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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, October 28, 1914, Image 1

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PENSACOLA WEATHETS
PENSACOLA
If t'-e Natural Gulf Gateway for th?
Great South American Trade of the
near future.
Fair TVedr
derate t9
eat winds.
F,!r Wednesday, wlfh i Yesterday's temperature
derate t briek north- Highest, 61 degrees; low-
3
VOL. XVII. NO. 301.
PENSACOLA. FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 28, 1914.
PRICE, FIVE CENTS.
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let
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; 11.41
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CJIlJ.S iLSlE -made
THAT GERMANS'
km, BlIfEN SACK
FRENCH INFANTRY, AIDED BY BRITISH MONI
TORS, FORCED INVADING TROOPS
BACK ACROSS YSER CANAL.
FRENCH REPORT CLAIMS THERE IS
NOW NO REASON TO FEAR FAILURE
DISPATCH ADDS THAT TOWARDS THE END OF
LAST WEEK THE SITUATION WAS DOUBT
FUL GERMAN HEADQUARTERS SAY THEY
HAVE MADE SOME PROGRESS SOUTHEAST
OF LILLE, BUT AT OTHER POINTS THERE
ARE NO IMPORTANT CHANGES.
BT ASSOCIATED PRRSS.
London, Oct. 27. Brief o'ficial statement by French war office tonignt
eaid there was nothing to report except some progress by the allies in the
region south of Dixmude.
A central news dispatch from Northeastern France, however, says the
Germans, in the great part, were Jriven back across the Yser canal yester
day. French infantry, aic'ed by British monitors, accomplished the task. A
dispatch adds that toward the end rf lest week the situation was doubtful,
but now there is no reason to fear failure.
The German general headquarters today declared the battle on the Yser,
near Ypres, and southeasterly from L?lle is proceeding with the same stub-
bornness while the Germans made progress yesterday. On the other battle I
front In the Western theatre no important events have occurred. West of
Augrstowe the German attack is slowly proceeding. Southwest of Warsaw t
the uermans have repulsed strong RuEsian forces. North o" Ivangorod the
new Russian army ' corps has crossed the Vistula.
Petrograd reports trie failure of the Germans to utilize an opportune mo
ment for an attack on Warsaw, after ihey had approached within e;ght miles
undiscovered has turned the tide of the German invasion of Russian-Pola J,
according to advices received ?rom the front today. The Russians genera!
are at a loss to explain why the Germans dft'ayed their night attack. The
enemy decided to delay and that allowed the Russians time to obtain rein
forcements. On a miniature see the status of the eo-)s;ng armies in upoer Bel
gium ran parallel today to the conditions which prevailed when the Ger
man rush toward Pans was checke-J. The Cerm-jn forward movement has
been characterized by. an even prefer prodigality of men than was shown
in the march in the direction of Paris. The invaders succeeded for days i,"
battering their way on and then suddenly came to something which caused
them to pause.
CLAIM NO GMN IR BrCCRritD.-v - -rv v-
Since Saturday no German g-in has been recorded and it is apparent
that the allies have either brour-ht up s'Jch strong reinforcements or en-,
trenched themselves so we'l or bot!, that the Germans must sacrifice man
after man for every foot of aro-nd.
The flat country in West Flanders pernvts no such entrenchments as
made the area of hostilities in Franre famous, but the British and Ee'gian?
with warships at their back h-ve dug themselves in wherever practicable,
while throwinq out every obtae'e possible to impede the enemy.
Whether Germany cn drive her forces like a ram throt'-.h the aHied bar
rier is a task, the result of which should decide the success or failure oc
Belgians Fight With Desperation as Homes Go Up in Smoke
!.
,f- -of.
' Tf t
H : f .if '-L" ..-. .- ?.'
-.'s :tr.
- 7 ' ' Jt Sr r.
-jr "ii.v
1
'
-
,7 .. ,:-T:, ?wrr
Photo shows Belgian marksmen, wlt'i
their long bored rifles capable to car
ry a long: distance, laying in ambush
on the bank of the Nethe ready .o
pick off the Germans on the opposite
side. Note in the distance the rti.i
tnce the great smoke rising from
burning- bildlngrs.
