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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, January 01, 1917, Image 1

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VOL. XX. NO. 1.
PENSACOLA, FLA.. MONDAY MORNING, JANUARY 1, 1917.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
ACE
99
GIMRCMMEN
SAY P.
u
;;ir.:rica Should Take Sides.
Premature Peace is
Curse.
ALLIES CONFIDENT
IN AMERICA
Many Important Changes in
War Theatres During
Year.
BT ASSOCIATED KRESS.
Washington, Dec. 31. In a signed
document addressed to the nation,
more than fifty prelates and laymen
of various denominations, represent
ing many sections of tha United
States, have united in a warning
against what they term may be a
premature peace in Europe which
"may bring a curse instead of a bles
sing." , The document declares the Chris
riiars of America should consider the
Vght or wrong of the occupation of
Celgium, Poland, Serbia, The Ar-
Eenia massacres, the destruction of
merchantmen, hardships of Jews,
Cyrlans and the "attempt to array the
, Moslem against the Christian in a
holy war."
And to be reminded that "peace is
a triumph of righteousness and not a
mere sheathing of a sword."
It also warns against "deliberate
organized efforts" to create a public
sentiment blindly favorable to endWg
hostilities. .
EBB AND FLOW OF
A YEAR OF WAR
PUIS
FORIIil
OF GOUEB
Tallahassee, in Gala. Attire,
Awaits Imposing
Ceremony.
III
H
ONGRESS
UHDERM
WITH WO
IS
IED
BK
UNCLE SMI HELPS WORKING WOMEN TO GET WORK
Extra Session is Already
Being Discussed by
Members
PENSACOLA IS
REPRESENTED
SPECIAL. TO THE JOURNAL
Tallahassee, Dec .'U. The
Leon hotel lobby tonight swarms
as in legislative times. ,The man
sion, capitol, city, hall, court
house, and in fact nearly every
public building and business house
is flying flags and is bedecked
with buntings.
Mayor Hinrichs, Comptroller
Bayless and Officer Bobe of Pen
sacola; also J. H. Smithwick
Judge Sheppard and many otner
public men. All plans are com
plete for inauguration.
I
The dawn of 1917 finds the bellig
erent armies temporarily, at least,
virtually deadlocked everywhere, ex
cept In Roumania; it also finds in the
air a Teutonic suggestion for a dis
(Mission of pence but no basis is of
f ered by , them . for , ending hostilities
and the entente have signified their
intention to continue fighting till
their oft-repeated desires are at
tained.
There are numerous -changes from
a year ago in the main theatres of
war. In the Somme region of
France, the Germans are driven back
by the French, over fronts of consid
erable size, while the Germans made
notable gains toward Verdun, but
later lost a part by , French counter
attacks.
The Italians advanced closer to
Trieste, the allies operating from Sa
loniki have placed the Serbians back
cn their native soil and advanced to
numerous points in Macedonia.
Russia's great drive last June
cleared the Volhynian fortress tri
angle of Austro-Germans and gained
much ground in Galicia and Buko
wina. The Teutons have taken half of
Roumania.
The Russians made big gains in the
Caucasus and Armenia, while the
British are being held by the T&ks
near Kutel Amaxa. Aside from Rou
mania at present there has been' a
little activity except from artillery.
The Teutons reinforced on-the Mol
davia Transylvania front are still pro
gressing in their drive, by which they
are apparently trying to join the Teu
tonic troops moving northward' into
Moldavia.
The Russians and Roumanians have
taken additional points on both sides
of the Oituz valley and in the Putna
and Zobala valleys. .
GREECE PAYS A IIIGH
TRIBUTE TO TJ.- S.
SHIP LDAOED
113 HIS.
Viator, With Arnmonia for
Cuba, Makes Fine
Record.
YYitn a tuu cargo or ammonia
products, the Norwegian' steamship
Viator cast off lines Sunday after
noon at 6 o'clock and steamed down
the bay, bound for Matarizas, Cuba,
where the cargo is consigned to the
order of the Armour Company.
lnis cargo was loaded nere so
quickly, and with such a minimum of
overhead charge that the exporters
are said to have been impressed with
the facilities obtaining at this point
All of which guarantees the handling
of additional cargoesin the future.
