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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, January 10, 1918, Image 1

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WEATHER.
ewhat cpldr Thursday. Frl
gentle to moderate northwet
''i- ..mnrtur yesterday, 60 d-
WEST FLORIDA HAb
MAN Y ATTRACTIONS
FOR T H E HOME
SEEKER :-: : .
-' V, 4t. 45 degree.
PEXSACOLA, FLORIDA, THURSDAY; MORNING, JANUARY 10, 1918.
VOL.1- la
PRICE FIVE CENTS
Florida Man Lost Relatives
In The Guatemala Earthquake
5 FIGH
inspector 01 or
S tate t eocfy Cooperation
. . ft k ' A i.
... r oOXV
HOOP
ID WEATHER
ID TIE HNS
Heavy Artillery Duels Pro
cccding at Several Points
With Great Vigor.
FRENCH CAPTURE
178 PRISONERS
Icavy Snowfall on Italian
Front Interferes to Some
Extent With Operations.
fAtiosiated Prea Summary.) -
Pad weather continues on most of
f.rtB hut never-
ti ins"1"
ve;s heavy amnery uu
'd. At several points infantry at-
:"a " ' f
!. . ma l Diuyviwwi
..a The liermaua, m vi"--,
I''' maneuvers, entered the British
advanced posts north of Ypres on the
i-aden ralUay. but were io vuc
r,v a counter attack. On the famous
it Mihiel salient, southeast oi vcr
'un Vrench troops entered the Ger-
man posif.ons on a
Ktroyed the. positions, and returned to
thei- own lines with 178 prisoners and
some machine guns.
Oa the Italian front, heavy snow
s tailing.
Aside from intensive artillery duels
on the Asiago plateau to the Tiave
river, and small patrol encounters,
here has been no fighting worthy of
mention. j
Both British and French newspa
pers -enthusiastically endorse Presi
dent Wilson's statement of war aims.
Likewise it has met with entire ap
proval of the representatives of labor
ji Great Britain. In a manifesto, the
atwites say that in the present state
- Lhe ltor ntxty can find jro..jor--on
uporf which the allied democra
ts are likely to disagree.
Germany has extended her subina
;ne zone to include waters around
'ape Verde Islands, Madeira, and a
:rt!on of those of French Senegal,
Ul off Xortbwest Africa. Througn
-hese waters law important tradi
routes from the Pacific and Indian
oceans, stouth Africa and South Amer-
oa to Europe.
PRiinNPRt ronu mm ships on the ground that they were
PRISONERS FROM RAIDmerely Tendered cpieuous thereby
Pans. Jan. 9. A to-ftl of 178 pris
wts was brought back ly the French
rim their raid upon the German lines
n the region north of Seichepray,
-it of St. Mihiel yesterday, the war
le announced today.
3ERLIN CLAIMS FRENCH
PUSHED BACK SUCCESSFULLY
Btrhn, Jan. 9 Strong French
:;."es yesterday attacked the German
's.'aoiis on a front of more than a
'i .e est cf Flirey and penetrated the
"e line of German posts, the German
Mersl staff announced today. Dur--S
the night the Germans counter-
tucked and forced the French back
t ail points to their former Dositions.
WITNESS BATTLE IN A
HEAVY SNOW STORM.
luiats Army Headquarters in Xorth
Italy, Jan. 8. (By Associated
snow was railing along the
fountain front and an intermittent
:ffiy artillery tire was in process
'-ng a visit which B. Harvey Car-
J" Jr. American consul at Venic,
at pa:d to the Aslago plateau on that
nt, as a guest of the Italian staff
r-m the summit of a hill which Con
i! --. i t . . .
- vaiu'ii, ascenoea, me enemy po-1
:tioiia on Monte Mellete di Gallic, and
vlly covered with snow. whi h x-
'"dfci down to the Frensela. vallv-
:.;gh hich the Austrians are seek-
ti puh their way to the plain.
rty a foot of snow fell during
;iJ Carroll's -visit and several om
rs rredi.ted three foot fall which
y cons ilered would bring tne enemy
through which Consul Carroll
iSl h 1 I I , ti nurtli Ava.iat01
rcg ""ulj be heard from the enemy
''tior.s seven miles distnnt near
ioate
'.rappa, where the enemy Is
4-
t-t.rg held Attar ha failure r.T
s 'm: effort to break through.
