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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, May 07, 1912, Image 1

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Official Weather Forecast.
IWWIIMiHIIiHHIMM(MMww
8HOWER8 TUESDAY AND PROBA
BLY WEDNESDAY f MODERATE
SOUTHEAST AND SOUTH WINDS
10 PAGES TO-DAY.
The Journal's Want Ad Way is
the Easy Way for You
the
VOL. XV. NO. 109.
PENSACOLA FLORIDA, TUESDAY MORNING, MAY 7, 1912.
PRICE, 5 CENTS.
LEVEE WORKERS DISCOURAGED;
THE ELEMENTS AGAINST THEM
Rain Continues to Come
Down in Torrents and
the River Still Rising.
A DESPERATE FIGHT 13 BEING
WAGED DAY AND NIGHT TO
SAVE THE REMAINING LEVEES
FROM RAVAGES OF THE FLOOD
r-BIG FORCES EMPLOYED AT
NEW OR LEAN 8 TO SAVE THAT
CITY FROM BEING FLOODED.
By Associated Press.
New Orleans May 6. "It looks like
the elements are against us." This
was the statement this afternoon by
"Major Kerr, chief of the Louisiana
state board of engineers, and sums up
the principal chapter of the story of
the desperate fight being waged day
and night to save Louisiana's remain
ing levees from the ravage of the
Mississippi river flood water.
The situation continues threatening
but there were no reports todav of
Dreaxs in tne Mississippi levees and
engineers expressed -a hope ' of final
victory.
Hard rains fell this mornlna- and
Jast night all along the river as far
Tiorth as Torras. Increased forces of
. laborers were sent today to the weak
sections n between Morganza and New
Roads and others to Amesville, Ave
miles north of here to work on a bad
Vtretch of eight thousand feet. Tru
levees are still holding tonight at
Baton Rouge.
The water from the Torras crevasse
today reached Morganza and tonight
rs a foot deep in some parts of town.
The levee on the west side of thoActh
. falaya river at ElbJa, six miles north
of Melville, sloughted off this after
noon, flooding a rich territory. Along
Bayou Des Glalzes the situation con
tlnued more alarming and at Slmmes
port the people are fighting hard to
prevent a break In the levees protect
ng the town.
TO SAVE NEW ORLEANS.
In a steady downpour of rain sev
erai nunarea mDorers . continued tne
, f fht today to strengthen the levees in
the third district of New Orleans, ex
tending from Flood street, 55 blocks
below Canal street, to a point near
tl e big plant of the American Sugar
(l;eflning Company. New revetments
levees at some of the weak places and
near Jackson Barracks a second line
of new revetments are being put in.
I I'jstween the levee and this new revet -!
lient, dirt Is being filled in, but this
process of widening the embankment
'- Is very slow.
The weak stretches In the third dis-
tflet extend along almost a mile of
the levee front. The water laeka
three to four feet of reaching the top
of the levee, but the protection em
bankments are not standard grade
levees. In places they are only 4 or
6 feet across at the top and extend
less 1 than SO feet from the water's
edge on the land side.
, In front of the Ursuline convent
numerous crawfish and muskrat holes
have developed and at these' points
the outside of the levee has been
blanketed with soft earth, tamped
down with the backs of shovels.
Besides this several thousand sand
bags have been placed along the tops
Of the levee in the commercial district,
10,000 additional sacks have been filled
and today these are being distributee
all along the water front. These sacks
are being used to top the levees and
stop overflow water. At Canal street
the sand bags are piled three deep and
at Esplanade street two "headers" of
the bags hold back the water, whicn
is 4 to 6 inches over the decks.
Large forces of men are continuing
the work of strengthening the weak
. places in the levee at Bonnet Carre,
25 miles north of New Orleans on the
city side of the river and today Capt.
. FAerrlll. of the United States en
gineers, placed Junior Engineer Se
quiera with 50 laborers on a weak
stretch of 8,000 feet at Westwego, five
miles anove ew orieans, on tne Al
giers side of the river. Captain Sher
rlll says he needs several hundred la
borers on the Westwego stretch but
has found It Impossible to secure them.
A very dangerous muskrat hole at
that point was closed by cribbing hur
riedly constructed late yesterday.
Heavy rains yesterday and this
morning further complicated the se
rious Mississippi flood situation in the
territory from the mouth of the Red
river south, where federal and state
engineers and Louisiana state officials
have an army of approximately 8.000
laborers at work in a desperate and
determined effort to save the remain
ing levees.
