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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, November 28, 1913, Image 1

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WEATHER FORECAST
BEGIN YOUR '
HOLIDAY SHOPPING
NOW
PARTLY CLOUDV FRIDAY AND
SATURDAY; LIGHT TO MODERATE
EAST WINDS.
VOL. XVI. NO. 331.
PENSACOLA. FLORIDA, FRIDAY WORNING, NOVEMBER 28, 1913.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
j
ua 11 11 it 11 M 11 11 11 u ii 11
p m&w ww
Eight H undred Marines Leave
Philadelphia For
Transport Prairie Gets
ay at 1 o'clock .in
i he Afternoon.
JEN COMMANDED
BY COL. LETEUNE
j:,;iii(s Had Been Assem
bled at Philadelphia From
Various Navy Yards of
u" Country, Detachments
i;rm Annapolis, Norfolk
W ashington Going- by
ruecial Train to Catch the
Transport.
V ASSOCIATED PRESS.
S-...;.-J:S'hia. Pa.. Nov. 27. With 800
-.; j and a full crew on board the
sn.port Prairie left the Philadelphia
id at 1 o'clock today for south-wy.rvc-.
The transport carries
an 1 ammunition for a three
, r.;s' tc The marines are cora
T,riiti "ol. J. A. Lejeune.
TV- c.-i.-ncl and officials of the Phil
i .!! .: navy yard said before the
f ,;r. fti!e-i orders received name
-n.'"!a. Fla.. the objective point of
!.- ;rii. 1" has been rumored at the
sa.v -iiii. however, that these orders
uy bo changed by wireless telegraph
-ni Washington after the Prairie
Hjyj c:n i" sea. Marines and some
f: if- iTi'iv of the Prairie played foot
,. f. the vessel sailed. The
n.n!"Ui was given a. noisy good -bye
,:u sailusH and marines of the re-
SPECIAL TRAIN CARRIES
WEN TO CATCH TRANSPORT
.:r!rnv',. .'o'. 27. A deta
Vritl States marines from
I'ncd other aetacnmenis
from
)'fi!k Hrrl AVashing-ton - hero this
run; and proceeded in 'a . special
:n f r Philadelphia It i under
d the -:oifhrrs arf to form part of
i r?s'ment vhich- is to sil tvi the
Twsrwt Prairie from tbe Philadel-
InqulTy at the marine barracks at
inapo'i? s tr. whether the' move
nt of :b troops from ther was in
5rHn.r to a. hiirry order elicited the
;r,y that word io !mvc them in readi
'rs had rente from Washing'ton two
t:iree d.ay.s a.(?o. rensacola was said
an 'OFton.ible" destination.
IE PRESIDENT
ITTENDS MASS
WITH CAB
" Hi.h Officials Were
j're.Hiu at Annual Pan
American Thanksgiving
Cdr!, ration With Attend
''i'l! Ma??.
P.' A.SSOriATED PRESS.
. -''nizton. Nov. 27, The fourth
";'--! Pan- Vn"iri-an Thankppivin?
'ranon with attendant mass. a. ser
. "f f-l;,r,lf"l unity between the
Kt.ite? and the twenty-one
iTT-Arican repnblics, was ob-
;:i'-n;' Wilson. Secretary Bryan
z number -f orhf-r cabinet officers,
il'r'-'mats from Latin-America,
.i:i?t.,v White and Justice. Mc-"-
-r ihr p-jprpmp court, and leg-
' n:.-K s ,-hurch was decorated
' rir-iii and l,atin-iAmeriean
- 'Ii-ivp of poac holdinfr to
n :i ii.-ak the flaar of the Unit--pd
that of tho Pan-.Amer-'"
ymbolired the peaceful
-T.."".r"Trn tl! nations of the west-'.-
V"t"rc for which prayers were
' : r"l'nal Gibbons was present.
r;'' " '"aarles W. Currie. bishop
on Page Three.)
