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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, July 10, 1917, Image 1

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THE WEATHER
Local thundershowers Tuesday and
Wednesday, gentle wind, mostly south.
Highest temperature yesterday, 90 de
crees; lowest. 81 degrees.
WEST FLORIDA MUST
FEED ITSELF!
VOL. XX. 192.
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA, TUESDAY MORNING, JULY 10, 1917.
PRICE 5 CENTS.
FIIE KILLED II
EXPLOSION
D
Two Store Buildings Were
Wrecked But Fire Was
Easily Controlled.
THIRTY-ONE ARE
SERIOUSLY HURT
Considerable Trouble Was
Wrecked But Fire at
Length Controlled.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Washington, July 9. Five men
were killed and thirty-one injured in
an explosion which wrecked two store
houses at the Mare Island navy yard
today, according to the commandant's
reports to the navy department-
Fire Under Control.
Vallejo, Cal-, July 9. Fire at the
Mare Island navy yard as a result
of cfi explosion in a storehouse has
been brought under control.
Officials have started a search of
the wrecked buildings and it was an
nounced that nothing official would
be given out until the extent of the
casualties and damage had been de
termined. The First Report
San Francisco, July 9. Two store
houses at the Mare Island navy yard
on San Francisco bay, were destroy
ed by an explosion this morning.
Twelve of the fifteen magazines
were badly damaged by the explosion,
the force of which broke thousands
of windows in Vallejo, a half mile
away. Fire started in the wrecked
buildings and desperate efforts were
made to prevent its spread to other
buildings. where explosives are
stored.' '
The explosion occurred at 7:44 a.
m- The concussion was terrific.
At the Southern Pacific freight
Eheds in Vallejo, two miles from the
scene of the explosion, doors were
torn from their hinges.
Santa Rosa about 40 miles north
west of Mare Island, reported that
the explosion was felt there.
Among the injured were Lieuten
ant L. C- Bird, U. S. Marine corps,
and two other men, residents of
Pasadena, who were passengers on a
ferry boat operating between South
Vallejo and Vallejo Junction- They
suffered from shock and were cut by
flying glass. Although the boat was
about two, miles from the scene of
the explosion, all the doors and win
dows were blown out.
Orders that no person be allowed
to leave Mare Island were issued by
Captain Harry George, commandant
of the navy yard
Mare Island is just across a nar
row channel from Vallejo.
BAR EXAMINATIONS
AT STATE CAPITAL
Tallahasee, July 9. Special exam
inations were held by the Supreme
Court today, a number of applicants
coming here to stand the required
test for practicing law in . Florida.
The date of the examinations was
pushed up to permit a number of
young men who may be drafted into
service, to get their certificates be
fore they are called.
PUBLISHERS HOLD A
MEET AT ASHEVILLE
Asheville, N. C, July 9. Thirty
five newspapers were admitted to
membership in the Southern News
paper Publishers' Association at the
fifteenth annual meeting which con
vened at Grove Tark Inn today. Sjji
of the new members are from Flor
ida, being the Pensacola News, Percy
S. Hayes; Miami Herald, J. A. Tay
lor; Miami Metropolis, Bobo S. Dean;
St. Petersburg Independent. L. P.
Brown; St- Augustine Bcord, H. L.
Brown; West Palm Beach Post, Joe
L. Earman.
During the session, which will ex
tend over three days, there will be
important discussions on every phase
or newspaper publishing.
BAYVIEWPAYILION
PIER BE EXTENDED
At a meeting of the Bawiew Park
committee of the Pencola Play
ground association yesterday morn
ing it was decided to extend the
pleasure pier at this popular resort
fifty feet further into the bayou,
bringing it nearly to the high dive.
This improvement will delight the
many patrons of the park and is one
Khifu been desired for some time-
ftl
Ti
EMMA GOLDMAN AND
BERK MAN SENT UP TWO
YEARS; FINED $10,000
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
New York, July 9. Emma
Goldman and Alexander Berk
man, the anarchists, were found
guilty by a jury here of con.
spiracy to obstruct the operation
of the selective draft law. They
were sentenced by Judge Mayor
to two years each in the federal
penitentiary and a fine of ten
thousand dollars.
it
COMMISSIONER SODERLIND
SUBMITS PLAN CUTTING THE
ASSESSABLE VALUATION 37 1-2
PER CENT.