A Kecord Leading..
In connection with the dispatch of
this carcro. some little record was
made at local L. & N. terminals. The
actual working time in placing this
entire cargo on the Viator was exact
y 13 1-2 hours, a fact pleasing to the
captain of the vessel and also highly
pleasing to shippers, whose head
quarters are In New York. -
The Viator, steaming into the port
Saturday morning,, began working at
a berth on the west side 01 the Li. &
N.'s Commandancia wharf, at 10:30
o'clock. No work was done Saturday
night, chiefly, because of the difficulty
of securing desirable laborers on that
night Beginning at the usual time
Sunday, the steamer began blowing
signals for pilot and harbormaster at
4 o'clock, and thirty minutes later was
ready to go to sea.
Athens, Dec. 31 Via London.
King Constantino summoned Garret
Droppers, American minister, to his
palace this morning and communi
cated to him the text of the Greek
reply to President Wilson's peace
note. The Greek note recites the suf
ferings of Greece at theTiands cf the
belligerents on both sides while
Greece has been endeavoring to main
tain neutrality. It says Greece en
dured greater hardships from the
war than any other neutral country
and desires peace. The note pays a
high tribute to President Wilson's
efforts and to'the American republic
Then follows a recital of Greece's suf
f erings, which on account of the cen
sorship it is useless to attempt to
cable. The Greek government later
made a formal reply which will asso
date Greece with the proposals of
President Wilson.
ENTENTE TELLS "CONFI
DENCE" IN AMERICA
Faris, Dec. 31. The entente pow
ers' answer to President Wilson's
(Continued on Paga Eight)
RAILROAD BILL
MOST PRESSING
Deficit, Tariff," Appropria-
tion and Other
' Measures.
BT ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Washington, Dec. 31. Congress re
convenes today to face, a mass of bus
iness, including railroad legislation
urged by President Wilson to supple
ment the Adamson act, and the prob
lem of how to meet the big treasury
deficit for the fiscal year of 1918.
These salient issues must be consid
ered together with the 4 annual ap
propriation bills, only one of which
has passed both houses.
There are also many general leg
islative measures and as less than
two months remain in the life of the
present session, administration lead
ers are inclined" to view the legisla
tive accumulation with despair and to
feaFthat an exfra session of the new
and politically uncertain congress 'will
be demanded.
The interstate commission commit
tee will begin hearings on the rail
road legislation Tuesday., Senator
Newlands, chairman of this commit
tee, has already said hp believed the
matter sufficiently important to war
rant an extra, session if necessary. '
The revenue -question-will, be taken
up immediately by . the ways and
means committee of the senate. Many
suggestions will be -offered. Among
them are a proposed increase in the
income tax, restoration of the tariff
on wool, rubber and coffee, and in
creased taxes on liquor and other in
ternal revenue.
The house still has nine big ap
propriation bills among which are
supply measures for the reconstruct
ed army and navy, and the senate has
thirteen appropriation bills to dis
pose of.
NEW OFFICE
TAKE-CHA
TO flIOR
New Sheriff, New County
Board, and New Tax
Assessor. .
I
:fiS
IIGE
01
Miss Sophie Lamb, at right, in charge of one of Uncle Sam's bureauB, and an applicant for work.
GAROAlfll
joinm
Fugitives From Torreon Tell
of His Growing
Strength..
BT ASSOCIATED PRESS.
; Laredo, Tex., Dec. 31. About a
thousand residents of forreon, of va
rious nationalities, fled when the
Villa army recently appeared before
Torreon and are enroute to the bor
der, according to nine refugees who
arrived today. They said half the
refugees are Chinese. They also said
Villa is meeting little resistance in
the Torreon district where several
small ' Carranza garrisons' are report
ed to have, joined him.
