OCR Interpretation


The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, December 29, 1917, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Florida

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062268/1917-12-29/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

.1 "
THE WEATHER.
'Local rln Saturday; colder In north
fiortloa. Sunday, fair In north, local rains
n central an dsouth portion.
Highest temperature yesterday, 56 de
greet; lowest, 42 degrees.
i
WEST FLORIDA HAS
MANY ATTRACTIONS
FOR THE HOME
SEEKER :
VOL. XX NO; $63.
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA, SATURDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 29, 1917.
RICE FIVE CENTS
I A II II II I II I II I II I II I II f II I If II
ALL RAILROAD SYSTEMS
ARE TAKEN OVER BY U. S.
250,000 Miles of American
Railway Systems Pass Un
. der Direction of the U. S.
CLEAR TRAFFIC !
IS FIRST AIM
McAdoo Appoints Advisory
Board Composed ot i1 we ,
Biggest R. R. Officials.
- By Associated Press '
Washington, Dec. 28. At noon to
day approximately 250,000 miles of
American railway systems silently j
, merged into one great continental j
chain for the winning of the war.
Under President Wilson's decision, ,
the great event, regarded by many -as
the opening or a new epoch in
government operation and control of
public utilities, "passed by - without j
any formal ceremony. , j
Director General McAdoo was con-
ferring at the time with line members ,
of the Tailroads war. board, ana kod
ert S. Lovett, chairman of the prior
itv shinment ' committee. -
Thi members of the war board
all railroad executives who have
4 been working, within the limitations
of law, to do , what the government
itself now proposes to accomplish,
pledged their support to tfhe govern
ment administration, as nas practic
ally every railroad man in the coun
try. . ' - "
Orders for. the actual unification
of the lines, common use of f acili
ties and eouloment. which are ex
pected to raise the freight jam imm
diatelv will be the first results.
As the first practical step in the
government's operation of railroads,
Director General McAdoo drafted
the railroad's war board into the
government service ; to work out
.. plans of unified operation and sub
mit them to him for approval.
The following five railroad execu
tives, each a leader in the business
of transportation, will work out the
Diana for weldinir 250.000. miles of
railroad Into one continental system
for winning the war:
Farrf ax Harrison, president of the
Southern.
' Julius Kruittschnitt, chairman of
the board of the Southern Pacific.
l- ' Samuel Bea," - president - of sthe
Pennsylvania.
Hale Holden, president of the
Burlington. . .
Howard Elliott, of the New Haven.
- THe financial question was touched
but lightly; in the conference. The
railroad executives described the sit
uation to Secretary McAdoo and told
him just what they need in the way
of . government guarantees and "en
couragement of security issues.
Operating problems were gone into
at length. The railroad executives
promised their fullest co-operation
in 1 carrying out any - measures . the
director general may , think neces
sary. '
'Mr. McAdoo said he- had made no
arrangements in regard to a staff,
but the presence at the conference of
John Barton Payne, 7of Chicago, head
of the shipping board's legal staff,
led to some speculation that Mr.
Payne might become an assistant to
the director general.'
The railroad heads were visibly in
a better frame of mind after the con
ference than they were before talk
ing with the director.
At the conclusion of - the confer
ence with the railroad heads, Mr.
McAdoo announced . that he had
called on the members of the rail
road war board to work out a gen
eral .plan of operation.
It is indicated that the war board
will continue as the operating board
in charge of the country's roads. It
will.be assisted . by its numerous
committees throughout the country,
including the operating committee
of Eastern railroads, headed by A.
W.Thompson, of the Baltimore &
Ohio.
sue no orders or directions for the
sue no orders of directions for the
immediate present, but will await
recommendations of the war board
before taking, any measures to clear
the congestion choking railroad ter
minals and tracks in the east.
"Whatever ccn be done to make
the roads more efficient," said Mr.
McAdoo. "will be done as soon as we
find out what is necessary.'
