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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, October 29, 1914, Image 1

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5. f..?.uman Endurance is Reached and all Firing Ceases
V v - 2r 2r :v :sr 2r 3c ?z ?c -m- -
i,
i
Germans Will Renew Attempt to Force Way Through to Dunkirk
E
pgN5.COLA WEATHER
F-,!r Trsday and FrI- i Yesterday's temperature:
cbv; pp:it to iwderate highest 62 degrees; low
ro'rtr.east tmids. est, 68 degrees.
Nij
PENSCOLA
Is t-e Natural Gulf Gateway for the
Great South American Trade of the
near future.
VOL. XVII. NO. 302.
PENS--1. u ' 'OJl THURSDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 29, 1914.
PRICE, FIVE CENTS.
?
rt
Refugees From Belgium Reach Holland Frontier Town
GERMAN
OFFICIAL REPORT SAYS KAISER'S
ARMY FORCED TO WITHDRAW FROM
THEIR POSITIONS IN POLAND.
REPORTED GERMANS FALLING BACK ALL
ALONG LINE IN NORTHERN FRANCE
IT 13 BELIEVED THAT CESSATION OF FIRING
CAUSED SUCH A REPORT AND THAT SOON
THE GERMANS WILL RENEW THE ATTACK,
AS THEY ARE E RINGING UP MORE AMMUNI
TION AND FRESH MEN FIRST ATTEMPT A
FAILURE ON ACCOUNT OF BOMBARDMENT
k"r OTJTTTC?
T7T"-M
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
London, Oct. 28. The limit of human endurance has
een reached in the battle in West Flanders and the fight
ng, which slackened yesterday, came to almost a complete
op today. Dispatches from the Dutch frontier declare
ne artillery fire has ceased. These advices it is believed
ere tonight were responsible for the report that 'the' Ger
mans had retired,,having given up the attempt to reach the
hannel ports. V
There is everyl evidence that the, Germans intend to
enew the attempt to force their way through to Dunkirk.
ney are cringing up tresn men and more ammunition and
ams, but at the same time are taking precautions to pre-
are secona line ior tne aetense snoiucl iorward movement
gain meet defeat. The new attempt, it is believed, will be
nade further inland as failure of the first one was largely
lue to the bombardment from the British and French war-
hips off the coast. Cessation of the heavy fighting seems
o have extended along the line as far as Arras.
The small forces left to hold the line from the Oise to
he Meuse rivers while the greater battle was proceeding,
pve been engaging in night attacks at different points.
vith the advantage sometimes of going to one and some-
fimes to the other. Along the Meuse, the French are ad-
ancmg slowly between Appemont and St. Mihiel in an ef
fort to cut off the Germans holding the latter place.
The German official report issued today says the Ger
mans have been forced to withdraw in Poland in the face!
'i Russian reinforcements.
A greater part of Africa has been drawn into the con
lict. It is reported that Germans have invaded Angola,
ve of Portugal's African possessions; that there has been
ighting on the borders of German and Belgian colonies,
f d that the British and Germans have been having more
rmishes. Still more serious is the rebellion in South Af
ica, although Premier Botha seems to have inflicted a se
ere defeat on General Beyers, routing his command and
faking many prisoners.
INVASION OF PORTUGAL NOT UNEXPECTED.
The Angola invasion was not unexpected as Portugal
ad declared her intention of helping the allies and, in
hew of the possibility of German attacks on her colonies,
-au ieiniorcea ner garrisons, it tne report oi tne uer-
an invasion is true, Portugal is the ninth nation to be
pawn into the war and there is danger of others following.
poiiand tears her neutrality may be violated. The mouth
If 1.1 O 1 t 1. J .... .....
tne ocneiat, wnicn tne Germans now that they nold Ant
erp, would find of much service, has been mined and
aval vessels prepared to resist any attack. On the eastern
order of the Netherlands, where the Germans are massing
a large lorces, the Dutch have sent an army.
n evening rxews dispatch from Northern France
ays it is reported the Germans are falling back all along
ic nne irom x-aDassee to the sea.
niflr
oorjT
3 liJTO
VERS'
i i ii inline '
BP
This pathetic group of ref usees from Antwerp was photographed at Kotsendaal, Holland, two weeks ago,
when the inhabitants of the Belgian city were fleeing from the bombardment by the Germans. Three hundred
thon&and refugees fled to Holland for eafety, and Rosendaal, a border-town, was filled to overflowing with pathetic
groups like this.