SHIP All"
MOTTO WOW
Tries to Keep Them From
Cabarets Helps Others,
Too.
Seven Steamers Known to
Be Due Here This
Week.
HAMILTON WRIGHT M ABIE
EDITOR OF OUTLOOK, DIES
BT ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Summit, N. J., Dec. 31. Dr. Ham
ilton Wright Mabie, associate editor
of The Outlook, died at his home here
today. He was seventy years old and
was born at CoT3 Spring, New York.
He is survived by a widow and one
daughter.
Many ships are due here this week.
TWe Quito and a Spanish steamship
carrying the name , of Guadalquiver
are both looked for today. The Petra,
from Gulfpcrt, should be here tomor-'
row. A Spanish steamer of the
Perez line, and the Dutch steamer
Wieldrecht are due probably Wednes
day, while the Oswald, a steamship of
about 4,000 tons, is due Wednesday
or Thursday from Galveston, for a
very heavy bunker supply. On Janu
ary 8, a stealer, . reported as the
"Dinnie" is due,. There is no such
steamer listed in availably maritime
records, but consignees have been ad
vised the ship will arrive on that
date, and that Is the name they have
been forwarded. ?
All these .steamers of course are
coming for coal and they are all as
sured of most rapid dispatch.
LARGE HOTEL1 BURNS
. IN AUGUSTA, GA.
BT ASSOCIATED TRESS.
Augusta, Ga., Dec. 31. Hampton
Terrace', a tourist hotel in North Aug
usta, was ' destroyed . by fire early
Sunday, with a loss estimated 'at
$600,000, The fire started apparent
ly from crossed wires and got beyond
control of the. fire department, which
was hampered by r lack of water
pressure, and the fr r.-e structure of
300 rooms burned ry. '.y. The hotel,
recently renovated, was to open
Thursday for the season. " A hundred
attacHes were m the building, but
they managed to escape. The insur
ance is said to be $200,000.
ANOTHER FIRE IN HIGH
, SCHOOL-NO DAMAGE
Another fire of mysteiious origin
was discovered last night in the High
school building on North Palafox
street but was extinguished before it
had done any serious damage. It was
in tne corridor, among some work
men's tools. The alarm was given by
a small boy who noticed smoke issu
ing from the building at about half
past seven last night. This is the
second fire in the High school build
ing within the past few weeks. The
police are investigating.
The school will pen on Tuesday,
as per schedule it is stated. :
Chicago, Dec. 31. Uncle Sam has
reached out his hand to the girl music
student who must do cabareting to
pay for music lessons, nd the am
bitious young singer who must sing
in cabarets and dance halls until
something else turns up!
They have been taken under the
wing of the United States employ
ment service and many are securing
good positions through the federal
employment bureau.
"We want to keep the young music
student and young singer, unwise in
the ways of , the world, away from
cabarets," says Mrs. Sophie Lamb,
head of the woman's division of the
federal employment service.
"So the federal service which helps
many unskilled work women and pro
fessional women has extended its aid
to the girls in the art world.
"We are aided by the largest or
ganization of women jn the country.
the co-operative league of the United
States employment service. There
are 8,000 prominent women in thiu or
ganization. Many of these women en
gage entertainers for home programs
or club or lodge affairs.''
The singer is nt the only girl Un
cle Sam is taking care of in the big
gest employment bureau in the
world the United States employment
service. Many positions are filled
every day. The occupations of the ap
plicants run from scrubbing to school
teaching.
The service has branches in many
cities. Neither the worker seeking a
position, nor the employe? seeking a
worker pays any fee to Uncle Sam.
SAYS fl
Offers Relations That
Prove Consistent
Manipulations;
El YEAR
USHEIfD
Bells Toll Then Whistles
Shriek General Holi
day Today.
MANY SUCCEED
THEMSELVES,
Others Assume Office iit
June by Executive
Confirmation.