As so many complaints have been
received against the valuation of
property for the tax assessment for
the next fiscal year, plans were con
sidered by the board of county com
missioners yesterday afternoon for
making a wholesale reduction in val
uation of 25 per cent of the present
value, reducing the assessable valua
tion to 37 1-2 per cent.
The plan was embodied in a reso
lution introduced by Commissioner
Soderlind, who stressed the import
ance of the matter and the benefits
to the taxpayers. Before acting on
the resolution the opinion of the coun
ty attorney was sought a3 to its va
lidity. Mr- Reese stated that no re
duction from the assessed amount by
the tax assessor could be made un
less there was complaint.
With the sense of the board ex
pressed, it is expected that a great
number of taxpayers will appear
claiming reduction. A meeting will
be held this morning at nine o'clock
to give all who wish to do so a chance
to complain against the valuation and
have it lowered.
If the valuation is lowered, it will
be necessary to raise the millage to
insure the revenue needed to operate
the government. The state millage
has been fixed, however, and by low
ering the valuation, it will recnfce the
amount of money taken from the
county by the state without crippling
the county. .
SECRETARY DANIELS ASKS AN
ADDITIONAL $45,000,000 AP
PROPRIATION FOR NAVAL
AERONAUTICS.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Washington, July 9 Congress was
asked by Secretary Daniels today to
appropriate $45,000,000 for naval
aeronautics in addition to the amount
carried in this year's appropriation
bill. The navy is working out a con
siderable air program of its own aside
from the great $625,000,000 military
aircraft project of the defense coun
cil. "The navy is making efforts," Mr.
Daniels said today, "to build up an
air force of sufficient size to operate
as scouts from naval vessels, to pa
trol the waters off the extensive
coasts of the United States and our
insular possessions and also to co
operate with naval forces abroad in
anti-submarine warfare.
"The $45,000,000 recommended will
be required to maintain and expand
existing schools and stations, to es
tablish new stations and training
schools and the purchase of necessary
aircraft seaplanes, dirigibles and
kite balloon?.
"The additional personnel required
for the operation of the naval air
craft is being enrolled in the naval
reserve flying corps
FIVE DEAD AND MANY
INJURED IN EXPLOSION
Cincinnati, July 9. Five dead. aii
a number injured was the result of
an explosion today in the plant of
the Interstate Sanitation Company.
The bodies were burned bcyong rec
ognition. The building on Third
street was destroyed and probably ad
ditional bodies may be found in the
ruins.
TO B E
BIG AIR-CRAFT
Fill WANTED
Biennial Session Sovereign
Camp, Woodmen of World
Atlanta. Ga., July 9. Atlanta to
day began the entertainment of the
biennial meeting of the Sovereign
Camp, Woodmen of the World, one
of the largest fraternal and benefici
ary orders in the United States. The
sovereign camp is made up of dele
cpta from all the state cajuos, which
HUSS1ANSKEEP
IIP SMASHING
GERMAN
New and Powerful Blows
Are Being Struck AH
Along Galicia Line.
CAVALRY AFTER
RETREATING ENEMY
Halicz, Gateway to Lem
berg on South, Seems
Doomed to Fall.
Associated Press Summary.
New and powerful blows are being
struck by the Russians in Galicia.
Apparently they have broken the
Austro-German line west of Stanis
lau, south of Halicz, as today's offi
cial report from Petrograd not only
reports important gains for the Rus
sians in the Stanislau area, but de
clares the Russian cavalry is pur
suing the retreating army. This pur
suit already has reached the Lukva
river-
Halicz, the gateway to Lemberg
from the south, seems doomed to fall
unless the Russian onslaught is
quickly stopped. A Russian push
northwest from Stanislau would re
sult in Halicz being hemmed in on
le sides.
