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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, August 02, 1917, Image 1

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THE WEATHER
Showers and thunderstorms Thursdav
and probably Friday. light variable
winds.
Yesterday's temperature: Highest. 85
degrees. lowest. TO degrees.
WEST FL iRIDA ML ST j
FEKD ITSELF!
VOL. XX. NO. 215.
RAINS HALTING
MUD HUSH
OF THEM1JES
Bombardments Continue
However Preparatory to
Battle When Rain Stops.
BOTH FRENCH AND
BRITISH MOVE ON
Terrific Smash by Russo
Roumanian Line Results in
Capture of Guns and Men.
Torrential rain, turning the battle-
field into a quagmire, almost halted !
the great allied offensive in Flanders-
,At two points near Ypres the Ger-
imans were successful in counter at-
tacks against tbv British. This is
offset in the Ypres canal sector,
where the British and French ad-
vanced their line3- :
Bombardments continue, prepara- I
tory to a recommencement of the
infantry battle when the rain ceases,
In spite of the heavy bombardment
alone the entire Aisne resrion. the
French in a counter attack east of indicated and it was predicted the hot
Cerny made progress. jwave would continue until Thursday
Germans northwest of Verdun or Friday
penetrated the first line trenches. j From Central Illinois on the west
Kussians soirheast ot larnopol has
taken the offensive in an effort to
prevent the northern end of line in
Galicia being pushed back toward the
Russian frontier-
The Russo-Rumanians smashed the
enemy line between the Putna and
Casin valleyes, penetrating to a
depth of twelve miles and captured
ninety-eight guns and forty-five
hundred prisoners.
GERMANS PAD FIGURES
ON SHIPPING LOSSES
London, Aug. 1 Figures of mer
chant tonnage sunk by submarines as
given out by German are known to
be inaccurate, said Andrew Bonar ,
H.aw, chancellor of exchequer, m
ljouse of commons today.
r
HEAPS WERE FOUND '
British Front, Auy 1 A seion
of defenses on the Wameton roan.
taken bv the British in first rush of . Chicago, Aug. 1 Twenty-one we not be willing to go drv for
new offensive in Flanders, was the ; deaths attributed to the heat were them "
6?e?e J1' fihtin dVriP h; reported in the last twenty-four! "Are we willing to sacrifice everv-night-
The Germans retook it, out - hours and city health authorities pre-i thing in the country to win the war
tne cnusn again uruvi- mem uuv.
uerman nonies ne micK in nmuy
nlaces. Bodies were found turned
away fr.om the direction of British
force, indicating they were retiring
when 6truck down. !
j
FALLING OFF IN SUB ,
1ULL.J l1 1'lvA i Cjif I
London, Aug- 1. Some falling off ;
in loss of British merchantmen by j
submarines is noted in the official :
summary his week Eighteen ves-;
se'of mov than sixteen hundred
tons and three under that tonnage
were sunk.
REPORT OF ATTACK BY
SUBS. ON AMERICANS
Washington, Aug. 1 Details of
the attack by German submarines i
upon the first expedition of American !
troops sent to France became known I
for the first time when the report of
sear Admiral uieaves n.ouc
k,. coo-,. n.nioi, Th. firt i
ISA llTJL S . ftishin At
r. , i jnJjLH i
to be engaged.
the second group 01 transpons was
itiSO attasked bv two submarines, one i
of which was apparently sent to the
bottom by a bomb from a destroyer.
Secretary I'uniels sent an uncensor-1
ed copy of the report in confidence j
to the senate navay committee mem
bers. which recently inquired as to
truth of charges that accounts pub-i
lished were greatly exaggerated. t
Shortly before the attack the helm j
of the flagship was jammed. The '
shin took a sheer to starboard. At
the time officers
others saw the
Guns then opened
. . . , . J J U
later a periscope sigmea . ucuuu
cnarge was urea uy one iu uc-
bris was seen to come to the surface.
the report shows.