WILL LOAN $135,000,000 ON
COTTON WAREHOUSE RECEIPTS
FOUR PERSONS KILLED AT SAMSON,
ALA. BY COLLAPSE OF A DRY KILN
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Samson, Ala., Oct. 27. Four men were killed and a fi?th seriously
injured early this morning wi;e i a lar&e dry kiln of the Alabama Lumber
and Kiln Company collanpd wtm-'r warning. All were bur.ed beneath
thousands of feet of lumber and it m a miracle that any escaped with
their lives.
The dead J,-A. Butler. Ed Fra:er. Marcus Hargrove and Alto Pew.
Wilbur Hall is" the most seriously injured and not expected to live.
r in motion a I
enrj-cherished
the German
n England,
her plan to reach Ca'ais and from trere
scheme to harass England. On t-e other h-rd the failure c-V
forces to progress, it is mrint-tined by military observers
probably would mean another retreat.
A statement issued by the official p'-rs bur?y todsy indicated how s'ov'y
each side must feel its way among the hundreds of little Fe'gian viM?gs
To co forward without careful recornoiter"ng wr-j'd be extremely pert'ous,
as it never is known whether a vi!l?'7e is merely occupied by harmless cit
irers or by armed forces ready to .-ttsck.
The admiralty haj not yet aduited that the monitors working off the
Eelci'n corst have sustained any d-imsre though the Germans claim to havo
reached the vessels with their artillery.
The talk of Zeppelins visiting Lonr'on has aS!med second place a'org
side the speculation as to when the German warships will dart from their
havens and engaqe tho British naval units. EnVishmen cannot explain
to their own satisfaction how the Germ-ns are aing to do this feat, neces
sitating as it will the running of the gauntlet ef the British fleet as well fs
speeding through a mined area. It mk-s t'"od food for araurnflnt. however,
and the newspaper writers build ip and tear down the plausibility of the
performance in the same article.
ttla
I-
vi- if yj-Vi t i !, I
CUUiiLU Ul I
LOSE LIVES lil A
M EXPLOSION
Details of the Plan Made
Known Loans Will Be
on Basis of Six Cents per
Pound for Middling.
1JDT0 MU)t
0 iffHUL
Terrific Blast Let Go In :i
Shaft Where Three Hun
dred Were Working, But
Many Escaped or Were
Rescued.
BATTLE FOR THE ROAD
TO CALAIS IS UNDECIDED
tonrlon. Oct. 27. The battle for the
fad to Calais was- still undecided today.
The territory west of the Yser, the
crossing of which cost the German
Tniy more men, compared with the
area cf hostilities, than any other sin
gle engagement in the war. continues
o he tne scene of the deadliest of con
flicts. Althoush it is Raid that t.le
"w of German reinforcements seems
i be without end, l;ey arnarently.
J" flaring from news in London, have
made no noteworthy advance since
saining this river.
Tho left wi-g of the allies has been
reinforced. This m?.y he due in nnrt
o efforts to offset the constant move-
pnt of fresh German troops and in
irl to making good the activity o- tho
rltish fleet, which accordirg to Ger
man advices has been forced to witli-
aw further from the coast lh-.e bv tht.
Tective fire of the Corman artillc v
wrman snips, aside from subrc.'t
dispatch declaring thnt the Belgians
lost 10 000 men when they were dri ci
from the banks of the Yser.
Tne biggest of the G?rman guns are
now reported to be at Bruges. There
has been no notable change along the
battle line in France proper, although
the Germans claim . that the fate of
Verdun will e sealed promptly as &o n
as tf.eir powerful guns get into action.
From ne.T Pheims has come a dis
patch dwelling upon the local Indica
tK n:- thr t the Germans are preparing
to hold their rnsi!inns In that part -f
the Alsne all winter.
Most of the claims from the Eastern
arena or tne war continue to ,i e
the uprT h-i"d to the Russians, al
though the Germans are rallying an3
seeking to stem the Russian onrush.
It seems to be officially conflrincl
that Italy has landed forces in A!
lo'-ij ar-d thpt Greeks also are making
their way Into this territory.
A NEW ZEPPELIN.
A disnntch from Geneva, Switzer
land, to the Express gives this account
Ines. have been reported in this vl- i f ' ' launching of a new Zeppelin:
nity, Dut the London press is diily
evoting more space to such a con-
nsrency.
