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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, November 12, 1917, Image 1

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TH E WE A THER.
Fair Monday,- except showers extreme
northwest portion. Tuesday, showers, ex.
cept fair northwest portion.
Highest temperature yesterday. 85 de
gree'; lowest, 66 degrees.
WEST FLORIDA MUST
FEED ITSELF I
VOL. XX. NO. 308.
PENSACOLA; FLORIDA, MONDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 12, 1917.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
GRAND RALLY
KELLEY BOYS
AIR LANES ACROSS
COUNTRY ARE FIXED
ACCEPTS BIG
RAILROAD JOB
BIG F
AT
L - Til .
U
1
WEXT TUESDAY
When the Big Y. M. C. A.
Drive" Will Be Inaugurat
ed in Pensacola.
EVERY YOUNG MAN
IN CITY INVITED
Organization Will Be 2 Unit
of the $35,000,000 Country-wide
Campaign.
I
1V
I'- . ; :
:: . :..::: .y.-2 .-.
The boys' organization in the big
Y. M. C. A. drive In ifs $35,000,000
campaign, as far as Pensacola is con
cerned; is progressing splendid
ly; "and the "Clg military rally
which has been arranged for Tuesday
evening at 7:30 o'clock. The high
school auditorium promies to see the
largest gatnering of it3 kind ever
held in Pensacola. Every boy and
young man in Pensacola between the
ages of 12 and 21 years. Is not only
invited, but ISxpected to attend this
rally, which '.will be addressed by Col
onel Davis, commanding officer at
Fort Barrancas, and Captain Bennett, j
commandant of tne navy aeronautic
station.
Organized entirely upon military
lines, this boys' movement is appeal
ing very strongly to the youth of
Pensacola, particularly when it is con
sidered that it is the first organiza
tion wftich has been formed through
which the boys, not alone of Pensa
cola and West Florida, but the entire
nation, will have any concrete part
In rendering assistance to the gov-
eminent in tne great worm war oe
tng waged-in the name of liberty, and
for the perpetuity of Democracy. '
The plan of the organization' is to
enlist all of the boysand young men
of the nation between the ages of 12
and 21 years in units of regiments on
purely military lines. A condition
precedent to an, enlistment is that a
boy must pledge himself to pay into
the organization between now and
April 1, 1918, $10 from his own earn
ings. This money mar be paid, in
cash from the savings of the hoy, or
may be pai In Installments- A cer
tificate of membership in the organi
zation ha3 been provided by the Y.
M. C. A., under the auspices of whicti
the movement is being conducted.
This certificate is drawn . upon the
same lines as a coubon bond the
main body of the instrument contain
ing the boy's pledge of his subscrip
tion, while a number of coupons to
be detached as installments are paid,
forms the balance of the instrument.
When all of "the coupons have been
liquidated, the certificate is receipted
and delivered to the menlber-
Promotions in the organization are
won by the boys through their activ
ity In. securing recruits for the move
ment. A boy who pledges $10 auto
matically becomes a member of the
organization as a private. He islhea'i
expected to Decome active in the pro
curement of recruits and upon secur
ing one recruit he is "promoted to cor
poral; two recruits, to sergeant; three
recruits, to a second lieutenancy, and
io on.
Organization work is being taken
up through all of the Sunday, as
well as the secular schools of the
country, arid by the end of the coming
week ft is confidently expected by the
local promoters of the work that Es
eabia county will have a majority of
her boys enrolled in the ranks of this
big nation-wide army of young pa
triots whose privilege it will be to
stand side by side with their fathers
in the great national work of con
ducting the war to a successful and.
glorious concIusloHr ar"
SCOTT M. LOFTIN
Local Alttny
To Go With
East Coast
IS APPOINTED ASSISTANT GEN
ERAL SOLICITOR FOR THE
ROAD WILL LIVE IN JACKSONVILLE.
73 MILLIONS IN FOOD
STORED IN NEW YORK
Now York, Nov. 11. Secret service
agents discovered foodstuffs and
other property valued at more than
seventy-three' umiion ouTIars stori
in warehouses herewhich was never
reported to Th"e government as re
quired under the trading with the
enemy act. This is only a small part
of what Is expected to be uncovered
before the search ends, it is said.
SUGAR GROWERS
FALL IN LINE.
New Orleans, Nov. 11. Louisiana's
entire sugar crop is at the disposal of
the government, and J. C. LeBour
gers, chairman of the allotment com
mittee of the American Can Growers
Association, has so notified the food
administration. The industry will
observe all orders of Pie administra
'aH, he said-?