CONSTABLE S. J. JONES
rftFJv with TpptONFR
RETURNS WITH PRISONER
stable b. J.; Jones returned
Constable
yesterday from Chicago, having in
custouy a negro namea vmwu
Brown, wanted in this county for
rfen-support. Mr. Jones had a little
tffluble in getting the negro, for the
latter, resisting being returned to
Pensacola engaged, a lawyer and tried
to fight extraSTtTon-
MORRIS CONFIRMED BY
SENATE AS AMBASSADOR
Washington, Aug 1. Roland Mor
ris, of Philadelphia, was confirmed
without opposition by the senate as
ambassador to Japan.
wake of a submarine- : , - a ot,a f a ! of school. As th hnilrlin nffprfti 5,,.t.-".
lire. fceveral CiajS I ... ...:, J V, r...v,-.U sHlvmatd cKlto- fnr- V n-nrtmon in- :
INTENSE HEAT
CONTINUES
ILL SECTIONS
Was at Its Highest Point in
East, Where Scores
Were Prostrated.
PHILADELPHIA, 26
DEATHS; CHICAGO, 21
Hottest Place in Country
Was at Red Bluff, Cal.,
With 104 Degrees'.
BY ASSOCIATED
PRESS.
-Intense heat
Washington, Aug. 1-
continued today over most of the i
country and was at its height point :
in the east, where New York City !
at 8 o'clock was sweltering under a j
temperature of 88 degrees, the high- I
est recorded at that time anywhere
in the United States.
The highest temperature vesterday
was reported from -Red Bluff, Cal ,
with 104 decrees. Relief bv rains
was promised for tonight in the west
hut in tVi eact- uttio nno-o i
to New England on the
east hlgtl !
areas of temperatures extended to-
,i I-. . i 1 1
? h iuZZ V , r Palleries when debate on prohibition
S,mJ SZ? ab0Vai"as resumed. Senator Calder. . the
seasonable averages first speakert announced that he
HEAT UNBEARABLE ; wou. vot( aprainst the resolution,
EARLY AT BOSTON declaring that in his opinion it was
J " j a question to be letermined by the
Boston, Aug. 1. A shift of the i tates.
wind to the southeast brought tempo- I Senator Penrose said he would
rary relief from the hot wave here ! vote against the resolution, "regard
early today driving the temperature less of its merits or demerits." He
down to a minimum of 73. At 8 pronounced the proposed amendment
a. nv there had been a rise of 2
degrees and the cloudless day and ',
lifeless air gave promise of another j
scorching day-
Thousands of persons spent the
I night out of doors on the common
land in parks and at nearby beaches.
TWENTY-ONE DEATHS
RECORDED IN CHICAGO
oictea tne rieatns today would ex-:
ceea that number unless the prom-1
iKfV4 relief arrives before nio-Vit Af.
6 a- m. today street thermometers j
registered 85 degrees and the tem-
perature was rising.
For the last two days the tempera-
ture has reached 98 degrees in the
shade and on Sundav the maximum
was 97
NEW YORK CONTINUES
iu snLLitN lis ntiAl claim enough votes to insure adop
' ' tion of the resolution They seek an
lOrk. Aug. 1 NeW lOrkj.orl,. rtiir-n.cinr. ir. V.O Virm All
Xew
continued to swelter today in the hot efforts to amend the resolution failed
wave which has held the- city in its i except the addition of Harding's fix
grip for the last two days. There ! ine the six vear time limit within
was no relief in wgh according to j which three-fourths of the states
.-..j ..v.-, ......c u,v.
i forced to go to work sought surface
1 -1 -j 1: r
ana fievatfu lines in preierence xa
bwa"8- Countless thousands spent
he the parks or at the
Deaes.
.Late reports from various sections
??terJlt. 2cd ?' strdfy 3
Tl0Tls'
Twelve deaths and thirty-one pros-
trations occurring m various parts of
the greater city. The minimum tern-
, h of ?. n.
m., from which hour the mercury
again began to go up at 9 o'clock it
had reached 89 degrees, one decree
v- , .. : ...r.