Gnrmany hps a number of small
cruisers at "Wilhelmshafen, together
"U a detachment of Gestrovers. suA
sudden appearance of some of
r-" r-hipn norhaps accompanied bv
H battle cruiser, would be no sur-
icsfatches reaching London a-er
"at Kmperor William har demanJe 1
""firivonnlly thnt Calais be taken.
!'3 a telegram received todav auotii ir
ffi Saxon Gazette gives what cur
ing to he a plan of German invas'on,
m the north coast of Franca Is In
i -i" hands.
V T, . . .
towns or west nanoers, over
through which the battle for the
has been was'ng are In ruins.
rr. nals are choked with the dead
; the country side is scarred as if
' ' 'nhquake.
"'- the Germans have not been
r In heavy losses is attested by a
The most powerful Hepcelin yet
made has Just been launched at Fried -richshaven.
on Lake Constance. With
out preliminary trials it flew aay
l orthwnrds at great speed, cheered by
the soldiers who shouted Ho London!'
"Count Zeppelin was present at the
Isnnching. The airship has a. special
armored compartment for bombs ner
the propellers and a tig gun la mount
ed In front to destroy aeroplanes. A
ttcond airship of a similar type will
be ready by the end of October.
"Jicre Zeppelins are bt'ng built at
Puiseldorf, Colmar and Berlin, tha
German staff desiring that the num-
cer be brought to a hundred quickly."
The Greek government has an
nounced to the powers Its Intention of
provisionally occupying Northern Epi
rus, owing to the necessity of sup
pressing the anarchy prevailing tlire
as the result of the breaic down of the
(CottAuued on Page Three.)
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Royalton, 111., Oct. 27. One hundred
or more miners were killed, it is be
lieved, in the Mitchell coal mine near
here today when a terrific explosion
occurred in the lower level of the mine
soon a "ter three hundred men had be
gun work.
Of those who entered the mine, about
100 escaped but thirty bodies were
soon brought to the surface and mors
than 100 other men were known to be
imprisoned in a lower level, cut off
from rescue by fire. It was thougnt
that all of those" shut off by the wall
of flame in the interior were soon
burned to death. - -
Royalton is a mining village 86 mil'-s
southeast of St. Louis on the St. Louis.
Iron fountain' and Southern railroad.
' All the men whose bodies were taktn
from the upper level had been over
come by gas; none baa been burned.
General Superintendent Mitchell said
the men in the lower ravel doubtless
had been overcome by the gas before
It exploded and that if they regained
consciousness, the fire that followea
the explosion would prevent their es
cape. The blast occurred in the northwest
corner of the mine where from 150 to
300 men were working.
Men in the southern part of the miiie
heard the explosion and Hurried to the
cages which took them to the surface.
Three hundred and seventy-two men
were employed in the mine but about
fifty had not entered tne shaft.
Up to 11 o'clock tho rescue parties
were unable to penetrate more than
fifteen hundred feet in the workings
but at that hour the rescue car came
from Benton. 111., with Tour hours' sup
ply of .oxygen. This made possible a
further penetration of the mine by
the rescue parties.
General Superintendent Mitchell said
he could not account for the explosior
as the- mine had been in continuous
operation and no gases had been Je
tected. At noon rescuers said they could see
at least twenty-five bodies on the
upper level. Kescuers scnght to checK
the flames in the lower level by drop
nine blankets soaked with water. This
temporarily checked the flames, but
A TIE
H I RISH I
TO ASSASSINATE
BENEfUL VILLA
Staunch Supporter of Gen.
Carranza Tries to End the
Life of Rebel Leader He
Confesses and is Shot.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
El Paso, Oct. 27. An attempt has
been made to assassinate Genera! Villa
by a man said to have been commis
sioned and paid by Gnerl Pablo Gon
zales, a staunch Carranza supporter,
a message to the Associated Press
from Louis Beravides. Villa's first sec
retary, said today. The would-be hs
pascin Francisco Mugla. was executed
a. "ter making a confession before
George C. Carothers. the American
consular agent. A tlegrim from Vi
la's secretary said Mugia was appre
hended at Guadalupe; wnare Villa with
bis troops have been awaiting the wt
come of the Aguas calientes conference.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Washington, Oct 27. Pull details of
the plan for the one hundred and
thirty-flve million dollar cotton loan
fund was made public tonight by the 1
federal reserve board. The board's
outline of the plan was sent to the
clearance house associations through
out the country.