The renewed Russian onslaught in
this sector brought with it not only
additional territory, but 7,000 prison
ers and 48 guns, including a dozen
large calibre pieces. The total Rus
sian capture of men in the present
remarkable offensive is mounting
rapidly and now is in excess of 25,000.
North of the Stanislau area Gen
eral Brussiloff is holding fast to his
newly won positions in the vicinity qi
Briezany and near Koniuchy, where
his troops n?a well placed for a con
tinuation of the drive upon Lemberg
alone converging railway lines. Austro-German
counter attacks here have
failed to shake the Russian posses
sion of this valuable terrain.
There is little but local fighting
along the Brtiish front in Northern
France, but farthoTtlown the line the
Germans are giving the. French little
rest. Attack after attack is being
launched by the crown prince in des
perate attempts to shake the French
from their position along the Chemin
des Dames. There was another drive
last night at Pantheon but like others
that have preceded it, the effort
was unsuccessful.
Meanwhile such trenches as the
Germans were able to retain after
their repulse in the attack of Sat
urday night in -the Aisne region were
wrested from them in greater part
by a brilliant counter-offensive start
ed by the 'Jrench.
The sinking of the American
steamer Massapequa, of 3,193 tons,
on Saturday by a German submarine
off the French coast is announced.
Her crew was landed. "She was bound
from the United States to France
with a general cargo.
FIRST MEETING OF
LOCAL DRAFT BOARD
The first meeting of the local ex
emption board was held in the court
house yesterday morning when work
was started assorting, inspecting and
numbering the registration cards. As
socn as the meeting wa called to or
der, Sheriff Van Pelt was elected
chairman and James Macgibbon,
Clerk of the board
Much work yet remains before the
board and numerous sessions will be
held until it is completed.
OPPOSITION DEVELOPS
TO FOOD CONTROL BILL
Washington, July 9. New opposi
tion developing today convinced Sen
ate leaders the administration's food
bill cannot be passed in its present
form. The democratic leader has
called a meeting of the democratic
steering committee tomorrow to dis
cuss material changes- At the same
time failing to secure unanimous con
sent to limit debate Senator Cham
berlain in charge of the bill, filed a
motion to invoke the new cloture rule.
in turn represent upwards of 12,000
local camps and an aggregate mem
bership of nearly three quarters of
a million. The Woodmen Circle (la
dies' auxiliary) is also in session
The annual election of officers will
take place Thursday. The conven
tion will probably be in session for a
week or ten days.
SEVERAL VILLAGES
AND OVER 7,000 MEN
TAKEN BY RUSSIANS
BT ASSOCIATED FRTSS
Petrograd, Ju?y 9 Several
villages and more than 7,000 men
have been captured by the Rus
sians west of Stanislau in Ga
licia, the war office announces.
Forty-eight guns, including 12
of large size and many machine
guns were also captured by the
Russians.
PROF. II. C ARMSTRONG, LATE
LY APPOINTED BY GOVERNOR,
OFFERS TERSE EXPLANATION
FOR HIS ACTION.
In discussing his resignation from
the newly appointed Board of Control
Professor H. Clay Armstrong au
thorizing the following statement
to The Journal last night: "I resign
ed from the Board of Control be
cause I did not think there would be
the unity of views that would be ne
essary to make the work of the board
a success.
Particulars of the first meeting ;f
the board, and the almost immediate
resignation of one of the three new
members have r.ever been made pub
lic and interest is keen throughout
the entire state- No information
other than the above explanation by
Prof- Armstrong made last night has
been offered, though the true diffi
culty is believed to have been in the
personal composition of the board.
H- J. Brett, of DeFuniak was nam
ed to succeed Prof. Armstrong, and
a meeting of the board was called
for yesterday in Jacksonville, but ow
ing to the absence of the new mem
ber could not be held.
Rumors of the differences at the
board meeting center on the election
of the chairman, J- G. Kellum being
the administration candidate,- while
Prof. Armstrong and other members
favored one of the old members who
(Continued on Page Two.)