Dr. W. B. Craig
m
Charged With Murdering Woman
ASSOCIATED- PRESS.
"'-. " Ind.. Xov. 27. Dr. Wil
' -v.e. clean of the Indiana
t'ollpge at Indianapolis.
; '-.i'-ed on trial here tomorrow
an indictment charging him
' . .rder of Dr. Helen Knabe at
; the night of October 23,
: i"raig was indicted at In-
December 31, 1912, on evi
' ' wilted by a private detective
y women of rhe state.
"' i jury also returned a bill
Y '..o M. Ragsdale, an under
J --. truinistrator of the Knabe
:.'-'5;ng him with being an ac-
r the fact to the murder.
''-T his trial has not been
-i oX Dr. KnaLc has been
CONSTITUTIONALISTS PLAtf TO SEIZE
LOWER CALIFORNIA; NAME GOVERNOR
r C ffer ' I ' i? & 7jK,$g$3
Standinf, General Trevino Heft) and
'anga; insert,
r ..tfc.ot'iTiove of the Constitution
alists In northern Mexico is to take
steps toward the complete overthrow
of the Huerta government in. Lower
Calif omia The" man "Whom ,Carranza,
High Praise for President and
Endorsement of the Monroe
Doctrine by Viscount Haldane
El ASSOCIATED PRESS.
London, Nov. 27.-The British gov
ernment's endorsement of the Monroe
doctrine as given by Viscount Hal
dane, , Lord. High Clvace'lor, ttonight
mad, memorable the Thanksgiving
dinner of the American society here.
Three hundred ' and fifty Americans
and many English cheered Lord Hal-dan-'3,
words repeatedly.
After lauding the president's high
ideals of citizenship, Haldane declared
Great Britain's policy was -J ike that
of tho United States regarding smal
COTTON BURNS
AT DEiOFOLIS
N EARLY Fl
Between - Six Hundred and
One Thousand Bales
Were Destroyed When
Warehouse Caught and
More Was In Danger
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Birmingham, ' Ala., Xov. 27. Fire
early this morning destroyed between
fiOO and 1.000 bales of cotton in a
warehouse at Demopolis, Ala. The
Placed On Trial
one of the most puzzling in the crim
inal history of the state. She was
f -und dead in her bed with a deep
gash in her throat, by her office girl.
Miss Katherine McPherson, when she
went to-Dr. Knabe's apartment the
morning of October 24, 1911. The po
lice after a long investigation declared
her case a suicide. The Marion coun
ty coroner's jury reported that Dr.
Knabe was murdered. Two grand
juries investigated the case without
returning any indictments. Then the
women of the state raised a fund and
hired a private detective to investigate
the murder and the Indictments were
returned by the third grand jury on
testimony submitted "b-y him. He will
be the principal witness for the state
at the trial here.
Pensacola
Tni'i'T'i'iiiMi 'in"i1l' , ITT I ni' L
v v ,
Gustavo Mireles; seated. General Car-
H. V. Anaya.
ha-s picked to act as governor of Low
er California is H. V. Anaya, a trust
ed -lieutenant.; The picture shows Gen.
Carranza and two of his risht-hand
men, en. Trevino and Gustavo, Mire-
ler nation's liberty. He said England
pave South Africa her freedom after
fighting just as-the United States gave
her liberty to" Cuba after interven
tion. The chancellor also asserted the
United States considered herself re
sponsible for smaller nations of tho
western hemisphere and that the pres
ident felt it his duty to .secure good
government and fair treatment for
them. He concluded by saying that a
high spirit and high aim have - been
brought into the American policy
toward adjacent countries through the
attitude of the president.
loss is estima.ted at least as $2n,000.
Nearly 5.000 bales of cotton wore in
tho warehouse at the time, of tho fire
and the blaze was confined to the
building. Kor a while apprehension
was felt that the business section of
the town might suffer from the flames
and assistameo might be necefsary
from nearby towns.