The funds are to be administered
under the direction of a "central com
mittee," composed of the individual re-eerre-board
members, tnit the actunl
'administration of the fund" will be un
der the "cotton loan committee, con
sisting of TV. P. a. Harding, a member
of the reserve board, as chairman;
Paul M. Warburg, a membei of the
board Col. F. M. House of Austin, Tex.,
A. H. Wiggin, of New York, James
S. Alexander, of New York; James B.
Morgan, of Chicago; Festus J. Wade,
of St. Louis; Levi L. Rue of Phila
delphia, and William A. Gaston, of
Boston.
Class "A" subscriptions aggregate
ore hundred million dollars to be
raised In the non-cotton states. Class
"B" subscriptions, the balance of the
fund will be raised by bankers in the
cotton states.
Applications for loans must be sub
mitted to the state and iocal commit
tees, which are required to approve
them and will be made through bankd
or backers. Loans be made on notes
at six per cent with warehouse re-
STATE ATTOR
TELLS WHY 00
HEY SI
RE
o TO
GERMANS LOSE
THOUSANDS
NIGHT BATTLES
MANY WERE DROWNED IN DEATH
GRAPPLE WHILE OTHERS WERE
BAYONETTED. THEIR BLOOD
REDDENING THE WATERS OF
YSER CANAL.
Replies to Resolutions
the Pensacola Equal,
Suffrage League.
of
DISCRIMINATION
CHARGE IS SILLY
Says League Wishing to
Convince Public of Capac
ity of Its Members for
Ballot Should Show More
Discretion Than to En
gage in Agitation of fat
ter of This Kind.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
London, Oct. 27. The correspondent
of the Daily Mail In Northern France
telegraphs under date of Sunday night
regarding the fighting on the river
Yser says:
'There .were 2,500 German bodies in
the Yser canal this morning after the
fighting in the night. Many of them
were drowned and others were bay-
onetted. The very water was bloody
while Dixmude's streets were strewn
thick with the dead.
'These ghoulish facts alone give
some idea or the savageness or tne
fighting, the desperation of the German
attacks and the stubbornness of the
allies resistance.
"Tne night was a hell from dark to
dawn. At almost every point of the
line man was opposed by man, some
times at a few hundred yards distance
but more often in close grips. Face
to face men even wrestled and died
oy drowning each other in the canals
waters. The Germans had orders to
pet throuegh that night, cost what it
would.
"An officer of theirs who was cap
tured said that the delay of more than
a week in crossing this water had In
censed the autocratic military mind In
Germany. It must be crossed tonight
If it costs a thousand men. That in
effect was : the order given and the
German fcoWiars all credit to them
did their best.
"Probably 5,000 of them gave their
lives last night. They could not give
more, yet they failed, .ue not because
the Germans did not literally obey
orders. They crossed tne waterway all
right as they were bid, but once
through they could not make good.
They were mowed down with rifle
shot, torn into human fragments by
shells and bayonetted back yard by
yard over their own dead Into the
waters of the canal. Into the very
gray of the morning this bloody work
went on so fiercely that there was
hardly a trench or oridge guarding the
whole lines that did not Imagine that
he had been singled out for special
Characterizing the charge that b
had discriminated in favor of a neijrt-s
in the matter of allowing Mrs. Florence
McGowan bond, as really silly, nnil
that a leairue wishing to convince tint
public of the capacity of Its members
for the ballot should have shown mri
discretion than to engage In the public
agitation of a matter of this klnJ,
State Attorney John P. Stokes list
night Issued a statement in reply to
resolutions adopted by the Pensacola
Equal Suffrage league at a meeting
Monday night severely condemning him
for declining to agree to bond for
Mrs. McGowan, who has been lndi"tod
on a murder charge and in to be tried
next week. The statement as dictated
by State Attorney Stokes Is as follows:
"After reading the resolution adopt
ed by the Equal Suffrage b-oirue of
Pensacola relative to the court's doni.il
of bail to Mrs. Florence MoOnw.n,
indicted upon the charge of murder in
the first degree, and my refusal to
agree to bail In this cusp, ail that I
wish to elate I that I regret tint I
cannot comply with the wishes of iho
ladies. As one who is fond of Hie
ladies it always gives me pleasure to
conform to their wishes and It in wltn
regret that I must adhere to tho per
formance of my sworn duty in 'h.s
casei
"The ball of all parties lndlcte.1 In
the circuit court Is fixed by thn jud; '.
