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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, April 23, 1916, Image 1

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PENS ACOL A WEATHEB
PENSACOLA
The Ideal Summer Resort
BATHING, BOATING, FISHING
r!f Sunday and Mon
day.. Light variable
wind.
Yesterday' temperature
Highest, 76 degrees; low
est, 59 degrees.
VOL. XIX NO. 114.
United States Arranging to
Cope With All Situations
In the Future.
FEARS RELATIONS
WILL BE SEVERED
GERMANS
lit SENT TO
i 10 IS
AT THE FHOHT
American Demands Being
Considered At - German
Army Headquarters,
a -
BT ASSOCIATED PRS8S.
Washington, April 22. Dis
patches received from Ambassa
dor Gerard, it was learned here
indicate that German officials are
greatly surprised at the demands
of Washington. Ambassador Ge
rard is said to have gathered at
least an impression that the for
eign office had no idea that the
communication would be final and
drastic.
While Washington Is waiting
official word from Berlin, it is
understood that the United States
is making plans to cope with
' every situation should relations
be severed. ,
It was learned here that the
note has gone to the German
army headquarters, where it is
.Chancellor von Bethmann-Holl-weg
and General von Falkenhaya,
the German chief of staff. 'Am
bassador Gerard conferred with
. Foreign Minister von Jagow to-:
niht, but the German reply ia ""
not expected before Wednesday. .
AMERICAN NOTE PLACED
IN HANDS OF EMPEROR
Berlin, April 22. The American
note is now in the hands of Emperor
William. Chancellor von Bethmann-
Hollweg and General von Falkenhaya,
chief of the general staff at general j
headquarters. ,
A summary of the note was tele
graphed yesterday to general head
quarters and a courier, bearing the
full text and the appendix was sent
there by train.
The deliberations of the emperor,
the chancellor and the chief of staff
will determine the future shaping of
German-American relations.
The note appears in the newspapers
of this afternoon. All is calm here.
The Lokal Anzieger's prediction
that the German reply will be delayed
is borne out by the fact that it has
.been forwarded to general headquar
ters. Prior to the publication of the
note the newspapers were permitted
to print nothing concerning it except
one dispatch sent from Washington
by an English news agency on Wed
nesday. This message was cabled be
fore that day's session of congress and
apparently was intended to prepare
the people for the note itself.
The Lokal Anzieger endeavors to
take a fairly optimistic view of the
situation, basing this on what it terms
the almost invariably misleading
. character of English news dispatches.
It declares, however, that if England
is endeavoring to starve this country
Germany cannot give up the right of
s-lf defense.
J TWO HOURS OF EXCITEMENT
ON FLOOR STOCK EXCHANGE
New York, April 22. Today's two
hour session of the stock market was
attended by much excitement and
further free selling. War shares and
the stocks of the companies operat
ing in Mexico broke 4 to 8 points
and the entire list including invest
ments, W8JS unfavorably affected.
GERMANS AND FRENCH
MAKE FIERCE ATTACKS
BT ASSOCIATED PRESS.
London, April 22. Fierce attacks
and counter attacks have been launch
ed "in the region of Deadman's Hill,
northwest of Verdun, and neither side,
claims gains as a result.-
Paris admits the Germans got a
foothold in some new French, trenches,
but later were expelled.
Berlin concedes a French gain in
Caurette's wood.
British attacks north of Ypres re
gained two hundred yards of trenches
recently captured by the Germans in
that section. The Russian troops re
cently landed in France, already are
Pt MR
ARE
U. S. CAN SEIZE $100,000,000 WORTH
OF GERMAN SHIPS IF BREAK COMES
.
I 1 i
Staff Special.
' New York, April 22V If diplomatic relations are severed between
the United States and Germany as a result of the kaiser's methods of under-sea
warfare, it really means eventual war between the two countries,
folowed by the immediate seizure by Uncle Sam of the $100,000,000
worth, of German passenger vessels now lying in our harbors!
