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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, April 25, 1912, Image 1

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V
Official Weather Forecast.
12 PAGES TO-DAY.
- - "---innn.n.n-ru-1-r
Generally fair Thursday and Friday,
except probably showers in north por
tion; moderate east winds.
The Journal's Want Ad Way is the
the Easy Way for You
VOL. XV. NO. 99.
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA, THURSDAY MORNING, APRIL 25, 1912.
PRICE. 5 CENTS.
i. ' : .V
-7
1
ROOSEVELT IS
SHOWNTOHAV
STOPPED SUIT
Confidential Correspondence
. of President is Sent
to the Senate.
PRESIDENT INSTRUCTED ATTOR
NEY GENERAL NOT TO BRING
SUIT AGAINST HARVESTER
TRUST LETTER FROM PERKINS
TELLS OF EFFORTS OF MORGAN
INTERESTS TO UPHOLD POLI
CIES OF THE ADMINISTRATION.
y Associated Press,
Washington, April 24. The confl
dential correspondence which passed
between President Roosevelt. Attorney
General Bonaparte and Commissioner
, Herbert Knox Smith, of the bureau or
corporations, in 1907, about the gov
ernment anti-trust suit against the
International Harvester Company, was
sent to the senate today from the files
of the department of Justice.
.One letter was from- Roosevelt to
Bqnaparte, written on April 22, 1907,
anfl said that Roosevelt had had con
ferences with. Geo. -W. Perkins about
the company's affairs and directed
Bonaparte not to file suit then, but to
go over the matter with Commissioner
Smith.
Perkins's letfem from Smith to Roose-
'. velt, dated September 21, told of con
ferences with 'Perkins and stated
Smith's objection to the prosecution at
that time. The commissioner wrote
that he thought the question of the
company's guilt or Innocence was
merely a technical question.
. Smith wrote that- Perkins said: "If
after all the endeavors of this company
and other Morgan interests to uphold
the policies of the administration anl
adopt their methods of modern pub
licity, this company Is now going to
he attacked in a purely technical case
the interests he represented were going
to fight"
A few weeks ago Attorney General
Wickersham refused to send the cor
respondence to the senate in renly to e
resolution by Senator Lea of Tennes
see. Later Johnson, of Alabama vailed
upon "vVtckersha r- for--the .cwTespend
.nceaandT!Mth!'! two hours It was Tn
hand. . .. ".- .' -
PARIS BANDIT
KILLS ANOTHER
Assistant Superintendent of Detective
Department Shot While Attempting
to Make an Arrest.
By Associated Press.
Paris. April 24. One more crime
was added this morning to the Ion
list of those recently committed by the
gang of bandit anarchists . which is
terrorizing Paris. Assistant Superin
tendent Jouln of the Paris detective
department, was ihot dead, and his
comrade, Chief Inspector Colmar, se
riously wounded, while trying to arrest
one of the gang named Gallot, at Pe.tlt
Ivry. a suburb, today. The bandit
escaped.
Another double murder, that of an
ared man and his wife, who were
heafcen to death at Thiais, on the Selnn.
has been traced definitely to the sam
gang of bandits, and this brings the
number of their victims up to over
score.
Prefect Ienlne says that Assistant
Superintendent Jouin, with : four in
spectors, went this morning to the
refuge of Bonnot, who is known as the
"demon chauffeur." and, with Garnler.
is a leader of the gang.
The detectives we-e unarmed, as the
law does not authorize the use of
arms by them while they are searching
domiciles.
Bonnot. who was at Irst mlrtake
for Gallot. anoher bandit, was found
In his lair. When the detectives ar
rived he orened fire on them, shot
Jouln and Colmar down, floored the
rest and then Jumped through a win
dow. Blandishing a lar?e revolver, he
cleared his way along the streets and
scaped to the woods, leaving a trail
of blood.
"AXE" MURDERERS
. ALL UNDER ARREST
Remaining Five Negroes Who Partici
pated In Over Forty Murders Are
Captured.
By Associated Press.
laFayette, La., April 24. Sheriff
LaCoste, of this parish, today believes
that he has arrested all five of the
negroes who. with Clementine Barna-
het, murdered the Andrus family of
five Here several weeks ago and
startled the south with the series of
"axe" murders." which totaled 40 or
more victims in Louisiana and Texas,
all negroes.
