OCR Interpretation


The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, April 24, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Florida

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062268/1912-04-24/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Official Weather Forecast.
ffcr
10 PAGES TO-DAY.
GENERALLY FAIR WEDNESDAY
AND THURSDAY; LIGHT VARIABLE
WINDS.
The Journal's Want Ad Way is the
the Easy Way for You
' VOL. XV. NO: 98.
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY MORNING, APRIL 24, 1912.
PRICE. 5 CENTS.
NO BINOCULARS
ABOARD TITANIC
DESPERATE BUT
THEY CANNOT
DELIVER THESE
PROMINENT LEADERS OF WASHINGTON
SOCIETY IN WHITE STAR LINE WRECK
FUTILE EFF
IEXIC0 PAYIKG
H II
Failure to Provide Lookout
With One Probably
Caused Disaster.
IF SUCH HAD BEEN SUPPLIED
THE ICEBERG COULD HAVE
BEEN SEEN IN TIME TO PRE
VENT THE COLLISION THIS IS
TESTIFIED TO BY FREDERICK
FLEET OF THE TITANIC BEFORE
SENATE COMMITTEE.
By Associated Press.
Washington, April 23. Like the
missing horseshoe nail that cost the
monarch his kingdom, the failure to
provide a binocular or spy glasses for
the lookouts on the Titanic was one o
the' contributing causes of the ship's
lose and with it the loss of more than
sixteen hundred lives. Two witnesses
before the senate Investigating com
mittee today agreed on this.
They were Frederick Fleet, lookout
on the Titanic, and Major Arthur God
frey Peuchen, a Canadian manufac
turer and yachtsman, who was amon?
the . rescued passengers. Fleet ac
knowledged If . he had been aided In
his observations by good glasses he
probably would have spied the berg
Into which the ship crashed in time to
have warned the bridge to avoid it
Peuchen also testified to the much
greater sweep of vision afforded . by
binoculars, and -believed the presence
of the iceberg might have been detect
ed in time to escape a collision had
the lookout been so equipped.
. It' was made to . appear that the
blame for being without glasses did
not rest with the lookout men- Fleet
said they had asked for them at
Southampton and were told there were
none for them.
Peuchen said that when the call to
quarters was sounded not enough ot
the crew responded 'to undertake the
work required in lowering and filling
the -boats. He criticised, the lack "of
experienced sailors aboard.
Herbert J. Pitman, third officer of
the Titanic, told of his failure to turn
Tack the life boat in which he and the
passengers were idly drifting, to at
tempt to rescue others when the Ti
tanic sank. He said the cries for help
made "one long, continuous moan."
The passengers Insisted but to go back
to their aid would have meant their
destruction, he said, so after starting
In the direction of the cries he re
clnded the orders and waited for
dawn. ' ;
In an executive session at the close
of the hearing today the committee
decided not to allow J. Bruce Ismay
or P. A. S. Franklin to leave Washing
ton until they are no longer needed.
Ismay may take the stand tomorrow. J
PUBLIC EXCLUDED. 1
Bftc&use of confusion caused by the
nrsh of crowds to the hearing, the sen
ate committee determined today to
exclude the general public To accom
plish this, the bearing was transferred
, to a smaller room. Only witnesses,
those particularly interested in the in
quiry and members of the press were
admitted. ' ' '
, The change caused disappointment
to thousands, most of them women.
Hundred around the building clam
red for admittance. The crowds lined
the hallways leading to the new room
and the police had difficulty keeping a
passageway to the door..
Life and death struggles of the Ti
tanic' victims reluctantly were pic
tured by Third Officer Herbert John
Pitman of the sunken liner.
Chairman Smith of the committee
pressed PitmAn regarding scenes after
the sinking of the ship.
"How far away were the cries from
your life boat?
"Several hundred yards, probably,
some of them. I told my men to g:-t
the oars out and pull toward the wreck
that we might be able to save a few
more. "The people In my boat demurred.
They said it would be a mad idea."
"Did anyone in your boat urge or
appeal to you to go back toward the
wreck V
"No, not one." ;. '
TMd any woman urge you to go
back?"