'SRiOL'S DISCLOSURES
RE BROUGHT TO LIGHT.
a Francisco, Jan. 9. Disclosures
r'S, arid of a ni
k- n Hindu temple, at
W ' CoUfornia in order to sway
, r t,p:rilon against ' the British
ment. -ame out today at a trial
'r th:rtv-ne persons charged
fnnt?ng a revolution against
f-'t? in India. ,
Tallahassee., Fla., Jan. 9. (Special)
Clarence E. Woods, silver-tongued or
ator of the Florida Press, editor of tha
Eustls Lake Region, who has recently
been appointed federal, inspector of
explosives for the district of Florida,
entered the State at - Tallahassee,
where he did his first work and mad-3
his first inspections after receiving his
appointment at Washington, . from
which city he came direct to .Talla
hassee. He called on the three hard
ware merchants here yesterday, and
they "were so responsive, so anxious
to co-operate with the government, so
willing to agree not to sell explosives,
to any persons who might later let
them get into the hands of aliens or
other enemies," declared Mr. Woods,
"that I feel that I am' going to find
Florida full of patriots."
Mr. Woods wished to publicly ex
press his thanks to Yaeger-Rhodes,
O. C. Van Brunt and Charles Williams
HOSPITAL SHIP HIGHER WAGES
SENTTOBOTTOMiFOR RAILROAD
WITH TORPEDO
GERMANS DISREGARD PROMISE
AGAIN, SENDING A MISSILE
THROUGH RED CROSS EMBLEM
ON SIDE OF VESSEL.
(By Associated Press.)
Iondon, Jan. 9. The hospital ship
Rewa was torpedoed and sunk in the
Bristol channel on January 4 while on !
her wav from Gibralter It Is announced!
officially. All the wounded were saved.
There were three casualties among
the crew.
The announcement follows: "His
Majesty's Hospital Ship Rewa was tor
pedoed and sunk in the Bristol chan
nel at a-bout midnight ; on January 4
on her way from Gibraltar. All the
wounded were safely transferred to i
patrol vessels. There were only three I
casualties among the crew, ; three j
Lascars being missing."
"She was displaying all lights and
markings required by the Hague con
vention. She was, not and had not
been within the socaHed-arred" x& ,
as delimited in the statement issued
by tne tierman government on Janu-
ary 19, 1917."
After making several charges of
misuse of hospital ships which were'gion of the demands of yard employes
deniea snecincaiiv hv tne entente srov-
ernments concerned, the Germans last
year suspended the immunity of these
vessels in tne English cbannel and cer- I
tain other waters. The British dis-;
continued special markings or hospital
and were more liable to attack. Last
September King Alfonso of Spain in
tervened and succeeded in obtaining
an agreement from the belligerents
for the free movement of hospital
ships within specified areas. .
The torpedoed vessel probably was
the British steamship Rewa 7,303 tons
gross and 456 feet long. She was built
in 1906 and owned in Glasgow and
has been in the service of the British
government.
The Bristol channel is an arm of the
Atantic extending into the south
western part of Great Britain between
Wales and the southwestern coun
tries of England.
TORPEDO TORE TRHOUGH ;
RED CROSS ON THE SHIPS
Cardiff, Wales, Jan. 9. Most of the
survivors of the Rewa were landed at
Swansea. Many of them were without
clothing of any kind. The woundetl
were removed immediately to a hos
pital. The torpedo which sank the Rewa
went directly through the Red cross
painted on her side.
OVER FIVE HUNDRED SAVED
FROM THE HOSPITAL SHIP
Bristol, England, Jan. 9 The hos
pital ship Rewa, with all lights burn
ing showing her identity, was tor
pedoed, and sunk an hour before mid
night on January fourth. A torpedo
passing through the red cross paint
ed on her side. Of 550 persons aboard,
only three members of the crew were
lost.