Small Party of Citizens Fight
Four Robbers for Four Hours
By Associated Press.
Fort Smith. Ark., April 21. A small
party of citizens fought a two hours
battle with four robbers at Midland,
thirty miles south of here in this. Baa
tlan, county, before dawn today, but
.the marauders escaped with loot esti
mated at $8,000. Four explosion?
wrecked the vault and safe of the
Bank of Midland, awakening the
townspeople.
The robber, set Are to the bank
building upon taking flight and valu
able papers burned probably will
double the loss. The flames, however
were soon extinguished. " '
The entry of the robbers into tho
THES TITANIC
OFFICER ACTED
PMOFA fill
Rescued Four Men, Took
Twenty More From Boat
and Saved Another.
FIFTH OFFICER LOWE BEFORE
THE- INVESTIGATING COMMIT
TEE AND TELLS OF THE DIS
ASTER REPORT IS RECEIVED
.THAT PASSENGERS OF STEAM
ER MOUNT TEMPLE SAW TI
TANIC SINK.
By Associated Press.
"Washington, April 24. Harold G.
Lowe, fifth officer of the Titanic, today
tld the senate investigating commit
tee that with a volunteer crew he res
cued four men from the water, saved
a sinking collapsible lifeboat by tow
ice it astern of his and took oft
twenty men and one woman from tae
bottom of an overturned boat and
landed all of them safely aboard the
Carpathia. ' 5
The story showed that Lowe played
the part of a. man. He was ordered
to take charge of lifeboat No. 14 and
packed it to Jts capacity on the ' top
deck and kept up a revolver fire while
tbe boat was descending, fearing some
one might attempt to Jump into It
while descending.
Senator Smith received a telegram
from the premier of Canada jsaying
that the steamer Mount Temple was
at" St. Johns. N. B.. with passengers
aboard who claimed to have seen the
Titanic 6ink. It was believed the
Mount Temple was the ship that was
only five miles from the Titanic when
she sank. Smith requested that de
prsltions of the officers and crew of
the Mount Temple be sent to him.
The premier then telegraphed that
the captain of the Mount Temple said
that he was fifty miles from the Ti
tanic and went to the scene, saw noth
ing and later got a message from the
Carpathia that she had rescued many
and there was no need to look fur
ther. ,
ISMAY ORDERED AWAY. "
A petty officer of the Ill-fated liner
vat -compelled .to--wart. J. Bruce
Ismay, chief official of the White Star
line, on the night of the ocean disas
ter. In order to curb Ismay's Interfer
ence with the lowering of one of the
lifeboats.
Lowe said he shouted to Ismay:
"Get to hell out of here so I can work,
wr.ile Lowe and other officers were
trying to lower & lifeboat.
Ismay was not trying to get into the
boat, said the witness, but his actions
were confusing and he was interfering
with the lowering of life craft. '
This man, (Ismay) said Lowe,
was greatly excited. He was holler
ing 'lower away, lower away, lower
away,' and I swore at him to order him
back."
Lowe said that Ismay went back and
made no reply to him. Lowe also tes
tified that he never would have known
th man was Ismay Is he (Lowe) had
not met a steward on board the Car
pathia who told him what he had done
and asked him ' why he 'swore at Is
may.'." 80ME ONE INTERFERING.
Senator, Smith arose at the opening
oi the hearing and formally announced
that he wanted to answer an Inquiry
that had arisen as to the purpose of
the committee's hearings.
"It is to get all of the facts at
tending this catastrophe," he said.
"The surviving officers and men of this
ship are not shipbuilders, and If we
con' get from them what they know, it
is all that we can expect. Now a word
as to the plan. It is the intention of
the committee to inquire of all suBjects
of Great Britain who may be in this
country and who may know anything
cf the disaster, and to hold them here
until we have learned all that we
can.
"This course will be pursued until
the committee have obtained all ac
cessible and useful information to ft
proper understanding of this disas
ter. "Now a word about the difficulty.
To the credit of most of the officers
and members of the crew, we have ex
perienced little difficulty in securing
such witnesses as we thought neces
sary, but from the beginning until
new there has been a voluntary,
gratuitous, meddlesome attempt upon
the part of certain persons to influ
ence the course of the committee and
t shape its proceedure.