"No."
"Who demurred, the men with the
oars?"
"Oh, no: they obeyed my orders, and
n the passengers said it was a ma.1
Idea to go back, that we should add
another 40 to the list of drowned. Then
we took in the oars and lay quiet."
"Deserve the screams."
"Don't sir, please! Td rather not
talk about it."
Tm sorry to press It, but what was
It like? Were the screams intermit
tent or spasmodic?"
"It was one long, continuous moan.'
The witness said the moans and
cries continued for an hour, and that
(Continued on Page Nine)
Government Criticized For Not
Preventing the Massacre at Fez
By Associated Press.
Paris, April 23. The massacre at
Fez, in which a large number of
French officers, soldiers and citizens
ere killed and wounded, has given
rise to considerable criticism of the
government authorities for not fore
seeing and preventing the occurrence.
Premier Polncaire telegraphed today
to Eugene Regnault. the French min
ister to make a complete Investiga
tion, The special correspondents of the
French newspapers at Fez Indicated
that the plot of the rebels included the
massacre of the whole of the French
mission headed by M. Regnault, which
recently arrived at the capital to
establish the protectorate. ' N
This plan failed owing to the Im
patience of the Arabian women to be
gin the carnage. These women are
described by th correspondents as
11,000 PEOPLE
LOUISIANA
ARE HOB
WATER TEN TO FIFTEEN FEET
OVER SIX PARISHES IN THE
NORTHEASTERN PORTION OF
THE STATE TALLU LA H FLOOD
ED AND PEOPLE GOING ABOUT
THE STREETS IN SKIFFS.
By Associated Press.
Delta - Point, La- April 23. From
Delhi to Delta Point, opposite Vicks
burg, Thomastown is the only town out
of water. Tonight the water is ten to
fifteen feet deep and over thousands of
acres of fertile lands of more than six
parishes in northeastern Louisiana on
which no crops can be raised this year.
Tallulah Is under water to a depth of
from four to six feet Water is in the
business houses and people are tra
versing the streets In skiffs and motjr
boats. A conservative estimate of the
homeless persons in northeast Louis
Ian is seventeen thousand.
THIRTY-IWO THOUSAND
RATIONS DUE TO ARRIVE
New Orleans, April 23. Thirty-two
thousand rations supplied by the Unit
ed States government are due to arrive
at Leland, Miss... today where 6,000 or
more flood refugees have collected.
Supplies have been sent to other refu
gee camps and temporary relief ac
corded nearly all of the 70 COO persons
made destitue when1 the waters from
Mississippi river crevasses forced them
from their homes In southern Arkan-
as, northwestern Mississippi and
northern Louisiana. -It Is estimated
that there are 5,000 or more refugees
at Benolt, Miss, .and vicinity, ar.U2iL
at the Delta fair grounds. Veiny cared
for bv the Greenville, Mis., relief com
mittee. Government relief boats with
food, clothing and other supplies have
proceeded up the Sunflower and Yas
rivers to aid refugees in those sections.
DANGER OF CREVASSES
CONSIDERED VERY GRAVE
Baton Rouge, La.. April 23. Th?
danger of crevasses in the Mississippi
river levees between Point Coupee and
Morganza is considered so grave thac
250 volunteer guards from St Mary
paris htoday inaugurated day an J
night patrol service along this stretch.
A company of militia was also placed
on guard duty between Baton Rouge
and Red river landing.
A break in the levee near Morgansa
would cause the inundation of the
richest farming section of the state.
Captain C. O. Sherrill, chief of th
United States engineers in charge of
the levee work of this district, accom
panied by the state engineer, is riding
alon- the west levee today from Tor
ras south. Under Captain Sherrill'a
direction, thousands of dollars are
being spent in strengthening the levees
in expectation of a further heavy rise
in the river beginning next week when
the upper crevasse waters begin to
come back through the Red river.
ARE PLANNING TO
SPRING SURPRISE
tunerents of Senator Cummins Are
Expected to Spring Something at the
Iowa State Convention. .
By Associated Press.
Cedar Rapids, Iowa-, April 23.