The pitiful look on the little girl's face describes more graphically than words the terror of the flight which
she understands so very little. The bundled up figure seated on -the cart unde.r-wnich the dogs which draw It are
resting is the feeble old grandfather of the little girl. In the basket on hi s lap is the family cat, which 13 fceing
taken with them on their flight, .77.
Germans Gkan$& l-heinMinds - -on
Length of the European War
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
London, Oct. 23. Router's Amster
dam correspondent says the German
semi-official press has changed its
mind and admits the war it likely to
lest longer than it originally thought.
The press estimate .thai Germany has
sufficient corn for. bread for her army
and population until the next harvest.1
FRESH RUSSIAN TROOPS FORCE THE
GERMANS AND AUSTRIANS TO RETIRE
Berlin, Oct. 28. German and Austrian troops in Po
nd, according to an official announcement issued in Ber
n today, hav been forced to withdraw before fresh Rus-
jan forces advancing from Ivangorod and Warsaw.
URKEY IS RECRUITING HER ARMY
HURRIEDLY TO THE FULLEST CAPACITY
. New York, Oct. 28. Turkey is recruiting her army to
fullest capacity, and even attempting to impress natur-
Continued on Pago SerimJ,
Not Morel han 60
Lives Were Lost
In Mine Explosion
BY ASSOCIATED r PRESS.
Royalton, 111., ' Oct . 2S. Estimates
this morning-of the deaths :in the ex
plosion that wrecked the mine of the
Franklin Coal & Coke Company near
here yesterday, placed the number at
between fifty and sixty. The night
shifts of rescue workers brought the
number of recovered , Dodi;s to thirty
seven and reported five other bodies
visible hut inaccessible to the rescu
ers. The mine officials said today that
276 miners, seven of them injured,
escaped immediately following, the
tlast, and these together with the dead
and missing account for the three hun
dred and thirty-five men that entered
the shaft yesterday morning to begin
their day's work. Only eleven of the
dead have been identified.
In an effort to alleviate the hysteria
which has been general among the
women and children, the coroner has
barred all relatives of the dead from
the two temporary morges. The
state mine inspectors' investigation
into the causes and responsibility for
the disaster will not begin until the
last body has aeen removed from the
mine, according to a statement of the
bureau of mines today.
The coroner's inquest was begun
today.
Inquiry among the survivors of the
explosion today developed that im
mediately after the explosion the men
operating the air shaft reversed the
machinery, hoping to draw the poison
ous gases from the mine.
This, said James Brown, mine man
ager, may have caused the death of
some of the men who were near the
entrance, hut it saved the lives of many
more.
AMERICAN SHIPS
HAS BEEN DETAINED
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS..
Washington, Oct. 28. The American
ship Kroonland, from New York,
bound for Naples and Greece with a
cargo of copper, has been detained at
Gibraltar by the British authorities,
according to official advices received
here today.
Consul Sprague at Gibraltar did not
report the reason for the detention of
the Kroonland, but as copper is con
traband of war. it is thought here
this was probably the cause.
The state department has askea Mr.
Eigh teen Hurt
When Pullmans
Were Derailed
MONTI CELLO BANK
CLOSES DOORS ON
ACCOUNT RUMOR
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Monticello, Fla., Oct. 28. To
avoid a threatened run, caused . by
the . reported . disappearance of
Cashier R. R. Turnbull, who U ill
in Kansas City, the Jefferson
County Bank of Monticello, has
been closed temporarily. An ex
pert at work on the books declares
accounts are correct. .