"Misrepresentations have been made,
I have heard. I have not, however,
read the newspapers because I did not
wish' to be prejudiced.
"The representatives of the press
h8ve all co-operated in every possible
way to lighten the burdens of the
committee.
"The committee will not tolerate any
(Continued on Page Eight)
town was accomplished quietly and. It
is believed, an hour or more after mid
night. Evidences of their work . of
preparation shows that the robbery
had been , carefully planned. The tele
phone exchange is in the second story
of the bank building. All wires wee
cut. The first explosion was muffled
and created no widespread alarm, al
though several persons told today of
having ben awakened by It and cf
having gone back to sleep only to be
awakened by the second, which was
followed by a third of greater force
than those preceding.
SENATE SUB-COMMITTEE STARTS PROBE; EXPLANATIONS WANTED
FROM BRUCE ISMAY AND OWNERS AND OFFICERS OF LOST LINER
iv vcW ''I t'-A- "44
A K v'' f-nrS ?f jh x -I
At thm upper left, Theodore Burton
Francis G. Newlands;
New York, April 24. Investigations
of the Titanic disaster have beei
started by the United ' States senate
and the English house of commons.
They will be thorough. J. Bruce Is
may, the White Star Line official who
made his escape while passengers went
to the bottom, and officers of the crew
are the star witnesses. They must ex
Ju d ge BcandonJBaid. High..:
Compliment to the Journal
Judge "W. W. Brandon, of Alabama, who spoke at the Underwood
Club meeting Tuesday night, called at The Journal office yesterday and
personally thanked The Journal for what he characterized as a "more
' than fair" report of his address.
"I had no reaeon to expect such nice treatment,' eald Judge Bran
don, 'because I knew that The Journal was opposing my candidate. I
want to say that the paper not only made a fair report, but that It did
even more it complimented me with a better report than my address
deserved."
Judge Brandon was informed hat The Journal always tries to be
fair. Its business is publishing a newspaper and it publishes the news
and pubjishes it straight, no matter whether dealing with political
friend or foe.
Judge Brandon is a cousin of Jackson Brandon of Pensacola and the
two had a very pleasant visit during his brief stay. He is a very com
panionable and agreeable gentlem-m one of the kind that Pensacola is
always glad to entertain.
WHAT AN ALABAMA PAPER "
PUBLISHES OF THE "FRAME-UP"
The only real candidate for the nomination at Baltimore is Woodrow
Wilson and here s the race they set for him. He must beat a combina
tion. In some sections all the opposition to Wilson is centered on Clark.
In another It is centered on Underwood. In yet another it Is centered on
Harmon. It is said that Wilson has Harmon to beat In Louisiana be
cause Underwood and Clark voted for free sugar, and Harmon is the
man to run against Wilson in Texas because Clark voted for the Sher
wood pension bill, a measure that v. ould have been beaten fifty votes in
the house if this had not been a presidential year.
We are all fond of boasting that the Anglo-Saxon Is the highest
type of the human race and in practical and political matters is no idle
vaunt. Why? Because ere the Phi ntaenet wore the crown it was a
sentiment stronger than the low "Fair play and old England forever."
A fair stand up fight has been the ellrht of your Anglo-Saxon for cen
turies. In our country we call It the "square deal," and it appeals to
every manly man and every honest man in every state of this union.
Has Woodrow .Wilson had a square deal In this race? Where is the
honest man to sav so? Where is the intelligent man who does not know
that he is opposed by a scurvy combination"? Now, I do not say that
Clark, Underwood, and Harmon met together and agreed -to a cabal;
but I do say that the condition is rrecisely what it would have been had
they met and conspired to defeat Wilson by unfair and unmanly methods.
Savoyard in Birmingham News.
BOATS UNSE A WORTHY ; THREE
HUNDRED OF T HE OLYMPIC'S
CREW REFUSE SEA DUTY
By Associated Press.
Southampton, Eng., April 24. Three
hundred of the firemen and greasers
belonging to the crew of the Olympic
struck five minutes before the White
Star liner was due to sail today for
New York. The men deserted the ship
in a body. They gave as their rea
son for striking that the collapsible
life boats installed on the vessel were
unseaworthy.
A deputation of men employed In the
engine room of the Olympic called on
the officers of the ship, and on Com
mander Clark, the chief or the emlgra
tion offices in Southampton, to whom
they declared that the collapsible craft
on the Olympic were flimsy.