QUESTION BU&JJiNG
PERMIT BE PROBED
Building Inspector Johnson, the
manager of an open air theater on
Palafox street, and the city commis
sioners will assemble in the office of
the mayor today for the purpose oi
making a through inquiry into the
status of a question which was
brought out a few days ago, when it
was ascertained that the open ir
theater building was refused a per
mit on account, as the building in
spector claimed, of not having com
plied with the law in its construction-It
is understood that there will be
an effort made this morning to clear
up matters in connecion with the
place in dispute. Manager Hopgood
of the theater concerned, was yester
day notified-to- beon hand in the
mayor's office. - -s
First Picture of
U. S. Gas Mask
A German gas mask picked up on
a French battlefield furnished the
idea for this perfected preventive
against trench gases, which Uncle
Sam has adopted. Representative
Heintz, of Cincinnatti, O., now cap
tain in the First Ohio regiment, N.
G., is shown wearing it. The bag at
tachment furnishes pure air.
TELLS M HE
QUIT BOARD
BLACKWELLQ
STAND II BIS
OWN BEHALF
Enters General Denial of
Many Things Witnesses
Swore to Against Him.
DEFENSE PLEADS
FOR A MISTRIAL
Alleges That Two Members
of Jury Had Expressed
Themselves.
By Thomas Ewinj Dabney-
( Crestview. Fla.. July 9. If Sheriff l
Sutton and Detective Moore were j
bribed to let Will Blackwell f-scape, I
why did they, as he claimed, givei
mm the handcuff key eight hours be
fore he gave them the money and
slipped out of the automobile at De
Funiak" Why give him the ky at all? j
If Sheriff Sutton could slow down j
the automobile as Will claims, could
nox me detective uniocx tne handeutt
when the money was handed him ?
Would not the officers have been
afraid that Will would carry the key
with him, to be saved for corrobora
tive evidence of the bribe and tBe
political motive back of it in case
he were recaptured? Would They have
risked going to DeFuniak without the
key to unlock the handcuff from
Bob's wrist, for it was the onlv one
they had?
How did Bob's Woodman of thu
World membership card get between j
the cardboard backing and the picture j
oi tne laoy with tne horse, anri why
did he suddenly take a notion shortly
after the crime to hand that identical
picture in Mrs. Atwell's room when
he had been satisfied to look at tho
atrocious chromo for fo many months
en his own walL Why, when Mrs.
Atwell brought it back to his room
did he again hand it in hers and tell
her not to move it. And why does
he not remember if he put the card
there or not?
If Will Blackwell's automatic pis
tol, which various witnesses have de
scribed as a Colts forty-five, was a
Luger, a foreign gun, as different
appearnce from the American weapon
as it is possible to make two similar
firearms, how does it happen that
Will Blackwell had the Luger with
him in Obie Adams' automobile on
the sixth of March when hs says he
traded it for a Colts thirty-eight dur
ing the spring festival celebration,
which was held on the second and
third of March?
Again, if BlackweIVs conscience
would not let him get out of Florida
after he had bribed his way to lib
erty, but kept dragging him back so
he could face down the outrageous
charges, why did he not go to some
authority, to some reputable citizen,
and say, I am innocent. My politi
cal enemies want me out of the way,
they let me escape for a considera
tion, and I offer this handcuff key
as corroboration of the bribe. Instead
of doing this, why did he let himself
be hunted down by his pursuers and
the man he claims turned him loose
for a bribe.
These are the principal questions
that Will Blackwell's testimony dur
ing the three and a half hours he
was on the witness stand this after
noon suggest themselves.
Added to the Sophronia Holmes'
identification, Bob's arrest under an
alias, in Alabama, his denial that he
had been in Florida, added to Bob's
suspicious journey to Crestview the
ni?ht before the murder and Will's
confession, as testified bv Mrs. Eliza
Atwell, the above constitute a chain
of evidence that seems unbreakable.
Bat for the above discrepancies and
doubts. Will Blackwell's promised
sensation might not have fallen so
flat. As it is, his denunciation of
Sheriff Sutton, who he says seeks to
send him to the gallows to wreak a
political revenge was not at all con
vincing. The miraculous happened on this,
the first day of the second week of
the famous trial. Even more people
were in the court room than before.