Tonight McAdoo issued his first
formal order designed to speed up
the freight movement, telegraphing
all railroad presidents and directors,
instructions to move freight by the
most? convenient and direct route.
IT. S. TAKES OVER 200
RUSSIAN LOCOMOTIVES
Washington, Dec 28. Two hun
dred locomotives under construction
in this country for Russia will be
taken over as part of the govern
ment's plan for the quick improve
ment of American railroad equip
ment. SUSPECTED SPY HELD I
BY THE UNITED , STATES. I
""
editor or tre KocKrord,-lllisois, "Ger
man la," which was barred from the
mails, was turned over to the United
Ftates marshal today -by the Camp
Sheirdan military police, and Is being
held as a suspected German spy.
I
WILL NOT CALL
DEFERRED DRAFT
BEFORE FEB. 15
(By Associated PressJ
Washington, Lee- 28. Provost
Marshal . General - Crowder has
notified State governos that
there will be no more formal
calls for deferred percentages of
the present quota of national
army men before February 15.
All men who have been called,
but whose order numbers are so
low they are not actually In
camp, will get the benefit of the
new classification.
Boards have been instructed,
however, to continue sending;
men . to. make up deficiencies In
the quota caused by rejection of "
men already In the service, until
they have enough men finally
placed In the first class.
They were notified also to ex
pect very shortly calls for men
skilled In special lines of work.
STATISTICS ON
ARMY'S HEALTH
ARE PUBLISHED
GENERAL DECREASE OF TOTAL
DEATHS SHOWN FOR WEEK,
WITH 248 DEAD FROM DISEASE
IN ALL CAMPS.
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Dec. 28. Deaths ; from
disease in the national army during
the week ending December 21st, num
bered 118 against 97 the week before
and in the national guard 120 against
165, as shown In a summary of army
health conditions made public today
by the war department. Of the na
tional army deaths, 77 were due ; to
pneumonia ; and of those in the na
tional, guard, 87.V---i. . -vvf '-
"The non-effective rate of the entire
National guard - for - the week," says
the report, "was 47.8 per thousand
against 46.5 for the preceding week;
the . admission rate for disease was
31.1 per thousand against 32.6. The
non-effective rate for the national
army was 41.8 per thousand against
40.4; -the admission rate for disease
was 34 3 against 34.7." '
In Southern camps measles has con
tinued to spread in the 34th. division
at Camp Doniphan, Okla.,' the .sum
mary says, but In father divisions , or
the national guard, the number of
new cases is small.
Many new cases of pneumonia are
still being reported from the. 31st di
vision at Camp Wheeler, Macon, Ga.,
and the 36th division at Camp Bowie,
Tex.
Meningitis has increased . at Camp
Doniphan and has decreased in ail
other divisions.
Communicable disease . rates are
comparatively low in all divisions of
the national army except the Slst.
Camp Jackson, Columbia, S. C; 82nd, I
Camp Gordon, Atlanta; . 87th, Camp
Pike, Arkansas, and the 90th., Camp
Travis, Texas. Measles has increased
at Camp Gordon and large numbers
of new cases are reported at Camps
Pike and Travis.
Pneumonia rates have generally im
proved except at Camp Travis where
80 new cases were reported.
The number of new cases of men
ingitis has been small in all divisions
except at 81st, which reported 37.
The outbreak of scarlet fever at
Camp Pike still continues.
A large number of new cases of!
mumps are reported in several di-1
visions of the national guard and na
tional army.
CLAIM GERMAN ART I
BOARD LOOTS WORKS '
Washington, Leo. 28 German's cre
ation of a so called commission of
experts with functions announced a
the protection of works art In in
vaded Italy is declared by semi-offtciat
dispatches from Rome to be only a
cloak to conceal the looting of art
works.