They refused to sail unless wooden
life boats were aubstitued for the col
lapsible ones and also demanded that
two additional seamen be signed on for
each boat.
Commander Clark argued with the
men, explaining that it was impossible
to procure wooden life boats in time.
He assured them that he had pre
op oenter, VUliam Alden Smith 1 upper
lower center, George C. Perkins; lower r
plain to the satisfaction of the Ameri
can and the English people why the
Titanic took a dangerous course when
a safe one might have been followed,
why no heed was paid to warnings
that a great iceberg was Just ahead,
shortly before the disaster occurred,
and why the great liner was not sup
plied with sufficient lifeboats to save
more than one-third of the passengers
viously officially examined all the col
lapsible boats and was perfectly satis
fied with them.
Commander Clark offered to take
the Olympic to the Cowes roads and
allow any of the crew to select any
boat or boats on board and he would
prove by demonstration that they were
absolutely safe.
The men refused to be convinced
and left the ship in a body.
By pressing into service all the
available engine room hands on the
White Star and American liners in
port, the OTympic was atle to leave
her deck Just before 2 o'clock th'.s af
ternoon and proceeded down South
ampton water.
One of the strikers alleged that he
put his thumb through the canvas of
one cf the new collapsible boats.
White Star officials declare thr
requisite complement of firemen,
greasers and crew is aboard the Olym
pic and that the vessel will soon pro
ceed. There are 1,400 passengers aboard.
right, Dunoan U. Fletcherj lowe left,
ij;ht, Jonathan Bourne,
on board. Senator Smith, of Michigan,
who was chairman of the senate sub
committee in charge of the investiga
tion, declares that no stone will be left
unturned in the search for truth. Tn
other members of the senate investi
gating committee are Newlands, of Ne
vada; Simmons, of North Carolina:
Fletcher, of Florida; Bourne, of Ore
gon, and Burton, of Ohio.
FREDERICK BEACH
AND WIFE -RETURN
'5- -'
Man Who la Accused of Cutting th'
Throat of Wife Comes Back to An
swer Charge.
By Associated Press.
New York, April 24. Frederick O
BeacTi and Mrs. Beach reached here
today on the steamship Kaiser Wil
helm II from a trip abroad, where Mr
Beach learned that he was wanted li
Aiken. S. C. for trial on the chargi
of having attacked Mrs. Beach there
on February 26.
The attack on Mrs. Beach create"
a sensation in society. She was seize
in front of the Beach winter home h
Aiken and slashed in tne throat with 1
sharp weapon. It was said that Mrt
Beach was assaulted by a negro. Mr
Beach stated that he ran from th.
house to his wife's rescue when n
heard her screams. After Mrs. Beach'
recovery she and her husband re
turned north and sailed for Europ
Later a warrant was issued on tlv
affidavit of a detective, accusing Mr
Beach of the attack.
Mrs. Beach's hand rested on h
husband's arm as they descended th'
gangway of the steamer.
Mr. Beach declined to say anythin ?
about the case.
Par?enp-ers on the steamship sal
the Beaches kept to their cabin most
of the time.
COL. ROOSEVELT
MAKING PAID BID
Taft's Campaign Manager Allege
Teddy is After Votes of Democrats
Socialists and Prohibitionists.
By Associated Press.
Washington, April 24. In a state
raent given out her tcday by Willlai.
McKinley. the Taft campaign manager
charges that Theodore Roosevelt "1
maklns: a paid bicl for the votes c:
Democrats, Socialists and Prohibition
ists to defeat President Taft, who is
us'iinj for Republican votes for his re
re mlr.ation."
Mr. McKinley refers to an advertise
ment Jn a Boston raper, saying, "re
member, yem don't have to belong in
any party to vote at the primary" as
proof of his declaration.
"Here, cpenly." says Mr. McKinley'
statement, "is the evidence that h
(Roosevelt) has done the same thln
secretly all over the United States."
IOWA ENDORSES
PRESIDENT TAFT
Four Delegates at Large to the Na
tional Convention Are Instructed to
Vote For Him.
By Associated Press.
Cedar Rapids. Iowa, April 24. Taft
a as endorsed by the Iowa Republicans
In state and congressional conventions
today, and four delegates at large to
the national convention were Instruct
ed to vote for Taft. The presidential
candidacy of Senator Albert B. Cum-ir-lns
was rejected.