At least Frederick Coudert, one of the most famous authorities on
international law in America, discussing the legal phases of this subject
now being fought out between the diplomtic forces at Washington and
Berlin, cites, at least, which seem largely to justify this conclusion:
Non-intercoune, in the sense of terminating diplomatic relations
' is a usual, but not inevitable prelude to war but, as a matter of
fact," declares Coudert, "between great countries, such a situation is
usually followed by war. ,
"Now let us trace the probable progress of relations between the Uni
ted States and Genrany after the adoption of the policy of non-intercourse.
:
"In event such i rupture between Germany and the United States
FORD WILLIWG
TOAGGEPTTHE
ESIDEWGY
Declares, However, He Will
Not Finance trie Third
Party. , .
WOULD BE OPPOSED
TO "MILITARISM
Peace, Prohibition and
Prosperity the Possible
Slogan.
BT ASSOCIATED PRESS.
New York, April 22- Henry Ford
tonight announced that he would ac
cept the nomination for presidency
"if the people wanted him." He de
clared, however, one thing was cer
tain, he would not finance the third
party.-- While he said he regarded
his nomination as a joke, he was not
quite sure "as to whom the joke was
on." He pointed to his recent in
dorsements in the middle western
states as "significant cf what the
people thought of militejism."
PEACE, PROHIBITION AND
PROSPERITY PROGRAM
Atlanta, April 22. Senator J. Ham
iewis, oi lumois, preacxea lomgn.
that a third party founded on "peace,
prohibition and prosperity will be
formed immediately after the repub -
, f Till " 1 1 1 . .
man auu ucuiuvxulii. cuiivcuiiuus. lie
explained that neither of the present
parties could take a pesition which
would indicate to Euroj that the
United States is not backing the ad-
ministration'3 . .foreign r policy.
on their way north, pre sumably for
the front, and -passed through. Lyons
today. ...
General Smuts, commanding the
British "campaign agair.st German
East Africa,' announces the capture of
Umbugwe and Salanga, 100 miles m -
side the border of the German colony,
Constantinople reports that the Brit-
ish lost four thousand killed and
wounded in the battle on the Tigris
river on April 17.
The Turks also declare tiiat a Turk
ish aeroplane made a flfght of 200
miles and dropped bombs on tie Brit
ish. ar the Suez cuult
5B mmmmZ
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA,
SU
' "
Some of the $100,000,000 Worth of Interned German Liners Dockedat Hoboken, N. J.
RITISH LOS
0
I BATTLE
BT ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Constantinople, April 22. Via Lon
don. The British loss in the battle
on the- right bank of the Tigris (Me
sopotamia), on April 17, was more
than 4,000 killed and wounded, ac
cording to an official statement issued
by the war office today.
The battle occurred at Bestissa,
says the statement, and ended with
the defeat of the British.
A British camp on the Suez canal
has been attacked by a Turkish aero
plane, the war office announced today.
The airship dropped bombs and re
turned successfully.
Gulf Highway
Will Furnish
Great Resort
Securest and There 'Will
Be Other Develop
ments Rapidly.
When asked to state" his' views on
WMVUVU MUIA AJ.AK,AAVUJ, V.
TurneJ. said. 4(j it Jg fte
thing 'that, could happen to
thig cit wiU xaU more a.
. d Bcheme that has
been suggested
"The need around nere now is to
maite provision lor the increasing!
tourist trade, and to do this we musti
have some place that will provide a
source of amusement for them the
year round." Continuing, he said: "It
is impracticable to attempt to de
velop the island beach to handle this
trade. We must have some place
that will be accessible at all times,
good or bad weather, winter or sum--mer,
and the ; only way that we can
do this is to build a road to the la
goon. Other developments will come
later. -
"The interest of the people must be
! aroused and kept up, for when all
get together and decide to build the
; road, well get it, and I think it can
j be done.