AMERICAN TROOPS IN FRANCE
CONTINUE WORK DESPITE SNOW
With the American Army in France,
Dec 27. (By the Associated Press)
For three days anow has been falling
intermittenly throughout the Ameri
can xone Interfering with the train
ing of troops and with communica
tions. No serious difficulty has been
experienced thus far in supplying the
troops In the out lying towns and
districts, but it la feared that the sup-
Storm wnnu ,
Motor trucks today were crawling
over the hilly roads at a snail's pace
because of the drifts and density of
the srow. Numerous accidents were
reported Md the weather was so cold
of GMiffjrs to eouipiiieSt
DRIVE
Unofficial Discussions Print -
ed in London and Paris
Reject Proposals.
BRITAIN KEEPING
"STIFF UPPER LIP"
Believe Germany Fears Sep
arate Peace Because of
Bolshevik Influence.
(By Associated Press) "
London, rec. 28. A statement pur
porting to giveC in broad outline the
view taken iniygh British political
circles of the German peace terms is
printed by the Daily Express. It says
that two things are known here, first
that Germany does not, want a sepa
rate peace with Russia," but a general
peace, and second, that Germany fears
Bolshevik influence, being afraid of its
effects on the German working classes.
'A stiff upper lip is -the attitude in
this country at resent," the state
ment declares. cThe peace terms are
not sufficient to lead us to lay down
our arms. We must , be watchful. It
is up to Germany td'showthat she is
sincere." , . . "-'- , .
FRANCE IS OPPOSED r
j1 TO.PEACEiANS.
Paris, Dec. .28. -France will not ac
cept a peace based on conditions be
fore the war' foreign; Minister Pichon
declared in 'replying in the. Chamber
of Deputies . today to terms of the
central powers outlined to Russia. He
asserted that Germany was endeavor
ing to involve France in its negotia
tions with the ' Bolsheviki, -but, that
the war would , go ; on whether or not
Russia made a ; separate peace. . .
".The foreign 'minister said Germany
was seeking to protract the; negotia
tions with aher Russians, re-establish
ing commercial relations;in the mean
Ume. 's-?:?
AMERICA'S; WAR AIMS :
? ARE ALREADY KNOWN.
Washington, Dec. " 28. : America's
war alms are regarded by t' admin
istration as sufficiently disclosed in
President Wilson's reply to the Pope's
last peace proposal and recent, mes
sage to Congress. Consequently,- un
less they are further developments in
the peace propaganda: set afoot by
Germans and Austrians through ne
gotiations with Russia Bolsheviki,
there is no intention on the part, of the
United States government of attempt
ing to elaborate or expand the state
ments of American purpose.
SUMMARY OF OPINION
. IN ALLIED NATIONS.
German terms for a general peace
and the suggestions that the entente
join the RusEo-German peace confer
ence have brought no immediate re-
sponse. American, British and French
leaders are silent, probably awaiting
a direct message from the peace mak
ers at Brest-Htovsk.
The attitude of the American gov
ernment has not changed and it i3
m "5"" r'".,;;':
and no indemnities are insincere. An
alleged view of . the . German peace
terms in high British circles says that
Germany desires a general peace and
does not want a separate peace with
Russia. British newspaper opinion is
divided.
A recess in the peace negotiations
hace been taken and the conference
will bo resumed January 4 at a place
not yet determined. Leon Trotzky,
the Bolsheviki foreign minister, is
said to be preparing a new appeal to
the entente allies to join the confer-
ence. It is inaicatea in nussian as
patches received in London that the
Bolsheviki place most of their hopes
In retaining power in the consumma
tion of a peace which will meet the
wishes of the Russian population, thus
(Continued cn Page Three)
that many cars were frozen and could
not be moved.
The troops of a newly landed di
vision, composed of former national
guardsmen, tonight reached the town
In which they are to be billeted tem
porarily after marching for two days
through the storm. Notwithstanding
the severe weather, their experience
seemed to have done them more good
than harm, fcr the men are rapidly be
coming hardened. Former guardsmen
of another division carried on their
work in spite of the storm, engaging
in bayonet, gteronde and automatic
rifle practice without interruption.
