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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, April 20, 1912, Image 1

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Official .Weatncr Forecast.
FAIR SATURDAY AND SUNDAY
EXCEPT SHOWERS IN EXTREME
NORTH PORTION j MODERATE
EAST WINDS.
VOL. XV. NO. 95.
THRILL
RAYNER SAYS ISMAY
IS RESPONSIBLE ONE
MARYLAND SENATOR BITTERLY ASSAILS THE
MANAGING DIRECTOR OF THE
WHITE STAR LINE.
I
SHOULD BE HELD RESPONSIBLE
AND CRIMINALLY PROSECUTED
DECLARES CAPTAIN OF THE TITANIC UNDOUBTEDLY ACTED UNDER
ORDERS OF ISMAY- WHO, HE DECLARED, RtSKED THE LIFE OF
THE ENTIRE ShflP TO MAKE A SPEEDY PASSAGE ACROSS THE
SEA DOES NOT BELIEVE ISM AY'S STORY V'THAT HE TOOK LAST
LIFEBOAT AND CALLS THE ACT A COWARDLY ONE.
WHITE STAR LINE ISSUES A
i STATEMENT GIVING TOLL AT 1635
By Associated Press.
New York, April 19. The living cared for, and the
dead beyond recall,-survivors of the Titanic were able
today to see in calmer retrospect the great tragedy that
was enacted when the liner plunged to the bottom with
over sixteen hundred souls.
Last night's total estimate was 1595, but today, the
company issued a statement placing the toll 1635.' The
exact number will never be known.
By Associated Press,
Washington, April 19. Senator Rayner of Maryland, In the senate late
today bitterly attacked J. Bruce Ismay, managing director or the White Star
Line. He said the captain of the Titanic undoubtedly acted under order cf
Mr. Ismay who, he declared, "risked the life of the entire ship to make a
speedy passage across the sea." Senator Rayner asserted that Mr. Ismay
should be held responsible for the disaster and declared that the civilised na
tion would applaud criminal prosecution of the management of the line.
Senator Rayner said he djd not believe Ismay' s statement that he took
the last lifeboat, but said if he did it was cowardly to take any lifeboat, for
the managing director, with his board, was criminally responsible for the
tragedy. "I haven't the Slightest doubt but that the northern route was taken
in obedience to Ismay'a direct orders. The martyrdom and other agencies
of separation which took' place on board the Titanic are too fearful for the
.mind to contemplate. No legislation can bring back a single life, but what
we can do Is to try and fix the responsibility and rely upon British justice for
the rest" ', -
ISMAY ALMOST WHISPERS WHEN
New York, April 19. The story of how .the Titanic met Its fate was told
today to the United States senate Investigating committee by J. Bruce Ismay,
managing director of the White Star Line.
Details of the story were drafted out by Senator William Alden Smith,
chairman of the special subcommittee charged with the examination of wit
nesses, and Senator Newlands, the other senator who came to New York to
condutc the Inquiry.
When asked the circumstances under which he left the boat, Mr. Ismay
replied almost In a whisper: .
"One of the boats' was being filled. Officers called out to know If there
were any more women to go. There were none. No passengers were on the
deck. As the boat was being lowered I got Into It"
Mr. Ismay was nervous when he took the stand. He rave his age as 50
years. He said he sailed as a voluntary passenger on the Titanic
"1 wish to say that I court the fullest inquiry," said Mr. Ismay. "We have
nothing to conceal.
"The accident took place on Sunday night. The exact time I do not know
because I was asleep. The ship sank. I am told, at 2:80.
"I understand you have been told that the Titanic was running at full
peed. It never had run at full speed.
-She was built to go 80 revolution and never had been speeded up to
that. We never had been shipped up to that. We never had all her boilers
working."
WANTED TO SEE HOW SHIP WORKED.
Although he came on a "voluntary trip," Mr. Ismay said -his purpose was
to see how the ship worked and In what manner she could be Improved upon.
A representative of the builder, Mr. Andrew, was on board, Mr. Ismay said.
"Did he survive?" asked Mr., Smith.
"Unfortunately, no." f
During your voyage, did you know you were In the vicinity of Ice?"
Senator Smith asked.
"I knew some had been reported," replied Ismay. '
Senator Smith asked If Ismay sought to send any wireless messages from
the Titanic after she struck. He said no.
Ismay said he heard the captain give the order to lower the boats.