Whether Senator A. B. Commins's ad
herents were planning a surprise for
the Taft forces in the Republican
state convention here tomorrow was
the paramount question among tie
delegates today. -.
The attitude of John IL Briar, Cum
mlns's Iowa manager , gave cause for
uncertainty even among Taft's friends.
He claimed to be able to control the
convention, but declined to divulge the
source of his support.
John T. Adams, Taft's Iowa man
ager, was more Insistent than evtr
that he and his friends would organize
the convention, even to the xetent of
raisng his estimate to 85 majority.
creatures of terrifying appearance,
vho rushed about the streets, tortur
ing the wounded and sometimes aiding
the Moorish rebels in the final mutila
tion of th victims.
Scenes of horror occurred In the
Jewish quarters of the city, where
the mob murdered, pillaged and burn
ed all the Jews they could find, throw
ing their bodies from th roofs. Many
young girls were carried off to suffer
outrages.
The Jewish quarter was set on fire
rnd three-fourths of it entirely de
stroyed, rendering over a thousand
people homeless.
The complete, story of the death of
the French telegraphers Is a narra
tive of coolness and bravery. Although
they possessed only one revolver
among them, they kept the mob at
bay for a considerable time, killing
8 xteen of the fanatics.
Ct ViwM&?& ilk Mw i
. Mr. and Mrs.
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Moore, social
leaders of Washington, D. C, were on
the wrecked Titanic when It struck the
Oliver Calls Wilson Club
Meeting Jor Thursday Night
President John G. Oliver announces that the Woodrow Wilson Club
will meet at the court house Thursday night at 7: SO o'clock.
No Important speakers will be there, but several members of the club
will speak briefly on the presidential situation as it appeals to them.
It is not regarded necessary by the Wilson supporters In Escambia
county to engage speakers from abroad either to advise the people how
to vote or to manufacture enthusitm for the campaign. They already
know how they are going to vote and their enthusiasm is already in evi
dence. Everyone Is Invited to attend the meeting Thursday nig-ht and every
Wilson maji .who comes Is urged to ring- at least one Underwood man
with him that is, if enough Underwood men can be found.
The campaign is now nearly closed and there wf.l not be many more
meeting. Therefore attend this one and bring your friends.
CANMbTTAGOTSE''
ON RESOLUTION
House and Senate Cannot Get To
gether on the Matter of Popular
Election of United States Senator.
By Associated Press.
Washington. April 23. A conferen-e
report was made to the senate today
announcing the failure of agreement
on the resolution aimed at a constitu
tional amendment to provide for popu
lar election of senators. It declared
that the house proposed to take away
from congress all supervisory power
over senatorial elections.
"To deprive congress of the right to
say whether a member of that body
had been corruptly elected," said Sen
ator Clark of Wyoming, chairman of
the Judiciary committee, "is striking jt
the very root of our legislative de
partment. It is my opinion that the
house amendment would preclude con
gress from making any Investigation
into the election of a senator. It would
leave It entirely In the hands of the
states."
Senator Clark Is one of the senate
conferees. The report of the failure
of agreement after sixteen confer
ences between the representatives of
the two houses of congress is in ac
cord with a notice Senator Clark gave
recently that he would report dis
agreement The matter now will be
brought up on the floors of the two
houses.
ARMED POSSE IS
CHASING NEGRO
After Ftllowing Trail of Man Who
Confessed to Killing White Girl, for
20 Mi lei, Dogs Lose it.
By Associated Press.
Nashville, Tenn.. April 23. A Hum
boldt Tenn., special says that after a
twenty mile chase of a negro giving
his name as Sid Williams, alias Bell,
alleged to have confessed to the kill
ing of Miss Mary EwelL of Ia Granga.
some weeks ago. an armed pofse of
fifty men with bloodhounds lost the
trail.
The negro was partially surrounded
near Gibson at midnight but fought
his way out.
MISSOURI TO
HEAD CONVENTION
Each Faction of Republican Party
Has Called Convention Today and
Lively -ngs Are Expected.
By Associated Press.
