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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, October 19, 1917, Image 6

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SIX
THE PENSACOLA JOURNAL, FRIDAY MORNING. OCTOBER 19, 1917.
THE MARKETS
; NEW ORLEANS COTTON.
I New Orleans, Oct. 18. Fear of
eold weather in the belt caused bny
intr of cotton here today and Pees
were advanced 14 to 20 points on the
first haulf hour of b83' GX
spot accounts contributed to wie
steadiness. Offerings came chiefly
from longs who were realizing protits.
A Quiet feeiing took possession ol
the market but the underlying stead
iness was retained. In the trading
up to noon the advance was widened
to 24 to 31 points.
High. Low. Close.
October "27.35 27.19 27.30
December 26.15 25.79 25.9o
January ........ 26.11 25.80 25.93
K 26.20 25.97 26.02
Illy 26.23 26.03 26.03
NEW YORK COTTON.
New York, Oct. 18. A renewal of
heavy realizing caused some irregu
larity at the opening of. the cotton
market today. October was 5 points
lower, with other months 6 to lb
points higher, and the active posi
tions sold about 1 to 4 points under
last night's closing figures during the
first few minutes with December
touching 27.25 and January 26-89.
The prospects for another cold wave
in the Western belt were more clear
ly defined than yesterday, however
and the market soon turned firmer
on covering and trade buying. Liv
erpool was an active buyer on the
advance which carried December up
to 27.45 and January to 27.09, or
about 16 to 19 points net higher be
fore the end of the first hour.
After selling at 27.60 for December
and 27.22 for January, or 29 to 34
fjoints net higher, the market became
ess active and there were reactions
of 10 to 12 points around midday.
It was reported that a private cable
has been received from Milan. Italy,
claiming that the Italian government
has arranged to take 70,000 bales of
American cotton monthly.
Cotton closed steady.
High. Low. Close.
October .... 28.07 27.75 28.05
December 27.60 27.25 27.51
January 27.22 26.89 27.10
March 27.02 26.69 26.90
May 26.91 26.57 26.79
CORN MARKET EASY.
Chicago, Oct. 18. Much cold weath
er predicted for tonight tended today
to ease down the corn market. The
lower temperature in prospect are
now looked uponu as a mens of
helping to put the crop into good
condition for quicker shipping than
the prevailing warmth and moisture
would have allowed. Selling, how-
oitai wa nnf n acreressive character
V V- & oo-
Opening quotations, which ranged
from tne same as ye&teruay a '
to 3-8c lower with December 1-14
to 1.14 and May at 1.10 1-2 to 5-8,
wrorofrtl lfiwpfi Viv moderate down turn
all around and then something of
rally.
Export information gave firmness
Sharp decline in the hog market
carried down provisions. for
especially seemed to lack demand.
TOP PRICE FOR POTATOES.
Houlton, Me., Oct. 18. Potatoes
sold for $4.85 a barrel in Aroostook
county today, the highest price ever
recorded for this session of the year.
A year ago the price was $3 per
barrel. Dealers look for even higher
prices as known as they say the de
mand will considerably exceed the
supply. .
LIVERPOOL COTTON.
Liverpool, Oct. 18. Cotton spot
fluiet; prices easier. Good middling
20.92; middling 20.42; low middling
19.92; good ordinary 18.98; ordinary
18.47. Sales 3,000, including 2,000
American; no receipts. Future
closed firm. New contracts; January
19.64; March 19.20; May 18.86.
SUGAR STOCKS SHORT.
New York, Oct. 18. With the
market practically bare of Cuban
canesugar, the new beet crcp not
available here before December, half
of the big refineries shut down and
the others running only half time,
New York is facing the most serious
sugar famine in its history. Some
stores have stopped selling sugar al
together and others are limiting the
amount purchased by each customer.
Prices as high as 12 cents a pound
retail are quoted.
Raw sugar brokers said today that
only about 25,000 tons of old crop
sugar remained in Cuba and this id
held mostly by speculators who paid
high prices for it, and refuse to sell.
There are ten thousand tons owned
by neutrals in warehouses here, on
which no license to export can be ob
tained and it is thought that this may
be taken over to . help out the short
age in France. Louisiana is expected
to supply about 25,000 tons of raw
but this will not be available here fol
a month yet, even if shipped prompt
ly. COTTON SEED OIL MARKET.
New York, Oct. 18. The cottoi
seed il market closed quiet. Spot
17.00 bid; October 17.00; December
16.80; January 16.90; March 16.75;
May 15.50. Total sales 4,100.