,csucr"
THIRTY-NINE DEATHS FROM
HEAT IN QUAKER CITY
Philadelphia. Aug. 1. From mid
night until noon todav 2(5 additional
. u shortly before 7 0.dock
... mornin- causej an arjT,rpt.iahlft
lowering of the temperature in the
vicinity. At 10 a. nv the government
! thermometer registered 87 degrees
2-compared with 90 at th
-Rxwrr ' vesterdav. The skv w
; t - d stofms
the same
as over-
reported up
th; gtate
j FOUR DTATHS OCCUR
j EARLY IN PITTSBURG
j
i Pittsburg. Pa., Aug. 1. Four
; deaths early today increased the
number of victims of the heat wave
in Pittsburg to 24. A revised list
showed that 15 deaths were attribu
table to heat yesterday. It was pre
dicted that the summer's high mark
of 92, established yesterdav would be
. at lett equalled arprobably passed
I today
OI tne oecK ana , nrrtArj rt mr-nr moVfr ! the structure in timp fcr thp onpninff ' ji.' "
PENSACOLA,
TRYIAflDE
PROHIBITiO
uch is Possible by Ratifica
tion by States of U. S.
Senate's Action.
AMENDMENT IS
PASSED, 65 TO 20.
Measure Next Goes to Hoir
and If Passed, Then Up
to the States.
nr ASSOCIATED PRKSS.
Washington. Aug. 1. The res
olution for submission to the
states of the prohibition amend
ment to the federal constitution
was adopted by the senate bv a
vote of 63 to 20- The vote was
eight more than the necessary
two-thirds.
The resolution contains a pro
vision that the states must be
asked to ratify the amendment
within six years- The house must
act on the resolution.
VERY LI VELY DEBATE
FEATURES THE SESSION
korc ,i, ; j i,
;mh" :f Vt
number oi spectators were in the
as "radical" and "revolutionary," and
declared that the question was one
which should be "primarily of state
concern
Senator Kenyon, of Iowa, support
ing the resolution, said:
A'hy do we prohibit the boys in
the army and navy from having
booze and insist that those who re
main at home shall have it? When
evrent her' Wkv
needed to
li
win the war to make
s;nfnro v..,., anA r..mmi hntt.
spoke in support of the resolution
Senator Curtis said he favored the
Harding amendment to limit the .
time in which the amendment could ;
be submitted to the states to six j
years.
May Pa.s in House.
Prohibition leaders in thp Viniisp
must ramv tne amendment to make
;t effective
' viivtv.x.
STATES MUST RATIFY
SENATE'S RESOLUTION
After a resolution on an amend-
1 ment to the constitution passes both
branches of congress v-' the reouired ;
- , - -. -. " . .
two-third majontv, it is certified to
the state legislatures of all -states.)
and after ratification bv three-
; fourths of all the states, it becomes!
' r.nnU ... v f
amendment to the state constiution.
nrvriXW mill IMlTf
;ULl lliXU DUlLUIiMj
prI7 rfI) Cftlflfil
IVLAUI rUlV uLnUUL
...
Work on the tabernacle is progress-
ing rapidiy and it is believed that no
ing does not retard the progress and
MEN SUBJECT TO
Hi.
5 X
HDATT A DP rrTCFl ! Birmingham, Ala., Aug 1 Atten
DlVir 1 AKu iXlfil'011 has eea calle bi" the National
; Canners' Association to an inac-
! curacy in o story sent from this city
An entertainment for the members ! by the Associated Press on April 21
of Company I enlisted from Roberts- to the effect that one person was
Gonzalez, or Cantonment, and for men ! dead and three others were critically
liable for the first draft from those
communities was given by County
Commissioner L. W. Hardy, at his
home Tuesday night.
A general invitation was issued to
the men, and manv were present. A
most enjoyable evening was spent as
j guests of the commissioner, who prov
ed an admirable host
FLORIDA, THURSDAY MORNING, AUGUST 2, 1917.