OUTSIDE APPARATUS.
Meridian. Miss., Xov. 27. Part of
the fire fighting equipment of this city
was rushed on a. special train to Ie
mopolis. Ala, this morning. An appeal
for aid from Demopolis said the town
way endangered by a cotton warehouse
Are.
BIRMINGHAM FIRE. -
Birmingham, Ala., Xov. 27. The
Butler Kyser Oil and Fertilizer Com
pany plant at North Birmingham was
destroyed by fire this morning causing
a Joss of $20,000.
ANOTHER GREAT
ENGLISH FIGHTER
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Barrow-in -Fmuw, England. Nov. 27.
The battleship Empror of India, the
! last of thp four on th British 1911 13
naval ronstrnction program, was launch
ed here today. Her const ruction had
bopn considerably delayed, owing to
labor troubles at the ship yard, so that
the new vessel is not of such modern
type as some of the ships already
lsrunchpd. She was laid down on May
31. 1912.
The admiralty departed from its rpert
custom and invited naval attaches of thci
foreiam embassies in London to be pres
ent at tho. liimcinng. its reasons beinj?.
probably, ihat details concerning tr:e
j new battleship were already known.
I THE PRESIDENT AND
j McCOMBS HAVE TALK
i BY ASSOCIATED PRESS,
i Washington, Xov. 27. President T dson
: had a long talk with William McCombs,
cairman of the Democratic national com
. mittee toda-v- and later had an engage
; ment with Sir William Tyrrell, Pj'yate
secretary to Sir iawara orey, j-"
foreign "secretary. - . , ' ,.
With (Mr. McCombs. the president dis
cussed politics in general and preliminary
work for the congressional campaigns.
About Sir William's visit, White House
officials made no comment. Sir William
has seen President Wilson twice before
and th- have exchanged information on
the Mexican situation.
VILLA DEMANDS
FIAT MONEY BE
USED I JUAREZ
Business Houses of the City
Close Doers Rather
Than Accept It.
DECLARES HE WILL
CONFISCATE STOCKS
Encumbered With Wound
ed, Lacking Provisions,
and Practically Without
Ammunition, Surviving
Federals Continue Their
Struggle to. Reach Chi
huahua City, Which the
Rebels May Soon Attack.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
El Paso, Texas, Xov. 27. The busi
ness houses in Juarez closed this af
ternoon when Rebel General Villa or
dered the merchants to accept the con
stitutionalist flat money. When Villa
heard of the action he announced he
would confiscate the storekeepers'
stocks.
Pancho Villa announced today that
he would leave tomorrow with his rebel
army for Chihuahua to attack the fed
erals who retreated Tuesday night af
ter attempting to take Juarez. He be
lieved that other rebel forces have in
tercepted the retreating federals and
he wall be able to capture the entire
command or annihilate it.
Today was an off day in Juarez.
Villa and most of his officers attended
the opening of the Juarez Jockey club.
SITUATION AT TAMPICO
REMAINS UNCHANGED
Vera Cruz, Xov. 27,-The situation
at-Tampico was unchanged this morn
ing according to a report received here
from Clarence A. Stiller, the United
States consul there. 1 ,- j. ;
A long- code nnefcfaarefrom Jobfi ind.
personal representative..-: of " .President
Wilson, and Rear Admiral Fletcher to
at the American consulate here this
morning.
ABOUT FIFTY REBELS
KILLED IN ENGAGEMENT
Mexico City. Xov. 27. Over fiffy
rebels were killed yesterday in three
sharp engagements between 40 revolu
tionists and federal troops commanded
by Col. Celso Aguilar in the state of
Tlaxcala, according to advices received
at the war office.
The rebels, who had committed
many depredations in the vicinity re
cently, were discovered by- federal
troops in a position they bad taken up
at San Damian Texoloc. For over an
hour they resisted the federal attack
but were finally driven in the direction
of San Andres Cua.milpa. where they
rallied and made a second stand.