STATEMENTS ON
M'GOWAN CASE
"We desire only to correct a
wrong impression that might be
gained from reading the statement
of the state attorney in the Mc
Gowan case, and do not care to
enter into a newspaper contro
versy Scott M. Loftin, attorney
for the defendant.
"The ladies evidently misunder
stood me. The state attorney is
familiar with this case and I am
not, and I could not criticize his
action. I told the delegation of
ladies that under the circumstances
it would have to be a very aggra
vated case for the court to refuso
bond. Judge W. B. Sheppard.
"The charge by the equal suff
rage league that I discriminated In
favor of a negregs is really silly.
People who are trying to convince
the public of their capability of
handling the ballot should r-xer-clse
better judgment than to start
such an agitation now." State At
torney Stokes.
"I never gave out any intervftw
or authorized the publication of a
statement saying Judge Sheppard
had characterized the fiction of the
state attorney as an outrage. It
was an unwarranted liberty to
publish such a thing, but I did
make the statement, though I did
not know it was going to be pub
lished." Mrs. Fred Roege, presi
dent of the suffrage league.
Scott M. Loftin Says Stokes
Statement Might Cause
Wrong Impression.
EXPENSE, HE SAYS,
PREVENTED ACTION
Ladies Misunderstood Judge
Sheppard, Who Says He
Did Not Characterize Ac
tion of State Attorney as
an Outrage rMs. Rocgc
Declares She Was Not
Talking for Publication
Suffragists Have Petitions
in Circulation.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
Huntington, W. V., Oct. 28. Eighteen
persons were injured,' five of them
seriously, when .three Pullmans and
a day coach of the Chesapeake & Ohio,
Washington-Chicago fast train No. 1;
was derailed this morning at 7 o'clock,
tan miles from Huntington. Two Pull
mans roiled down a high embankment.
A broken wheel on the day coach is
believed to have caused the accident
All the injured were in the overturned
Pullmans. The injured were brought
to Huntington.
CAUSES UNKNOWN.
Richmond, Va., Oct. 28.Chesapeake
& Ohio general offices here have re
port from Huntington, W. Va. saying
that their train. No. 1, westbound be
tween Washington-Richmond and-Chicago,
was wrecked at 6:47 a. m. today
at Barboursville, 10 miles from Hunt
ington, through causes as yet undeter
mined. '
Eighteen persons were injured, five
seriously. The injured have been taken
to hospitals at Huntington.
The Destroyer
Paulding Hard
and Fast In Mud
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Norfolk, Va., Oct. 28. The torpedo
boat destroyer Paulding, which went
ae.-ound in Lvnnhaven Inlet during a
I storm early Tuesday morning, is still
' fast in the sand. Her crew Is aboard.
Neither vessel or men are in any dan
ger. The violence of the gale carried the
Paulding over one sand bar and
against another. She now lies in about
five feet of sand. Warships are stand
ing by and will endeavor to float her.
If was " said at the navy yard this
morning that it will probably be nec
essary to dredge a channel through
the sand to get her out.
The destroyers Fanning, Burrows
and Jouett are at the navy yard for
repairs to slight damages sustained in
the storm Tuesday morning in Lynn
haven roads.
BUSINESS MEN OF
U. S. ARE IN ATLANTA
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Atlanta, Ga., Oct. 28. Officers and
directors of the United States Cham
ber of Commerce who are on a t mr
of the South making a special study
of business conditions, arrived here
today from Birmingham, Ala. The h
cal chamber of commerce tonight gao
POLICE HAVE NEW
CLUE GIRL MURDER
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
South Bend, Ind., Oct. 28. The
South Bend police department took
up 'a new clue in the Hazel Mackiin
murder case this afternoon. Search
now is being made for the owner of
a big seven-passenger automobile, wio
on August 17, two days before the
Mackiin girl was murdered, influenced
Mary Foldosi, a fifteen-year-old Polish
a dinner to the visitors at which John
H. Fahey, of Boston, president of the j girl, to accompany him into the coun
national organization delivered tho try, promising to pay her seven -dul
principal address.