MILLIONS BE SPENT
TO HOUSE WORKMEN
Washington, J&n. 9. The immedi
ate expenditure of one million, two
hundred thousand dollars to provide
housing accommodations for shipyard
workers, at Kewpor : Xews. was de
cided by the shipping board after the
senate subcommittee presented urgent
requests for it. Similar facilities will
be provided at all plants as soon as
possible. ,
PEACE CONFERENCE IS
REPORTED IN SESSION
Amsterdam." Jan. 9. Advices say the
Brec.-Lttovsk ' pi' ace conference . is
agaii ta cession. --".-
Hardware Companies for their court
eous treatment of him and offer to co
operate in the work for the protec
tion of property in this county. Mr.
Woods explained that cartridges may
be bought as formerly, but any "per
son wishing to purchase gun cotton or
dynamite for even any Innocent prac
tice like blowing up stumps, must first
obtain from the county clerk of th'i
court a license, . which costs 25c; This
requirement of license, Mr. Woods
stated, was simply to prevent ex
plosives getting into the hands of
irresponsible or hostile persons, and
he believes it will result in great con
servation of property in this and othel
states. -
Mr. Woods said that he and the
other explosives inspectors are sup
posed to perform duties of detectives,
reporting all seditious utterances and
actions to the proper federal authori
ties. -: ' ; .
MEN POSSIBLE
PENDING DISPUTES BE THANS
FERRED TO GOVERNMENT
FROM THE RAILWAY EXECU
TIVE BOARD, BUT NO STRIKE.
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Jan. 9. Higher wages
will be asked of the railroad adminls-
trat ion soon by nearly all classes of
nrimnized .. railroad- labor- . It "was
learned today many pending wage
dismites mav be transferred to the
government from tjie railway execu
tive boards, and in other cases new
demands, may be formulated, for pre
sentation to Director . McAdoo.
, Strikes are not contemplated, it . is
said. :t.' . ; - ; , v ,-
Railroad labor leaders are seeking
to show the necessity of higher wages
to hold employes from more tattrac-
tive wages elsewhere.
Confer With McAdoo
Railroad employes other than those
nomprltedjn; the fquj. great., brother--
ooda arermssTng for a" coftsIoratfoTf
"of tjlejr interests by Director General
iicAdoo
S. E. Herberling, president , of, the
Switchmen's Union of North America
saw Mr. McAdoo today for a discus
i Tor suDsianuai inti cbbco. j.ih
. ' . it . . C Hnn TkA
four brotherhoods represent only 360,
ft00 out of the 1.700,000 railway work
ers,t according to Mr. . Heberling. and
the interest of less powerful groups
sbonld not be. lost sight' of.
Maintenance of way employes, the
largest of the railroad unions, recent
ly requested the federal board of medi
ation and conciliation to call attention
of the director general to their Inter
ests but because the law limits the
activities of the ooard to mediation
in disputes affecting .. operating em-
nloves. the reauest was turned over
to the department of labor.
The Order of Railway Telegraphers
has been making demands for Increased
wages and : improved working condi
tions on individual systems through
out the ; country. The Switchmen's
union is the only union besides the
four brotherhods which ever has pre
sented a demand to the transporta
tion systems of the country as a whole.
Director McAdoo announced tonight
he expected to name railroad directors
for certain sections of the country to
assist him in administering the gov
ernment operation, but was not deter
mined how many were necessary nor
for what territory each would super
vise. It is considered, probable, how
ever, that not more than six or seven
will be named. McAdoo said specific
ally he did no plant to appoint state
direr trs. .
ATTACKS ON NEWS
PRINT MEASURES
Washington. Jan. 9. Attacks on the
joint resolution authorizing the pres
ident to have the federal trade com
mission take control of the print pa
per industry, were made by Senators
Hardwick, Smoot, Sherman and King.
Smoot characterized -it as a most
. vicious measure, and declared under
its provisions the president will be able
to withhold print paper from - any
newspaper or magazine desired.
Smoot also asserted the resolution
was introduced at the request of pub
lishers in an effort -to reduce, the price
of paper to rates below those agreed
bv the manufacturers and government
The measure was vigorously defended
by Senator Owen, who said such a step
was necessary to break the power held
by the alleged paper monopoly ovr
the press. He charged that makers
now can dictate to "the press of the
country by withholding supplies.
EIGHTEEN LARGE SHIPS
VICTIMS OF U-BOATS.