Conveniently Deaf
To The Tests Of The
Enlisting Officer.
Evidently his hearing depended
on what was said, or rather, that
after hearing, he then decided
whether or not he had heard it,
which in either case is a para
dox. He said he wanted to enlist in
the army, and maybe he did, but
when the ear test was made, the
recruiting officer stood across the
room and said in a moderate tone
of voice: '99."
Whereupon, it is customary for
the examinee to repeat the sound,
if he heard it This one did not
repeat. In a slightly louder tone,
almost of regular speaking vol
ume, the officer said, "88." and
still the would-not-be rookie re
mained deaf and dumb
Fearing that the applicant was
suffering from cold feet rather
than deafness, and was blaming
it on his ears, the officer said in
the tiniest whisper: "What's the
matter, can't you hear me?"
And the applicant immediately
responded: "No,.1
IB LYNCHES
II LEADER
MEMBER OF EXECUTIVE COM
MITTEE WHO MADE HIMSELF
OBJECTION ABLE, IS STRUNG
UP BY MOB.
BT ASSOCIATED TRKSS.
Butte. Mont., Aujj. 1. F. Little, a
member of the executive board of the
Industrial Workers of the World, and
a leader in labor troubles in Arizona,
was taken from a lodging house early
today by masked men and hanged to
a railroad trestle on the outskirts of
the city-
The body was cut down at 8 a. m.
by Chief of Police Jerry Murphy, who
identified it. Little in a recent speech
here referred to United States troops
as "Uncle Sam's scabs in uniform,."
Since his arrival in Butte recently
from Globe, "Ariz., Little had made a
number of speeches to strikers in all
of which he had atacked the govern
ment and urged the men to shut down
the mines of the Butte district. His
record was under investigation by the
federal authorities, whose attention
had been called to his activities-
Little took a leading part in recent 1
labor troubles in Arizona. He wrote
to Governor Campbell, of Arizona,
from Salt Lake City, protesting
against the deportation of T. W. W.
members from Bisbee. Governor
Campbell replied, telling Little he re
sented his interference and his
threats. Little was understood to have
the confidence of William I Hay
wood, recretary of the I. W. . na
tional organization and was regarded
here as one of Haywood's confidential
agents.
Little was a cripple, but active and
j On his body was a card bearing the
' words, "First and last warning,. Oth
j ers take notice Vigilantes."
! Little was taken out of the building
1 in which he lodged by a party of
; masked men who took him avry in
an automobile. He was not given
: time to dress. The building is near
i the Finn hall, which is headquarters
i for the new metal mine workers'
I union, which recently called a strike
i of miners and which was frequently
I addressed bv Little.
JUSTICES OF SUPREME
COURT ON VACATION
Tallahassee, July 31. Attorney-
General Thos. F. West, who is con-
i mrmmit tV, ett aclcino- ohmit
, certain cases that have been appealed
to the higher courts, asks that it be
i stated that the Florida supreme court
' has adjourned from July 14 to Octo
I ber 8. All of the judges are on their
i vacations now or are preuarirrg to
; take needed summer rest, as are the
; various "attaches of the court and the
' supremeT5TTt library. All attorneys
: in the state having business with the
' cirt should make note of
as to save themselves
pondence with officials
UljUlNllNu U A
FAMILY EXPLAINED
! FY ASSOCIATED fRESS
ill in the family of Mr. and Mrs.
Martin Young from eating canned
peas. Dr. W. W. Ransom, the at
tending physician confirms the state
ment of the canners association that
he found members of the Young
family suffering from ptomaine pois
soning. but that it was not caused
by eating canned goods-
M
nisiii PA
ORDERED IHTOiSEHD-OFF
OT
Local Company Under In
structions to Assemble
at Armory Sunday.
MAY ENTRAIN THE j
FOLLOWING DAY
When Military Ocupies the
Armory, It Automatically
Becomes Military Camp.