A. B. Farquar, of Norrolk, vice-president
of the organization, declared here
today that while the south appeared
to have suffered more than any other
section as a result of the European
war, he had found great optimism.
Mr. Farquhar said Southern farmers
must rely on their local banks and
not on the federal government for
real aid In the form of cotton loans.
KANSAS CITY CLEARING
HOUSE TO HOLD MEETING
Kansas City, Mo, Oct. it. X pe
cial meeting of the members of the
Kansas Citv Clearing House will bo
lars a week to care for a baby. When
several miles south of th city the man
attempted to assault the girl.
Steamer of the
Manchester Line
Is Sunk By Mine
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Fleetwood, Eng.. via London, Cot. 28.
The trawler City of London arrived
here today with the survivors of the
British freight steamer Manchester
Commerce which struck a mine lale
Monday nignt off the north ccast of
Ireland and sank. Captain Payne and
thirteen of his crew were drowned
while thirty others were saved by the
trawler.
Ambulances, physicians and a large
crowd of the townspeople were at the'
dock when thrawier came in. Second
officer Geo to.jf the story of the dis
aster. He said:
"The explosion ocoured twenty miles
north of Tory Island on the main trade
route from Manchester to Canada. The
explosion shook the vessel as if it were
merely a chip of wood. There was no
doubt In anyone'3 mind as to what
had happened. The ship iegan to sink
at once and wa beneath the waves
seven minutes after striking the mine.
"The officers and crew exhibited the
greatest coolness under r.he circum
stances. We were able to launch only
one life boat when the fchip gave a
sudden lurch and went down. The
captain and officers who were at the
moment preparing to launch the other
boats wero comjeliod to jump into
the water to try and save themselves
by swimming to the single boat alreaJy
launched. Several of them were car
ried down with the ship
"I was swimming for twenty minutes
before I was picked jp. The last I
saw of the captain he was giving orders
for launching a second boat. I took
command in the solan tr life boat and
we picked up all the survivors Hnd
then cruised about for a long time
When satisfied that there was no more
to be saved, we hoisted an Improvised
sail. We had gone 42 miles when we
were picket up by the trawler.
"Several of our men suffered greatly
from exposure as most of them ha5 no
clothing except shirts and trousers."
THE PRESIDENT
WRITES LETTERS
Snraene for a fuller report on tne cir- na xier iomwiu w
Smsfance? attending Z detention of for raising a 5.000.000 cotton pool
the Kroonland. Jamon the banks of the country.
FOOD SHORTAGE FOR
MANY THOUSANDS;
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
New York, Oct. 28. One hundred
thousand inhabitants of Jerusalem are
facing starvation, according to Sam
uel Edelman, American vice consul in
that city, who reached here today on
the steamer Ancona. Two thirds of
the residents of Jerusalem are Jewir.
Mr. Edelman . said. For many years
they have depended upon their earn- :
ings from tourists and upon charity i
for support and the war has cut off j
all their sources of subsistence.
BY ASSOCIATED TRKSS.
Washington, October 28. President
Wilson wrote letters today endorsing
the democratic senatorial candidaots
of W. W. Black in Washington, R. U.
Stevens in New Hampshire, Edward S
Johnson In South Dakota. W. E. Par
cell in North Dakota, Piul A. Rusting
in Wisconsin, and Representatives
Tuttle. Townsend and Baker, candi
dates for re-election In New Jersey.
Through his letters to Vice-President
Marshall and Representative Un
derwood, the president has made blan
ket endorsements of all democratic
members of the senate and house run
ning for re-election and has sent in
dividual letters supporting almost all
new democratic candidates. He also
has sent letters endorsing a number
of democratic candidates for governors.