RIVER IS RISING.
The river rose at all rolnts south of
the Red river, a rise of two-tenths of
a foot being recorded at New Orleans
during the night. The rise at Baton
Rouge was two-tenths for the past
(Continued on Page Nine)
10,000 Visitors Are Already in
Macon For Veteran's Reunion
By Associated Press.
Macon. Ga., May . Veterans of the
Confederacy, eons and grandsons of
veterans and their ladles to the num
ber of 10,000 at the lowest estimate,
already are here for the annual re
union of the United Confederate Vet
erans and affiliated organizations which
will begin tomorrow morning. Eight
special trains arrived this morning,
some from far western states and Io
cs.: railroad agencies report 150 more
on the way. Delegations are coming
from as far north as Kansas and Mis
souri and from the west as far as
Colorada and California.
The largest delegation will come
frcm Texas, mostly because San An
tonio is a leading candidate for the
next reunion. Other cities which want
RIOTING AND REIGN OF
, PREVAIL IN
. By Associated Press.
Philadelphia, Pa May 6. Rioting
was begun today In Schuylkill Valley
and continued tonight. Outbreaks are
reported In the hard coal regions.
There Is a feeling of unrest since the
failure of the proposed agreements
btween th operators and miners was
TAKING TESTIMONY TO DISSOLVE
UNITED STATES STEEL CORPORATION
By Associated Press.
New York, May 6. The taking of
testimony In the federal suit to dis
solve the United States Steel corpora
tion was begun here today and proba
bly will continue for two months.
Hearings will be held. In other cities
and probably it will be as much as a
year before the United States circuit
ccurt at Trenton, where the suit was
filed, will take up the evidence for
judicial consideration.
The hearing today before Henry T.
if! GUARDED
BY SOLDIERS
AT MIAIA
OFFICERS OF LAW FEAR ENE
. MIES OF LEE COLLINS MIGHT
ATTEMPT TO TAKE HIM FROM
PRISON.
Special to The Journal.
Marlannafi May 6. Eleven members
of Company C. F. N. G came here
this evening to guard Lee Collins, the
negro charged with killng Deputy
Sheriff Dan Hansford, of Calhoun
county, last November, Collins escaped
r. b irwia snil vn cantured &t ' Live
. 1 ' ' ....w - - .
Oak some months' later and carried to
Tallahassee for " Bare Keeping. v nen
court convened recerftly 'at ' Blounls-
a fYiancrm rt venue tft this COUntV
v. fe. a. -" ' -
was secured. Collins was brought
. w
here ana arraignea iouay un me
charge of murder, pleaded not guilty
and his case was set for next Tues
day. It was feared that the dead of
ficer's friends might attempt to take
maters in their own hands and troops
were sent over with him.
The soldiers will return to Tallahas
see on the midnight train tonight car
rying the prisoner with them to be
kept until the day of his trial. Upon
his return next week troops will be on
duty here until the case Is disposed
of. This step was taken as a matter
of precaution for the protection of the
negro. ' . -
SIX HUNDRED
REBELS KILLED
Four Hundred Federals Routed Army
of Fifteen Hundred Near Cuatro,
Ciefuegos.
By Associated Press.
Mexico City. May 6. Six hundred
rebels were killed and the remainder
of the force of fifteen hundred sent
scurrying to Cuatra, Ciefuegos, in a
fight yesterday with 400 federals, ac
cording to reports received by Presi
dent Madero from the field af action.
The federal loss Is not given but a
number are dead.
Considering the force of the govern
ment forces It Is considered a remark
able battle. It occurred between Cua
tro, Clengas, and Monclova, and was
the second engagement In three days
and probably will be followed by a
third tomorrow. -
MRS. GRACE IS
INDICTED BY JURY
She Is Charged With Shooting Her
Husband, Eugene H. Grace, in Their
Fashionable Atlanta Home.
By Associated Press.
Atlanta, Mav . Mrs. Daisy Ople
Grace was indicted today by the grand
Jury on the charge of shooting her
husband, Eugene H. Grace, at their
home here on March 5th.
Grace is still alive at his mother's
home at Newnan, Ga.
the reunion In 191S are Chattanooga
and Jacksonvlle.
San Antonio plans to unite the re
union next year with the semi-centennial
celebration of the battle of San
Jacinto.