After another stubborn tight the
rebels fell back on the town of San
Diego and dispersed only when their
ammunition was exhausted.
Fifty-three bodies of insurrectos
were said to have been found on the
battlefields whil the federal loss was
reported as having been insignificant.
A column of federal troops com
manded by General Rubio Navarreto
was ambushed yesterday by a strong
body of rebels near Santa Cruz whilp
moving from Monterey toward Ciudad
Victoria. The federals were caught in
a. ravine, by the rebels, who poured in
a heavy rifle fire from the hillsid".
The federal troops brought their ma
chine guns into action and the rebels
were eventually driven off. leaving
some seventy dead on the field. The
federal comma-nder admits that twen
ty of his men were killed.
Another rebel force yesterday sacked
the town of San Dionisio. in the state
of Puebla. They did not even spare
the church, which they looted after
killing the sacristan. Such, a thing is
unusual, churches and priests being
generaly respected by the raiders.
A dispatch from San Louis Potosi
says today many trains are running as
far north as Vanega, where the; fed
eral trops are concentrated. Commun
ication, however, is interrupted further
north where the rebels are reported to
have, dynamited some trains and are
still in command of the railroad.
ADMINISTRATION FEARFUL
OF SITUATION AT TAMPICO
Washington. Xov. 27. While Rear
Admiral Fletcher has secured formal
pledges from the constitutional, 0en
eral Aguilar, that there shall be no
interference w-ff h foreign property in
the oil fields about Tuxpam, there is
some concern as to whether that is
broad enough to cover the rather criti
cal situation at Tampioo. State de
partment officials will feel easier when
thev hear of the arrival of the admiral
on his temporary flagship, the Rhode
Island, at Tampioo. where he Is expect
ed some time today.
The battleships Nebraska and Michi
gan and the gunboat Wheeling already
are at Tampioo and their commanders
have been instructed to look after not
only American, but British and other
foreign interests in that vicinity.
It is thought at the navy department
that there is little danger of any ac
tion by the constitutionalists in the
neighborhood of Tampico that would
actually threaten the destruction of
the great oil tanks at that port.
Though no specific instructions have
been given to the American naval
commanders, they are expected to act
on their own discretion in protecting
the properties.
The real danger, if any existed,
would lie in interference with the pipe
lines running as. far as twenty-five
(Continued on Pago Three)
LURE OF THANKSGIVING
TURKEY MAKES BREAK
IN DEMOCRATIC PLANS
ZELAYA IS HELD
WITHOUT BOND
DY MAGISTRATE
Former President of Nicara
gua Who Was Arrested
at Midnight 'is Jailed and
Will Be Given an Exam
ination Mondav.
BV ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Xew York, Xov. 27. Jose Santos
Zelaya, former president of Xicaragua,
arrested in bed at midnight on charges
of having committed murder in Xic
aragua, was held today without bail for
extradition to Xicaragua and he was
remanded to urison.
General Zelaya was arrested as a
fugitive from justice on complaint of
Roger B. Wood, an assistant United
States attorney. Mr. Wood charged
that a warrant for Zclaya's appre
hension for murder had been issued in
Xicaragua but did not name the al
leged victims. It was said, however,
that they were two countrymen slain
twelve years ago. and that the death
of Leroy Cannon and Leonard Groce.
Americans slain in Nicaragua in 1909
in the Estrada revolution, bad noth
ing to do with General Zelaya's arrest.