Until the evidence Is presented to the
court, the court will not allow K-iii
in a murder case without the con-erit
of the state through its state attorney.
If the state attorney feels that it. ii Iks
duty to refuse to agree to ball, tho De
fendant may take the matter IkI'oim
the court, where the evidence i i n -sented
and tho court decides the q na
tion. ATTORNEYS FAIL TO ACT.
"In the case of Mrs. McGowan I de
clined to agree to bail, because the
evidence before me, if found to bo trua
by the petit Jury, will Justify a verdict
r-" rmrf'r In the first degree. Under
these circumstances it was my duty
as a., officer of the state to decline to
agree to ball for the accused. If tint
defendant's attorneys bad reason to
believe that their client wtt entitled
to ball they had the right to take thu
ceipts for cotton as collateral on a
basis of six cents per pound for mid
dling. Applications for loans must be made
before February 1, 1915. Loans have
a maturity of one year with the prem
ise of a renewal for six months on ap
proval of the central committee.
NEW LAW WILL RELEASE
VAST AMOUNT OF MONEY
attack.
"It is believed that some five thous- matter be'ore the court and present,
and Germans crossed the river Yser the evidence and have the quHtln
but hardly one of them got back. Those settled by the court. Having declined
to the north and northeast of Dixmude , to do this, the inference is Irrnslstlhb
probably two thousand were met by a i that the defendant's attorneys th 'm
fine rally of the Belgian infantry and "Hve holieved that their client was
of the cavalry who had tethered their not entitled to bail.
horses, and were driven by main force "Reference has also been made to
at the bayonett's point, to the river the case of Sarah Mitchel. who wa.
canal and into it. There must have also indicted for murder in the first dc
been frantic scenes and the bodies ' ree- and on whowe behalf a requ -sf.
coon in vw n th. nrt Hav vtavm i was made that the state asrree to hail
grim testimony of this.
I for her. On behalf of tne Mate I agreM
"About three thousand German in
fantry men got into Dixmude. They
held it for a time but with shell and
Washlngtrn Oct 27. Comptroller of' rifle fire the place was riddled through
CAP"AN7A SUBMITS HIS
RESIGNATION TO CONFERENCE
(Continued on Page Three.)
Mexico City. Oct. 27. General Car
ranza has submitted hl3 resignation
as firt chief of the Constitutionalists
to the Aguas calientes conventim '"'i
condition that General Villa will re
tire to private life. Carranza ?alJ, in
offering to resign, that he was actu
ated only by the highest motives of
patriotism and the acceptance or re
ection of his offer must depend on
whether or not his r-'-MnPt'e"
contribute toward peace and further
ance of true democratic ideas.
Currency Williams tonight made pub
lie a statement showing the reserves
j held by National banks on September
j 12 were five hundred and eighty million
dollar's in excess of the amount re-
quired under the new banking law. Of
; this, twenty-one mllVlon is In Fich
'mond; fourteen million In Atlanta, and
twenty-four million dollars In the Dnl
. las districts. The statement polr ts
out the approximately four hundred
and sixty-five million dollars will be
. released under the new aw.
U.S. Torpedo Boat
Paulding Driven
Ashore In a Gale
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Norfolk. Vt, Oct.. 27. The torpedo
boat destroyer Paulding1 went ashore
about 2 o'clock this morning at Lynn
haven Inlet and now lies fast, bow on.
She is supposed to have been driven
ashore by the gale of last night, which
blew for a time with almost hurri
cane violence.
A portion of the Paulding this after
noon is imbedded in about five feet
of sand. The North Dakota, the Pan
ther and the Culgoa are lying by her.
A line has been attached and efforts
will be made to float her.