Troops from the Southern states
have been quite uncomfortable in the
last few days but Ihey are becom
ing accustomed to the cold and snow.
PEACE
GREBLE
S
. Camp Bowie Commander
Tells Senate Committee of
Lack of Necessities.
SHIPPING BOARD
PROBE CONTINUES
Admiral Bowles Outlines
' Legislation Needed; Make
Program a uc . ess.
Washington, Dec. 28.-Major Gen
eral jGreble; commander :-. of Camn
Bowie, Texas, testifying before the
senate military , committee, ctclared
the lives of many menwho recently
died there would have been saved if
winter- clothing, S?irTTc1ent tents to
avoid overcrowding-, and prpper hos
pital ..facilities" and sanitation hyi
been provided. He said that during
Nc-eir:ber a third of Sis command
passed through the hospital, w.th
deaths .from pneumonia, measles and
ether diseases averaging sixteen
daily. -;; . y . ;
1 TlID f A T CIITTI MP IC
I I UlVUll 1 1 lillj 1Q
CONFIRMED BY A. P.
(By Associated-iVess.)
NewTork, Dec. 28. In -iew of pub
lished statements attributed - to Gen
eral Tasker H. Bliss, chief of staff of
the army at "Washington, to the effect
that while in. France visiting Ameri
can headquarters he had never heard
of the incident of an American sentry
being, found with his throat cut after
the , German jraW, ,when an American
battalion was in the front line trenches
and that no such report -had reached
the war department, f the Associated
Press cabled V its ' correspondent with
the American army in France for more
definite . information as. to ; the source
of. his ' dispatch', on ;' this'subject,- De-
cemtr -2Sth,Jiutwi fJhstaiuUng :the tact
thaj the " original diapatch" stated tb-Ji
Incident had leeiv read from bulletins
sent to certain. American units. A
reply just received "from the corres
pondent says: .
"In regard to the .throat-cutting In
cident, the matter in my. dispatch wa.
copied from an official communication
to the troops, issued by' the general
commanding the division concernec"
A copy of the order Is in ray posses
sion. AERIAL OPERATIONS
FEATURE FIGHTING
Rome, Dec. 28.-Active patrolling
and aerial operations took place yes
terday but there was no renewal of
infantry fighting on 5 a large scale.
Following is today's report from
army headquarters.
"In the,: Ghidicarle ' and Largarinr,
valleys patrols were driven back on
the; Asiago plateau to the west of
Canovodi Sbtto, one of our compa
nies surrounded the garrison of an
enemy advanced post, capturing an
1 officer, 26 men and much war ma-
' terial. Between Cesuna and Canova,
our patrols raided the enemy line,
bringing back an officer and thirty
six men. .
"A powerful aquadron of Caproni
airplanes was sent against large hos
tile forces in the IToncnT valley and
bombarded them with very satisfac
tory results.
"From the Brenta to the coast
there were only artillery actions.
Paris Report.
Pans. Thursday, Dec. 27. The
French war office issued the follow
ing official statement tonight:
"In the Argonne we repulsed an
enemy surprise attack.
"On the right bank of the Meuse
the activity of the artillery on both
sides continued very lively in the re
gion of Caurieres wood and Bezon
vaux. Northeast of Benzonvaux our
batteries caught under their fire an
enemy troop construction which was
dispersed with loss.
WOULD
EXEMPT
BUILDING FROM TAX
Washington, Dec. 28. An outline
of the legislation wanted by the
shipping board to provide additional
powers. for the speeding. up the con
struction of the new merchant fleet,
Former Rear Admiral Bowles, as
sistant general manager of the
emergency fleet corporation told the
penate committee today that the
board desired authorization - to de
clare a war xene around TTpyards
territory, as well- as to commandeer
houses and local transportation fa
cilities so as to better care for the
workmen at the plants. . - . - .