Fifteen minutes before the hour of
midnight was .tolled off at the police
station last night, the great, deep
toned bell in the tower announced
that but a few moments of 1916 re
mained. The bell tolled slowly, keep
ing this up until a few minutes f
twelve. The hour was struck, and
then, shrieking from many steamers
came the announcement that 1917 was
here.
Immediately the call was taken up
in all sections of the city. On the
bay front, whistles worked overtime,
a number of bells were rung in all di
rections. The din was considerably
augmented by discordant auto sirens,
while on all sides firecrackers ex
ploded, pistols cracked, and the air
was pierced with long streams of
colored sparks as skyrockets flashed
through space. Roman candles also
illuminated many points, and the
hilarious welcome to 1917 was kept
up for an hour or more.
Watch parties were held at many
points. In some of the churches late
services were held, and when these
separated, auer a round of good
wishes for the new year, a large num
ber of people were on the street.
Friends did not forget The Jour
nal s telephones, and many a voice,
wished their favorite paper a pros
perous new year. .
TodayHhe city will take a day off.
Business houses generally will close
at noon, a great many remaining
closed for the entire day. In line
with previously-given notice, the
banks wjll not open for business, and
the government offices will be closed
all day. Mail may be received at the
postoffice, Sunday hours to be ob
served. The city hall will be closed
for practically all day.
Recently-elected officials will as-
same their respective officer tomor
row, among them being a new sher
iff, new board of county corejnission
ers, new tax assessor, and others. A.
number who were chosen by the peo
ple will be appointed thraagh the
governor's office in due time. These
will include prosecutors for itate aadtj
county, harbormaster, timber custo
dian, etc., but the commission sf thai
present court officers will )t-xpirew
for six months.
There will be no change in theof-.
fices of the county or circuit clerk,
county tax collector, clerk court of
record and county judge. Incumbents.
of those offices were either re-electedi
or had no opposition, in which, latter'
class were Jos. S. Roberts, tax col-j
lector, and A. M. McMillan, clerk ef
the court of record.
James Macgibbon will age in serxfa
as circuit clerk; Henry Bellinger will
serve as county judge. Sheriff Ellis
will be succeeded by Jas. CT Van felt,
and Cade E. Shackelford will be re
lieved of the county tax assessor's of
fice by Wiley J. McDavid. The cir
cuit clerk will also have to perform
duties of county treasurer, f r under
legislative enactment, the cffSce of
county treasurer is abolished, begin
ning today.
J. George White is again serving a,
county commissioner, having been
elected to that office without eppo-i
sition. " The new members of thi
board, who assume office today are:
L. W. Hardy, Gus SoderSai, J. E.
McCurdy and H. E. Ganrty. Re
tiring commissioners aro George Da
vis, M. O. Baggett, W. TTTnicy and
W. C. Barrineau.
W. B. Wright relieves J. II. Sher
rill on the board of public instruc
tion, the ether members having teen
re-elected. Superintendent of Public
Instruction A. S. Edwards also suc
ceeds himse'f. " . .
Supervisor of Registration N. B.
Cook, holding the position under ap
pointment, who was also elected,
holds a commission from retixtng
Governor Trammell, and is already in
charge of his office. Mr. CKk also
holds the position as city supervisor
of registration and of course h'
charge of both aets of books.,
. Senator John B. Jones will return
to the state senate under the usual
hold-over, while representatives from
Escambia county will be James M.
Johnson, who is city building inspect
or, and M. O. Baggett, former county
commissioner.
Hamilton Wright Mabie, associate
editor of The Outlook since 1879, was
born in Cold-Spring-on-Hudson, N.
Y., in 1846; he received his 3f. A. de
gree at Union college, and Ms LL. D.
at Western Reserve. After practic
ing law for six or seven years, he
gave it up and devoted himself to
editorial and literary work. Some of
his chief vorks are: Norse Stories;
Essays on Books and Culture; Wil
liam Shakespeare, Poet, Dramatism
and Man; In Arcady; Christmas To
day; American Ideals, Character and
Life.