After spending the night on the
bare boards of a cell in the police sta
tion, Jose Santos Zelaya. former pres
idet of Nicaragua, arranged through
his counsel for a hearing today. Xot
withstading the holiday, United States
Commissioner Shields consented to ex
pedite the case and it was expected
that Zeiay;- would be brought before
him this afternoon to answer charges
of having murdered to Xicaraguans
twelve years ago. . ,
Zelaya was arrested at midnight in
the apartment of Washington S. Val
entine. lTe made no effort to escape nd
went uncomplainingly to the police
station asking them io give bim what
conveniences they could. The mar
shals -had traced -him to the. apart -ment--after
! having spent- a sweek oh
his rat .-v . -.r. . ; -v- - ' ' :, r -
Zelaya's lawyers planned to resist
vigorously the attempt to extradite
him to Xicaragua. To this 'end they
sought to show that die- was not re
sponsible for the murders with which
he is charged and that. hoy were the
outgrowth of a political struggle.
NO DOCUMENTS. IN CASE.
Washington. Xov. 27. Oflicia' docu
ments asking for the extradition of
former President Zelaya for the al
leged murder of two countrymen in
Xicaragua had not been received at
the state department today and what
was to have been a hearing became,
merely a. cc iference between Zelaya
was a prisoor in Xew York, where be
was arrested la.st night.
Zelaya's extradition is asked on
charges of the murder of Domingo
Toribio a.nd Sixto Pineda at Masaya.
April 21. 1901. Xo mention of his
summary execution of Cannon and
Groce,-two Americans in 1 901), is made
in the papers, according to set vices
here. Diplomats here point out that
under the" extradition treaty with Xic
aragua, Zelaya could not bo. prosecuted
for the killing of Cannon and Groee
unless his extradition is specifically
asked for that purpose. Furthermore,
under the terms of the treat y. should
he he a.cquitted of the murder of To
ribio and Pineda he would have a
month In which to leave Nicaragua
unmolested: should he serve a. sen
tence he would have a. month to do
so after bis release. Fnder the cir
cumstances it seems that the pro
oeedings against him is entirely dis
connected from the murder of the two
American soldiers of fortune.
COL. GAILLARD IS
SINKING RAPIDLY
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Baltimore. Nov. 27.-- Physicians of the
Phipps psychiatric clinic, at John Hop
kins' hospital, announced this afternoon
that practically all hope has le-n aban
doned for the recovery of Lieutenant
Colonel David Dubose tiaiilarS, who dug
Culebra. cut in the Panama canal. He
has been sinking steadily ' for tho last
few days.
Col. Oaillard's condition, it is naif' now
is such that death might be a matter of
either a few more da?, as Is the usual
result In brain diseases.
His son, Lieutenant David P. Gaillard,
C S. A., said today that his father's ill
ness came on him suddenly in July. .
PRINCE OF WALES
MAY ATTEND EVENT
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
London, 27. A suggestion that
the Prince or Wales should attend the
official opening of the Panama canal, is
under consideration by King George, ac
cording to the Liverpool Courier. Such
recognition of the event would be popu
lar in the Cnited States, the Courier
says, and would help to obliterate, some
of the ill feeling caused by the British
government's decision against official
participation in the Panama-Pacific ex
position at San Francisco.
HUNTER WOUNDED
HIMSELF FATALLY
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 27. A Dyers
burg. Tenn.. special says that Asa Eiggs
of that place, a prominent West Tennes
seean architect, is dying at Tigrett 33 a
result of a gunshot wound in the head.
He was getting .over a. fence yesterday
afternoon while hunting: and his gun was
discharged.
Conferees Flatly Refuse to
Attend the Scheduled
Night Sessions.
SLIM ATTENDANCE
AT DAY SESSION
More Than One-Third of the
Bill Goes Over, But the
Important Provisions as
Reported by the Adminis
tration Democrats Remain
Unchanged The Leaders
Think They Will Finish
by Monday Night.
BV ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Washington. Xov. 27. The lure of
Thanksgiving turkey tonight made tho
first break in the democratic senate
program to rush the administration
currency bill through that body before
the holidays. After working all day
on the measure with a slim attendance,
tile cqriferees flatly refused to attend
tonight's scheduled session. It meets
tomorrow morning however, to resume
the hurried consideration.