"I then left the bridge," added the official.
Three boats, he said, he saw lowered and filled. In his own boat were
four members "of the crew and 45 passengers.
"Was there any Jostling or attempt by men to get Into the boats? asked
Senator Smith.
"I -saw none."
"How were the women selected 7"
"We picked the woman and children as they stood nearest the rail."
Senator Smith told Mr. Ismay It was reported that the second lifeboat
left without its full complement of oarsmen and from 11:80 p. m. until 7:30
a. m. women were forced to row the boat.
"I know nothing about it."
Mr. Ismay was asked long long he remained on the Injured ship.
"That would be hard to estimate," he responded.
"Almost until she sank. Probably an hour and a quarter."
Then Senator Smith asked the circumstances under which he left the boat
NO MORE WOMEN, SAYS ISMAY.
"The boat was being filled," began
know If there were any more women to
were on tn deck, so as th boat was being lowered I got into it
"The ship was sinking?" asked Senator Smith.
"The boat was sinking," almost whispered Mr. Ismay.
"Was ther any attempt to lower the boats of the Carpathia to take on
passengers after you went aboard her?" asked Senator Smith.
"There were no passengers there to take on," said Mr. Ismay. ;
"What course did your lifeboat take?"
"We saw a light and headed f er it"
"How long were you In this lifeboat?"
"About four hours." He said he saw no life rafts In the sea.
Continued on
Graphic Story Told o Heroism
of Major Archibald W. Butt
By Associated Press. -
Washington, April 19. A graphic
story of the heroism of Major Archi
bald W. But on the Titanic, was told
today in an interview given to the
Washington Star's stair correspondent
in New York by Miss Marie Young, a
former resident of this city.
Miss Young Is believed to have been
the last woman to leave the Titanic
and the last of the survivors to have
talked with the president's miUtary
aide.
She and Major Butt had long betn
friends, Miss Young having been a
special music instructor to the children
ING ARE
HE
TELLS HOW HE MADE HIS ESCAPE
Mr. Ismay. "The officers called out to
go. There were none. No passengers
Page Six.
of former President Roosevelt
"The last nerson to whom I spoke on
board the Titanic was Archie Butt, and
his good, brave face, smiling at me
from from the deck, was the last I
could distinguish as the boat I was In
...n4 anrav frnm th steamer's frfde.
"Archie himself put me into the boat,
wrapped blankets aifund me and
tucked me in as carefully as If we had
started on a motor ride. He himself
entered the boat with me, performlns
the little courtesies as calmly and with
as smiling a face as if death were far
away,, instead of being but a few mo
ments removed from him."
PEtfSACOLA, FLORIDA, SATURDAY MORNING, APRIL 20, 1912.
TA
MAP SHOWING COURSE OF OCEAN LINERS
AND POINT WHERE THE
J 0iUri I colli siom I
1 ' itmvV?Vf
DILLINGHAM BILL
PASSED BY SENATE
The Educational Test, Requiring
Every Male Immigrant to Read and
Write, Restored to the Bill.
By Associated Press.
Washington, April 19. The Dilling
ham immigration bill, with the educa
tional test restored and modified in a
form, passed the senale late today on
final vote.
The test requires every male immi
grant to read and write. Williams of
Mississippi made a motion to exclude
persons of African descent but it was
lost.
Plight of Victims in the Floda ,
By Associated Pre.
New Orleans, April 19. Conditions
Jn the flooded territory of southeast
Arkansas, Mississippi and Lousiana
are growing worse and the plight of
the victims Is deplorable. ; Hundreds
are gathering in emergency camps,
but at Inaccessible Interior points are
suffering for lack of food. About forty
small towns are Inundated. Business
and traffic in the Yazoo delta of the
Mississippi is paralyzed.
New Orleans. April 19. The stages
of the Mississippi river here this
IB FILE LISTS
OF EXPENSES
CANDIDATES MUST CERTIFY TO
THEIR EXPENSE ACCOUNTS WITH
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT BE
FORE TONIGHT.
Today is the last day for candidates
to file their list of campaign expenses
and they should do so before the clerk of
the 'circuit court closes his office to
night The law requires that this be
done, and if a candidate fails to do so
he may be dealt with severely.
DEUSTRATOR
MISS MARY BRADLEY, OF GON-
ZALEZ, WILL INSTRUCT GIRLS
HOW TO PREPARE AND CAN TO
MATOES WILL TAKE SPECIAL
COURSE OF INSTRUCTION.