DONATE LAFAYETTE
CHA1EAU TO FRANCE
1 BT ASSrxnATETVRESS.
New York, Dec. 31.Through the
efforts of Mrs. William Astor Chan
ler, John- Moffat and other prominent
Americans, the historic chateau in
France which was the blrthpTace of
the Marquis de La Fayette, has been
purchased and will be donated to the
French Heroes Fund aa a memorial
museum and home for orphans and
disabled soldiers. - ,
Somewhere in Florida
a Bride is Waiting for
Him to Come Back
A sad story is told in a letter
from a Florida woman to the
Pensacola police department,
which is on file at the station.
Her name is withheld for a-, num
ber of reasons. It is about her
husband, "who left for Pensacola
to work on a job he was told to
come and take" ahd . that's alL
Newly-married, she relates how
her husband had "ten thousand,
ten hundred dollars in the bank,
' but can't draw it out for fear he
will be recognized and arrested,
'count of killing a man," but, de
spite that record, she "wanted him
back with her."
Police officers do not believe
the man is here.
BT ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Boston, Dec. 31. Thomas W. Law
son, Boston, in a letter to Congress
man Henry, replying to the latters
request for information regarding the
recent rumored leak from Washing
ton to Wall street offers in an hour's
interview to convince President Wil
son of this necessity of immediate
congressional investigation of stock;
market manipulation of the last two!
years. . !
The letter made public tonight as
serts an investigation would disclose
operations of a great "false news
maker" aiming at "complete befud
dling of the American people on the
real vitals of the hour." It declares
Wilson's associates are not responsi
ble but that a leak" is one of a series
through which Americans are "robbed
of hundreds of millions" and a few
people got sixty odd millions, a part
of which was divided with "important
people." Lawson says the investiga
tion might reduce the prices of neces
sities, expose the "man who said to
a German give me fifty millions of
margins and III end the war by mak
ing it impossible for allies to finance
themselves" expose his trip to Ger
many and sendinsr by submarine of
forty million dollars of American se
curities, with a consequent smash
of the mailiefcafffl ydividiag- fafpgoX-
it. , - , .
LEECH ATTACKING
THE OYSTER BEDS
SPECIAL TO TRB JOTTtNAl
Tallahassee, Dec 31. Publicity
has been given throughthe press of
the state recently to the attack on
the oyster beds of the state by a so
called leech. .
The presence of this enemy of the
oyster was called to the attention of
State Shell Fish Commissioner
Hodges, who went to the oyster reefs
attacked and secured specimens of the
oysters and what was thought to be.
a form of Jee Jies and forwarded them
to the bureau of fisheries at Wash
ington in order that proper investi
gation might be made by the depart
ment. .--'
Commissioner Hodges la just in re
ceipt of a letter from Dr. H. M.
Smith, TJ. S. fish commissioner, ad
vising of the receipt of the shipment
and also that proper investigation had
been made by the government and the
examination revealed the fact that
the forms in the oysters were not
leeches, which are fresh water forms,
but marine flat-worms, known as
Turbellaria.
The department is now seeking for
some remedy to be applied for the de
struction of this enemy to the oyster.
DECEMBER RAIN IS .
DOUBLE THE NORMAL
Normal ramfalL according to the lo
cal weather bureau, for this city and
section for the month of December, is
4.17 inches. The gauge at the Pesa-
cola station has been registering un
precedented seasonal rains during
the last month of the year, and with,
yesterday's measurement, a total of
9.95" inches has been recorded ft
Pensacola vicinity.
This is a total of 5.81 inches in ex
cess of normal, or more than twice as
much rain as naturally expected, from
past records.
Under this condition of things,
there Is not much wonder at Cia fear
ful and almost impassable onditlcn
of some of the county road. It is all
blamed, however, on old Jupiter Phi-'
vius.
46 WOMEN BURNED
TO DEATHIN ASYLUM
Montreal, Canada, Dec. 21. Forty
six women wtre burned to deith in a
fire which destroyed St. Ferdinand de
Halifax asylum in Megastic county,
Quebec, Province, late Saturday nisrb
according to a report here tonight,"'

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