CHICAGO CASH GRAIN.
Chicago, Oct. 18. Cash: Grain
and provisions:
Corn No. 2, yellow $.94 1-21.96;
No. 3 yellow 1.94 1.95; No. 4 yellow
nominal.
Oats No. 3 white 59 3-461;
standard 60 1-4 61.
Rye No. 2, 1.60.
Barley 1.121.35.
Hay Timothy 6.508.25; clover
18.0024.00.
Pork Nominal; lard 23.8723.92;
Ribs 27.0027.50.
The Journal's "Want Ad
way will get you results.
NAVAL STORES
Pensacola, Oct. ' 18. The spirit
market was firm at 47 5-8 with no
sales.
Last
Receipts, Casks. Year
Today 23 204
This month ...... 2,125 3,679
This season ..... 41,429 47,999
Shipments, Casks.
Today 3
This month 3,487 7,977
This season 24,840 38,722
Stocks, Casks.
Today 41,218 27,995
April 1 . 24,629 18,718
The rosin market was firm with no
sales.
Last
Receipts, Barrels Year
Today 57 869
This month 9,477 13,430
This season .122,514 139,131
Shipments, Barrels. -
Today 470 100
This month 19,048 10,705
This season 136,202 151,955
Stocks, Barrels.
Today 80,105 89,094
April 1 93,793 101,718
Quotations as follows:
Quotations were as follows :
X ... i 7.30
WW 7.30
WG 7.20
N 6.95
M 6.30
K 6.07 Vz
I S$2
H . 5.85
G 5.85
F 5.82
E 5.82 Va
D 5.82
B 5.82
SAVANNAH MARKET
Saavnnah, Oct. 18. The spirit
market war firm at 49 with sales
of 79 casks.
r t
Receipts, Casks Year
Today 265 291
This season 65,478 73,264
Shipments, Casus
Today no shipments 19
This season ...... 52,727 55,449
Stocks, Casks
Today 25,867 . 26,339
April 1 11,169 7,620
The rosin market, was firm with
sales of 691 barrels.
Last
Receipts, Barrels Year
Today 803 829
This season 202,462 235,330
Shipments. Barrels
Today 625
This season 237,071 216,398
Stocks, Barrels
Today 81,551 95,064
April 1 ..103,456 72,832
Quotations were as follows:
WW 7.50
WG 7.45
N 7.15
M 6.50
K 6.30
I b.05
H 6.02
G . 6.00
F 6.00
E 6.00
Dv. 6.00
B 6.00
JACKSONVILLE MARKET
Jacksonville, Oct. 18. The spirit
market was not given.
Last
Receipts, Casks Year
Today .. 553 361
This season 95,279 104,899
Shipments, Casks
Today ... 250 103
This season 73.754 89,750
Stocks, Casks
Today 51,016 38,048
April 1 29,511 22,899
The rosin market was firm with
sales of 1,051 barrels.
Last
Receipts,' Barrels
Today 2,068 1,457
This season 273,686 313,501
Shipments, Barrels
Today 1,736 1,700
This season 301,814 285,013
Stocks, Barrels
Today 128,978 176,782
April 1 157,106 148,294
Quotations were as follows:
X 7.50
WW 7.50
WG 7.40
N 7.10
M 6.55
K 6.35
I 6.05
H 6.00
G 6.00
F 6.00
E 6.00
D 6.00
B 6.00
Subscribe for The Journal.
SQUIRREL FOOD
50?T WORDS WITH fJOTHttfG
tr4 -TrlEM HAKE r SOWCj
OH V '
MAKING TRENCH CANDLES SO SAMMY
CAN READ HIS LETTERS FROM HOME
No siree! Our boys won't have to
grope in the dark as they serve in
the trenches. .Washington women are
leaders of a candle-making move
ment which promises to spread all
over the country. In the picture above
are) Mrs. Ida M. Galloway, chairman
of the Potomac Auxiliary, and (seat
ton matrons who have ust finished
ed) Mrs. Van Norman, two Washing
making a lot of candles for use in the
trenches.
This is their candle "recipe":
Cut a sheet of paper, say this news-
paper after reading it, into strips,
about two inches wide, roll tightly
tie with a string, boil in parafine for
Lutherans Prepare For
A Great Celebration
New York, Oct. 18. Lutheran con
gregations and other branches of
the reformed church throughout the
world are completing plans for the
celebrations to be held at the end of
this month in honor of the quadri
centennial of the great historical
event, when the German monk, .Mar
tin Luther nailed his 95 theses on the
chapel at Wittenberg and thus be
gan his fight for the Reformation.