It. TV. Hardy, of Gonzalez, field agent
for the- Pensacola Commercial Associa
tion, was in the city yesterday and told
a representative of The Journal that he
had Just been notified by Prof. J. J.
Vernon, of the University of Florida,
that his appointment of Miss Mary Brad
ley, of Gonzales, as lady demonstrator
for the girls tomato club, which he has
recently organized. Miss Bradley has
already received her commission and will
begin at once taking a epeclal course to
prepare herself more thoroughly for the
work she is to do.
The Pensacola Commercial Association
recent'y appropriated a fund to defray
the expenses cf giving the lady demon
strator a course to prepare her for the
work before her and to pay her salary
durlr.g the remainder of the season. The
work of the lady will be to demonstrate
to the girls in the tomato clubs the man
ner of canning and preparing their to
matoes after they have gathered them.
Miss Bradley will complete the course
of study necessary in time to enter upon
her work of demonstrating by the time
the tomatoes are rewjy.
TODAY S LAST
FOR THE CLUBS
IS APPOINTED
TOLD 0E
v3i-,-;. s
District Has Become Deplorable
morning Is 20 feet, five-tenths below
the record of 1903. At the Canal
street ferry, bags have been placed
about the entrance to the carriaare
driveway to -keep-the wave wash tfi
passing boats, from flooding. lap
streets. - ; .. 'JL-'.
The Southern Pacific ratiroad ferry,
house at the foot of Esplanade ave
nue has been dyked to keep out the
flood, tracks have been elevated over
the lines of sand bags and the right
of way ditched where the water is
flowing out into the street The rear
Woodrow Wilson Got 25;
Oscar Underwood Only 6
The following letter received from "Old W. D. Williams, of West
vllle, Holmes county, Indicates something of the sentiment for Woodrow
Wilson In that eectlon:
WILSON GOT 25, UNDERWOOD 6.
Westvllle, Fla., April 17. 1918.
Editor Pensacola Journal.
In a straw vote taken today from citizens and farmers present, to
ascertain the sentiment in reference f the choice of a Democratic nomi
nee for the presidency, the vote stood as follows:
Wilson 25
Underwood 6
Clark 1
Total 32
It being a rainy and disagreeable day, there were a few absentees,
but the above vote Is a fair and just representation of public sentiment
on that important subject in our town and community.
Respectfully submitted by
W. D. WILLIAMS.
P. S. The Republican vote was Taft 1, Roosevelt 2.
A W Ml
STORM HERE
LAST NIGHT
LARGE LUMPS FELL THICK AND
FAST FOR A FEW MINUTES, AFTER
WHICH JHEmVY RAIN CAME, BUT
NO DAMAGE WAS DONE, SO FAR
AS IS KNOWN.
Just before U o'clock last night Pen-
i. . . irtetri a. mild hall BtOrm.
While the hail fell for only a few min
utes. It came in ia-rge ramps "u icu
fast during the time it did last, beating
hard upon window panes and roofs, but
doing no damage, so far as Is known.
The hall was followed by a hard rain
which lasted for a few minutes, after
which the temperature wa a trifle lower
than earlier in the night.
TIME IS GRANTED
THE RAILROADS
Head of locomotive Engineers Gives
Them Until Monday to Accede to
Demands for Increased Pay.
By Associated Press.
New York, April 19. Warren S.
Stone, head of the Brotherhood of
Locomotive Engineers, sent an ulti
matum to the conference committee of
eaatern railroad managers today, giv
ing them until Monday to accede to the
engineers' demands for higher wages.
The action followed a request by the
chairman of the conference committee
for forty-eight hours more time.
DISASTER OCCURRED
nDEAM
'A -ja-
waiting room of the ferry building is
under water and a passageway has
been erected two feet above the floor
level. A pool more than a foot deep
andVten yards across has formed in
ftont of the building. There is n
danger at this point however, s the
railroad officials have made every
preparation for higher water. If the
prediction of a foot and a half more
water is realized, it Is quite probable
this ferry will be abandoned as far
as the transfer of trains Is con
cerned.
ROOSEVELT IS
LEADING TAFT
Incomplete and Scattering Returns
From Oregon and Nebraska Show
Him to be Ahead.
By Associated Press.