Bt Louis, April 23. Caucuses pre
liminary to the Republican state com
mittee meeting tomorrow and the
state convention Thursday beean
here .today and it Is expected they
will not be concluded until late to
night Each faction is calling the state
convention, at which four delegates at
large and alternates to the national
convention will be chosen and elector
and a national committeeman elected.
The Taft leaders announced that the
president has 494 1-2 delegates In
structed. Roosevelt 4411-2 and con
tested 224.
The Roosevelt faction claims 664 1-2
votes and gives the administration
428 1-2 votes with 51 contested and 9
un Instructed.
Clarence Moore
great icebergs oJf the Newfoundland
coast' Mr. Mcore went down with the
ship; Mrs. Moore was saved and re
turned on the Carpathia.
MEDIATION ISv
NOW PROBABLE
Threatened Strike of Locomotive En
gineers on Fifty Railroads Y.'ii! '. e .
Likely be Averted.
By Associated Press.
New Tork, April 23. Medi.nic'r
the differences between the Broil:- -hood
of Locomotive Engineers and tl.t
eastern railways, involving a threat
ened strike on the fiftv lines east
Chicago and north of the Potomac,
expected to result from the action ct
the conference of the committee o."
railway managers today in atrreeinr 1
confer .wlth Charles P. Neill. Ur.Vr-'"
States commissioner- oa labor, at""
Judge Martin J. Knapp, of the Unite-.
States commerce court, regarding tht
dispute.
While the answer of the railroads tr
the letters of Neill and Knapp did no:
definitely accepl mediation, the opinio:-,
is expressed by the engineers that
the end this will be the result.
Tonight In all quarters the opinion
is expressed that the possibility of o
strike which yesterday appeared im
minent Is Increasingly remote. On th:
St.res of conferences tomorrow proba
bly will depend the settlement of th
dispute or arrangement of the plan o
arbitration.
SIX LIVES LOST
IN EXPLOSION
Four Bodies Are Recovered From Cea
Mine and Two More Men Are Re--orted
Missing.
By Associated Press.
Madisonvlljc; Ky., April 23. Si
lives, instead of five, are now believe'
to have been lost in an explosion fol
lowed by a fire in the Coil coal min.
near here Sunday night Four bodies
including those of Joseph Collowe:;
the. mine foreman, and three negrr;
miners, were fond today..
Two more men are missing and the!
bodies are. believed to be in the mir.
W. D. Coil, president of the minlr-.
company, said e believed the explo
sion was accidental and was caused by
dynamite. .
NEW HAMPSHIRE
FOR PRESIDENT
Roosevelt Leaders Practically Concsdr
the State to Taft, Who Already Ha
3S0 of the Delegates.
By Associated Press.
Concord. N. H. .April 23. A victory
is practically conceded to Presided
Taft tonight by the Roosevelt leaden
The returns at a late hour gave Taf
2S0 and Roosevelt 234 of a total of 811
of the state convention delegates.
THE INTERNATIONAL ART
INSTITUTE INAUGURATED
By Associated Press.
Venice, April 23. The Internationa'
Art Exposition waa Inaugurated todav
bv the Duke of Genoa In the name o'
King Victor Emmanuel. J. Pierport
Morgan, who arrived yesterday, was
ore of the central figures at the cere
mony. Count CrlmanL mayor of Venice, It:
bis speech said this exhibition had
great artistic significance owing to It
Ireng connected with the re-birth of
the Campanile and the resurrection or
Italian power in northern Africa anl
the Mediterranean.
TO HELP ALLEHS
Attempts Made to Smuggle
Weapons Into Jail to
the Six Men.
THEY ARE ARRAIGNED ON THE
CHARGE OF MURDER AT H ILLS
VILLE, ENTER PLEAS OF NOT
GUILTY AND SECURE A CHANGE
OF VENUE TO AN ADJOINING
COUNTY, WHERE THEY WILL
EE TRIED ON MAY 30.
By Associated Press.
HillsvUle, Va, April 23. Desperate
but futile efforts were made this af--ornocn,
according to detective, to
3muggle weapons to six members of
the Allan clan In JaiL Earlier In the
day they pleaded not guilty to the in
dictments charging them with murder
in connection with the Carroll county
court house tragedy on March 14 anJ
their trials set for April JO at Wythe
vllle, In an adjacent county.