Company I will occupy the armory
hall Sunday morning and will prob
ably leave Monday afternoon, though
the time of departure is not at all :
certain. Orders were issued by Cap- :
tain James F- Phillips, commanding
officer of the company, instructing
the men to report for permanent duty
Sunday.
The order follows:
Order of Captain Phillips.
From C. O. Company I.
To All Enlisted Men in Company I;
Subject: "Mobilization:
Under the president's procliamation
dated July 9, 1917, drafting the na
tional guard into the service of the
United States, you are hereby order
ed to report at the armory, at the
corner of Chase and Palafox streets.
Pensacola, Florida, at 8:30 o'clock,
Sunday morning, August 5, for per
manent duty.
Men failing to report will be ar
rested and tried for desertion.
JAMES Y PHILLIPS,
Captain, First Florida Infantry N. G.
Commanding, Company I.
Under the ruling of the attorney
general tHat when the company occu
pied the armory it will constitute a
military camp, a half mile barred
zone for alien enemies has been out
lined, and no saloons can do business
within that limit. No houses of pros
titution 1 an exist within five miles of
the armory, under proclamation of
the president.
ASSUMES PASTORATE
HERE IN SEPTEMBER
Pev AVivi V. M r IlvL-nin Viavincr com-
?'t it '"'rL!!;!
yesterday for his old home in Char- j
lotte, N C. He will spend the month
of August settling his business af
fairs, with a view to permanent set
tlement as pastor of the Knox Pres
byterian Church, at Pensacola.
He will occupy the pulpit of this
church morning and evening of the
first Sabbath in September, and on
the fifth Sunday will preach for'ilie
new Presbyterian Church at Crest-
view. Fla., which he organized on last
Sabbath.
FORMER PENSACOLA
BOY WEDS TEXAS GIRL
Dallas, Texas, Aug 1. In the pres
ence of the. university faculty and
students. Franklin Zeek, instructor in
French, and Miss Louise Wadsworth
an honor B. A., S. M. L, were mar
ried at 10 o'clock this morning bv Dr.
H- M. Wnaling, Jr., professor of the-1
ology. officiating, in the First Metho
dist Church. Dr. Terry, professor of
education, was best man. Miss Lu
cinda Smith, of Dallas, was brides
maid, and Misses Mamie Ttasberry
and Louis Pendleton, of Durant, Ok7a.
and Ray Burgess, were maids of hon
or and ushers. The church v.as dec
orated in palms and Easter lilies.
The bride wore blue gabardine, grev
hat and boots, and corsage of small
white roses and lilies of the valley.
The bridesmaid wore coral-eoloreS
Georgette crepe, and carried Easter
lilies. Mrs. Zeek, of Pensacola, wore
wisteria crepe de chine and purple
asters.
The bride's father is a prominent
drug man, of Dallas The couple left
on their honeymoon, for Wisconsin.
They will be at home September 2.
The bride is accomplished, and the
Pensacola mother-in-law is charmed.
Miss Lucile Rice, of Honey Creek,
Texas, was organist, and Mrs. Mc
Ginnist, of Dallas, sang, "Birthday."
DETROIT REPORTS DAY'S
TOTAL OF TEN DEATHS
Detroit, Mich-, Aug. 1. Ten deaths
and nineteen prostrations in the last
twenty-four hours is the toll at
tributed to the heat wave that has
prevailed here for several days. There
was no indication of a let up in the
hot spell-
VESERUICE TH
i
Live Movement on Foot to
Entertain for the De-
.pai uii uuiuitis.
ONLY TENTATIVE
PLANS ARE MADE
Committee May Call Today
on Public for Their
Co-operation.