More than one-third of the bill was
gone over today, but the important
provisions as reported by the adminis
tration democrats on the banking
committee, remain unchanged. Minor
amendments, changing the wording,
were adopted, but the administration
plan for regional banks, owned and
ccntrolled by national banks, was un
touched. The leaders are confident tonight the
lonferenoe would complete its consid
eration by Saturday night, according
to the program, and the measure will
go to the senate floor as a party meas
ure when the regular session begins
Monday morning.
Among the important matters al
lowed to go over for future considera
tion was the number of regional lanks.
The Georgia senators secured delay,
fearing Atlanta would be handicapped
if a regional bank were created in
some other southern oitv. . : . i
HITCHCOCK ABSENT.
In the abse ice of Senator Hitchcock,
no one presented the. amendments be
.and the live, xepublicans-.of, JtheljtO.nXr
mittee had framed and the conference
sped through section after section, en
dor?ing the Owen-Glass bill practically
without c-hanse. Senator O'Gorman,
one of the democrats of the committee
who aider Senator Owen in presenting
tlie bill to the conference, predicted
that with the exception of the section
fixing the number of regional reserve
banks, the bill would be completed by
the conference today.
It was understood today that an at
tempt might be made to pass a resolu
tion binding the democrats in the con
ference to support the administration
bill. Senator Hitchcock- was expected
to refuse to support the conference bill.
Senator L;nie of Oregon has so far de
clined to so into the conference and
Senator Xcwlands. while attending the
conference, has an original plan which
he intends to press on the floor of the
senate. The defection of three sena
tors might imperil the majority in the
senate if the republican lines hold.
. During the morning session the con
ference accepted the Owen provision
by which the new regional banks
would he capitalized by subscription
by nationul banks and by which the
banks would he controlled by the
member banks, electing six out of
nine directors. About one-fourth of
the bill was -completed When the conference-
took a, recess to allow the sen
ators to get hurried Thanksgiving din
ners. HITCHCOCK SAYS CAUCUS
! GREAT SURPRISE TO HIM
Omaha. Xb., Xov. 27. -United Sta.tes
Senator G. M. Hitchcock, in an inter-
i view today, said in reference to yes
terday's action of the democratic sen
ators on the currency bill:
"The callins" of the democratic con
ference was a. surprise to me. Sena
tor Owen's speech on Monday indicat
ed a conciliatory disposition.
'This led me in my speech on Tues
day to adopt, a similar plan and to
continue my arguments to the merits
of the bill agreed. on by my section of
the committee and reported by me.
"The close attention given my
speech a.nd the comments made after
wards led me to hope that some if not
most of the changes which I proposed
would be favorably considered.
"A general spirit of good feeling
prevailed on both sides of the senate
chamber and the prospect for an am
icable adjustment of differences and
early- action seemed bright. To sorne
extent this has been marred by the ex
cessive zeal of the conference.
"Its drastic action in ordering ses-
(Continued on Page Three)
Unusual Event Featured Opening
of the Italian Parliament At Rome
BT ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Rome, Xov. 27. Two socialists and
a republican took the cath in the pres
ence of the king, a form unprecedented
in the Italian parliament, where so
cialists and republicans hitherto had
stayed away from the opening.
The king's speech from the throne
was greeted for the first time by rep
resentatives of all classes of tne na
tion, made possible by the introduction
in Italy of universal suffrage.
His majesty recapitulated the event3
of the conquest by Libya by the
Italian army and navy which he
praised. He said the conquest had
given Italy a civilizing mission which
it would accomplish with respect for
THANKSGIVING
IS FITTINGLY
OBSERVED HERE
An Immense Congregation
Gathers at First Metho
dist for Union Services. ;
DR. WM. ACKERMAN
PREACHES SERMON
Rev. M. II. Holt Presided
Over the Services and the
Pastors of Practically All
of the Protestant Churches
of the City Participated -Beautiful
Music Rendered.