New York, April 24. Taft, en route
to Massachussetts, arrived here to
night. He continues his Journey to
morrow. Concord, N. H., April 24. With a
few towns unreported, the returns to
night give Taft 497 delegates to the
state convention and Roosevelt 260 as
a result of yesterday's primaries. The
preferential vote gives Taft a majority
cf snore tha.n three thousand.
M PRACTICES
m CANS
Refugees Arriving at Gal
veston Tell of Acts
of Bandits.
LIVING ARE TORTURED AND
COMPELLED TO GIVE UP THEIR
BELONGINGS, WHILE GIRLS
ARE CARRIED AWAY AND WOM
EN MURDERED AMERICANS
ARE SAFE IN BUT FEW PLACES
IN THE ENTIRE COUNTRY.
By Associated Press,
Galveston, Tex., April 24. Stories of
inhuman cruelty and barbaric tortures
of the living, with unspeakable dese
cration of the dead, continued to be
come known here when other refugees,
arriving from Mexico on the steamer
Texas yesterday, submitted to inter
views today. W. R. M. Lims, an
American attorney of Honolulu, and
J Flexon, an American railroad en
gineer, related such stories here to
day. According to Mr. Lims. there are but
few places in the entire republic of
Mexico where Americans are safe. One
instance of cruelty he described witn
these words and asserted he personal
ly investigated the facts so as to
assure himelf of its truth: ,
"An old German settler who had been
particularly kind to many natives was
one day visited by a band of bri
gands who demanded money. The
German gave them all he possessed,
but the outlaws were not satisfied and
refused to believe his statement. Then
they took the man's wife and numbers
cf them performed unspeakable out
rages upon her while others held her
captive. As she was dying, ,they
abandoned the woman and thrust her
body through and through with a
machete and then heaped other un
mentionable indignities on her body,
hcldlng the husband meanwhile and
compelling .him to witness the out
rages. . '
Mr. Lims was a. passenger on the
steamer Texas which arrived here yes
terday. He was in Mexico on a special
mission which he did not explain, but
which caused him remaining in that
country thirty days.
GIRLS CARRIED OFF.
Flexon. the locomotive englneman.
declared many Mexicans of the better
classes are in as bad or worse pre
dicament as the Aemican residents.
The bandits, taking advantage of the
unsettled conditions in the republic,
lcot towns and villages, and carry
away the young daughters of Mexican
families to suffer vile mistreatment.
The maurauders travel In such num
rs as to make protection for such
girls and young women practically im
possible. ONE THOUSAND AMERICANS
THREATENED IN MEXICO
By Associated Press.
Chicago, April 24. Mall advices
from Guayamas. Sonora, Mexico, tell
of danger threatening nearly a thou
sand Americans on the west coast of
Mexico. A special steamer has been
"hartered by Nelson Rhoades, Jr.,
manager of a sugar refinery, to suc
cor the Americans who are able to
reach coast points. Yaoul Indians are
tc ported on the warpath and rebels
are looting. 'A part of Sonora is in a
plate of anarchy.
IMMENSE AREA
NOW INUNDATED
Three-Fourths of Northeast Lousiana.
Comprising Eleven Parishes, Under
Water.
By Associated Pret.
Tallulah, In., April 21. Three
fourths of northeast l ou's'ana within
the boundaries of Arkansas on the
nrrth, Ouarhlta rivfr on the west, the
Mississippi river on the east and R1
river cn the south, comprising eleven
perishes In whole or in part, is today
under water.
Much of the lar.d In these parishes
which today is above water v,1ll go un
der as the flood spreads. Most of tr.ls
vast expense cf muddy water hai
ushered through the great Dog Trail
crevasK in the Mississippi river levee
rear Alsatia, La., but for nearly two
weeks norv an almost equal volume
cf water has ben pourlrfg Into the
section between Delhi and Monroe,
ncrth, from the crevases at Panther
Forest tr.d Rosemary, Ark.
The water from Panther Forert Is
today 6urrojndir.e the town cf Ray
Ille, around whioh a strong protection
levee has Just been completed.
Sharp Interest in
The Senate's Titanic Inquiry
y Associated Press.