The Southern Confederate Memorial
Association, an organization of women
whose purpose is to erect -monuments
throughout the south, convened this
afternoon. Tonight the Sons of Vet
erans will assemble in the auditorium
at Camp Gordon. Elaborate programs
have been arranged and there will be
many prominent speakers.
Camp Gordon comprises ten thou
sand tents lent by the government and
will accommodate fully 15.000 veterans
In addition to the national guard
troops of Alabama and Georgia and
several companies of Boy Scouts. Eat
ing places have been installed in the
state fair buildings.
TEfeROR
SCHUYLKILL VALLEY
made public The Idle miners today
made demonstrations.
There Is a veritable reign of terror
at Mahoney City tonight. Howling
mobs of men, women and boys stoned
suspected workmen. Trolley cars, au
tomobiles and wagons suspected of
conveying workers were stopped and
searched by the rioters.
Brown, the examiner appointed by the
circuit court, was the first to be held
In the suit which the government
brought under the Sherman anti-trust
law. Not only Is the steel corpora
tion made a defendant, but many of its
subsidaries and prominent Individuals
are named in the suit. - J. Pierpont
Morgan, John D. Rockefeller, Andrew
Carnegie, George W. Perkins and
Daniel G. Reld are some of the de
fendants. ACCEPT PLANS
AT THE ASM
BOARD OF STATE INSTITUTIONS
ACCEPT PLANS OF ARCHITECT
J. B. DAVIS GOV. GILCHRIST
ORDERS TROOPS TO MARIANNA.
Special to The Journal.
Tallahassee, May 6. The board of
state Institutions this afternoon ac
cepted plans of Architect J. B. Davis,
fromerly of Madison county but now
of Atlanta, for a receiving hospital at
the state Insane asylum. . .
Upon 'request of- State Attorney C.
Lu W ilson and -ether . official requests;
Gov. .rdlchist this afternoon - sent
detachment of one non-commissioned
officer and ten enlisted men from the
Bloxham rifles to Marianne to Insure
the safe-keeping of Lee Collins, to
be tried"- there for murper. The mur
der with which Collins- Is charged was
committed last fall in Calhoun county.
SAYS THE ALLENS
HELD CONFERENCE
One of Jury In Court Room at Time
of Shooting Was Principal Witness
Yesterday.
By Associated Pre.
Wltheville, Vsu, May 6. At the trial
of Floyd Allen, the commonwealth to
day . continued Its effort to show that
the Allen gang had conspired to "shoot
up the court and shoot down the law
at Hillsvllle last March. The prose
cution placed on the stand M. "C.
White, a member of the Jury who
found Floyd Allen guilty in the Carroll
county court. White declared he had
seen Floyd and Claude Allen hold a
whispered conversation Just before the
shooting occurred. When the firing
began. White said he dropped to his
hands and knees and crawled out of
the court room.
Thoroughly terrified. White Jumped
into the fireproof vault in the clerk's
room and remained there until the
firing had ceased. He declared he did
not see the shooting.
LAWYER CHARGED
WITH BRIBERY
C. D. Comstock, of Birmingham, is
Held Under $5,000 Bond to Await
Action of Grand Jury.
By Associated Press.
Chattanooga, Tenn May 6. Pro
bate Judge L. I Herzberg, at Gads
den, Ala,, this morning held C. D.
Comstock, the Birmingham lawyer
who was tried a few weeks ago, Will
Campbell, Sr.. and his son, Jim Camp
belL charged with attempting to bribe
a witness In the Lutes murder case to
the action of the grand Jury under
$500 bond. Will Campbell, Sr., Is the
father of Will and Cleve Campbell,
who. with D. S. McClaln. have been
convicted of the Lutes murder.
DECISION DISMISSES CLAIMS
AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT
By Aasoclated Press.
Washington, May 6. About eighty
claims against the government, based
upon the alleged use of private lands
in the construction and strengthening
levees along the Mississippi river, will
be dismissed because of a decision an
nounced today by the United States
ccurt of claims in a case instituted by
Mattie L. Jackson and others.
The court held that the United
States in exchange for its authority
over navigable streams had the right
tw prevent erosion and preserve the
natural identity of streams, however
injurious the consequences resulting
from such procedure; that the owner
ship of riparian lands on navigable
waters was always subject to the
consequences - of governmental im
provements In the aid of naviga
tlon.
TRANSPORT ARRIVES TO
MOVE MANY AMERICANS
' By Associated Press,
Mazatlan. Sinaloa, Mexico, May 6.