London", Jan. 9. The British . ad
miralty reports the sinking the pas?
week, of eighteen merchantmen of ov
erx and three under sixteen -, hundred
tons, as well as four fiahinx vessla.
LAUD SPEECH
OEUSOH
Address Takes Leading
Position in ,.. Both News
and Editorial Columns. ,
IS MAGNA CHART A
OF FUTURE i?EACE"
Various Viewpoints of
Newspapers Stress Differ
ent Phases of Message.
(By Associated Press)
London. Jan. 9. President Wilson's
speech, like all his utterances since
America entered the war, takes the
leading place in both the news and
editorial 'columns of the Liondon press.
One newspaper describes 5 it as the
Magna Charta of future peace.
Coming so closely, on the heels of
Premier Lloyd's : address at, the labor
conference, the words of the heads of
the American and British governments
are compared closely. While , some
differences are found ; in the manner
of discussing the various questions,
this evening's newspapers; find no dis
agreement in essential policy.
It is noted', that the president deals
more sympathetically, with vthe Bol-
shevikl than did the premier, Vat it Is
pointed out that America has riot suf
fered from the Russian j collapse as
the western allies have- However the
Westminister" Gazette - welcomes Mr.
Wilson's "careful, sympathetic lan
guage and says it hopes that "&M mis
understandings which mar have aria-
en' from other - statement" will - be re
moved by the -unequivocal language in
which the president, adopts the Rus
sian demands' as his own." h ; ,
The" speech appears in -the newspa-
era under -.big ? heaflUnM .such .. as
"World Peace ""Program,"' ) and "Great
Program bf .International1 Reforms."
. The .Evening lNews tin its introduc
tion' describes the speech ' as - one - of
world-wide importance ' in which the
president laid down America's 1 peace
terms. In clear, ;' direct and simple
language. It continues: 4 - - v - (
"With but trifling exceptions . Mr
Wilson's views coincides with and en
dorse those expressed by Mr. Uoyd
Geerge. , Because of this fact Mr. Wil
son's' speech, will be read w'lth' double
satisfaction in this country." .
: The ; New , regards - as -noteworthy
passages of the speech those offering
help to Russia, and declaring that the
peace - negotiations must - .absolutely
open. . .,;..- ..;.
The Star . emphasizes the passage
referring to the freedom of the sei
reduced armaments, abolition of secret
diplomacy and taking a" stand' against
economic warfare after, the conclusion
of peace. It describes, the speech as
a clear cut definition of the alms of the
allies. , ; ..
Under the heading, "The Parallel
offensive a second . blow," the Stand
ard heralds the president's address as
"another notable contribution to the
drum fire on the enemy's moral post
tion." It hopes that no - opportunity
will be lost in future to "rain blows
on the system whose creed, in Mr.-Wil
son's words, is imperial domination
This newspaper says tho : surrender
of the -German ruling class may be
nearer than some think; therefore the
allies must continue to drive home to
the German people the fact that their
sufferings ! will continue in ever:: in
creasing severity until the Kaiser ao
ceots the principle of right over
might." ... ' " " .
The Pall Mall Gazette says Presi-
endt Wilson's - message constitutes an
effective : model of frank " and opeu
diplomacy. It remarks that the strong
est German microscopes , will "be taxed
to find evidence of discord between
his words and those of Premier Lloyd-
George.- . ' . --
. After summarizing the speech the
Pall Mall Gazette continues :
"If the German press does not like
Mr. Lloyd-George's . program, 1 it . will
scarcely find President Wilson's more
congenial. - President Wilson " Includes
in his ultimate, aspirations some con
ditions which msLy seem impracticable
to our present vision and. which in any
case can only mature - as "the fruit
of long searching deliberations:: But
the allies have proved their., possession
of a common and" unselfish purpose in
the permanent removal of those men
aces whereby the life of free peoples
has been poisoned and jeopardized."
The Westminister ; Gazette: is the
only paper to comment on President
Wilson's inclusion in his program of
absolute freedom of . navigation upon
the seas, outside of territorial waters.
