
ure at Once.
By Associated Press.
Washington, April 16. The senate
today passed the house bill to appro
prlate $300,000 In addition to the $860,
000 already provided, to maintain and
protect the levees on the Mississippi
river against the Impending flood.
The bill then went to the president
who urged this action in a special
message and who approved It.
MUST ACQUIRE
SELF GOVERNMENT
President Taft Gives Ha Views on
Granting American . Citizenship to
Porto Rieana.
By Associated Preaa.
Washington. April 1. President
Taft today gave hia views on the sub
ject of granting American citizenship
to Santiago Iglesias, president of the
Free Federation of the Working Men
of Porto Rico, he said:
"As fast as the instinct and habit of
self-government is acquired by the
people at large and faster, the fullest
possible measure of local and fiscal
self-government should be granted."
The president said he was glad to
see that neither Americans or Porto
Ricans entertained Ideas of statehood.
Mrs. Grace is Bound Over
to Await Action of Grand Jury
By Associated Press.
Atlanta, Ga., April 16. Mrs. Eugene
H. Grace was today bound over to
await the action of the grand jury on
the charge of shooting her husband
with intent to murder. Her bond of
$7 600 was continued. Mrs. Grace was
Bolting Florida Republicans
Call Another State Convention
By Associated Press.
Jacksonville, Fla April 16. The
revolting Florida Republicans issued
a call today for another state conven
tion to be held here on April 18 and
decided to repudiate the action of the
SI RAW VOTE
71 FOR UN
UPIDERWD0D27
Ballots Come From All
Over Third Congres
sional District.
INDICATIONS ARE THAT WILSON
WILL CARRY DISTRICT BY AL
MOST THREE TO ONE OVER UN.
DERWOOD AND HE WILL SWEEP
STATE BY EVEN A LARGER MA
JORITY. Twelve votes received yesterday la
The Journal's straw ballot from the
third congressional district bring the
result to date as follows:
Underwood ..M....M.M.....M.2T
Wil&ou . . ... ...... aw. -. . 7 1.
Total . .
The votes received yesterday came
from Escambia, Santa Rosa. Walton.
Holmes, Calhoun, Liberty, Washing
ton, Leon and Jefferson counties.
J. H. Donaldson of Jeffereon, J. L.
Miller of Santa Rosa, and O. W.
Youngblood of Escambia vote for Un
derwood. .
Robert Lambert and R. E. Johnson
of Washington county are for Wood
row Wilson. Mr. Johnson writes that
his precinct is "very strong for Wood
row Wilson."
M. C Pitman of Holme county Is
for Wilson and writes: "I am heartily
in favor of Wilson as between thes
two candidates.'
P. D. McDonald of Walton county la
for Wilson, and W. H. Hatchett of
Liberty county votes for Wilson and
writes: From what I can learn Wil
son will carry thle county."
M. C. Pippin of Calhoun county
writes: "I say Woodrow Wilson first,
last, and all the time, and this is what
I think Calhoun county will ay."
B. F. Maxwell of Leon county votea
for Wilson and says: Our precinct
will go aU right. You bet"
And so they come. The returns In
dicate a sentiment In the third con
gressional district of mora than two
and a half votes for Wilson to every
one vote that Underwood gets.
The people are not to te footed by
the Inconsistent and foolleh arguments
being advanced by the Allies. The
people are not yet where they can all
be led around by the nose nor driven
Into the aupport of a man who Is not
even In the running simply because h
few men In Washington or Wall street
frame up a combination to make them
do it. .
And the best part of It all Is that
the sentiment for Woodrow Wilson In
South Florida Is even stronger than It
Is In West Florida. The natlon-rld
southerner candidate will sweep every
section of Florida.
CONFERRING OVER
MEXICAN SITUATION,;
President Calls Cabinet Together and
Later Gen. Wood Hold Eamait
Conversation With Stimsen.
By Aieoclated P ".
Washington. April 1. Apprehension
In official circles over the Mexican
situation was indicated today by con
ferences at the White House in which
President Taft and the cabinet.
Huntington Wilson, acting secretary
of state, and Major General Leonard
Wood, chief of staff of the army, par
ticipated. Gen. Wood reached the White House
soon after the cabinet assembled, and.
held an earnest conversation with
Secretary Stimson in an adjoining
room. Mr. Wilson then was summon
ed from the state department and the
three officials went into the cabinet
room.
RAILWAY SHOP
CRAFTS MEET
Representatives of 200,000 Members
West of Mississippi Resume Their
Conference.
By Associated Preaa.
Kansas City, April 16. Representa
tive of 200.000 members of the five
railways shop crafts west of the Mis
sissippi river reaumed their conference
today with the expectation that final
steps toward the federation of the
crafts would be taken before the meet
ing adjourned.
The first discussion was on admit
ting painters, steam fitters and othT
allied trades.
rresent, but did not take the stand.
She showed no emotion at the state
ments of witnesses that her husbanf
accused her of trying to kill hlra.
Two physicians testified that Gra-Ci
i doomed and might die In two week
or six months, but could not re
cover. Republican state convention at Pa
latka on February
It was stated the action of today
Tas under direction of Ormaby Mc
Harg, campaign manager of Roosevelt

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