Scott M. Lof tin, one of the best
known lawyers in the state, has ac
cepted the position of assistant gen
eral solicitor for the Florida East
Coast Railroad, and will leave . Pen
sacola on January 1st to take up his
new duties in Jacksonville.
The announcement will be a soiree
of sincere regret to Mr. Lof tin's f el
low members of the bar in Pensacola,
as well as to Peniacolians generally,
for Mr. Loftin, during his residence
here, has been nrominently identified
with the upbuilding of the city, and
his loss Will be keenly felt."
" In discussing- - hia - removal frora
Pensacola last fight, STr. Loftin: ex
pressed deep regret that he leav
ing, and voiced his appreciation for
the help of .Pensacolians in whatever
degree of success he has attained.
Looking to the future, he said, how
ever, that his new duties offered so
much in the way of opportunity that
he could Hot resist the proposition,
even at a sacrifice.
Mr. Loftin was born in Montgom
ery, and came to Pensacola when h
was nine years of age. He was ed
ucated in the public schools here, and
at the age of 12 started work to earn
enough money to attend college.
This he did, and later studied law
at Washington and Lee University at
Lexinsrton, Va. At the age of 18 his
disabilities were removed, and a year
later fie was admitted to1;he bar.
Since the beginning of his prac
tice of law, Mr. Loftin has been'actlve
in politics, and when 21 years old was
elected to represent Escambia county
in the state legislature- At 23 ' he
was appoltned to fill the unexpired
term as solicitor of the Court of Rec
ord of Escambia county, rendered va
cant by the resignation of Charles B.
Parkhill. From thaIime until the
expTfatlon of his term in June, 1917,
Mr. Loftin filled the offfceof county
solicitor.
As a member of the local bar, he
commands the respect and admiration
of his fellovrn&arristers. and during
his practice here has made a specialty
of maritime law. in practically every
Tecent libel action of consequence in
the Federal Court here he has been
identified with either blie side or the
other.
Mr. Laftin Is also prominent in fra
ternal circles, having been Grand
Chancellor for the Knights of Pyth-
ia. and later elected supreme repre
sei. l"ve. He is a menber of vari
ous other organizatioins.
Misses Katherine and Josie Loftin,
sisters -of Mr. Loftin, will remain in
Pensacola foffhe present. bu will
later join hmf In Jacksonville.
Until the firstof the "year, Mr.
Loftin will maT?6"frequent trips to
Jacksonville, and leaves tonight for
Miami to represent the railroad in a
case to be tried there.
BE TRIED
PEIilSACOLA
Alleged Slackers, Arrested
V
in Okaloosa, Up Before
Judge Sheppard.'
TO
II
BIG, DOCKET ON
FOR COMING WEEK
Including Stevens Espionage
- - - ' t:
Case, One I4quor and
Many Civil Cases.
Federal court for the northern dis-:
trict of Florida enters upon its sec-
ond week for the fall term today, and;
it is probable that much mora' busi
ness will be brought before Judge'
William B. Sheppard than during the
opemncr week.
cases for trial, those arraigned vilf
consume, more time, as many of im
portance will be brougnt up.
on the docket for the weeK is tne case
of Gustave Stevens, charged with vio
Iating the espionage act by threatenr
ing the life ofTi.esident "TVilson,5
Stevens was brought to Fenaacoia
Saturday bmy a deputy marshal, in
companv with Waldo and Robinette,
The other two entered pleas of guilty,
but Stevens stoutly maintained . his
innocence, and his " triat will probably
be one of the featuretTbf this term.
Interest also attaches to the trial,
which will also. 'probably occur this j
week, of the twb'Kelley hoys, from
Okaloosa county, charged with' violat
ing the draft act, and wilfully fail
ing to register for military service on
June 5th. ' ,
The Kelleys were among number
of federal prisoners brought here last
night .and IodereA In th-countyiJJI.,,
They were arrested last summer and
after a preliminary hearing before
Commissioner Sullivan were bound
ver for investigation by the grand
jury at the fall term of the court.
John King, charged with selling
liquor to members of the military
forces of the United States while in
uniform, is also in the county jail
awating trial.
A number of cases have been acted
upon by. the grand jury, though the
presentments have not vet been
made. This may be done this morn
ing and all other cases broueht for
immediate trial-
In addition to the laree number of
criminal cases on the docket, there
are many civil cases which frequently
occupy several days.
