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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, August 07, 1917, Image 4

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Irtti PENSACOLA JOURNAL. TUESDAY MORNING, AUGUST 7. 1917
DAILY WEEKLY SUNDAY
Journal Publishing Company
LOIS K. MATES, Pres. MARRY R. COOK, Publish!-.
Conducted from 1S?9 to 1915 Under the Editorship and
Management of Col. Frank L. Mayes.
. MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
American Newspaper Publishers" Association
Florida Press Association
Southern Newspaper Publishers' Association
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
One Week, Daily and Sunday i 12
Two Weeks, laily and Sunday
One Month,' Daily and Sunday
Three Months. Daily and Sunday
Six Months, Daily and Sunday ; i
One Year, Daily and Sunday
Sunday Only. One Year 1.j?JJ
The Weeklv Journal. One Year 1 rm
Mail subscriptions .ire payable in advance, and papers
will be discontinued on expiration date.
Office Journal Pl'ltf.
Corner Tntendercia
:r.d PeLuna, Street
Uoomr
tirrt
4R; TV.:
Tvlitorial
riiblisher.
Office, I8f0
Entered nr serohd.rlann matter at the postoffice In
rensacola. Florid", under At of Conirresw, March , 179.
Represented In tlte General Advertising Field by
CONE. LORF.ZF.N AYOODMAN.
New YorV Chlcaeo Detroit Kansas City Atlanta
what I can to stop the papers from talking '
about his ambitions. In tact, he has none;
the job in hand is his life's work."
There rang the soul of a true man! If
politics in this country still enters into
the making of our plans, let us be thank
ful that their execution abroad will not be
so marred.
THE SCRATCH PAD
By Thomas ewing dabney.
r-vrv hi" D
The quiet that reigns
Irish convention is the
the storm.
about the ,
lull before i
TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 1911
AUGUST, 1917.
One Hundred and Twenty-First Day of
America in the War.
WOULD PROVE ANYTHING.
Reasoners of the transcendental or mys
tical type have been disturbing old prophe
cies and doing strange things with dates
to ascertain when the war will end.
Human ingenuity in this respect seems tot
be without limit, and the astonishing jug
gling stupefies when it does not con
vince. For instance, in the Pittsburg
Gazette we find that the war will end in
.1917, for the following reason:
President Wilson was born. 1856
Took office 1913
Has been in office 4 years
Has lived 61 vears
Total 3834
Similar figures for our other allies
King of England, President of France,
King of Italy, King of Belgium, Emperor
of Japan, King of Serbia, King of Monte
negro, and King of Roumania. also add up
to 3834. which mystical number, divided by
t ( , because two hemispheres are involved
in the conflict, give1017. Simple, isn't it?
At first glance this seems to indicate the
miraculous discovery that history is the
picture writing of eterniy; that births,
deaths, battles, dynasties, earthquakes,
plots, and revolution are a code message to
posterity, and that, so to speak, we have dis
covered the roseta stone" of the universe
and may read he future and solve the rid
dle of the universe.
Alas, that the hope is founded on such
quicksands of logic!
As the Jacksonville Times-Union points
out, there is nothing strange in the coinci
dence that the date of birth, the time they
succeeded to office, the years in office and
the age of the nine presidents and kings,
should add up to 3834. the double of 1017.
A man's present age. plus the year he was
born will equal the present year. The date
a man went into office plus the number of
years he has served will also equal the
present year.. The elaborate calculations
of the Gazette have simply added both sets
of figures and the total is accordingly
double the present year.
Had the mystic prosecuted his calcula
tions last year, he would have proved just
as conclusively that the war would end in
1016, or in 10b". had he done it in
1015. And so, on he could have proved
that the war ended the vear before it
be
JUGGLING THE FOOD OUT OF OUR
MOUTHS.
Two dollar wheat (to the farmer) will
not mean cheaper bread under present
economic conditions, but with handling
methods simplified, a considerable reduc
tion is possible.