The transport Buford arrived at Ma
zatlan at 7 a. m. today direct from
San Diego, CaL
The Buford will leave for Topolam
bampo and Alt&ta this afternoon, re
turning and , taking Americana from
here Tuesday.
0
HOSPITAL
TEN ARE KILLED
WHEN TRAIN OF
VETS. WRECKED
Special Was Carrying Old
Soldiers to Hie Reun
ion at Macon.
FORTY OTHERS WERE INJURED,
SOME DANGEROUSLY, AND
-'WERE CARRIED. TO HATT1ES
BURG FOR "TREATMENT TWO
DEAD BABIES' AND THREE
OTHER UNIDENTIFIED VICTIMS
ARE STILL IN THE DEBRIS.
By Associated Press.
Hattlesburg, Mies., May 6. Ten per
sons were killed when the first sec
tion of the New Orleans & Northeast-
era "Vanzandt Confederate Veterans
Special, en route from Texas to the
reunion at Macon, Ga., was derailed
early today at a trestle a mile south
of Eastabuchl6, Miss. The locomo- j
tive and five cars were wrecked and !
forty persons were hurt. Two uniden
tified dead babies and three other vie- j
tlms had not been taken from the de
bris up to nightfall. They are believ
ed to be veterans. Engineer W. A.
Wood, of Merdian, Miss., and two un
known machinists were killed. The
derailment was .on a straight line and
the train was running about thirty
miles an hour. The dead were brought
here.
The Identified dead are:
Mrs. J T. CiniMrm. TTati A brtnn
Texas: J. S. Downing, Atlanta; W. A.
Wood, engineer. Meridian; Mrs. Chas.
Holmes. Bi SDrinirs. Texas: C C.
Jones, negro fireman.
The scene Immediately after the
crash was particuraly distressing on
ac-COUnt Of the cries of the lniiird
The aged veterans who were uninjured
wcrKed untiringly to extricate their
less fortunate companions.
When the enrlna send tender Ipft th
track at a short trestle they were
ionowea oy a oaggage car, day coach
and three tourist sleepers. Various
organizations are giving the Injured
every attention here. .
Five doctors alrt three nnrw, Vrntyn.
ei thw anon A f )a 't.vriKi 'uu
withjnrchalf an - hoar - after' the - fin
jjcwb iracuea nere. living comraaes
of the dead and injured, however,
had not forgotten ' the lessons- they
iearnea on tne neia or battle and their
attention to the dead and ministra
tions to the wounded v nrnmnf
With the assistance of the. members
of the train crew whose lives were
sparea, the passengers allege, soon re
moved the cars that stood on the
tracks and had a-athered tnth tha
remains of as amany of the dead as It
was ,possioie to reacn before a wreck
ing derrick could reach the scene to
lift the debris from those ninioned h
neath it.
MARITIME BILLS
PASS UNANIMOUSLY
House' Adopts . Measures Relating to
Maritime Conferences and it is Be
lieved Senate Will Act Quickly.
. By Associated Press.
Washington, May 6. An interna
tional maritime conference and imme
diate equipment of all United States
army transports with life-saving ap
paratus Is provided for in the bills
passed unanimously by the house to
day. It is expected that equal speed
will be made in the senate.
The international - conference would
be held in Washington and the presi
dent is authorized to open negotiations
with all maritime powers to send dele
gates. The conference would consider
the broad question of life-saving
equipment of merchant vessels and in
vestigating the desirability of interna
tional patrol to the North Atlantic
during seasons when Icebergs abound
and the practicability of compelling
large liners to have convoys on trips.
WILL EMPLOY
NON-UNION MEN
This Is Decision of the Officials of the
Twenty-Four Railroads Affected by
Freight Handlers' Strike.
By Associated Press.
Chicago, May 6. Officials of the
twenty-four railroads affected by the
strike of 6,000 local freight handlers
planned to resume the movement of
freight today with the assistance of
1,000 non-union men. Patrolmen will
guard railroad property.
President Flannery, of the freight
handlers' union, declared that the
strike would spread to other cities un
less the railroads granted the demands
of the men Vi Chicago.
The freight handlers ask a nine
hour working day. an Increase of pay
and a Saturday afternoon holiday.
HALL IS TO SEAT
10.000 PERSONS
Arrangements Are Being Made for Re
publican Convention to Accommo
date 1,230 More Than Last Year.