."And not only will it appeal to the
! moneyed class, who can motor there.
j but the natural consequence will be
that car lines will be extended to
care for the increasing trade, and
when that is done we wiU have one
of the best pleasure resorts in the
country."
OIEH
SUNDAY MORNING, A
SED
A
I '
1
f
i
if went no farther theTe would not necessarily be any change in the
status of Americans in Germany or of Germans in America, Our diplo
matic representatives, before leaving the country, would turn over the
protection of our citizens and the archives of our embassies and consu
lates' to those of some otKer power.
There are 68 German and Austrian merchant steamers, aggregating
527,293 gross tons, laid up in United States ports. In addition there are
interned in our waters the cruisers Prinz Eitel Friederich and Kronprinz
Wilhelm interned at Norfolk; a gunboat held at Honolulu and the mer
chant steamer Odenwald at San Juan, Porto Rico. Their value is esti
mated by experts at $100,000,000.
In the port of New York there are 29 vessels; Boston, 8; Baltimore,
3, San Francisco, 2; Philadelphia, 8; Norfolk, 2; Galveston 2; Seattle, 1;
New Orleans, 8; Savannah, 1; Honolulu, 8; Hilo, 1; Pensacola, 8; Jackson
ville, 1; Tampa, 1. Fifteen are owned by the North German Lloyd Line
and 25 by the Hamburg-American company. The giant Vaterland, rated
at 54,282 tons gross, with accommodations for 3,000 persons, is the biggest
and they range all the way down to the Neptune at San Francisco, weieh-
1 lng 197 gross tons.
Snnni r
u-iliLt
no nil
BT ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Boston, April 22. An attempt to
identify isolated bacilli as those of
scarlet fever was being watched with
Interest by the staff of the city hos
pital today!. Germs isolated by Dr.
Frank B. Mallory, associate profes
sor oi pathology at the Harvard Med
ical school as the probable bacilli of
that disease were injected four days
ago into the veins of H. R. C. Mott
and Hugh W. Rice, former orderlies
of the institution, for the purpose of
determining whether scarlet fever
would develop.
The disease was expected to mani
fest itself within five or six days phy
sicians said. Should Dr. Mallory's
theory of the identity of the germs
prove correct, a vaccine for treatment
of scarlet fever could be readily ob
tained, it was said, and the disease
would be robbed of any of . its dan
gers. -'
CHICAGO CATCHER TO
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION
Chicago, April 22. Walter, Mayer,
catcher of the Chicago' Americans,
today was released . to the Milwau
kee club of the American Associa
tion. Transportation
Is a Feature of
Preparedness
BT ASSOCIATED PRESS.
New York, Aprii .22. Develop
ment of a system of military trans
portation as a step towards nation
al preparedness has been undertaken
by representatives of railroads and
automobile 'industries with, the co
operation of the war college. This
was announced today in a statement
issued by the Society of Automo
bile engineers, which says that at
a conference at the war college Mon
day suggestions were favorably
considered that a motor truck corps
be ad led to the quartermaster's de
partment, v .
The national automobile chamber
of commerce, -American Automobile
association and American Railway
association have agreed to take
part in developing a system.
m
k- .:
nrnnn
11 H i
ULillUI liill!
BE TOO!
PRIL 23, 1916.
f
- "s-f -
V
E APRIL 11
Convention of Alabama Ban
kers Association Convenes
On That Date.
PROMINENT MEN TO
MAKE ADDRESSES
Besides Alabama Bankers
Men From Other States
Are to Attend.
Bankers from practically every
city in Alabama as well as men
prominent in the financial world, are
to meet in Pensacola next Thursday,
when the Alabama Bankers' Associa
tions convenes in annual' session at
the San Carlos hotel. It probably
will be the largest convention in
point of attendance, of any ever held
in Pensacola.