Elaborate festivals in celebration
of the anniversary are being ar
ranged in neatly all of the larger
cities of America. While the young
people's societies, leagues and educa
tional institutions of the Lutheran
church will take the leading part in
the observances, the churches of
other denominations are co-operating
in the plans.
, If the world wasn't enzajred in war
large pilgrimages representing almost
every country probably would havs
been directed to the famous places in
Germany connected with the life and
deeds of Martin Luther.
Martin Luther was born at Eisle
ben, on the border of the' Harz dis
trict of Saxony, in 1483. His pa
rents were poor, his father a miner
At about 14 he was sent to school at
Erfurt. Here, as at Eisenach,
where he had been previously, he
maintained himself by singing carols
under the windows of the townspeo
ple. His general education finished, he
yielded to his father's wish and be
gan the study of law. But after only
a few weeks of study he suddenly
threw it all up to his father's great
consternation and went into a mon
astery. His new life among the Augustin
ian monks was in extreme contrast
to his free and intellectual university
life. Finally he was summoned by
his superiors to a more busy and
useful life as teacher in logic and
ethics at the University of Witten
berg. It was from this Wittenberg
pulpit that he began his arduous fight
against many of the traditional cus
toms of the church and finally
against the pope himself.
On Oct. 31, according to an old
custom to celebrate the church anni
versaries by theological debates, he
nailed to the church door 95 theses
against sale of indulgences, in order
to give notice of his proposed dispu
tation. Luther did not realize at first
OTHER'S FRIEJI
FOR
Expectant Mothers
ABSOLUTELY SAFE
5AX BOOOY-
COOLO Y'LfcT
HrtV two-
Bits foR ft
kweev. old f-wv-J,
7
- '
two hours, and set out to harden.
The finished candle will Durn from
two to four hours.
what mighty forces he released when
he began his ppptjijtion to the church.
He regarded himself as a loyal son
of the church and hoped for a recon
ciliation with the pontiff. But the
first step once taken, the road be
came wider and wider.
The final break with Rome was in
evitable. In 1520 the pontiff took
the decisive step to send Luther a
papal bull, which condemned Luther's
writings and announced his excom
munication if he did not repent and
recant after 60 days. As an answer
Luther burned the papal bull as well
as the canon law, which taught the
supremacy of the pope-
The following year Luther was
summoned to appear before the Em
peror Charles V. at Worms. Luther
appeared before the famous diet of
Worms firm and collected. Mani
festations of approval shouted from
the housetops apprised him that tho
hearts of the German people were
with him. After reaffirming his
doctrines contained in his theses, he
folded his hands and looking to
Heaven exclaimed: "Here I stand; I
can do no other. God help me!"
The only apparent result of the con
ference was that another papal bull
was issued and Luther's writings
were burned in the market place. His
hold upon the people was undoubted
ly strengthened.
From this time on Luther worked
incessantly. Besides his labors in
the university at Wittenberg, he
preached and wrote many polemical
and expository works. One of his
greatest achievements was a careful
and scholarly translation of the
Bible. He died at Eisleben, the town
of his birth, in 1546, and was buried
in front of the pulpit in the Castle
Church at WiWttenberg.
MASK BALL FOR
THE TOBACCO F
A masked ball will be given Mon
day evening in the Keyser auditorium
for the benefit of the tobacco fund
for purchasing tobacco for the men
of the army and navy.
As this is the first masked ball to
be given this season it will probably
bring out a large crowd, and a neat
sum raised for the worthy cause.
Prize danjes will be held and candy
has been donated by Balkcom and
Crystal , Pharmacies for the prizes.
The naval band will furnish music for
the dance.
BENNY KNOWS HOW TO
THERE SH6 WAT5 Fd
rAE SH6S HK6 HO6Y
j.To t Bee 1
UNO
vJHO is this
I WEAK OLD )
2
IBISH SOLDIERS
IN f IB DESCRIBED
BY WM. REDMOND
BT ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dublin. Oct. 18. A series of vivid
pen pictures of the life of Irish sol
diers in France, written by the late
Major William Redmond, the distin
guished Irish leader, shortly before
his death at the front, have been col
lected - by Mrs. Redmond, and are to
be published shortly in the form of
a small memorial volume. Extracts
from some of the most striking of
these letters have been put at the
disposal of The Associated Press.