The newspaper says that in-such
world as- that to which the president
looks forward, with. : an association of
nations affording a guarantee of the
Tn'.strcal independence of all statea,
'itb cpen covenants, disarmament . by
uti:fvi consent and freedom, as far as
Con tinned m Ynto Tv
Tallahassee, Fla, Jan. 9. (Special)
George M. Casserleigh, who,, f or four
years ; lived and voted in Tallahassee
where he was a linotype machinist and
operator at ' the Appleyard 5 Printery,
believes that his daughter and grand
son were'among- the lost In the recent
Guatemala earthquakes, : the worst in
the history of the republic. Mr. Cas
serleigh left here some' months ago
for New Orleans where he was joined
by Mrs. -Casserleigh, and after spend
ing some time in Shreveport they re
turned to New Orleans for the holt
days, expecting to meet there' their
daughter ; with her husband and baby
who. were supposed to come from Cen
tral America - to spend ' Christmas in
the Crescent City. : The boat, however,
did not bring them but Instead brought
AUTO PARKING
ORDINANCE IS
NOW IN EFFECT
NEW MEASURE WAS PASSED
MONDAY AND COMMISSIONERS
WORK-OUT AND ANNOUNCE
PLAN TO CARE FOR CARS.
An ordinance which prohibits the
standing of automobiles on ' Palafox
street between the hours of 8 a. m.
and 7 p. m. unattended for more than
twenty minutes, was passed by the
commissioners Monday and became ef
fective immediately, as a clause, in
said measure provided. Until the pub
lic is thoroughly familiar with said
license, there will probably, be no pro
ceedings against car owners or oper
ators, but in due time persons violat
ing the law .will be arrested and pre
sented for fine or imprisonment, in
the city court. . , ;
There are several hundred automo
biles which-have been parked on Pal
afox street dally, in the business-district,
and the commissioners yester
day began envolvlng some plan to take
care of this . large number ' of cars.
At the city hall, during the afternoon,
it. was concluded to follow the below -mentioned
: plan .
TA ca,l-iiiCR re It fte-'wiTked1: t
intersecting street on the east siae or
Palafox street a re to be stopped on the
north side of the street thus made use
of. For Instance if ' cars are parked
on Romana street, east of PalaTox.
they are to4 be lined : up on the north
side of that-street,-one - behind tho
other.,- Of course two. cars abreat'will
not be allowed, as that would .-"congest
the street. Neither will, cars be
allowed to park on the south side , of
East ' Romana street, as that would
leave . the passage too narrow, but this
condition will be relieved by a surplus
of autos being parked on Romana
street' west of Palafox street on . the
south side of the driveway, of course!
all cars to be headed toward Palafox'
street. - ' .. .
On Garden street, it r was further j
worked out. this wider thoroughfare j
will be regarded, as two streets, anl
carst to be parked on the side of the j
curbing to be o,n the south.side, while!
those to' be .parked on the north side j
of the. driveway, to line tne grass plot
Palafox street policemen were 3'es -
terday familiarizies themselves with
the new numbers - on all cars
found on that thoroiiahfare so as to
be able to reach thlfefespeetive owners
in case of violation of the new statute.
- v
PRESIDENT COMES
OUT SQUARELY FAVOR
WOMAN'S SUFFRAGE
Washington, Jan. 9. President Wil
son tonight threw his support to the
federal amendment for women suffrage
on .the eve of a vote on ' the suffrage
in the house. Twelve 'democratic
members called at the White - House
with word that many of ' their col
leagues wanted advice from the head
of their party as to the position tney
should, take. After forty minutes ot
conference, a statement, dictated -by
the president . himself, was issued say
ing the committee found the president,
had not felt at liberty to volunteer his
advice to members' of congress in this
matted, but when his advice ' was
sought he frankly and earnesly advised
members to vote for the amendment
as an act of right and justice for the
women of the country and - of the
world. : i!' -;- t ---. ' -
GOVERNMENT BUY
FLOUR ON LARGE SCALE
-Washington, Jan. 9. To supply the
needs of army and navy of nations as
sociated with the United States in
the -war - against . Germany, - the food
administration will purchase from ev
ery flour mill in the country not to
exceed thirty per cent of its output.
Out of the; flour purchased, it ' is ex
plained, the - food administration- will
retain at all times a reserve stock, and
will ship flour .to any "point where a
local supply might; be short. ;
newspapers telling of the terrible
'quake which was so severe as to
silence telegraph wires in Guatemala.