The prisoners will be taken there
3urlng the night and strict l-recaution'
will be taken during the transfer froj-n
here, as the day's developments shows.1
the Allen's had many' friends who
might attempt a rescue
On the pretense of being intoxicate 3
Vesley Smith attracted attention
around the Jail and was locked up
Smith is said to be a friend of the
Aliens and planned to get in jail and
occupy a celL adjacent to Floyd Allen
rnd thus communicate, with him.
..ater in the day J. C. ' and Davi?
Strickland were driven at the point of
a rifle from the vicinity of the Jail.
They were charged with , loitering in
front of the Jail and acting threaten
ingly. The application of the defense for a
change of venue was not opposed.
Attorney announced the severance of
the CRtes and the commonwealth wili
xy Floyd Allen flm and probably hi.:
ons, Claude and Victor, next, then his
nephews, Reil Allen, Sidna. Edward.-1,
and Byrd Marion.
MAJOR BUTT. NOBLEST
HERO OF THEM ALL
Major Archibald Butt.
New Tork, April 23. Titanic pas
sengers who returned on the Carpathia
tell an Inspiring story of the heroism
of Major Archibald Butt. Major Butt
and CoL Astor died together like
heroe on the sinking ship. They
v orked like soldier, putting women
and children -In the lifeboata .and then
etumir.g to the ship, similingly waved
farewell to the rescued while the Ti
tanic sank out of sight in the icy
waters.
"Throughout the whole panic and
during the lowering of the bdats." re
lates a survivor, "Butt and Astor as
pitted the ship's oarers. They were
trgether always, and as our lifeboats
pvlled away I faw their figures out
'!r:ed against the sky. Apparently
their arms were entwined about each
other's shoulders."
T was on the last boat that was put
over the Titanic," said another sur-
Ivor. "Ma.1or Eutt helped me to a
stat as coolly as if it were in a parlor.
Then he took off his hat. said 'good
by. and smilingly waved his hand to
i:3 from the watery deck as our boat
ulled off. The last I saw of him was
waving his hat and smiiing.-
Major Butt counted his friends by
the hundred and they deeply mourn
hia loss. The saddest mourner of all
s one of the prettiest debutantes of
Washington, Miss Dorothy Williams,
whom the major was soon to have
wed.
The information that Major ' Butts
3nd Miss Williams were engaged was
given out at San Antonio, Texas,
former home of the grief-stricken
hride-to-be. It came through Briga
dier General Lockwood, an uncle of
Miss WilMams, who is the daughter
of Col. John R. Williams, of the coast
artillery corps, retired, and also a
firter-ln-law of Joseph Lelter, of Chi
cago. General Lockwood said: "Miss
Williams, my grandniece, met Majo"
Putt soon after he became aide to
the president. They were to have been
married next falL"
Confirmation of the engagement Is
seen In the cancellation by Miss
Williams of all tocial engagements.
Her friends assert that this action Is
alone due to grief for Major Butts.
r r
1 immw pwiiiii 'SyV
Iv k-f" -v - K "',.J' " v
ft- y'J
TOLLTOBIDIT!
They Are Tortured, Robbed
and in Many Instances
Assassinated.
FORTY-SEVEN PASSENGERS AR
RIVE AT GALVESTON FROM
VERA CRUZ AND TELL OF BE
ING COMPELLED TO FLEE AND
LEAVE THEIR PROPERTY THE
AMERICANS HAVE ABSOLUTELY
NO PROTECTION,
By Associated Press.
Galveston, April 23. Forty-seven
passengers, all but one citizens of the
United States, who arrived this morn
ing from Vera Cru on the steamer
Texas, tell of alleged torture and
assassination of Americans In the re
public. All the refugees left their
lands, homes, furniture and everything
they possessed except enough money
for passage and the clothes on their
backs. Among the entire number there
are only four or five trunk.
M. H. Ish tells of the murder of an
American citizen named Wait.
"'itr. Wait was a neighbor to me."
said Mr. Ish. "He had sold several
head of cattle and hidden th money.