How a commodity that costs compara
tively little on the farm finally attains a
selling price way out of proportion to its
value by the time it reaches the consumer,
who represents at least 05 per cent of the
nation, was graphically illustrated, during
the graduating exercises of a Minnesota
high school we quote The Outlook as
follows :
"The stase was set with larse placards representing
thf lorar elevator, the railway, t!ip Cliantcr of Cnr.i
inert e, the terminal elevator, the trill, a wholesaler.
;in. the retailer. These, us the picture shows, were
plac-ed along the front of the stace, an.l as the speaker
progressed in his discussion of the farmer and Ins
wheat, a i lassmate, dressed in woikinsr clothes an'
representing the farmer, came upon the scene with a
hundred pounds of wheat In a sck.
"The stase 'farmer- was told that he would he
obliged to leave two pounds of wheat at the local ele
vator, six with the railway for haul If? the hundred
pounds two hundred miles, one pound for the Cham
ber of" Commerce for selling the wheat, one pound at
the terminal elevator for handling the crop, seven
pounds for the mill for the grinding Into (lour, eipht
pounds to the wholesaler for selling the flour to th"
retailer, and eleven pounds to the retailer for selli-is
and delivering what was left of the wheat to the
cut- turner."
Thus in value to the consumer the hun
dred pounds of wheat dwindles to sixty
four a fearful leak. In order to get a
imnarea pounds, lanor mat is, money
must: produce nearly two hundred.
A similar demonstration in other com
modities would open the eyes of the people
and let them see how little food thev get
for their money and how much juggling.
What lasting solution to the high cost
problem is there other than shortening the
journey of commodities from producer to
consumer, and eliminating the profit
ambuscades ?
Our militia boys are in the arm- i
ory, but they haven't got enough
equipment to kill time with. !
Unfortunately there are only a few
women in the Russian army and j
this explains why it has retreated so ;
greatly- i
Just to show that he could change ;
his mind like a regular Russian.Ker-
ensky resigned and re-accepted with-
in the space of a few minutes. .
cri ti
NO POLITICAL AMBITIONS.
It was inevitable that Pershing should
be mentioned for the presidency, and his
denial of political ambition is timelv.
"He is a soldier, pure and simple." said
l is brother. "I couldn't tell you whether
he i a republican or democrat."
America has uniformly rewarded its
successful soldiers with the chief magis
tracy, but they were successful because
they thought only of their military plans
and had no political designs.
Pershing's answer, through his brother,
is a sufficiently plain rebuke to those who
think personal preferment is the only
spring of human action that the salvation
of humanity is merely a stepping stone to
a selfish ambition. Pershing is thinking
of his cause, and that is why we feel so con
fident about him. "My brother." savs
James F. Pershing, of Chicago, "is not and
never will be a candidate for president."
Have you given anything to the j
Navy League? The fact that nobody x
is going- to make a personal solicita- '
tion wjij not enable you to dodge your 1
conscience.
Creel has suggested that the vol
untary censorship be given up. Doubt
less he made so many contradictions
it was impossible to keep track of
them all
The big drive in Flanders has dis
tracted our attention from the other
theatres of war, including the Irish
Convention, but we expect rn hear of
some picturesque battling there be
fore all is said and done.
It is estimated that two out of
every nine doctors in the United
States will be needed at the front. If
they don't volunteer, they will be
drafted, for Uncle Sam is determined
that the boys shall have the best of
everything, and plenty of it.
One bWppd thing about the war -
it is an antidote for the politics that
always breaks out about the year
after the president ha? been inaug
urated, and will prove that it is pos
sible for the country to survive even
if Republican and Democratic lean
er aren't, putting Faris green into
each others' coffee-
When the Germans heard the
voices of the Russian girls coming to
the attack, says a press despatch,
they were demoralized- Doubles
they remembered the time when they
came home from the lodge laboring
under a heavy cargo of beer, and
knew they didn't have a chance
atrainst the female of the species.
THE INTELLECTUAL TENDENCY.
Americans are reading only 80 per cent
as manv books as thev did seven vears ajro.
if the number of titles published in 1010 and
.1017, which arc 13.470 and 10,445, respect
ively, arc an index. By this is meant the
number of books on all subjects, without
reference to the size of the edition.
