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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, October 30, 1914, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062268/1914-10-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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Paris Reports Say She Can Get Metz and a Portion of Alsace to Quit
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Russian Embassy at Tokio Announces
egfins "War on Russia
iurieey
A' 'CP'S P
ACE'O
S TO FR A Mr 7
B
PENSACOLA WEATHEIg
ra'- FH-lav and Sat- i Yesterday's
r.u r s t winas.
est, tS degrees.
VOL. XVII. NO. 303.
blow at mm
OF OPPOSING AMY
E3IJEAK THE RESISTANCE OF LAST UNITS OF
ARMIES TRYING TO MAINTAIN
THEMSELVES IN POLAND.
GERMANS WILL ATTEMPT TO BREAK
THROUGH LINES OF ALLIES FROM LILLE
IF THIS IS SUCCESSFUL
THE FRONT FROM YPRES TO THE COAST
WILL HAVE TO FALL BACK TOWARD DUN
KIRKNOTHING OF IMPORTANCE IS EX
PECTED UNTIL TROOPS ARE GIVEN A REST.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
London, October 30.
j I France from the allies, Germany has made an offer to
concluue peace on a basis ot the cession of Metz and
possibly a portion of Alsace to France. The offer, ac
cording to the correspondent, was refused.
TURKEY OPENS WAR ON RUSSIA.
Tokio, October 30. The Russian embassy here an
nounces that Turkey has opened war on Russia.
Theodosia, Crimea, October 29. For one hour today
a Turkish cruiser bombarded the city, damaging many
buildings. One soldier was wounded. When the bom
h rdment was concluded the cruiser left toward the south
west. Theodosia formerly was Kaffa, and is a Russian
seaport on the southeast coast of Crimea.
LULL IN FIGHTING ALONG BATTLE LINE.
London, October 29. The battle of the Yser and the
J.J lies of fights along the whole front in Belgium and
-France appear, with the troops now exhausted, to have
atacks, in which the gains and losses are about equally
dvided. The battle front near the sea was comparatively
cam again today, and although the Germans, in this
Morning's bulletin, claimed progress south of Nieuport,
the French late today say there is no change.
The Germans seem to have transferred their more
serious operations further inland and to be trying to break
through the allies' lines from Lille. If this is successful,
the allies holding the front through Ypres to the coast,
will have to fall back toward Dunkirk. However, nothing
mportant is likely until the troops have been given a rest
and reinforcements arrive to fill the gaps in both armies.
Where the Germans are pushing, this long promised at
tack toward Verdun, both sides are losing prisoners and
gpLins
In Poland, where the Austrians and Germans are re
tiring before the Russians, something more decisive has
occurred. Driving back the
Warsaw last week, the Russians now have struck at their
center southwest of Warsaw, and according to Petrograd
reports, have broken the resistance of the last units or
the armies trying: to maintain themselves north of the
Pilitza river. On the East
claim success.
In South Africa the situation appears more favorable.
Premier Botha is at the head of the army operating against
the rebellious commands of Generals Beyers and DeWet.
The report that the Germans have invaded the Portu
guese colony of Angola lacks confirmation.
ONSLAUGHTS OF ARMIES
ARE LACKING IN FORCE
5 lk
Vj Mwsr! Oct. 29. The onslaughts cf
larmia battling for mastery n
iNffian marsh lands still lack the
Jte necessary to score a victory. The
"mans have not reached the French
nor have the allies frustrited
'?e;r dotfrmlnatlon to attain this goal
""ertfieless
such scraps of reliable
as reach London are
a uy British observers to Indicate
temperature:
.
THE ALLIES HOLDING
The Daily Chronicle's Paris
nerman rieht advancing in
Prussian frontier both sides
that the advantage at this stage rests
with the allied troops.
The German assent to this Is, of
course, only negative In character and
takes the shape of a confession of
failure to achieve their object to break
through the defense of their oppon
ents. That the reported lnll in the
fighting in this region Is only momen
tary Is taken for granted, but up to
tha nrpnt ttm nanra nt a renCWS!
of the German offensive has come to
Jatiwied a P SiurJl
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA, FRIDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 30, 1914.