Portland, Oregon, April 19. Scat
tering returns from five counties out
side of Multnomah In today's primary
give Roosevelt lead over Taft and La
Follette. In Multnomah county the
vote was two to one for Roosevelt.
Springfield, 111., April 19. The Re
publican 6tate convention cheered the
name of Roosevelt every time It was
mentioned and elected eight delegates
at large instructed to "do everything
In their power to secure hia nomina
tion for president."
Omaha, Neb, April 19. Owing to
late voting In the primary election
throughout the state, results are late
arriving tonight Early returns are
meagre, but the first figures showed
Roosevelt leading Taft and La Fol
lette, and with Clark and Norman run
ning close, with Wilson next. The
vote was lighter than expected.
MONEY RAISED
FOR SURVIVORS
At the Preliminary Session of the
Christian Conservation Congress one
Thousand Dollars is Donated. -
Bjt Associated PrM,
New York. April 19. One thousand
dollars was raised for the Titanic sur
vivors at the preliminary session of
the Christian Conservation Congress
today.
The congress opened with delegates
In attendance from eighty cities. It
marks the close of the Men and Re
ligion Forward Movement In the
United States. Every city visited by
the movement has delegates to the
conservation congress.
J
10
SPLENDID HEROISM OF
THOSE WHO
CAPT. SMITH DIED THE SURVIVORS SAY AS
A GALLANT SHIP CAPTAIN
SHOULD.
HE AVERTED PANIC BY
COMMAND:
THE MOST DISTRESSING PICTURE
SEPARATION OF MEN AND THEIR WIVES. THE LATTER CLINGING
TO THEIR HUSBANDS AND REFUSING TO GET INTO THE LIFE
BOATSTHE ETERNAL SEPARATION WAS MORE THAN SOME
COULD BEAR..
By Associated Press.
Tw York. April 18. Seven hundred and, forty-five persons, mostly women,
slcn in heart and body, wrote into the annals of maritime history today the
loes of the finest steamship ever built by man.
They were the survivors of the White Star liner Titanic, which ank. bow
foremost, with 1,595 souls aboard, her colors flying and her bsnd playing
"Nearer My God to Thee." in 2,000 fathoms of water oft the banks f New
Foundland under starlit skies at 2:20 a. m. Monday.
With one voice they told of the splendid heroism of those who remained
behind to find a watery grave that they might live.
Captain Smith died, they said, as a gallant sailor should, after having
first placed all the women who would go aboard the lifeboats. There were
many who stayed behind to die In their husband's arms.
From their narratives stand oat in bola relief these farts:
The Titanic was making twenty-one knots an hour when she struck tbe
iceberg.
No one at first thought that she would sink.
She romalned afloat more than two hours.
The Iceberg ripped open her bowels below the waterllnA.
Panic was averted by Captain Smith's terse appeal to his crew: "Be
British, my men."
A small number of steerage passengers tried to rush for the lifeboats and
were held back by the crew and other passengers.
The Titanic turned her nose for the bottom when the last lifeboat was
less than a hundred yards away, reared her stern high In the air and trembled
for a moment before seeking the bottom.
There were two explosions when the inrushlng water reached her boilers.
When she sank there was silence; a moment later the cries and suppli
cations of fifteen hundred dying men rose In melancholy chorus over the spt
where she went down.
For hours the survivors rowed In lifeboats over a alm aea before the
Carpathia picked them up.
THE MOST DISTRESSING PICTURE?
"The most distressing picture of the disaster was the' picture ef the sep
aration of men and their wives. Many of the women, -having kissed their
husbands good-bye, still clung to them, refusing to get l!to the waiting life
boats. A great many men lifted their wives into the boat.
""V "In -the partings the horror cf waiting death waa forgotten.. It was th-
thought of leave-takings, of eternal separation between these men and women
that moved and impelled the silent throng of onlookers."!
This was part of a story of his impresio&s told h4re Mday by Gilbert
Tucker, Jr., a former magazine editor. '
THREE FRENCH SURVIVORS CABLE
GRAPHIC NARRATIVE OF THE DISASTER
Paris, April 19. Three French survivors, Fernand Omont, Pierre Marechsl.
son of the French admiral, and Paul Cbevre, the sculptor, conjointly cabled
to the Matin a graphic narrative of the disaster to the Titanic, In which they
repeatedly Insist that more lives could have been saved if the passengers had
not bad such dogged faith that the Titanic was unsinkable. As they rushed
on deck there was much excitement, but this soon died.. One of the officer',
when Questioned, humorously replied: "Do not be afraid; we are merely
cutting a whale in two."