Only in history has there been an in
crease bv events of the oast men are
recking to understand the present and for
see the future. In religion, domestic econ
omy potery and drama, fiction, and
geography and travel, the decrease has
been noted.
What is the cause?
Naturally the high price Vt paper has dis
couraged publication. Rut there are other
causes as well motor rides, moving pic
tures, high cost of living.
But greatest of all. perhaps, is the daily
press, whose circulation has increased so
wonderfully during the years of war. Not
only does give the stirring events of the
day, but its economics, fiction and other
special departments satisfy the needs for
merly supplied by books.
Book reading may fall off still further
that its, the reading the new and upntrietl
1. oks. but that will not indicate a waning
intelligence. The truth is the world is in process of a
g" at change no- -
cm of the manifestations. Old standards
o education arc going by the board because
oH standards of efficiency arc not alequat
to modern conditions. Immediacy of
action is the characteristic of the age, and
books cannot deliberation. World changes
are happening faster than books can be
written: facts are become more exciting
than fiction. And men are reading the
papers more because they arc thinking in
headlines and acting in bulletins; they
read fewer books because they are learning
more things.
5 PLEAD GUILT!
AT
T
, H 1.
1
Five defendants were arraigned in
the court of record Monday morning,
all pleading guilt'- to the charges
which had been preferred against
them. None were charged with ser
ious offenses. The jury for the wees
will be formally organized probably
this morning, and several cases
are on the docket for early disp -i-tion.
Those who pleaded yesterdt.
and their respective penalities, wer
as follows:
.Tames Henderson. Sam Short and
Wm. Barney, all charped with '
cambling, fined ?5 each or Ar days. J
Alfred Williams and Joe Wilson,
charged with train riding, fined
and costs or .0 days, sentence to be
suspended on condition they leave the
state.
I am Sincere! Stop Calomel!
I Guarantee Dodson's Liver Tone
Listen to me! Calomel Fickens and von mav lose a
day's work. If bilious, constipated or
headachy rend my guarantee-.
i
S MM SEEN
ETTi
us- e i
-.f
BELLVIEW.
Liven up your sluggish liver! el
fine and cheerful; make your work a
pleasure; be vigorous and full of am
bition. But take no nasty, dangerous
calomel, because it makes you sick
and you may lose a day's work.
Calomel is mercury or quicksilver
which causes necrosis of the bones.
Calomel crashes into sour bile like
dynamite, breaking it up. That's when
you feel that awful nausea and
cramping.
T.isten to me! If you want to enjoy
the nicest, gentlest liver and bowel
cleansing you ever experienced, just
take a spoonful of harmless Dodson's
Liver Tone tonight. Your druggist or
dealer sells you a 50 cent bottle of
Oouson s Liver lone under my per
sonal money-back guarantee that each
spoonful will clean your sluggish livor
better than a dose of nasty calomel
and that it won't, make you sirk.
Dorison'n Liver Tone is real liven
medicine. You'll know it next morn
ing because you will wake up ' n!;ng
fine, your livaj 11 be working; (, pad
ache and dizzirrr pone; stomach will
be Bweet and bowels regular.
Dodson's Liver Tone is entirely veg
etable, therefore harmless and can
not salivate. Give it to your children.
Millions of people are using Dodson's
Liver Tone instead of dangerous cal
omel now. Your druggit will tell
you that the sale of calomel is almost
stopped entirely here. Adv.
Bellview, Aug- 6 Leonard Cher
ry is very ill.
Alonzo Ard called at the home of
J. F- Handrop Sunday.
Miss Bessie Ard returned from
Tensacola Saturday.
Bellview school will open Septem- j
ber P.. 1017.
Mrs. Bessie Clarke wiu no at the I
home of H. A. Aard Tuesday
Sing will be held at the Latter
DaySaint's Church Tuesday at 8 p- m- j
Kverybody is cordially invited. i
Bellview men are expected to dip
cattle in their vat this week.
Miss Victoria Nix was a visitor at
Bellview Sundav-
THE OUTBURSTS OF EVERETT TRUE
By CONDO
PC'T THAT ClQ-AR. CUT
IMMEOIATCLY J
"If HiOC -rrti T Lii
to fiND a pcvce.