A band of desperadoes came to his
hacineda and demanded money. Fail
ing to get it, they deliberately behead
e.l him with their machet, gathered his
cattle together and drove them off.
There are many Instances Just like
tais.
"We lived In a little settlement
where a colony of eleven American
families had founded the town of San
burn. All of these eleven families left
because we were afraid to remain
longer, knowing we wbuld all be kill
ed or tortured. I am 64 years old. I
went to Mexico one year ago, put all I
had, $1,650, in land and Improvements
thtre and today I have only this
Showing his two hands) and the
clothes on my back.
4 '"Before lea. lhg we'fllod our claim
for damage with the American consul
in the Max! co city. Another planter
who went to Mexico two yc-ars ago
returned to America minus more than
20,000 and left behind land cattle and
ilve si.ock"
Mr. McGee tells of cruelties prac
ticod on an American now in the hos
pital at Mexico City. O
' The bandits vleited the homo of
Mr. Shay, one of my neighbors, about
a week before I left the tseUlement,-''
zuid Mr. McGkje, "and demanded money
.T'd gizns. He gave them' about twelve
drllsis and one gun, saying that was
c.li he had on the place,
WOMAN WAS BEATEN. .
"Tho land then left, but returned to
Slay's place and demanded more
money and arms. Not being given the
money and guns, they took Mrs. Shay,
tied her down and began beating her
jet. Mr. Shay and his son. to top
J.bc torture, gave four guns and $800
in money to the desperades, who, after
a f.nal beating of the woman, left the
place. Mrs. Shay was badly injured
and she had to be carried to the hos
pital at Mexico City, where it was
found that nearly every bone in her
;?et had been broken- She is In a se
rious condition.
I "What has been true of the Shay
family has been likewise true of scores
o other Americans and by staying
there we took our lives in our hands.
The bandits are everywhere. The
Mexican government is not able to
o,uiet these bandits and many Ameri
cans believe that the forces so dislike
the Americans that they would rather
rermlt the brigandage than try to stop
Whenever rurales are near the
bendlts disperse, but there is rarely a
shot fired."
.Practically every man on board the
Texas had a like tale to tell of ex
;eriences there. Two men who rode
hcrsetack Into Vera Cruz after aband
oning everything they possessed ex
cept their hordes and their guns, tell
of meeting four armed bandits In a
r arrow pass en route. t
"The only reason we are here, said
one of the men, "is because we Tere
h'cky enough to beat them to It. "
"Everywhere you go, except right
In the largest cities, you will see de-'-ted
farms, houses burned, livestock
stolen and in many Instances the de
caying and headless bodies of their
owners are left lying abaut. The
bandits are In Buch large numbers and
po scattered over the interior that to
rfslst them is useless. The Americans
Just have to give up everything to
them when they come to the settle
ments, no matter how well armed they
may be."
Southern Wholesale Grocers Are
' Now in Session in Montgomery
By Associated Press.
Montgomery, Ala April 23. The
Southern Wholesale Grocers Associa
tion began a three days' annual con
vention in Montgomery at 10 o'clock
this morning with Frank Harvey
Miller, chairman of the local commit
tee on arrangements, in tbe chair.
Practically every Eection of the south
is represented by the hundreds of
gTocers In attendance. Manufacturers
from all Farts of the country are also
conspicuous at the convention.
Governor Emmett O'Neal delivered
an addrer-s of welcome for the state to
which response was made by J. H. Mc
Laurla,. of Jacksonville, Fla., presi
OVER
Bull Whip Ticket and Tac
tics Are Condemned All
Over Florida.
EDITOR J. W. CARPENTER, CLARK
MAN, WILL NOT GO TO UNDER
WOOD, AND HON. G. W. HINSEY,
A HARMON MAN. LIKEWISE RE.
FUSES TO FOLLOW THE FRAME
UP LEADERSHIP OTHER DEMO
CRATS WniTE.
There are a good many men In
Florida who cannot be traded off c
delivered over, and this attempt to
swing them to the support of a "sub
stitute" candidate for president 1
meeting with opposition at every turn.