Map Shows Where
Hap shows where some of the bloodiest fighting of
the war has taken place during the past week. A part of
the German army at frightful cost has succeeded in cross
ing the Yser canal near Nieuport. ! .
MEXICAN CONVENTION STORMY;
DELEGATES REACH FOR PISTOLS
Will Hold Conference
on Foreign Exchange
SECRET
EWIEWTS OF
OCEAN VESSELS
The Destinations of Vessels
Clearing for Foreign
Ports Will Not Be Made
Public in the Future.
The movements of ocean vessels,
clearing from Pensacola, will in fu
ture be kept secret, insofar as the na
ture of their cargoes and their desti
nation is concerned. There will be
no further enrolling 4n the 'clearance"
book at the custom house of the ves
sels destination, although it is expect
ed the name will be entered the saxn
as heretofore.
This change has been ordered by
the secretary of the treasury and Pen-
sacola custom officials anticipate tho
receipt of an order to this effect to-
day. It la designed to prevent the
warring powers becoming cognizant
of what vessels are leaving ports oi
TTnit. . Stat with cargoes uea-
tlned for European poris, thus en
abling them to seize both vessels and
cargoes. The order of Secretary Mc
Adoo follows:
"Until further directed, you will re
frain from making public or giving
out to any other than duly authorized
U"U-: information
ny and aH outward cargoes
fndthl donation thereof until
thirty days after the date of the clear-
ance of the vessel or wwsal arryins
suca arse,
KEEP
Great Armies Meet
British and American Rep
, resentatives Will Discuss
the . Cotton Situation
McAdoo Sends Letter to
Clearing House Chair
man. BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Washington, Oct. 29. Another con
ference on foreign exchange condi
tions and international features of the
cotton situation will be held at. "lie
treasury department tomorrow be
tween Governor Hamlin and Paul Al.
Warburg of the federal reserve board,
Sir George Paish and Basil B. Black
ett of the British treasury, and Ben
jamin Strong and A. H. Wiggins, New
York bankers.
Secretary McAdoo tonight made pub
lic a letter he had sent to clearing
house chairmen throughout the coun
try urging support of the one hundred
and thirty-five million dollar cotton
loan fund. 'He said the cotton situa
tion presented a problem of the most
urgent character and declared his con
viction that a prompt subscription of
the loan fund would be productive of
immense beneficial results,
Postmaster General Burleson today
awarded to a South Carolina firm the
contract for supplying the postofflce
department's entire annual supply of
wrapping twine, about one million and
half pounds, at thirteen cents rer
pound for cotton cord: It Is estimated
. a H 11 ia acta xr n f xf
mat twenty idouii
the substitution
of cotton for jute
twine heretofore exclusively used.
DESTROYER PAULDING
SINKS DEEPER IN MUD
Norfolk, Va, Oct. it. Tho destroyer
Paulding. agTound at Lynn Haven ln-
l. has settled deeper In the sand.
The crew still is aboard, but a part
will UMr KNm be ..
naval station h-"Jf tJSo!
. private ""ZJJuL
jbe employed to float the Fauiaing.
EOSES TO INTEREST
wrrvTT;DC
ULDEC!
ALLEGED I(U (LUX
TRIAL FOR LIFE
Three Charged With the
Murder of John Walden
in the Northern Part of
Holmes County, Being
Tried
SPKCIAL .TO THE JOURNAL
Bonifay, Oct. 29. The trials of
Lonzo Grubbs, Tom Myers and Harvey
IClUx clan "that IV is ""claimed '"exists
.JfA-.v.- n.1.-t..w.-.vt.
near the Florida line, 'acgan yesterday
in the circuit court. They are charged
with the murder of John Walden, of
the same neighborhood, who was shot
from ambush several weeks ago. The
(Continued on Page Three.)
Finally, Yield to Calming
Speeches of Their Col
leagues Villa and Zapata
Delegates Rule the Con
vention. BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Aguas Calientes, Oct. 29. The coali
tion of delegates representing Villa
and Zapata ruled Thursday's session
of the Mexican national convention
after the stormiest and most exciting
meeting the assembly has witnessed.
The delegates reached for their revol
vers, but finally yielded to the calming
speeches of their colleagues. .