By Associated Press.
Chicago. May 6. An ararngement of
seats in the coliseum for the Repub
lican convention is being perfected
whereby 10,000 persons, or about 1,200
more than were present when William
H. Taft was nominated, may be ac
commodated. The work of tabulating credentials
already has begun at national head
quarters. Although more than 800 delegates
have been elected, credentials of only
110 have been received.
HHP CLARK
ID ROOSEVELT
GET MARYLAND WILSON'S VOTE
Incomplete Returns Show
Progressives Had a Land
slide in Primaries.
HARMON RECEIVES ONLY FOUR
VOTES TO THE STATE CON
VENTION WOODROW WILSON
THE ONLY CANDIDATE TO GET
INSTRUCTED DELEGATES FROM
SOUTH CAROLINA RESULT IN
TEXAS REMAINS IN DOUBT.
By Associated Press.
Baltimore, May 6. Champ Clark and
Foosevelt carried Maryland today. The
Incomplete returns up to 12:15 a. m.
from all counties of the state Indicate
the vote for Roosevelt Is 66, Taft 63,
Clark 69, Wilson SS, and Harmon 4.
uncertain 23. The majority necessary
to control the state convention Is 65.
WILSON PROBABLY HAS
CARRIED SOUTH CAROLINA
By Associated Press.
Columbia, S. C, May 6. Forty-one
counties out of forty-four held Demo
cratic conventions today. On the
presidential preference vote Wilson re
ceived instructions and endorsements
frcm many counties and there was no
expression from other counties.
WILSON APPEARS TO BE
THE FAVORITE IN TEXAS
By Associated Press.
Dallas, Tex., May 6. It will require
the county conventions tomorrow and
pessibly the state conventions on May
28 to decide whether Taft or Roose
velt for the Republicans and Wilson or
Harmon for the Democrats will receive
the Texas delegates ' to the respective
national conventions. Saturday's pre
cinct primaries . showed Wilson
strength that surprised the Harmon
leaders, making him the favorite for
J the county conventions tomorrow on
the tart nt tha return TVia TTar.
mon people point out, - however, that
the full result of the primary voting
wilL jj.ot Jre :Knoiya , until the . county
conventions .meet and' the claim - that
i; is likely to take the state convention
under a final choice.-
The result as between Taft and
Roosevelt is left even more in doubt
by the precinct primaries, whose only
apparent up to this forenoon has been
to indicate a close race for delegates
on the Republican.
Col. Cecil A. Lyon, Republican na
tional committeeman from Texas and
Rcosevelt leader for this state, issued
a statement today claiming 12 out of
he 16 congressional districts for
Roosevelt and declared that Roosevelt
probably would carry all the districts.
CoL Lyon also denounced an attempt
In Saturday's convention In his home
district at Sherman to disqualify him
as a citizen of Texas on the grounds
that his wife is not a resident of
Texas.
Mrs. Lyon .resides in . Colorado
Springs, Colo., . on account of her
health. CoL Lyon, however: has resld
ed In Sherman. .Texas, for thirty-six
years.
PREDICTIONS ARE THAT
CLARK WILL GET WASHINGTON
By Associated Press.
Walla Walla. Washn. Mav s
timent among delegates to the Demo
cratic state convention here today lies
between Speaker Clark and Woodrow
Wilson, the prediction favoring the
former. Clark leaders claim a ma
jority of from 76 to 100 of the 719
uetegates.
MISS EDMANDS IN
BOWERY MISSION
Flanoe of Rev. C V. T. RichesorTBet
lieved to be a Worker in God's Prov
idence House in Broome Street.
By Associated Press.
New York, May 6. All attempts to
fix the identity of a "Miss Edwards,"
a worker in God's Providence House
in Broome street, today were futile
They were aimed at identifying "Miss
Edwards" as Miss Violet Edmands,
whose fiancee was Rev. Virgil Riche
aon. According to stories published in
Boston, the "Miss Edwards' who has
been working among the children in
the Bowery mission is none other than
Miss Violet Edmands. fiancee of the
Rev. C. T. V. Rlcheson, the former
Baptist minister who is to be executed
this month for the murder of Avis
LinnelL
CAMPAIGN FOR
SOUTHERN OHIO
Taft Made Ten Speeches Yesterday
and Covered Much Ground, Going
Into Masachusetts and Maryland.
By Associated Press.