Thanksgiving day was fittingly ob
served in- Pensacola. yesterday with a
union service at the First Methodist
church. Probably not in the history of
that edifice has so large a congrega
tion gathered to give thanks, prac
tically all of the pastors of protestant
churches of the city participating in
the service. Rev. M. H. Holt, pastor
of the church, presided, and Dr. Wil
liam Aekerman of Temple Beth-El
preached a strong and very interesting
sermon, one which was followed close
ly by the large congregation and great
ly appreciated. Beautiful music was
rendered, and as a whole the service
was very successful.
The following program was ren
dered: Organ prelude.
Hymn Choir.
Invocation Rev. K. L. Mclver.
Scripture Reading Rev. E. R. Pen
dleton. Hymn Choir.
Scripture Reading Rev, J. A. Peter
son. Prayer Rev. R. G. Haskew.
Offering for Woman's Home.
Sermon Dr. William Aekerman.
Hymn Choir.
Closing Prayer Rev. A. S. Moffett.
"America" Choir and congregation.
' Benediction Rev. Thomas Iynnox.
.DR. ACKER MAN'S SERMON.
Dr, Aekerman had as hi subject
''Hove Shall-Wp be TlVnkfuL" and his
'x-xt.; '"And He ifTHcted thee and suf-
fered thee to hunger, and He gave
thee the manna to eat which thou
knowest not and which thy fathers
had not known, in or.le-that He might
make thee know that not In" bread
alone does man live, but by everything"
that procecdeth out of the mouth of
the Lord."
The speaker said that at first Fight
it would seem that if the idea involved
in this text tea-hes one lesson more
than another it is the imperative need
for food, but the apparent contradic
tion vanishes when a person looks upon
the matter a little more closely. He
pointed out what the manna was, say
ing that if the complaints of the peo
ple who were fed with it are to b
trusted it is an unsatisfying bread.
The people ate it and yet were hungry,
and they were not even assured it
would be always theirs; so to the un
satisfying nature of it was added also
the uncertainty of its continuance.
Dr. Aekerman logically came to the
-conclusion that there could have ben
no more impressive means to teach
mankind that there is something more
needful to the human soul than brea-d,
something a man can more worthily
fix his thoughts and his desires upotl,
and in the obtaining of which he may
find the true elements of a righteous
life, and for the gift of this he has to
be thankful.
HUNGRY FOR WEALTH.
The speaker pointed out that in this
age of materialism men are dominated
by hunger for wealth, for luxury and
for sensual joy. and for this mn and
women give up their health, their
peace of mind and veTy often their
honor, but instead of this there would
be a. universal famine not for bread
and all it stands for to eat not a
thirst for pleasure, but an unquench
able desire to measure human duty !n
all its height. brea.dth a.nd depth then
would men live jnstea.d of existirrg, and
then would they draw water of joy
from the wells of salvation.
DIGNITY AND HAPPINESS.
Dr. Aekerman appealed for a, life of
dignity and happiness and stated that
dignity is not to be found in the rest
less pursuit of lower joys, nor in the
tripping up of fellowmen in the strug
gle for the world's pri7es, but in the
ceaseless effort to crush out every
noble yearning of the himan breast
and in extending a hand that helps to
those that are needed; to lift up those
that are sorrowful, no matter what
their belief or what their creed.
"True ha.ppiness." be said, "is pos
sessed only by those, whether rich or
poor, who have peace in their heart
Continued on Page Three.)
the religion, the family life and - the
property of the natives. It would also
open a field for Italian emigration in
the neighborhood of the mother coun
try. The king announced that many re
forms were to be introduced in Italy
and alluded to the intention of tho
government to give Italian women
their rightful place.
Concerning the church, his majesty
said- the most . ample religious liberty
would be given to it, but that it would
be prevented from interfering in state
affairs as the government regarded
itself as the only representative of
Italian subjects and could' not admit
any limitation of its sovereign!-.
.1

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