Here are notable illustrations right
here In West Florida, J. W. Carpen
ter, editor of the Cottondale News,
and a supporter of Champ Clark,
writes:
FOR CHAMP CLARK.
Cottondale, Fla,, April 22, 1912.
Editor Pensacola JournaL
I notice in your Sunday Issue that
I am quoted as favoring Mr. Under
wood for the Democratic nomination
for president. I told Mr. Fhomaker.
Si., when that gentleman was taking
the "straw" ballot, that If there were
no other choice but Wilson and Un
derwood I would favor Underwood,
BUT that I was going to vote for
Champ Clark and will write his nam
on the ballot end place an "X" before
same, unless my hand is paralyzed anl i
th! pencil market Is suffering, a
shortage. The statement that I am
for Underwood is mifleading. I am
foi Champ Clark until the gong is
sounded.
Very truly vours.
J. W. CARPEN'TKR.
Here la another cae. Hon. G. W.
Hinsey, tax collector of Franklin
county, and an original Judson Har
mon man, writes:
CAN'T ENDORSE SUCH TACTICS.
Apalachlcola, Fla., Arrll 20, 1912.
Editor Prnsacola Journal. .
I have been closely" watching ti e
papers In hopes of t-e!iig sr.mtliln.T
that -would satisfactorily explain why
the names of Judson Harmon nl
Champ Cinrk will le oinkted from tho
official ballot to be usod at the prim
ar election on the 30th inat.; end why
certain sectlcns cf the United Stati-a
have apportioned to tho tbreo csr.t!!
I'rtos, Harmon. Clark and Undorwood,
with Florida in the Underwood terri
tory, of course, but up to this wrlt
Irp. have soen nothing that satisfac
torily explains It.
I have all Rion? been for Judson
Harmon, but such seeming formation
of a triple alliance and three -cornered
fight ii gainst Woodrow Wilson com
pels me to change, for I cannot en
dorse any such tactics and will now.
vote for and do what little I can for,
the Interest of Mr. Wilon.
Yours very truly,
G. W. HIXSET.
The foregoing Is an illustration of
thf cases of two men who have been,
Jn effect, disfranchised because they
ate prevented from voting their prefr
erce on the printed ballot. The
state executive committee' provided bv
resolution, parsed unanimously, that
tht names of ALL candidates for th
Democratic presidential nomination
should appear on the ballot Chairmen
Price, without any authority from th
committee and without any request, so
fur as he has yet Indicated, from th
candidates themselves, refused to print
the names of Clark and Harmon en
th ballot.
Here Is another Democrat who will
not stand for bull-whip methods.
Henry c. N'eel, of Greenwood, Fla.,
writes:
WILL VOTE FOR WILSON.
Creenwood. Fla., nrtl JO, 191!.
Editor Pensacola Journal.
I must congratulate you for you"
ptrairhtforward end honorable course
in The Journal's editorial manage
ment, and for your manly fight in be
half of the masses as against th
privileged classes. I hall take great
pleasure In casting my vote for yon
and Judge Griggs as delegates from,
the third congressional district to th
rational Democratic convention. t
am an ardent supporter of Woodrow
Wilson and believe him to be the onlr
los-ioal candidate of democracy for th
presidency.
It seems to me that there Is n ef
frt being made on the part of the
friends of Harmon. Champ Clark and
Underwood to combine against Gov.
Wilson and thns thwart th wishes of
the people anything or any person
t" beat Wilson, else why this sudden
change on the part of some of the
Continued on Page Six.
dent of the association. On behalf of
the city. Mayor W. A. Gunter. Jr.,
welcomed the delegates and the r
si,onse to his address was delivered ry
Lloyd Hooper, of Selma, Ala., first
vice-president of the association. Th
forenoon- session closed with an ad
dies by E. J. Meyer, presidont of the
Business Men League of Montgom
ery. The convention will get down to
brslness this afternoon when annual
addresses of the officers will be de
livered and the reports of the secr
tary and treasurer submitted. Cora
mittees will be announced after lunch.
The visitors will be entertained whl!
In Montgomery.

xml | txt