The convention will te in session
for three days and duri?r? t.'iv.e
men known throughout the country
as bankers and financiers wil deliver
addresses. Governors of federal re
serve banks, bankers of New York,
and other money centers and men en
gaged in other lines of business will
be heard, while the program of en
tertainment will be elaborate and will
give the visitors a good impression
of Pensacola.
Some of those who have thus far
engaged reservations are as follows:
Charles H. Levermore, Tallahassee,
Fla.
E. L. Andrews, Camp Hill, Ala,
W. H. Haley, Haleyville, Ala.
I. Kelly, Opp, Ala.
Jas. A. Walker, Montgomery, Ala.
J. E. Burford, Hartford, Ala.
J. B. Byrd, Enterprise, Ala.
.R. A. Foote and S. H. Andrews,
Jackson, Ala.
J. T. Ivey, Luverne, Ala.
A. S. Woolfolk, Montgomery, Ala.
Miss Hattie Beal, Birmingham
Age-Herald.
E. E. Segrest, Slocomb, Ala.
Ja3. Keith and Thos. E. Kirby, Bir
mingham, Ala., two ladies accom
panying. E. B. Crawford. v ' .
Mrs. Haveland H. Lund.
Mrs. Geo." H. Mathis.
A. D. Welton. - ,
Emmet A. Jones.
W.B.Harris. . .
iCoflOauei ea. Tags Five-i .
Flies OF
iTE ILL BE
EMDIG1TI0
LE TIC
MOW ASSURED
County Board Calls On
State Board of Health
To Assist. ,
CAN TAKE MONEY
FROM GENERAL FUND
Resolution Is Passed to Aid
This Work Imme
diately. '
At a special meeting of the board
of county commissioners called yes
terday morning- to consider the advis
ability of co-operating with the state
board of health in the campaign for
the eradication of the tick, it was de
cided that such assistance would be
rendered, and resolutions were pass
ed providing for the disbursements
to be made.
These resolutions, which provided
that a certain sum of money of the
general fund be placed at the dis
posal of; the board of health, are as
follows:
Wliereas, it has been demonstrated
after investigation and tests that the
eradication of the southern cattle tick
is essential and necessary to the rais
ing and improvement of cattle in the
state of Florida and in Escambia
county, and
.Whereas, the United States De
partment of Agriculture, after many
years of investigation and experi
ment, and the department of agri
culture of other states of the union
have found that the best manner and
means of the eradication of the south
ern cattle tics .is m i:e buiiuing or
vats and the dipping of .cattle in an
arsenical solution, a tested fonnuiar,
and
Whereas, the state is at the pres
ent time under quarantine against
the shipment of cattle out of thi3
6tate, and from Escambia county,
and cattle cannot be shipped from
this county and this state into other
states which have quarantined
against the tick infested territory,
and
Whereas, The Legislature of the
State of Florida by Chapter 6,434,
Acts of 1913, ha3 by its foresight
and wisdom, provided a way, and
Whereas, The State Board of
Health of the State of Florida ha3
shown its desire and willingness to
aid, assist and co-operate, and to ex
pend its funds, and
Whereas, The law mentioned of
1913, was enacted upon request of
the State Board of Health of the
State of Florida, to assist in this
work; therefore, be It
Resolved: That in order to inaugu
rate and secure the co-opsration of
the State Board, of Health of the
State of Florida, and of the Agricul
tural Department of the United
States of America in this all im
portant work; therefore be it
Resolved: By the board of county
commissioners of Escambia county,
Florida, that they hereby request
and petition the executive committee
of the Florida State Live Stock As
sociaion, as provided by chapter 6,434
laws of 1913, to recommend suitable
locations and construction of cattle
dipping vats in Escambia county,
Florida, and be it further
Resolved: That the State Board of
Health of the State of Florida, as
provided by chapter 6,434, acts of
1913, is hereby requested by this
board of county commissioners to im
mediately upon such recommenda-
(Contlnued on Pag Two.)