London, April 24. Sham interest In
the American senate's Titanic inquirr
was demonstrated In the house of
commons this afternoon. Alexander
MacCullum Scott Inquired:
"Are you aware tnat those called
rore the senate committee are not
receiving fair and honorable treat
ment? Will you take steps to secure
fair and honorable treatment for
British subjects ?'
Francis Dyke Acland, parliamentary
under-secretary for foreign affairs, re
plied: "No such complaint has ben received
iinnnai nmn
ilLOUIS liLUD
MEETS
ATCOURTHOU
Prominent Local Speakers
Will Deliver Short
Addresses.
CANDIDATES FOR STATE AND
COUNTY OFFICES ARE INVITED
TO BE PRESENT AND WILL BE
GIVEN AN OPPORTUNITY TO BE
HEARD MEETING HOUR IS 7i30
O'CLOCK AND THERE WILL BE
NO IMPORTED SPEAKERS.
The Woodrow Wilson Club of Es
cambia county will meet tonight at
7:30 o'clock at the court house, when
supporters of the leading candidate
for the presidential nominations ar
invited to be present, as well aa th
public In general.
President Jno. O. Oliver, who issued
the call Tuesday night for the meeting
tonight, expects to have a number of
prominent Escambia county Democrats
eddress the voters in favor of the can
didacy of Gov. Wilson.
ALL CANDIDATES INVITED.
In addition every candidate, either
for a state or county ofllce, is invited
to be present, as well as their support
ers. These candidates will be given an
opportunity to be heard during the
evening.
There will be no Imported speaker
at this meeting.
PRISONER ROBS
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
Relersed From Jail He Loots the
Place, But is Captured and is Again
.Locked Up.
!
SE
By Associated Press.
National Falls, Minn.. April 24. The
sheriffs office here was robbed livt
night by Edward Connelly, who wus
released from the county Jail yester
day afternoon after aervlnrj a aentencj
of twenty days for attempted burglary
at Ray, Minn. - .
Connelly broke into the office - of -Sheriff
Forrer In the court; honse nr,T r..
stole about $?00 and several waff her'','
knives, etc., belonging to pri-'cnif.
Connelly was captured today and agal t
locked up. ' " ."
BATTLESHIPS AT
NEW ORLEANS
The Nebraska and New Hampshire
Are There to Participate in Centen '
nial Celebration.
By Associated Press.
New Orleans. April 24. The battle
ships Nebraska and New Hampshire
arrived here lat night to participate
in the centennial celebration of Louri
ana's admission Into the union, April
30. The gunboat Petrel arrived several
days ago.
The revenue cutter Win (lorn Is du
to arrive this week and will Join the
fleet in a naval parade on the 80th.
Captain James H. Oliver, of the New
Hampshire, is senior Officer. Secre
tary Knox and his party a.r expect
ed to arrive here from Washington
next Tuesday morning.
TALKS OF A WAVE
OF RADICALISM
President of Association of Manu
facturers Wondars if Thia Form of
Government is a Failure.
By Atsoclattd Press.
Boston, April 24. "The wave of
radicalism." was one of the topics
considered by lYcrldent Ilobbs of the
Nf.tlon.ol Association of Cotton Manu
facturers in hie annual addr-s de
hverryi before the opening aos.-lon of
that orgar.i7atlcn today.
"In our country," paid rreident
IJobbs, "there has If en o much talk
and o much denunciation of the es
tflllshed order th;.t one naturally be
gins to wonder if, after al. this na
tion and its form of government are
failures. '
GERMANY TAKES LEAD
FOR GREATER SAFETY
By Associated Press.
Washington April 24. Germany ha
taken the lead In a movement to se-
rurev.fTa'er Fliety 10 P"-' ei-gers on
the high seas hy International airree
ment. Count Pernstorff, tn German
ambassador, today Informed the st-ate
department that the lmreriil govern
ment believed the time was rire for
an agreement among all maritime na
tions. London in
by us. Surely In this matter we mu?t
trust to the good sense of the Ameri
can people; and we do not desire f
interfere without absolute necessity.-
In answer to previous queries, It.
Acland had said:
"I am not aware cf the precis
grounds on which the United States
senate inquiry is being held. I under
stand the object la to determine th
responsibility for the wreck. As far
as I am aware there never has ben
previo'isly a foreign Inquiry into the
loss cf a British ve?el on the higH
fcea-a."
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