Nearly all of the smaller nrnwrn-
nons were completed last week, and
the defendants fnfnrrl nr
enlarged. Approximately sixty cases
were disposed of, and very few were
continued ior-the term.
ALLIES
- M iw, til
if f fm)
New York, Nov. Il Plana for
estabUshQtg transcontinental air
ways as mala arttries of air navi
gation in the United States were
approved by the executive com
mittee of the Aero Club of Amer
ica todxf' Under the plans, the
airways will be named Woodrow
Wilson," "Wright Brothers."
"Langlty." Chanute and Bell."
The Wright Brothers line runs
from Washington through Vir
ginia, North Carolina, Georgia,
Alabama. MississippC XouiaUoa,
Texas, New Mexico, Arizona,
ending at San Diego, Cal.
RflOL
0 PEN
S
FOUR AUTOS
BURN AT THE
LEON FAIR
THIS MUG
With a Long List of Varied
Exhibits and Many
Amusement Features.
NEW BUILDINGS
ALL COMPLETED
TRUCK AND 8 PASSENGER MA
CHINES DEMOLISHED. CROWD
TOOK LIVELY INTEREST IN
THE CONFLAGRATION
(Speeches and 'Plane Flights
Will Enliven Program.
Site Recommended.
- "And Where's you papa,5 little girlT Oh, I ! At the front with the
army, eh? Well, you can het 111 take good care of you tfiThe gets home.
Ivea little, girl xJike you over in England." Tommy and the children of
France re allies. Groups like this are to Fe seen wherever British sol
diers are quartered in French towns. ' .
Dim 13 MOOS a
sUHqus
London, Nov. " 11. The Bolsheviki revolution in Petrograd is reported
approaching collapse.' Regiments; loyal to Kerensky are marching on the
capital. Fighting is under way in the city, according to Pelrograd . re
ports. Tvo Tsarkoe-S.elo near Petrograd, where former Ejgiperor Nicholas
livedf capWred hy T8ya"t f orce3.TReb els" retreated fo Peoirrad "Tn disor-'
derly mobs. Red Guard defeated in Moscow.
SHIPS REPAIRED IN
RECORD TIME AT
NEW DRY DOCK HERE
WOODMEN WANTED
FOR THE ARMY
Experienced woodmen are wanted
at once for service in the aviation
section of the signal corps, accord
ing to announcement made yesterday
at the local army recruiting1 station.
At 10 o'clock yesterday morning
the American schooner Sam C. Men
gel, used by the great lumber firm of
Louisville, for the importation of ma
hotranv throu&rh Pensacola. was
docked by the Bruce T)rydock Com
pany, for repairs to her propeller and
shaft. At 5 o clock all repairs had
been completed and the vessel was
again resting on the bosom of Pen
Eacola hav. after receiving record-
breaking service at the hands of Pen
sacola'g newest industry.
This is the second" Doat to be docked
by Che comp"afly since opening for
business, the Yakima, of the Saun
ders Fishing Fleet, being launched
Saturday afternoon. The American
schooner, John Francis, is scheduled
to be docked t53ay-
ARMENIAN GIRLS ARE
SOLD FOR 8cts. EACH
A special effort will be made to en
list men with the necessary quali-'from their homes and sell to Turkish
New York, Nov. 11. At a mass
meeting held heff" for Armenian
Syrian relief, ?TenrjV3!brgent'Eau. for
mer ambassador to Turkey, declared
that nearly a million Armenians and
Syrian have been slain by Turks
since, the war started. Hundreds of
Turks, he said, entraired in the traf
ficking of girls, whom they kidnap
fications for this service, as the great
demand insures early promotion.
As there are many saw mills in this
part of the country, it is believed
that the announcement will have a
special appeal, and that many from
West Florida will volunteer for this
service.
Woodmen for the aviation section
will be sent to Vancouver Barracks,
Washington, for service. .
army officers for annroximatelv
cents eacn.
80
Ten Million Slsn Pledge
Washington, Nov. 11. More " than
ten million . American housewives
pledged themselves to follow the food
administration's conservation direc
tions, it is announced. The pledges
were obtained i na two weeks' campaign.