Cindnanti. May 6. President Taft
campaigned through southern Ohio to
day. He made ten speeches, many in
a downpour of rain. He covered much
ground and went over into Massachu
setts and Maryand. Most of his au
diences were attentive and at times
demonstrative.
At one place he said: T don't re
member in the seven years Roosevelt
was president that his path was
strewn with the bodies of the dead
bosses that he had killed."
NEGRO IS LYNCHED.
' Columbus. Miss., May 6. George
Edd, the negro accused of shooting
and wounding Mrs. Thomas Dee, the
wife of a farmer, and her son. was
captured by posses last night and
hanged to a tree.
EMMETT WILSON
CLUB ORGANIZED
SANTA ROSA
CANDIDATE FOR CONGRESS NOT
ONLY LED, BUT CARRIED COUN
TY BY DECISIVE MAJORITY
OVER BOTH OPPONENTS VOTE
WAS 731 MAYS WAS LOW MAN.
Emmett Wilson not only led In
Santa Rosa, but be carried the county
by a majority over both opponents.
The vote on congressman now stands:
THE STANDING.
"County Flournoy Mays Wilson
Escambia 491 665 1986
Santa Rosa 821 254 731
Holmes 278 439 610
Walton 4S6 278 B16
Washington 120 409 6 SI
Jackson 413 1471 970
'Calhoun 170 203 216
Franklin 56 1S7 152
Gadsden 244 883 224
Liberty 7T 127 94
Leon 290 351 238
Jefferson 91 618 73
Wakulla 82 240 185
Madison 172 621 281
Totals ..3291 6096 6857
Incomplete.
In the above table, Calhoun Is the
only county that is yet Incomplete, but
it is nearly complete so that the of
ficial count will not change these figures
very much. With these figures, Em
mett Wilson has a lead over Dannltte
H. Mays of 761 votes. The vote re
ceived by Congressman Maya is 6096.
Opposed to this is a total vote for Col.
Flournoy and Mr. Wilson of 10.143
democrats who thus Indicate that they
want a new congressman from the
Third district. The majority against
Mays Is 4,052.
These figures speak louder than
words can do of the wish of the voters
of the district for a change, and indi
cations are that the change Is to be
made.
E EXPENSES
OE CAR
BY THURSDAY
CANIDDATES MUST PRESENT
THEM TO THE CIRCUIT CLERK
BY THAT DATE, ACCORDING TO
LAW.
. .According to the laws governing the
primaries, all of the candidates for of
flee, county, 'state, or otherwise, must
file their expense accounts not later
than Thursday, May 9th.
While all of those who are at present
candidates filed their expenses before
the fiust primary, they must now file
their expenses in this primary in or
der to be qualified.
Candidates for county offlcee will
file their accounts with the clerk of
the circuit court, while the Candida tee
for state offices will file theirs with the
secretary of state.
All candidates should remember that
there are only two more days in which
to attend to this Important detaiL
GERMAN FLEET TO
VISIT AMERICA
Sails From Ke'l May 11 and Is Due In
New York June 9 to Remain Four
Days.
By Associated Press, v
Washington, May 6. The German
fleet which is coming to return the
call made by the American fleet to
Germany last year, will sail from Kiel
May 11 and Is due in New York June
9, to remain until June 13.
Elaborate plans for the entertain
ment of the visitors have been made.
POLICE HOLD 8U8PECT.
Chattanooga, Tenn., May 6. The lo
cal police have in custody James Car
ter, alias Wash Depriest, wanted in
Tahlequah, Okla., charged with the
murder of Blue Ghormely and Perry
Dilday. The prisoner denies his guilt,
but he answers the description of De-priest.
Worn Out by Grief Vincent Astor
Seeks "Real" Mother for Solace
Py Associated Praee,
New York, May 6. Worn out by
grief over his father's death and his
efforts to cheer his youthful step
mother, young Vincent Astor. now
head of the family In America, has
turned to his "real" mother, Mrs. Ava
Willing Astor. for solace.
After the funeral of John Jacob As
tor Saturday, Vincent took Mrs. Made
line Force Astor home, then he hur
ried off to meet his mother. There
another meeting yesterday and
mother and son were together again
toua; .
Toung Aster's sister, Alice Marie1,
Enthusiastic Supporters of
Popular Candidate fop
Congress Meet.