. He also suggested that - congress
should protect shipbuilders from the
operations of the war excess profits
law. The operation of the law is so
uncertain now that builders are hav
ing : trouble placing contracts at a
reasonable price-
MEAT MONOPOLY AIRED AT
TRADE COMMISSION INQUIRY
Boston, Dec 28. The equewdng small dealers out of competition by
the alleged grasp of big packers upon the meat and allied industries of the
country, was depicted by witnesses before the federal trade commission
here investigating the meat Industry and its relation to the high cost of
living. Many witnesses gave their version of being driven out of business
by what they termed the trust, or or patting into the combine in order to
live.
Frances J. Heney, special counsel for the commission said that the pack
ers controlled the rendering business from its collection of butcher's waaie
to the manufacture of valuable by-products. By their methods, he added,
the commission sought to show tout a- man who bought a steak or roast
paid an unnecessary high price for his dinner.
Witnesses engaged in the rendering business asserted that the packers
sought to stifle competition by their methods, not only In th rflandering
ousiness out iraae in mes.es as wwu.
FOOD PROBE
BY SENATE
IS DELAYED
ABSENCE OF HOOVER FROM CAP
ITAL PREVENTS INVESTIGA
TION COAL SITUATION IS TAK
EN UP AND EXAMINED.
By Associated Press.
Washington, Dec. 28. When the
senate committee investigating th1
sugar shortage finally called for Food
Administrator Hoover today to glvu
his view of conditions, a letter from
Chief Counsel Lindley of the food ad
ministration, was presented saying
Mr. Hoover "had learned through the
public press' that he was to testify
today but had been called to Xew
York. ,
It is entirely likely that Mr. Hoover
will be . subpoenaed ' to testify, prob
ably next Wednesday. Committer
members believed Hoover had been
sufficiently notified and were surprised
at Judge Lindleys statement that
Hoover learned through newspapers
when he was expected. .
In view of the repeated attempts of
the Food Administrator to - be heard
previously ; Senator Yardman called
T. A. Ellis, of the food administration
to the witness chair, and under: ques
tioning Ellis, testified Chairman Reed
had.?notif ed..teim. lat. Saturday Mr.
Hoover'would be heard today and that
he" had given the information to Mr.
Hoover.
Counsel Lindley's lawyer, however,
declared he had gone to the capitol
yesterday to notify the committee that
he wolud be unable to appear today
but found all the se-nators at the
funeral of- Senator Xewlands.
. As Mr. Hoover did not appear today,
the committee - resumed investigation
of the coal situation with Y. B. Col-
ver, of the l-'c-cierai lrade commission
continuing on the stand.
Colver did not believe the United
States should s-nd coal to Italy or
France and paid Iyord Xortheliffe told
him that . England had enough coal
above ground to supply all Europe ex
cept Germany.
"It takes fiVe times aa long to send
coal from thh United States to Italy J
as from Wales to Italy," he said. !
oZZgSS cZ,o
coal to Italy," remarked Senator!
Reed. "Why .is it people were freez
ing in France last year and the Amer
ican nmbassarior was unable to keep)
his Paris residence warm?
"Transportation, I suppose," ans
wered Colver. J
"I think they could get it across the
channel If England had it," said Sen
ator Reed- "
BIG ESPIONAGE TRIAL
OPENS IN CHICACO
(By Associated Press.)
Chicago, Dec. 28. At the prelim
ary hearing on charges of failure to
report for the selective draft and of
violation of the espionage act against
Paul H. Billhuber. until recently an
aero engineer employed by the Dayton-Wright
Company, of Dayton,
Wallace S Whittaker, traffic mana
ger of the company, identified a cor
respondence file, together with maps,
drawings, plans, and secret minutes
of the aero company's startegy board
outlining war policies, which were
found in Blllhuber's rooms when he
was arrested several weeks ago.