The aisles were packed, the windows
were half filled by heads. The only
place sitonable in the entire building
that was not occupied by a human
form was the stove occupied the first
day of the trial by a boy who made
(Continued on Page Two.)
To Train Officers For
Great Merchant Fleet
Washington. D. C, July 9 Six
additional schools for chief officers
of the American mercantile marine
are to be opened today. The loca
tions are Atlantic City, Cape May,
Philadelphia, Baltimore, Crisfield,
Md, and Norfolk, Va. The plan is
to give intensive 'aining in use of
PRESIDENT DRAFTS
NATIONAL GUARD AND
CALLS OUT REGIMENTS
BT ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Washington, July 9. Presi
dent Wilson issued a proclama
tion today drafting the national
guard of the country in the Uni
ted States army, to date from
August 5 next, and calling all the
regiments out for active service.
DIVIDEND
BE PUD TODAY
RECEIVER OF THE FIRST NA
TIONAL BANK TO BEGIN THE
DISTRIBUTION OF $93,000.
Today at ten o'clock a five per cent
dividend will be paid by the receiver
of the First National Bank to the
depositors of the defunct institution
Notice has been sent the depositors
and all have been requested to call
at the former offices at 11 West In
tendeneia street instead of the pres
ent offices in the American National
Banq building.
Ninety-live thousand dollars will be
placed in circulation by the payment
of the dividends which makes a total
of 70 per cent which has been paid
since the bank closed in 1914.
NAVY RECRUITING IS
SATISFACTORY HERB
With a total of 166 men for June
and an increase of three over the
past week navv recruiting in this
district is going forward rapidly and
the Pensacola station is contributin
larsrely to this success. For the week
ending June 5, this city stands
fourth with three enlistments, of a
total of 3.V The Montgomery dis
trict stands fourth from the bottom
in the south, Dallas, Texas, being the
highest for the week with 232 men.
New Orleans. Birmingham, and Co
lumbia are all lower than Pensacola
however.
For the month of June, Pensacola
recruited 16 men for the navy and
stands fourth on the list in this dis
trict. Montgomery, having fhe entire
state to draw from tops the list at
75, with Tuscaloosa and Mobile fol
lowing. Selma brings ep the rear
with one recruit for the month.
The local station is starting Juty
off for a rush and will no doubt
stand near the top for week. One re
cruit was secured Chapman George
Rider being the only one on Pensa
cola honor roll yesterday
No recruits were received at the
armv station.
MRS. DAVE ALLEN
DIES AT BAGDAD
Word was received in the city of
the death last night at Bagdad of
Mrs. Dave Allen, aged about 79 years
after a lonj? illnes?. She was widely
known in Santa Rosa and Escambia
counties, and her death is sincerely
mourned.
Four daughters, all married, sur
vive. One is at Knoxville, and one
is in Georgia. On account of the un
certainty in either or both reaching
Bagdad, the hour for the funeral has
not been announced.
ENEMY TRADING BILL
QUITE SURE OF PASSAGE
Washington, July 9. The adminis
tration bill to prohibit trading wan
Germany and her allies was consid
sidered by the house today. Such
progress was made it is expected to
pass by Thursday. Opposition was
led by Lenroot, of Wisconsin, but
Montague, of Virginia, in charge of
the measure, indicated he will accept
amendments agreeable to Lenroot.
TRY TO RESTORE MANCHU
DYNASTY IN CHINA
Washington, July 9. Final over
throw of a movement to restore the
Manchu dynasty in China :s believed
here to be a matter of a few days
Latest reports are the republicans
are blocking all four lines of railroad
to Pekin and Chang Hsun. the mon
archist commander, is holding the
capital as a pledge to his personal
safety.
MR. AND MRS. M. E. COVINGTON.
OF FRISCO. ARE VISITORS HERE.
Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Covington, of
San Francisco, are visiting at th
home of Mrs. Covington's father; 11t.