One of Major Redmond's letters
deals with the capture of Ginchy by
the Irish troops. "A notable feature
of the charge at Ginchy," he says,
"was that the Irishmen sang Irish
patriotic songs, one battalion . to the
other, as they charged, and the effect
created was most inspiring." The
scene after the battle he describes as
follows :
"The Germans surrendered very
freely, and in very few instances
waited for the bayonets of the Irish.
When able, the enemy made good his
retreat, but when this was not possi
ble, he surrendered and threw down
his arms. In some cases, however,
treachery was attempted.
"I met a Munster Fusilier who in
the confusion of the battle had got
separated from his battalion. He
was resting by the road waiting to
find some one who could direct him
to his headquarters. He was cov
ered with mud, but full of genuine
enthusiasm-
"I asked if his battalion had made
many prisoners. He replied 'es,'
but added that once or twice the
Germans had tried treacherous tricks.
Une party advanced as if to surren
der, shouting "Kamerad! Kamerad'
and when about twenty yards off
opened fire. I asked the Munster
man what then took place, and. he re
plied, 'We knocked them over till
further orders.
"One prisoner said, 'We do not
want war it is the war of the rich
man, and the poor always suffer.'
"Nearly all the Irish possessed
some trophies of the fight, and it
was a common sight to see even the
wounded on the stretchers clutching
in their hands German helmets and
bits of enemy equipment.
"Many of our wounded were . just
bays, and it was extraordinary how
they bore pain which must have been
intense. Very few murmurings were
heard. One young man said to "the
chaplain, 'Oh, Father, it is hard to
die so far from home in the wilds oi
France!' Certainly the fair land of
France just here did seem wild the
trees all torn and riven with snot and
the earth on every side plougned
with huge 6hell holes.
"The Irishmen, while clearly im
mensely pleased with themselves,
showed no undue exaltation, and
their demeanor towards their cap
tives was good-humored and even
kind. It was pleasant to sep how
tenderly they helped the wounded
Germans along, and down the road
from the dressing station it was a
common sight to see our men helping 1
along prisoners just as kindly as if
thev were their own comrades.
"The losses in the Irish battalions
were naturally heavy, but by no
means very great in view of the work
that had been done.
"It is not too much to say that the
whole army has expressed warm ad
miration for the action of the Irish
troops; and the capture of Ginchy,
coming hot-foot on the taking of Guil
lemont, has put, it is safe to say. an
entirely new complexion on the whole
position in this part of the. line.
"A captured German officer de
clared that his people had believed
that Ginchy could not be taken. 'But,
he added, 'you attacked us with devils,
not men no one could withstand
them'"
Arouses the Liver ,and Purifies the
Blood.
The Old Standard ereneral strenerth
ehine tonic. GROVE'S TASTELESS
chill TONIC, arouses the liver to ac
tion, drives Malaria out of the blood
and builds up the system. For adults
and children. 60c. Adv.
THE FLORIDATOWN-FERRY PASS
FERRYBOAT
"FRESH WATER"
On the Spanish Trail Rout
on regular schedule as followa:
Leave Ferry Pass, 7 and 10 a. m., 2:30
and 6 p. m.
Ieave Floridatown, 8 to 11 a. m., J. SO
and 8 p. m.
Special trips win be made as required.
J. R. M. GATES.
HANDLE PANHANDLERS.
j ' wen. SAY- why oonxv
AW SAY Br f Y 5eS WA,4r) -VOV) WAVT f rHUTe I
I i -res wai4t I y for a y I ah th' rAmure will i
T FOR I NU"f6y OVR TUtN YOU J
VYen ) I I KwJDAGuYsr""
( f tl-THe. OLD FASHvOieD X " f-Xo TV4E UTTLe OLD CHURCH "T $&(OW HO -I WAi4Yfd
zt. rfte oj shhhc- sj i well Rue - J &l rf) CO '
( VSMYLEMA CLL 0W6 A Q3C?feTO MAKfe HeR rAY JS VAfACK HOMfe TO ,
a"V vG VTVe.L.usHttJG bwdeJ 1 V Vs IOA-HO T
rrHE Weekly Dinner Dance at the
X San Carlos Cafe will be held on this
evening from seven to eleven. Table
d hote dinner will be served from 6 to 8:30.
Also regular cafe service a la carte. Music
by the Military Saxaphone and Drum Quin
tette. Table reservations may be made by
phoning 2080, l. "
Daily Weather
Report
U. S. Department of Agriculture,
Weather Bureau.
Charles F. Marvin, Chief.
DAILY WEATHER BULLETIN
Pensacola, Oct. 18, 1917.
Pensacola's Temperature Data.