SCOTT M. LOFTIN IS ELECTED
PRESIDENT AND W. CHIPLEY
JONES SECRETARY MR. WIL
SON, AS WELL AS A NUMBER
OF HIS ACTIVE SUPPORTERS,
WHICH WERE LOUDLY AP
PLAUDED. Characterizing Pmmrt trnu .
man possessing the real qualities and
stature of statesmanship, a man able,
energetic and determined to accom
plish something for the Third district,
and In view of the recent expression of
the voters in the district for a changa
iu. mar representative in congress, a
number of able speakers last night
aroused tremendous
- " UW4MWACM3UA fX V VilTI
organization of an Emmett Wilson
uuo.
Several hundred earnest and enthu
siastic, sunnortera nt
young Democrat met at the court
"yu asi nignt ana organized the
Emmett Wilson finh ti n.,A.. A
which is to further his candidacy and
w uouu vry enort to nave him nom
inated on the 2Sth day of this month.
BCOtt M.LOftin VI AlAOtjtA
nent president of the club and William
-mpiey Jones was elected permanent
secretary. Both Mr. Loftln and Mr.
Jones expressed their hearty apprecia
tion of the honor bestowed upon them
and promised loyal, constant and vig
orous SUDDOrt nt the vntinir n.mA.
whose candidacy the club proposes to
In Introducing Mr. Wilson to the au
dience. Mr. Loftln explained the pur
pose of the club. He said the voters
of the Third congressional district had
unmistakably expressed themselves is
desiring to send another man to th
national congress, and that he knew
the honor could be bestowed upon no
worthier shoulders than Emmett Wil
son's. "The people want a change
said Mr. Loftln in closing his Intro
ductory speech, "and it devolves upon
us, one arid all of the entire district,
to put our shoulders to the wheel and
elect this splendid young Democrat
who will represent the district and at
all times reflect credit upon the entire
state."
MR. WILSON SPEAKS.
Tilr. Wilson was visibly affected bv
the eulogy of himself and when hd
arose to speak he was greeted with
applause and shouts from every seat
in the building. When he began to
speak the applause broke out anew.
The speaker did not go into the
questions at Issue In the campaign.
He said he had made them clear to
the .Escambia county voters the week
before and he considered it inappro
priate at the time to go over them at
this meeting. He asked to be allowed
to speak about the subject which waa
nearest his heart the expression of
confidence In him that the voters of
the district , made plain on last Tues
day. This vote Mr. Wilson said he
appreciated more than he could ex
press. He realized, he said, that It
waa not a personal compliment to him,
but was an endorsement of the prin
ciples which he believed In as well .is
a desire on the part of the voters to
have a representative from the Thli-d
district who would represent them ac
tively and aggressively upon the finer
of the house and on the Important
committees of that body.
Mr. Wilson said he had Issued
platform which is familiar to tho
voter of the district. This he says
does not contain vote -catchers, but la
a concise statement of the things he
believes In and will work to accom
plish. He said he wanted to go to
congress because he wanted to d
some service for his people, that he
would not seek appropriations alone,
but would take part in the debates en
the great questions which will affect
the people of today, their children and
their children's children.
Mr. Wilson said he would not at
tempt to criticize Congressman Mays'
record because be had already done so.
but he pointed out the fact that the
representative from he Third district
had never raised his 'voice upon tha
ft fsT rt tiA form In tfi m
any of the vital questions of the day. ,
If elected, and he said he felt con
fident that he would be elected. Mr.
Wilson said he would bend every en
ergy of his life to represent the peo
ple as they deserve to be represented.
He promised to study the questions
which affect the people and that as
the days go by he hoped to grow in
experience and efficiency and to render
good service to a people who deservt
it
The splendid voto which was given
Mr. Wilson in every county of tha
district he said pleased him beyond
expression, and he promised that the
trust of the people should never b
betrayed, abused or neglected.
OTHER SPEAKERS.
A number of the club members
spoke in favor of Mr. Wilson's candi
dacy. C. E. Dobson urged individual
effort on the part of the members,
(Continued on Page Two.)
was at the family meetings. At no
time during the funeral services fcr
her father waa she permitted to come
In contact with her youthful step
mother. It waa stated by a friend of the
family today that another heir to the
Astor millions is not expected until
late next autumn. This seems con
trary to popular belief. The new Mrs.
Astor now is in seclusion and she- as
pects to remain at her Fifth avenue
house for the coming few rteekr It
is expected she will retire to one of
the Aster 6ummer placoa with tA
ccGilac of hot weather.

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