3C TV5Y 1
YOU RACING SOM
Summer Complaint-
(encral Sir Herhert Plumer. one of the
British commanders who has been con
ducting the great drive on the western
front, is known in the service .is the "Dan
dy General."
Key. Patrick Kirby, who has been ele
vated to the Catholic priesthood at Youngs
town. Ohio, is the fifth of six brothers to be
ordained.
Henry Arthur Jones, the brilliant Eng
lish playwright, was a successful traveling
sa'esman before he began writing for the
During the hot weather of the sum
mer months some member of almost
every family is likely to he troubled)
with an unnatural looseness of the;
bowels, and it is of the greatest im- I
portance that this be treated prompt-1
ly, which can onlv be done when the J
medi ine is kept at hand. Mrs. F. F. !
Scott. Scottsville. N. Y., states, "I
first used Chamberlain's" Colic and;
Diarrhoea remedy a much as t:ve :
years ago. At that time 1 had a ,
severe attack of summer complaint,
and was suffering intense pain. One i
dose relieved me. Other memehers;
of my family have since used it with I
like results." adv.
He Cures Insomia.
Boston. Mass. After going pract-;
ically sleepless fov three years. Mi-i
chael Horgen has cured hi?
by having a bed built. It is hung,
from the ceiling by weights, and,
when it is lifted up and let down j
Furthermore, "the. General asks that I do tage.
slowlv bv machinerv Horgen is a't-'e
J to sleep. The bed was built on the
l advice of a famous nerve specialist,
j Hov-'en has been ifvat'- iDera-
tor for 20 scr
' y y : - ".---
; 1 i t . r : r 1 d I c-riM HI .
Thcy sy THCRe JS such v- - 1
A place, aio 7 Her. r-cL - Al":
a Ai- c3Moe: 51:
-r
A.-tlvir
Mass., has written the l'e::.-:f fia io
liio department, a skin:,' the latter tu
locate a w hite woman know i as Et
ta Chaliforie, who at one time gavt
her address a- 1 "JS 1-2 Hast Govern
ment street. She could not be lo
cated --e.-terday.
It is under.-lood that there is nr.
estate to he -c't'ed up and 1-er sig
nature is re. hi! red to runrhans pa
pers before s'irh ( an be done.
Anyone knowing the whereabout ;
of the woman would he doing much
of a favor bv giving such information
to the depart mr i:..
STifiGtR ENTERS
PIES IF Tf
T- M. I "owning, who cla'ms that
his home is in Na-hvdie. when ar
raigned in the re order':. -.urt yester
day morning oti a iha.rge of being a
dangerous and su jncioiis harai ter,
entrred a plr'."i or t;-uil;-. and Reord
er Semmes ;;t once ho-ir;" 'i'.'.'A over
to the county a;;t h-r:t l.as' t-ven-
ir.g he was charged with larceny, but
a more grave charge will probably
be made oit in the solicitor'; ir'n'-ma-tior
which wi'l vrobablv he filed at
t h i term of ti
Nothing was
the relative-, t
I 'owning ga:
uri
lirari
f rei-ord.
! yesterday from
he addresses of whom
the offieers Sunday,
and asked that th";- be eomr'Vinicat
ed with. The police depart f;" nt of
Nashville did not n i iv to th tele,
gram of Tehee Clerk Welsh, but )t h
'bought the young man gave som i
fictitious name an.d t':- io'icf '.'
partmcn? of Nashvill- is trying to
locate or identify him
Stomach and Liver Troub cs.
No end of misery and artual ;-uf far
ing is caused by disorders of the
stomach and liver, and may be i voided
by the use of Chamberlain's Tabic.--.
Give them a trial. They on'.;.- cost a
que.vter. Adv.
FORCHEIMER'S
FASHION SHOP
'The Store for Women'
D'ALEMBERTE'S
PEROXIDE CREAM
for face massage.
Phone 109
"A GOOD DRUG STORE"
Pensacola Buggy Works
STUDEBAKER CAS.
Repairs Parti Accessaries
and Supplies.
Phone 808.
105 N. Palafox St.

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