A movement looking to the enter
tainment of the boys of the local tr.i'.i
tary company has been t-uggested by
C. Fred Schad and a number of
friends of the company, and unie
Mr. Schad leaves the city for a week
or more on vacation today, he will
endeavor to interest the public in ;
providing some sort of a send-off for !
the local .oldiers. i
Several friends have been talking j
of this movement during the past few!
days, but the uncertainty as to d; '.
of departure has been the cause of
holding up any decisive steps. As :t ;
is very generally believed that the
local company will be ordered to en-,
train on Monday or the next day, the
movement yesterday began to take on !
concrete shaps, and" today committee.s J
may circulate amonir. the citizens for;
support in the undertaking. j
A tentative program suggested i :
that of giving a band conceit several
hours previous to the departure of
the train, and furnishinjr refresh
ments for the young soldiers. In the
latter pait of the program everyone
may help, and relatives and friends '
of the young troops may serve these !
refreshments, and thus spend the last
few hours in the city with the young '
v.an- " " I
A more definite program will prob-;
ably be mapped out today, when sev- 1
eral self-constitute-, committeemen
get together and work out so'ne
asrreed-on plan. As the troops are
ordered to the armory on Sunday of
this week for actual service, with the
probability of being ordered to entrain
the following day, little time remains
to provide Vnn etitertarrimenf, and the
committee expects the co-o;eration of
the public should they decide to ar
range a special program for enter
taining the boys before their depar
ture. GADSDEN CO. HONORS
ITS MILITIA COMPANY
SPKPTAT. TO TIIR JOI'RXAt-
Quincy, Aug. 1. Gadsden county
is very proud of her volunteer com -'
pany of soldiers, which numbers 44 ;
fine young men under the leadership,
of Lieut. V W.Wright. In honor of !
this company, scheduled to leave Mon-
day morning, there will be a patriotic
union service at all the churches Sun -
dav mornincr at the court house. TTte
meeting will be presided over by Rev.' enough tat great e 1 i-at ionai enter
W. A. Burns, of the Baptist Church. prise in this co-mtry -u- u as the s
Brief talks will be made by Rev's, tahlishmer.t -r there failing ramps
Blacknell. of the Presbvteriar, Church, for young m n rcpr ser-J. should
and Davis, of the Methodist Church,
and bv pv-Senator Y Watson. The
response
will be made bv Lieut. :
Wright.
A special program of
music is being arranged.
patriotic
DR. KENNEDY IS
ON DUTY IN FRANCE
As to the mean for doing this, Mr.
According to letters received by Wier said that p-rf.aps V.e greatest
friends in Pensacola, Dr- Kennedy has is in keepm r i.':v the "link between
been assigned to a base hospital in each soldi' r nr.d hi- h i.nd stated
France, and is now on active duty, that acronigi- : Kre :-k L. OI ru
in the letter the doctor, states that j p teed, this wa? uv.f. of t .vo great
at one time 600 men were brought ! est mf!vene 1-c-ivnir the r-.r-n
to that hospital alone, greatly taxing: well during the Civil War.
the resources of equipment ar.d pro- j Continuing, th- s; -aker -aii thit
visions for caring for the wound-d. ; every kind t,f n-tar:ii re'.atio-.
! tween the rr.cn and the co::::u..:,::.-
OFFICER LOCATES
A STOLEN AUTO
i tive participation is desired. V
E. W. Fowler's automobile, stolen! might be a-ked to serve as ushers, to
Monday night from its parkinp place address the Sundav School cla-.-es,
in front of the Isis theater, was dis-ithe Boy Scouts (the latter would
covered yesterday by Special Officer: highly appreciate having a real sol
Bobe about one mile from the bridge dier to talk To'them), sometimes evert
over Bayou Chico, the car being con- to preach-
siderably off the road and partly hid- j "The same principle applies to
den in the woods. It i3 thought that; every lodge, college, society or bnsT
a party or parties who wanted to j ness association. C!ub3. settlements,
either catch a late car, or who just ; recreation centers, organizations of
wanted a free ride, came across the ; every sort should be opened to soi-
unoccupiea ana inviting appearing
j Ford, and' promptly decided to use
it- The drive, however, was evident -
ly done By a person knowly aTl about ( coldiers ar.d families or individuals
a car, for the machine was not dam- j ir. the community cannot of course,
aged in the least, it was snid. Inibe forced. They must come as a by
such condition it was returned to the j product of the various social occas-
owner.