MISSING VISITOR BELIEVED
DEAD; LAGOON TO BE DRAGGED
Hope that Frank H. Toung, of
Broken Bow, ?Ceb., who mysteriously
disappeared on the gulf beach near
Ft. McRae on Christmas day, would
be found alive was .practically aban
doned yesterday.
Alva Morgan, who accompanied Mr.
Young on his trip to Florida, has ex
erted , every efrort in an endeavor to
locate the missing man but stated
last night that he fears his companion
was drowned in the big lagoon. .
Footprints which were identified as
those of Mr. Toung, who had lost sev
eral toes from one fot, were tracad
from the spot where he was last seen
to the point where the gulf cut through
the narrow penlnaaftn- during the Sep
v i r t
POSTMASTER
HELD UNDER
GRAVE CHARGE
W. H. McSWAIN, FORMER POST
MASTER AT DEERLAND, BOUND
OVER FOR TRIAL ON CHARGE
OF EMBAZZELMENT.
W. II. McSwain, former postmaster
at Deerland, Fla., was taken before
United States Commissioner Jerry
Sullivan, Jr., yesterday, charged with
appropriating to his own use funds
of the United States government, and
was placed under bond of $1,000.
The arrest followed a recent inspec
tion of the Deerland postofflce by
Postofnee Inspector Smith who re
ported a shortage of $527.05 in the
money order fund $8.19 in the postal
funds- A subsequent checking, ac
cording to Inspector Smith, reduced
the shortage iri money order funds to
$403.44 and placed the postal short
age at $18.19.
W. A. Jerrnigan, predecessor of Mc
Swain as postmaster at Deerland, was
convicted of being short in his ac
counts a little more than . a year ago
and was sentenced to serve six months
in the federal penitentiary at Atlanta.
ORDERiSTOPS ARMY MEN
- SPEAKING IN PRINT
By Associated Press.
Aver, Mass., Dec. 28. Orders issued
tod5r by Brigadier Oeneral William
Weigel, acting commandant of Camp
Devens, prohibit officers and enlisted
men at the cantonment from writing
for publication, articles or books deal
ing . -with military subjects. Men who
have ideas which they think may
prove of military value are invited
to submit them through their superior
officers to the adjutant general.
"It is understood that the orders
were prompted by indiscreet revela
tions concerning military matters
made by national army men in let
ters written to college and small town
papers.
WORLD CROP ESTIMATE
SHOWS PRODUCTION LOSS
Washington, Dec. 28. World crop
statistics compiled by the interna-
I tional institute of agriculture at Rome
ana teiegrapnen. to me atpannini -m
agriculture here, show the 1917 wheat
production to he 1,864,000.000 biu. which
is 3.8 per cent less than last year. This
does not Include Germany, Austria
Hungary, Bulgaria and Russia, where
existing conditions prevented the col
lection of reports.
TURKS REPULSED
NEAR
JERUSALEM.
London, Dec 28. British troops In
Palestine repulsed a Turkish attack
north and northwest of Jerusalem and
advanced about two and one-half
miles on a nine mile front along the
Turkish right flank, according to of
ficial report.
NEW FRENCH WAR LOAN
IS OVER SUBSCRIBED.
Paris, Dec. 28. The ten billion
francs asked for in the third war loan
have been exceeded, M. Klotz, minis
ter of finance stated in the chamber
of deputies. He said the returns are
still incomaleta.
tember storm and then are lost at tha
water's edge. It is believed that after
landing on the beach he walked east
ward toward Ft. McRae in quests o?
gasoline for ths launch on which he
and Mr- Morgan had come from New
Orleans. It is thought that Mr. Young
attempted to wade across the breach
In the peninsula, but was caught in the
strong undertow at that point end
carried into the lagoon.
Mr. Morgan engaged a launch an I
made a trip to the gulf beach yester
day, where ha made a thorough search
for his missing friend and early to
day he will causa the lagoon to the
dragged in hope of recovering Mr.
Young's body. ,
i rv :
FORD lilTEO
HERE TO SEE
ISHIPyilfiD SITE
Mayor and Citizens Extend
Invitation to Auto Wizard
to Visit Pensacola.