KERENSKY FLED CONCEALED IN AUTO
. Paris, Nov. 11. Wireless dispatches from a Swedish town say Pre
mier Kerensky has two hundred thousand men supporting him. The pre
mier left Petrograd last Tuesday, for general headquarters, concealed in
the bottom of an automobile ambulance, accompanied by General Alex
iff, former commandefln chief, and Foreign Minister Terestchenko-
ADVANCE OlSf ITALY STOPS
Italian Headquarters. By Associated Press. Nov. 10. Observers
from advanced positions along the front say the Austrian advance is not
showing the impetuous rush of previous days, evidently slackening as it
gets farther from base. Fighting has taken a wide range, from Trentino
eastward to Tagliamento, thence southward to the sea.
Tallahassee, Fla., Nov. 11. (Spe
cial.) There was wild excitement
among the immense crowds on the
Leon County Fair ground Friday
night, when, at 9:S0 o'clock, three au
tomobiles and a big motor truck were
burned. All of the cars were com
pletely demolished by the flames from
burning. gasoline except one of a pop
ular make, which had all of the seat
and back portion of the body burned
away, but which, when cranked, came
up the hill to town for repairs.
The big truck was a total loss, it
being uninsured. It belonged to a
local bottling works." It was from
this truck' that all of the other cars
were ignited by burning gasoline,
which was scattered by the explosion
of the tank. Many cars were parked
closely together just within the gates
of the ground, and ifls considered re
markable that even more did not
catch fire.
, The fire started " when .'the truck's
engine was- ehked -down- -A little
gasoline was taken from the tank to
encourage the carhfetor. Some of
it leaked on the ground at the rear
of the' car when the gas was being
Today the eyes of Escambia tarn
to Molino, where the county fair
opens, and exhibits from every pari
of the county have been assembled to
show the agricultural possibilities of
this section.
For weeks the fair grounds in Riv
erside park have been a scene of great
activity. Carpenters, painters, farm
ers and scores of others, workmen
and exhibitors, have been laboring at
top speed to prepare for the opening
day. As a result, everything is in
readiness for the" opening this Tnorn
ing at 10 o'clock.
The site selected for the fair is an
admirable one, bordering the river,
and ottering a vantage point from
which the flights of the naval air
planes may be seen.. In arranging the
groundgT evy convenience for the
comfort""of the visitors has been in
stalled, tables placed on the lawns
for those Mho wish to spend the day
and bring their own lunches.
Ample amusement features hsve
been arranged, though the fair man
agement is stressing The. agricultural
exhibits,. whlTTr are felt to be truly
representative. The poultry, live
stock, and agricultural buildings ar
ready, and'the exhibits will be large
in number and" rich- jn variety.
In addition to the amusement fea
tures and the agricultural exhibits,
speakers from the State College wili
address the crowds on the subiecti
RECRUITING MORE
ACTIVE IN PAST WEEK
PERSHING PRAISES NAVY
With Acerican Army, France, Nov 11. By Associated Press. Gen
eral Pershing said to a correspondent today: "Troops and supplies are
arriving in increasing numbers- Thanks to British and French navies,
submarines have ndt claimed the life of a single American soldier on a
troop ship bound for France' Conditions on the American sector con
tinue normal, with intermittent artillery firing on both sides.
FINLAND AT WAR RUSSIA IGNORED
Helsingfors, Finland, Nov. 11. A state of war is declared in Finland.
A provisional soldiers" committee ap pointed Sailor ScBiecks as commis
sary for Finland, succeeding Governor General Nekrasoff. The Diet is
in session, but the Russian representative therein was completely ignored
ffi.ffr0m C 0Ck- In 7 j of livestock, poultry and canning
nvwijwtig v v avut v viv . v.cx aaiii j it I CJUUS
oacK-iirea ana ignite 1 tne gasoline
on the ground. Then came the ex
plosion, which threw burning gasoline
onto the other cars.
A new car from Qufncy, . belonging
to a Mr. ward, was amone" the de- j
stroyed vehicles. Another was what ; ,
is known locally as the "death car," j Army recruiting in Tensacola has
because of the numerous accidents it (shown a tremendous gain during the
past week, a total of nine being se
cured for tile various branches, in
that time. With the completion of
the first draft quota, in practically
every par? of the counfry, voluntary
enlistment is 5eing Stressed, before
the second call is made, to give those
who registered an opportunity of se
lecting the branch of the service in
which they prefer t Serve.
Increase in enlistments here is
Iargelv due to the fact that more mei
have been working in this territory
recruiting for "the army. Special men
has beenin, one of them resulting in
the death of a prominent local young
man about a year ago near IJuH's
Pond, on the Meridian road.