The iigltation started a. lew day
ago when the i'ensacola Equal SSiitf
rge league passed resolution. de
nouncing State Attorney Stoko h
causc he declined to acquiesco in tri
motion to allow Mm. ITorenco Mc
Cowan, charged with murder in ti1.
first degree, liberty, under bond,
went merrily on yesterday. The f tatn
attorney remains firm that Mr. Mc
Gowan is not entitled to bond. Koctt
M. Loftin, one of th3 attorneys for
Mrs. McOowan, states hi.s position in
the mitter and tells why habeas c.r
pus proceedings were not instituted.
Mrs. Fred Ro?ef president of thi fiiIT
rage league, says she was not talking
for publication when she quoted JudEo
Sheppard as saying the action of t ho
state attorney was an outr-ipe: rml
the juugu, "!bcu.'h loath ro make ;iny
statement, said the Indies evidently
misunderstood h!m, that ho v;ih i; t
familiar with the cjso nnd therefore
could not criticise the utile attorney.
In the meantime tlio fcuflmpe le-ine
put nine petitions In circulation ind
obtained ulgners requesting the Ftate
attorney to set at liberty the alle. d
murdercN3. Many signatures wero .1
tained. In fact It was announced 'ant
night that over two hundred people,
men and women, had signed tho peti
tions. LOFTIN MAKES STATEMENT.
Scott M. Loftin, attorney for Mrs.
McGowan, Issued the following state
ment last night:
"In the Interview of State Attorney
John P. Stokes, published in The Jour
nal of this morning he used the fol
lowing language:
"Tf the defendant's attorneys had
reason to believe that th?lr client was
entitled to bail they had the HgM to
take the matter before the court and
present the evidence, and have th
question settled by the court. Havliii;
declined to do this, the Inference l:t
irresistible that the defendant's at
torneys themselves believed that their
client was not entitled to ball.'
"It Is not our desire to enter Into
any newspaper controver?v relative to
this matter, but In Justice to our client
and to ourselves it becomes nee-csta-y
for us to reply to thl.s statement midi
by Mr. Stokes.
"When Mrs. McOowan was nrrnlrned
In court on Monday, Oct. 10th, nd
pleaded not guilty to tho Indictment,
we Immediately applied to the court,
for ball, stating to the court that Mr...
McGowan had been exonerated by I ho
coroner's Jury, and upon being rear
rested before the Justice of the pe.-ico,
had been allowed ball with the Cfin
sent of the utatc attorney in the su
of two thousand dollars, and had ?ip
peared at court to answer the ch .'.
against her, and In view of the:"; ' ir
cumstances we believed she sho-'ld b
allowed bail to answer the Indictment
found by the grand Jury. The court
stated that ball would be granted if
the state attorney consented, but tho
state attorney stated In open court lh it
he woald not consent to ball. It Ii
true, that when the state attorney r
fusd to consent to ball, we did not
make further application for the rea
ron that the only course left und-r
the circumstances was a habeas cor
pus proceeding. Hy this is meant tha.
we would have had to filu n p'tHion
before the court unking for a writ of
habeas corpus, and upon the writ be
ing granted we would have had t pro
duce before the court all the wltnce ;
for the state and the defendant, at t.'r
expense of the defendant which would
have required several days. Ah fni'i
of the witnesses lived out.sldo of I'cn
sacola this expense would hav
amounted to a considerable amo-int..
and as Mrs. McGowan had no ni.-inn
and her friends had already c orne to
her assistance in securing counsel for
her. she decided to remain In J'il
rather than call upon hr fiiondi for
the money neccss?iry to pay th ex
pense of a habeas corpus proceeding.
"As we have already stated we bav
no desire to discuss this matter
through the columns of the news
papers as we are perfectly athRet
to have the case tried by a Jury -f
twelve men and abide by their ver-
(Contlnued on Last Page.)

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