WILL INSPECT
SOUTHERN POMXJ
Plans Establishment of Vas8
Shipyard to Build Fleet to
Fight U-Boat Menace.
Several telegrams and letters from
parlous organizations and private 11
dividual, in Pensacola have been itf
to Henry Ford inviting him to corott
to Pensacola on his trip south to Sm
speet Shipbuilding sites, when flfai
story from The Journal's WsshlngtcS
bureau was published Thursday mora
Ing, that the auto wixard was on
inspection tour of the south, and h4i
been urged by Senator Fletcher t
come here, a flood of invitations fo
lowed, to back up the Senator's effortsw
First on ths list was a letter from
Mayor Johnson, extending an invita
tion to Mr. Ford to come to Pensa
cola. The mayor sent ths following
telegram to Mr. Ford yesterday:
"Pensacola, Fla., December 3S.
"Mr- Henry Ford. Assistant to U. &j
Shipping Foard, Washington, D.
"We understand that you are Co
make a trip south in the near future
In behalf of the people I desire to
extend you a cordial invitation to In
elude Pensacola, the deep water pork
of the gulf, in your tour. Wishing
you the compliments of the season.
THOMAS VI. JOITNSOK.
"Mayor.
Chas. B. Hervey, manager of the Fan
Carlos hotel sent Mr. Ford a telegram
inviting him here, and followed the
brief message , with the following let
ter: ) Dscember 2", 1917.
Dear Mr.-Ford:
I am enclosing you herewith copy
of my telegram to you of this dat.
and' also copy of an article published
in the Pensacola Journal this morn
ing. - . , f
I know you will recall the very
pleasant incidents of our meeting in
Mobile at the C&wthon last spring:
also that for some time I was In tha
pleasant predicament of entertaining
"angels unawares "
In connection with your visit south
to inspect ship building sites, I am
very anxious to have you come and.
visit Pensacola and see what we bavs
to offer here. I have absolutely noth
ing to sell, except hotel accommoda
tions, and I do not care to sell aoay
of them for I would be pleased to have,
you come as my personal guest. Al
so, Mrs. Hervey bids me extend an
invitation to bring along Mrs. Ford as
she was very much taken with her
charming hospitality when we lmule
you a little visit on your yacht.
As you are no doubt aware, Fena
cola has a magnificent port, the deep
est and most natural harbor on the
Citilf coast. Moreover there are a number
of excellent locations for shipbuilding
plants, and In natural locations whers
the hills and the water so meet that
it would be easy to immediately in
stall plants.
I am now permanently located st
the San Carlos, being president anAV
general manager of the company op
erating same. I will esteem it . great
favor if you will advise 'roe In ad
vanes of the date of your coming, and
j assure you that I neiisve inn yuuri
coming here will re to tne reai inienfftj
of our government and we of Pens-
cola will feel honored to have you.
very truly yours
CHAS. B. HERVBT.
GIVE NEW YEAR
DANCE FOR SERVICE
A dance will be given on New Year's
Eve night by the Army and Navy Ldfa
Activities Committee In the K. of C.
hall on West Garden street, according
to Announcement made yesterday.
Use of ths hail wa arranged
through tha courtesy of the local
branch of the K. of C, It being Im
possible to secure tha use of any of
the other dance halls in the city o-i
that night. All service men and their
friends in Pensacola are cordially in
vited to attend ths dance.
JUDGE SHEPPARD TO
PRESIDE IN TEXAS
Judge William B. Sheppard will
leave for Corpus Christie, Texas, in a
few days to preside over the federal
court for the Southern District dur
ing the term which convenes on Jan
uary 7th. The transfer of Judge Shep--pard
to that district for this term is
necessitated through the death of
Judge Bums.
It is understood that an important
murder trial will be brought- up at
the term of court over which the lo-
cal jurist will perside.

xml | txt