PRICE 5 CENTS.
OIIDEiPLISllH?
FOiEffiTIOIf
LIT1IEILISTEDIEI
' Discussed at Meetm- Held
j Under Auspices of Cham-
; oer c: twonv.v.eree
,'L. H. W1EK, EXPERT
IN LINE. SPEAKS
j Chairman of Necessary Com-
j mittees Named, and Per
! sonncl Announced Soon.
riar.s for t:
ie rocre.it ic-r. of the en-
listed men of the army :md navy in
Ponsavoi.i were r awe at a meet in
held yeter!ay morning in the Cham
ber oi' (Vnrerco, which. w;ii address
ed by L. H W'ut. veprosenti:v.r Vra
joint rommiji-ion of tr.iinir g camp ac
tivities. Mr. Wier i? here to assist in the
organization of activities for the
amusement of the enii.-te 1 men. a
movement for which ha- a'r a !- been
launched, and received the support of
the city commissioners. Oiairmen of
committees on spurts, educational and
library, music and dramatics, social
entertainment, hospitality, com me.--cial
relations and m;b'i. were se
lected, but will not be announced until
the gentlemen have agreed to serve.
Much of Mr. Wior's address was
given over to an oxnlanation of the?
objects of the organization, its offi
cers and its work Of the last named,
he said, that th-- work is divided irfcl
three parts, over one of which the Y.
M. C. A. lias jurisdiction. Thi- i
concerned cniefly. he stated, with the
establishment of buildings for recrea
tion purposes, one bui!din. for e,:-h
brigade. The buildings arc fuiiy
co-iipped for tire or.veiie'ice nil
pleasure of the iv.en. ar. ! ci-i....;
books, magazine-, writing materia L-.
facilities for lecture, hisrrh services
moving pictures and games Five men
are in charge of each building
Of the second branch of the work,
the speaker stated that it sought to
create goo,) r-ora! conditiors near the
camps) and to exclude vice and vicious
resorts. This is purely a negative
consideration and oncerns Usif with
what should not exist, Vcit t -,f work of
eciua' iir.port lm-e and perhaps even
greater than the ot her two. in es
tablishing t he proper ont-n-t between
the r.-,e!; of the s'',vice. and those liv
ing near them-
The rrea'e -t larger, the - reaker
said, and t itu the exp-u t i. e e Eu
rope as proof, , in . : t i 1. g o'T
the men m the ca-nns from normal
so ial intercourse ar.u ncn aiiou and
i tn ScVe '0 " the '!
1-
c
iris of
friends and other run,-. -ins
ohmry : i' wtV. ' '
has been guicb-d. T'r, ; rsu'.t - !
ho.nesi-kne depr-- -io s ' i
moral and physical tone 1 vp-iir
i
h-!t
,;
r.",l
; e
' efficient- or" :he r an as t ,,,! ;j,Jr
his value as a citizen in -.ft-r 'ife
: "Moreover." :-vM he spe-ik-T.
commis-does rot. , orider
barely avoid the wholes..'
: tion of r-h;-i"al di-ens. :snd
-ropn'a--ora!
de
terioration Amer.ca dea-iis some
thing more thm that e riu.t make
these men stronger in every sense,
more fit. morally, i..e:i tally and phv
sicaliy, thri:-. they ha-- ever been in
their live-. 'or it will be said of uj
that like everv .n'r.fr mtior. that, has
encountered tc.- pr'.re'-m f t:ie tram-
-
camp, we a;
!'ii,e
!' It;
:olu-
near then f hould h-e established
Churches shcuh! make th-3 so'd:.-r
of their respective denominations feel
not only that they are welcome, but
that they are members of whom rc-
aiers noL merer- as ouisi'.e.-i ant as
; participants
' "Closer serial relation; between
ia& that will be established."

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