Highest on record for October, 95
degrees.
Lowest on record for October, 35
degrees.
Highest temperature 24 hoursend
ing 7 p. m., 78 degrees.
Lowest temperature 24 hours end
ing 7 p. m., 71 degrees. .
Day temperatures in October, usu
ally rise 77 degrees.
Night temperatures in October usu
ally fall to 62 degrees.
Pensacola's Rainfall Data.
Rainfall for 24 hours ending 7. p.
m., .24 inches.
Normal rainfall for the month of
October 4.08 inches.
Total rainfall this month to 7 p.
m., .43 inches.
Total excess this year to Sept. 30th,
2.12 inches.
Humidity: 7 p. m., 96 per cent.
Barometer: 7 p. m., 29.96.
IWeatherl
Tem
Precip
I
perature1
itation
Stations:
7 p.m.
24 hra
7
p-ra
high
ending
7
p. ZXL
est
yes-
'day
Abilene, clear 52
Atlanta, clear 70
Boston, cldy 59
Buffalo, cldy 66
Baltimore, clear .... 60
Chicago, cldy 50
Denver, cldy 34
Galveston, rain 72
Green Bay. cldy ....44
Hatteras, clear 70
Jacksonville, pt. cldy 74
Kansas City, clear .. 40
Knoxville, rain 72
Louisville, cldy 72
Memphis, cldy 56
60
72
58
79
62
68
40
82
60
78
79
46
TP
78
82
42
84
80
88
56
39
52
78
78
80
78
64
79
76
40
86
88
68
62
28
.01
.02
.46
.06
.10
.12
.36
.01
.16
.88
.25
.04
.06
Minneapolis, snow . . 32
Mobile, clear 74
Montgomery, rain .. 74
New Orleans, clear. 78
New York, cldy . . . . 56
North Platte, clear. 32
Oklahoma, clear ... 46
Palestine, cldy 58
Pensacola, clear .... 74
Phoenix, clear 72
Pittsburg, rain 68
Portland, Ore., clear. 62
St. Louis, cldy 48
San Francisco, clear. 72
Sheridan, cldy 32
Shreveport, cldy .... 58
Tampa, rain 78
Toledo, cldy 64
Washington, clear . . 58
Williston, clear 26
.01
.12
.24
.01
,01
.04
.02
.02
Weather, barometer readings, wind
direction and wind velocity at 7 p. m,
along the Gulf coast.
Brownsville, clear, 29.84, E.
Corpus Christi, cldy, 29.98, N 28.
Galveston, rain, 29.96, N 20.
New Orleans, clear, 29.90, SW.
Burwood, clear, 29.92, SW.
Mobile, clear, 29.92, S.
Penseacola, clear, 29.96, SW 11.
Ppalachicola, pt. cldy, 29.96 SE.
Tampa, rain, 30.00, N.
Miami clear.29.98, NE 10.
Jacksonville, pt. cldy, 30.02, E 10.
Hatteras, clear, 30.16, E 10.
BALKCOn DRUG CO.
The Prescription Store."
Phone 19 or 123.
ABBOTT AUTO
REPAIR CO.
a!fox and Gregory Streets
Phone 415
GET AN
ELECTRIC IRON
DO THINGS NEATLY, SPEEDILY
AND COMFORTABLY.
Pensacola Electric Co.
PHONE 2010
BUY
Gonzalez Corn Meal
A AT YOUR GROCERS.
A 0ae table meal ground in Pensaoola
'of the choicest milling- com,
M. F. Gonzalez & Co.,
Pensacola. Ft a.
EVERLASTING
Fabrics Company
L. E. NOBLES & CO.
Hart Schaffner & Marx, and
Kirschbaum Suits. t
Yur Money's WertW or Yeur Men?
re oirt att
Will C. Diffenderfer
Sells Men's Wrist Watches That Are
Guaranteed.
"The House of Reliable Good?
14 South Palafox Street.
SPRINKLE'S MARKET
Fresh Home - Grown
Meats, Poultry, Eggs
and Vegetables
phone rts
Pensacola Buggy Works
STUDE BAKER CARS.
Repair Parte Accessories
and Supplies.
Phone 800.
108 N. Palafex St.
J. P. REMICH & SONS
"THE STORE THAT SATISFIES"
REMICH'S GROCERY SPECIALS
ALWAYS SATISFY
Phone 722
MARSTON & QUINA,
West Florida's Oldest Furniture
House.
exclusive Agents Glob. Wernicke
ca
Try the "Want Ad Way
BY AHERN..J

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