The Paulding is resting easy on the
sand and Is in no danger. The surf
is heavy :Dut life boats go out to her
without difficulty.
Cannonading at
Sea Thought to
be Naval Battle
. BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
New York, Oct. 27. Heavy cannon
ading at sea off the Virginia Capes
heard by those aboard the steamer
Saratoga and at r.rst thought by them
to be an engagement between British
and German war vessels wm believed
today by Captain Miller of the steamer
to have been United States battleship
In target practi-ee. . The Saratoga
reached New York this afternoon.
nd through. The Germans dushoi out
of the crumbling houses only to be
wiped out jy a sirocco of shrapnel and
shot in the stieets.
"When Sunday morning broke, the
dead and wounded were everywhere.
Dixmude was a cemetery, but In the
woods not far away the Germans still
lingered. They held a position under
that this defendant's ball be fixed at
one thousand dollars, which she wan
unable to give. She Is now in Jail.
CHARGE A SILLY ONE.
"It has been suggested that bwatm
Sarah Mitchel was a re?ro and Mr.
McGowan was a whM person. I dis
criminated in favor of the negro tnd
against tho white person. Thla la rea.il
silly.
"The evidence against Sarah MltchM
will not Justify a vrdU"t of guilty ?
any degree of unlawful homicide hllt-
desperate fire and eventually were re-j T mansinugnier. wnicn is t.vi
inforced. The allies cooild not oust ' lowest degree of unlawful homicide in
tham and the Germans are still across j tnls "tate rh" 'art ' th'u r ?p-iouf lr
the Yser. (question whether the evidence will Jus-
."-w!r ,.,,,.,, may not be per-I t!lV B verdict of guilty of nny unlawful
manent and they may suffer the same I homicide whatever, but he was m
i . u ..a oexcome hundreds of their I d,oted by thP rnnd ,,Jry "nd U ,ny
rii7 cr.w,r. ,,..... ,-, .t, I duv to prosecute her. Fhe was f-n-
got over only to meot their death, but
tho Belgian and French lines, for the
time being at least, have been drawn
back about this point."
TARGET
PRACTICING
BY THE DESTROYERS
Norfolk, Va., Oct. 27. The reported
naval engagement off the Virginia
Capes last r.;,'iu was most likeiy the
target practic; of the torpedo boat
destroyers. A large number of them
are maneuver-.ng now and most of
their practice is at night
It is said at Cape Henry today that
no filing could he heard tuere i&t right
on account of a 58-mile gale.
A m erica n Vessel
Stopped and Fourl
of Crew Removed s
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
St. John. N. B.. Oct. 27.The Ameri
can tug Security, owned by the Stan
dard Oil Company, was boarded v.
terday afternoon by, a detail of e'ght
men from the Slxty-ecr.d regiment
and four of her crew were removed.
One, a naturalized clt ?n. was re
leased. The other three, all Germans,
were detained.
The members of the crew were ar
rested on the grounds that they were
subjects of a nation with which Great
Britain is now at war. The tug's
paper showed that thr of the t :
men had signed as subjects of Germany.
titled to bond, however, and It was roy
sworn duty under the evid-n e in ihi
ca.e to apre to hall for her.
"The difference In those two c.iei
Is thit in one case the evidence wl'l
Justify a verdict of guiltv of muni r
in the first degree urn in the .thr
case it will not. In th former caii
the accused person h.'f.i no ristht In
ball and in the latter case the a-ou:l
person did have a rU'M to bail.
"Being a sworn ofTlc;r 'f the stnt i
with the facts before me, I wm cniie j
pon to perform a dutv. The Fqwril
'Suffrage league was withot the fo(
and had no duty to perform, and lik i
others who act without Information
with respect to matters with refer --rr i
to which they have no duty to perfur-n.
they may engage In Idle criticism and
rlve vent to their rympithy.
AGITATION UNFORTUNATE.
"It would seem that n league that
wishes to convince the puhl!c of tn
capacity of Us members for the ballot,
would show more discretion than to
ergage in the public aquation of .i
matter of this kind. The cas I pend
ing In court and we are on the eve of
the trial. Agitation pro and con lin
tho effect of stirring up ruMle senti
ment for and against the accused an 5
(Continued on Laat Page )
I . '
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