SOUTH WILL CELEBRATE
GREAT TICK CAMPAIGN
Washington, Nov. 11. In Missis
sippi and eight other southern states
KrgtlAne ItoxrA Kuan oT.inf.A1 4 n V i . r 1 . a n t ' J" i i
.v uwu.io "v . 1 wizen eciit neie j rum neaufiuar-
mark the freeing from quarantine ters, co-operating with Hie officer
against cattle ticks. Nearly 66,000 j who h9 been here since the declara
tion or wur.
Those wl- have been sent of dyf-
ing the past week, up to and includ ing
three Tlt nigni, rc: Charies
Cogburne, R. A. Evans, Jesse L. Eg
erton, Henry C. Edwards, Jos. Febro
and C. H. Minnex, Sidney Uugan. JJu
gene Washington, and V7. II. Taylor,
negroes.
square miles of ternzorv to be Te
leased December 1st. This breaks all
records for tick eradication.
BIG PLANT WORKING
ON WAR ORDERS BURNS
GOVERNMENT TO STANDARDIZE BREAD
Washington, Nov. 11. Definite steps to standardize bread, looking to
lower prices, will bo taken tomorrow, when President Wijson Issues a proc
lamation placing all bakeries under government license on December 10th.
subjecting them to food administra tion rules, prescribing ingredients and
weights of loaves. Prices are not to be fixed, but with standardisation
it is expected that natural competition and simplification of distribution
will force down prices for pound loaves to 7c or Sc. Fancy breads will
be eliminated. The weights of loaves will be a pound, pound and a half.
two and four pounds. i
New York, Nov. 11. This city's
waterfront was the scene of another
disastrous fire today, when the Wash
burn Wire Company's factory, work
ing on government orders, burned.
The loss, .was estimaTeu at two mil
lion dollars. 5t is said that 25 Ger
mens and 200 Austrians are included
among the 1000 factory employees.
NEGRO KILLED FOR
WRITING NOTE.
Quitman, Ga.. Nov 11. Jesse Sta
ten, a negro, of Spain, Ga., was taken
from his home Friday night by un
known parties and shot todeath on a
lonely road. Near the body Mas
found an insolent letter addressed to
a young white woman of the community.
COL. HOUSE SEES KING GEORGE
London, Nov. 11. King George received Col. F. M. House of the
Amtrican commission to the inter-allied conference, in audience today.
Colonel House required no introduction to the King, whom he bad met
before. " .
HAWAIIAN QUEEN DEAD
Honolulu, Sawaii, Nov. IL -Queen Lilioukalini, of Hawaii, died this
morning- Deatn was expected ior several days.
FRANCIS WATCHING THE REVOLUTION
Edward Lee the Hero
of Perdido Bear Hunt
Petrograd, Nor. 11. Davia R. Fran-
. a
cis, the Americnan amoassaaor, wno
has been closely following events of
the new revolution, said he has been
trying vainly for two days to find
any member of the provisional gov
ernment. "I am awaiting develop
ments," he said.
Hers is a story about how a party
of local sportsmen went out fishing
yesterday afternoon and caught a
bear. They incidentally caught 41
trout and some red fish- But the big
doings centered around bruin, with
Ed. Lee the hero of the occasion.
&est the story be doubted, here are
the witnesses, all composing a party
that went down to the Perdido for a
afternoon's spTSrt:" Gerald Msssey,
Ernest Carbine, John Ether i(JgS, Na
poleon and Robert Andrews.
The story goes that the party had
good fishing for a time, until Mr.
Lee got restless and went back up on
the bluffs to look around. He hadn't
looked very far before he saw "a black
lump ahead of him that resembled a
stump; but he was astounded to hear
the stump emit a growL
Alas, it, was a bear.
'- Mr. Lee went to the beach to tell
xiAnda. There are- those who say
he lost no time on the errand; but
that is neither here nor. there. The
bunch went up, a shotgun was gotten,
and a charge of No. 8 shot poured
into the animal. The charge wasn't
heavy enough, however, to do more
than rat some ginger into the bear's
retreat.
But the most intere?t!ng feature
was yet to come. Naturallv the crowd
explored around a biCTnd suddenly
came upon two cubs. In gome mys
terious way, however, these also dis
appeared. Down on UTe beach the
party learned from ex-County Com
missioner William Shelby, who was
encamped there, that the animals paid
him a visit Saturday night, making
tracks all around his tent.
By way of supplementing "the story
of the lost bear, it was said the par
ty s real catch amounted to 41 three
pound trout and '25 pounds of red
fish-

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