T. L. Covington- Mrs. Covington wil!
spend several months in this city.
instruments, in computation and a
few studies of the kind to men with
good nautical experience, skilled in
the technique of management of ves
sels the special training will give
to the government the much needed
officers for the mercantile fleet be
ing built.
LOGflLllS
SBEDISCIISSED
y GITIZEIS
Movement for Regulation or
Abolition of Restricted
District Is Launched.
ARMY AND NAVY
MUCH INTERESTED
Jas. H. Foster Discusses tho
Question and Points Out
the Attendant Evils.
Groat interest is beinsr taken by
army and navy officers at the reser
vations here in the movement for
abolition or regulation of the restrict
ed district, and in an effort to mini
mize the evil a number of prominent
citizens met in the council chamber
of the city hall yesterday morning to
hear James H. Foster, of the Ameri
can Social Hygiene Association, dis
cuss the problem from an army and
navy standpoint, and its effect on
the enlisted men-
The meeting was callei to order bv
Secretary Jennings, of the Y. M. C.
A., who briefly outlined the reasons
for calling the meeting. He intro
duced 2lr, Foster, who explained the
interest the association had in the
matter and showed how it was work
ing in co-operation with the depart
ment heads in bettering the condi
tions of life near camps where men
are being trained.
He stated that as both the secre
tary of navy and the secretary of war
had expressed disapproval of the ex
istence of segregated districts an.-l
the permission of legalized vice near
recruiting camps, the problem cou-
T-t: r . .1 i
iiunuiij; i ensiicf ia resolves iiseu
into a business proposition, regard
less of the moral or social quebtion3
involved. It means simply, according
to Mr. Faster, that unless conditions
near camps are in conformity with
the standards the department lay
down, the camps will be moved, and
the question for Pensacola to decide
is whether or not the camps or the
district is the more valuable.
To prove this contention, Mr. Fos
ter cited the experiences of other
cities, where camps had been moved
because the local authorities refused
to close the districts.
He then discussed the political as
pect of the situation and said the
districts not only breeds vice and dis
ease, but usually breeds political cor
ruption, for the houses are operated
in open violation of city and state
laws.
Patriotically, he said, to close the
district would be Pensacola's b't, and
would show the city's appreciation of
the necessity of keeping the mem
bers of the military forces in best
possible condition.
"If Pensacola does not close the
district," said Mr. Foster, "one of
two things will happen, either some
outside agency, Ftate or federal '.toll
clean up the district, or the military
establishments here will be dlgTon
tinued." Commissioner Frank Sanders, who
as commissioner of fire and police,
has supervision over the enforcement
cf the regulations of the district, at
tended th meeting and at the close
of Mr. Foster's address, was called
upon for a statement
He said that if the citizens of Pen
pacola want the district closed up,
it can be done, and he will do it. After
his short statement of his position,
numbers of those present questioned
the commissioner on various pha?es
of the matter.
W. S. Garfield offered as a substi
tute that the matter be referred to
the Law Enforcement League, and
that the presiHent of the league be
asked o call a meeting at ten o'clock
Tuesday to consider the matter
further.
As an amendment to tre substitute
or second substitute, Rev. Jonn It.
Brown moved that no motion be made
but that the matter be left informally
with the commissioner?. Mr. Ganield
withdrew his motion. Mr. Brown's mo
tion was defeated, while that of Mr.
Jones wa." adopted.
The following committee ap
pointed to advise the Law Enforce
ment Leaeue of the action taken:
Mr. Jennings, Mr. Jones. Captain
Aiken, Mr. Perkins and Mr. Allison
Yesteiday afteroon the executive
committee of the Law Enforcement
L-iague held a meeting and after a
Fh"rt open session went into executive
session. It is learned that plans are
being made for working out a co
operative police system composed of
federal, city and county forces to
stop the sale of liquor, which is be
lieved to be one of -the contributing
causes of the recent troubles. No
definite plan was made, but another
meeting is called for Wednesday
when Captain Jayne, commandant at
the navy yard, and Major Hughes,
commanding, C. A. C, Fort Barran
cas, will be invited to attend the
(Continued on Page Two.)

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