PROBABLE AMERICAN
FORGES BE WITHDRAWN
BT ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Washington, April 22 A decision
as to whether American troops will be
withdrawn from Mexico may be reach
ed by Wilson and his cabinet Tuesday.
This was indicated tonight when it
was reported from San Antonio that
General Scott may be back in Wash
ington with his report in time for the
cabinet meeting. While Secretary
Baker declined to comment on Scott's
decision to come back after only a
short conference with General Fun
ston, it is known that Funston feels
he cannot go further with the pursuit
of Villa unless heavily reinforced.
General Funston wishes a freer
fcand in dealing with. ti.o problems
PRICE, 5 CENTS.
OFFICERS 1
i s
i
J
Jul,
He Is the Man With Whom
Mrs. Grace Mercer, Held
In Jail, Eloped.
SAID SHE TRIED TO
SWALLOW POISON
Woman, Arrested Friday
Night, Finally Gives Name
Of Man In Case
Federal officers, especially thosa
attached to the white slave branch
of the government, are securing the
south in search of John E. Boldcn.
who visited Pensacola in February
and again more recently, for he is al
leged to be the man in the sensational
case that developed Friday night
when Mrs. Grace ' Mercer ' was jailed
on request of her hu:;band.
Mrs. Mercer steadfastly refuse.!
through Friday night and yesterday
morning to divulge the name of tha
man with whom she is alleged to have
become acquainted in Peneacola dur
in Marcli Gras, i.id whonr it m
charged zho accompanied to a smu'l
Alabama town anil ? p:rit two week.
Twenty-four hours at the police sta
tion, however, caused her to wealtcn,
and yestpvday afternoon ahc told the
officers the n-irne of t'.ie man. Short V
afterwards she is allied to have at
tempted suicide by drinking carbolic
acid, but Officer Herringtou took th.
vial from h? hefore she had t,a or
1C pOl-
i;Spn.
. Mrs. Mercer- is.- f rna 4 RauWburj-,
and her husband' is an, engineer ox
one of the railroads running thvor.ri
that- city. . 4 She . lft there to spend
Mardi Gras' in PensmCo, :v:- viovev"
returned, the husband being told I'li t
she was visiting her mother in Pan
ama City. It is alleged 'that while
visiting here Mardi Gras she met Bol
den, of whom little has been learned,
and that on Mardi (fras ni?ht they
went from Pensacola to a small Ala
bama town and silent fome t'me. Later
Mrs. Mercer returned to i ensacolu,
but then paid a lengthy visit to Jack
sonville. She returned to Pensacola Friday
morning, and it was Friday night
that the husband, passing through th
city, saw her on the streets and caused
her arrest. The woman is detained in
the city jail only a3 a government
witness.
The officers expect finally to locatm
Bolden, but a3 yet they have been un
able to secure his place of residence,
or, to what point he went when leav
ing Mrs. Mercer. The latter refuses,
It is understood, to supply this infor
mation. Draftsmen Take
a Hot Shot at the
'Navy Department
BT ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Newport News, April 22. Th
American society. of Draftsmen, in
annual session here today, adopted a
resolution introduced by the New
York branch", which severely criti
cizes the methods followed by the,
navy department in its treatment of
the draftsmen at the New York navy
yard. The resolution is to be for
warded to Congressman James P. Ma
her, of New York, with the request
that he bring the matter to the at
tention of congress. 4
of supply and information beyond the
border. It is retailed that President
Wilson rejected the plara of the gen
eral, staff for a virtual military oc
cupation of northern Mexico when the
expedition . originally , contemplated.
The administration felt inch a move
ment meant certain war with Mexico,
and point to the present friction as a
result of the small punitive force to
support this view; There is no rea
son to believe the admiristration has
changed its viewpoint. If Scott rec
ommends the expedition be freed of
restraint and reinforced or withdrawn
doubtless the latter coarse will lx
j followed.
I

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