Presently the captain ordered all to don 1'fe preservers. The heats were
then lowered but only a faw people stirred and several of the boats put of.'
half empty, one with only fifteen persons In 1L
When the Frenchmens boat rowed off for half a mile, the Titanic pre
sented a fairy-like picture, illumined from stem to stern. Then the lights
began to go out and the stern reared high in the air. An immense clamor
rose on all 6ides and during an hour anguished cries rang out. It was. say
the narrators, like a great chorus chanting the refrain of death. Bometlme
the cries died out and then the melancholy chorus began again, mors terribly
and more despairingly.
The narrative continues:
"Thoje shrieks pursued us and haunted us ss we pulled away In the
night. Then one by one the cries ceased and only the noise of the sea re
mained. "The Titanic was engulfed almost without a murmur. Her stern quivered
in a final spasm and then disappeared."
The Frenchmen and their companions suffered bitterly from ths cold.
They cried out to attract attention, and a German baron who was with them
emptied his revolver in the air. When finally the Carpathia appeared a
feeble hurrah went up from the small boats, every one of which moved as
swiftly as possible toward the liner.
The Frenchmen related tragic incidents as they were leaving the sides of
the Titanic. After all the boats had been launched, many of the passengers
who had stayed behind too long tried to embark on a collapsible raft which
worked badly. Fifty persons climbed onto the raft, which was half filled with
water.
One after another the passengers on the raft were drowned or perished
with the cold. When & corpse was found in the way It was thrown overboad
and only fifteen of the fifty who bad taken refuge on the raft were saved by
the Carpathia,
"Col. Astor and many of the others were superbly heroic and ths crew
of the Titanio with sumbllme abnegation fulfilled Its duties to humanity, the '
story reads.
"BE BRITISH, MY MEN," WAS THE COMMAND
MEGAPHONED FROM THE TITANIC'S BRIDGE
New York, April 19. "Be British, my men!" This thrilling command,
megaphoned from the Tltanlc's bridge by Captain Smith, sealed the fate of
great numbers of the ship's crew, but steeled them to self-sacrificing action
that probably saved scores of passengers.
The etory was told by a member of the crew who had an oar In a lifeboat.
"When we heard the command to lower the lifeboats," said the sailor,
"some of the crew pressed forward. Then came that call from the' bridge,
'Be British, my men!' The command was obeyed. Like martyrs, the sailors
hurried passengers into the boats, then they stepped back to die." The sailor
said Bruce Ismay was almost thrown into the last lifeboat. There were no
women waiting.
MRS. ALEXANDER COMPTON AND
DAUGHTER, OF NEW ORLEANS, PROSTRATED
New York, April 19. Mrs. Alexander T. Compton and her daughter. Miss
Alice Compton, of New Orleans, two of the Titan ic's rescued, reached New
(Continued on
Navy Department Wants Legislation
to Give it Control of the Wireless
By Associated Press.
Washington. April 19. The govern
ment's inability to get early informa
tion regarding the loss of the Titanic
through the wireless outfits of the
scout cruisers Chester and Salem or
tht naval shore stations, has con
firmed the navy department in its de
cision to press for legislation which
will enable the government to assert
control over all agencies. whether
private or corporate, which may seek
to restrain or interfere with the gov
ernment officials on such cases as this.
New York, April 19. Mrs. Ada E.
Balls, of Jacksonville, FUu, a refugee
PAGES TO-DAY.
The Journal's Want Ad Way is the
the Easy Way for You
PRICE. 5 CENTS.
VIVORS
REMAINED
THE TERSE
"BE BRITISH, MY MEN"
OF THE DISASTER WAS THE
Page Two.)
f.-om the Titanic, Is confined In Syden
ham hopltal, suffering from shook.
Boston, April 19. The Leyiand lire
sTeamer California, which arrived to
day, had neither survrvors nor bod!s
frc.m the Titanic aboard.
"We arrived at the wreck scene."
said Captain Stanley Lord, -Just in
time to see the last boat filled with,
survivors before hauled aboard the
Carpathia. W were about the sunken
craft for three hours, but saw no sign
of the life boats whlrh we now un
derstand are still missing. There was
no s'gn cf life amour the wreckage."

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