Antonio Soto Gam a, who spoke for
the Zapatistas precipitated the climax
which threatened disruption of the
convention. The first part of his speech
was applauded, but one of his meta
phors, miscarried. He had compared
the Mexican flag to a rag and was not
permitted to finish his figure of
speech. Indignant and angry delegates
rose to their feet and with hands on
their pistols yelled at each other in
fury. General Obregon, Colonel Hay
and other prominent delegates rushed
to the platform and finally succeeded
In obtaining order.
Washington, Oct. 29. Official re
ports received here tonight said that
Carranza had ten thousand troops at
Leon, twenty-flve miles south of Aguas
Calientes, ready to block any south
ward movement of the Villa forces In
the event the Aguas Calientes conven
tion fails to effect a peaceful solution
of Mexico's difficulties.
EVEN THE ARMY RATION
COMES A BIT EXPENSIVE
"Washington. Oct. 89. Even the army
ration with its simple components, iias
shared in the general Increased cost
of living. The annual report of Quar
termaster General Aleshire, shows that
the average cost of the ration for
American troops this year was 24.40
cents as against 23.41 for 1911.
TWO COLLIES START
OUT WITH SUPPLIES
Norfolk. Va-, Oct. The colliers
Mars and Hector sailed yesterday
afternoon for Hawaii via the Panama
canaL The Hector carries a subma
rine torpedo boat on her deck and
structural steel for buildlncs to be
erected at the Peart harbor, Hawaii,
naval station.
this
TXT HPI-JTO CtTrTTXT TXT
SECURING BELGIAN SETTLERS
European mm
Thinking People of the
World, Says H. Jensen,
Will Cause the Great Con
flict to Be Brought to a
Close Not All the World
War Mad.
Although England is preparing for a
war of two years, Hjalmar Jensen,
head of the London-Savannah Naval
Stores Co., believes the great conflict
wiJl be brought to a close within six
months. He -tases this belief, not on
what he learned in Europe, but because
of the fact that not all the world is
war mad. On the contrary only the
leaders in the war movement are in thia
conditions an dthe great majority of
thinking people will cause the conflict
to end long before a decision is
reached on the fields of battle.
Mr. Jensen is direct from London,
-Hi- farr;!y res:de . In - that. cits..
al
though ho Is compelled to remain in
Savannah to a great extent, the latter
city being the headquarters of his
Company which has offices also in Pen
sacola and other cities in the naval
stores, belt.
Mr. Jensen Is considered one of the
biggest men In the naval stores world
and he Is in close touch with the pro
ducers, factors and auyers and his
views on market conditions are conse
quently sought by those interested in
the trade.
"There Is hardly anything that can
be told," said Mr. Jensen to a Journal
representative last night, "that Is not
already known by the producers, for
they are remarkably well informed,
both on conditions here and abroad.
As far as general market conditions are
concerned It Is a well known fict that
turpentine today i selling below its
intrinsic value and should be bringing
between 50 and 65 cents 1 per gallon
There are now about seventy thousand
casks, roughly speaking, being held,
and if I had the capital I would gladly
hold this amount for six months, by
which time, in my opion, the war will
be over.
"The suspension of the American
Naval Stores Co., caused a shrinkage
in values of fully $20,000,000. This
company upheld prices and the oper
ators, never thinking the values would
decline, bought or leased more land
than they should at high prices, and
the production toegan to increase in
great volumes. The present condi
tions are partially due to this produc
tion, for when the American suspended
there was a surplus of some 600,000
barrels of rosin on the market with a
new crop coming on. However, thi
condition Is rapidly passing. There
was a marked decrease In the pro
duction this year and It will be greater
next year, for many are doing dusI
ness on a less expensive scale.
"The formation of the T. V. A., in
which. I am informed 80 per cent of
the producers are enrolled, will serve
to hold up the prices, for It leaves
only 20 per cent of the turpentine and
rosin produced to be sold independent
ly. "When this is marketed buyers
will be compelled to seek the associa
tion and as a result prices will be
kept up."
HAS SON IN WAR.
Mr. Jensen's family reside in London
and his oldest son has enlisted In the
British army and "been given a com
mission as a lieutenant. The system
now In vogue there is to put all the re
cruits through a course of training
and then send them to stations to re
lieve more experienced officers and men
who are in turn sent to the front.
BIG INCREASE IN
CHURCH GROWTH
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Washington, Oct. 29. More than
8,000 new members were added to the
Seventh Day Adventlst church this
year, according to a report presented
at today's session of the general con
ference of that denomination. It also
showed that the Seventh Day Adventlst
movement now penetrates eighty-five
countries.
Contributions for evangelistic work
totaled 2,66,727, an increase of $164,
528 over 113. Of this amount $2,079,
223 was raised In Kortti America,
PENSACOLA
Is t-c Natural Gulf Gateway for the
Great South American Trade of the
near future.
PRICE, FIVE CENTS.
LAND
Prcs't C. E. Dobson of the
Chamber of Commerce
Is Working on Pan.
ONE LAND OWNER
WILL GIVE $1,000
The Belgian Peasant is Per
haps the Most Industrious
and Thrifty Farmer in the
World Their Homes are
Now Devastated and It
Proper Efforts arc Made
They Could Be Induced to
Come Here.
President C. K. DiVbson of theCham wi
of Commerce has been quietly at work
for rome time on a plan to latere
Florida's large land owners In wur' aS
settlers from Belgium, tho war-fr'ejt.
country whose people have been im
pelled to flee to Kngland and Hollar.!
for sustenance and protection. Pics.
dent Dobson has already rec -rived in
surances from one larKe kvml liol.l.f
that he will contribute $1,0',)0 In rnoii y
and offer other inducement if .rt tW
rrom these hardy pcorAe cm l.f k -cured
for the rich 7urm l.ui.ls . f
The Belfrian peasant in perh;..; (1.
mot industrious nrid thrifty r.inur
in the world. Tl ,e density f ilm
papulation and the. limiU-1 tfirllors r.f
the small Belgian kind.xu have m :n)n
thrift and industry not-OK.s.try for every
one ther who rnakew rj lUiriK I'mm ili
soil. Tho con: ?quencc is tint i-vry
foot of Belgian' .voll Is cultivated arid
every farmer knows how to K' t llm
most out of tha foot of soil.
In Florida's cll.mate, where farmiiur
operationn ran ! carried on at all
seasons of tl-o veur, the IlKinn farmer
would unquestionably to.ik the gro.it
eft kind of a iucce and President
Dobson believes th.it tho rlfrht Kind
of effort will 'bring quite -i greit num
ber of Belgian refugees liei e.
As an indication that other organiza
tions and sections are interested lr
the name idea, it is noted tha. th
Na.ahville Industrial Bureau Is si no t.
work on a similar plan and the Mobile
Chamber of Commerce Is taking it ui
as well.
It is jelieved that the United State
department of commerce will asslit any
proper effort to secure Be'gtan settlers
for southern farm laniB mkI tho matter
will be takft.n up with tho department
at once.
The matter is an important one and
well worth the earnest consideration
of all who are interested In southern
farm development.
Steel Barons In
Annual Meeting
Are Optimistic
BY ASSOCIATED PKESS.
Birmingham, Ala Oct. 29. Am op
timistic prediction of bun!nsK . ,,"il
tlons in this country for the tmm ill .
future and the statement the' t!io
struggle for commercial suprem.iey
was the underlying cause of th K;j
ropean war, were features of the 1
dress delivered by Judi;e IJlbert 1 1.
Oary, president, before th. seventh r'i
nual meeting of the American Ii on
and Steel Institute, which opened h' r
today.
"Without particularizing,'' -'I
Judge Gary, "it would eeni si- f
predict that in rnnny important re
spects, business condition in rue
Pnlted States for the rief ,'i'"i
months at least, will le-tt-r t! n
they have been the last three ncn .: :.
As to tie long future, I with '-
phafiis, that the opportunit ies . r
progress in this country aro pret'.r
than ever before."
LOSS THROUGH WAR.
Mr. Gary declared If the Kuropein
f war is continued with Its present v!o-
lence for eighteen months, the Ions of
life will aggregate four million, ami
the pecuniary loss to all the nations
involved will total thirty-h.e hi; -hi
dollars.
PRESIDENT WILSON
CHATS WITH
NOVELIST
Washington, October 29. President
Wilson today received Jerome K. Je
rome, the Enrl'-h author. They dis
cussed literary subjects.

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