Mr. Casserleigh's daughter married
Jose Humberto Reyna Barrios, son and
grandson of presidents of Guatemala,
and Casserleigh grandson is a grand
son and great-grandson of presidents
of the republic, but was born in the
States. Mr. Casserleigh writes his
former employes here' that he was so
worried at Christmas time that he neg
lected to send out Christmas cards.
Many Christmas surprises had been
purchased for the . grandbaby and its
father and mother, however, but they j
have never arrived ,in Xew Orleans to '
receive them. Mr. and Mrs. Casser- j
lelgh fear the entire family may have
been wiped ;out; in the earthquake.
DRILL GROUNDS
ATHLETIC FIELD
AT AIR STATION
SEVEN BIDS OPENED YESTER
DAY' FOR CONSTRUCTION OF
GREAT ADDITION SEVERAL
FOREIGN FIRMS IN LOT.
Seven bids were opened at the -aeronautic
station yesterday for the con
struction of a drill ground and athletic
field, approximately 900x300 feet, which
will be one of the most notable addi
tions to the station in recent years.
Bids ranged from $26,600 to $49,270,
and time for completion ranged from
60 to 223 days. There were several
out-of-town bidders in the lot.
Those who bid, the - price they of
fered and the time for completing the
contract were as follows: v
W. P. Kennedy, 60 days for $26,00.
G. II. Turner Company, 225 days for
$32,2i7.'
H. F. Puighum Company, 170 dnys
for f32.985.SS. .-
T. W. .Long Company,-.of Jackson
ville; -90, days for $34,440. ;n ,
T. C. I-Toudfoot, 90 days for S37.362.
J. ,W. Eley, 100 days for $49,270, ,
Smith Concrete Company Atlanta.
Ga.,). cost plus 10 per cent. . '
CAR AND
AN AUTO COLLIED
Willifim Barling, colored, driving an
automobile, hit car "No. 33 f the Kat
Hi!! line yesterday afternoon, on East
Wright street, the auto suffering some
considerable damage. Barling, who
was arrested Iy Ofllrer O. Chestnut, i
charged with operating an. autoniobi!
in a careless and reckless manner,
and will be arraigned for trial at. this
; morning's session of the -recorder's
'. court. v
OKALOOSA BOARD
BE GIVEN HEARING
Tallahassee, " Fla., Jan. 9.-j-( Spec
ial. I r!hnrtr3 i havintr Vicen fileil
: aerainst the counts commissioners of
Okaloosa county, Governor Catts has
f fixed ' January 23 as the date ' upon
which they will be given a hearing,
it was announced at the executive
; offices. The charges allege' graft in
the letting of contracts for the court-
! house and school building at Crest
I view, the county seat of the new
county of Okaloosa- There is great
interest in that county in the charges
jand it is expected that a large crowd
of interested citizens will be here on
the 23rd for the hearing.
FLORIDA BOY SUFFERS
FROM MENINGITIS
"Tallahassee, Fla., Jan. 9. (Spec
ial.) Abram " McDougall, a well
known and very popular club man of
Tallahassee, who enlisted in the navy
of the United State's some time ago,
has spinal meningitis at the Norfolk,
Va., navy yard, where he is stationed.
Authorities there today wired his
father, former Tostmaster . Alex Mc
Dougall, of the condition of his son.
with the result that Mr, and Mrs.
McDougall left on the next train for
Wnnilf Abram McDouarall is a
pharmacist, but for several years
nviAT hi pnlistnient was a valu
able employe of the Walker and
Black department store here- Mr.
McDougall is known by practically
everyone in the county, is of a large
and prominent old Tallahassee fam
;ir onsi Vis u-am favorite amonc po
litical visitors to the capital, most of
whom knew him. he having worked
in '- every drug store in town before
going into the clothing business.
News of his condition is anxiously
awaited, by scores of friends and ad
mirers here. ,. . .'
ALABAMA BOY DIES
. . AT CAMP WHEELER
Macon. Jan. 8. Only one death, that
of George Hurt, of Thomasville, Ala
bama, occurred at Camp Wheeler to
day. He died of pneumonia.
IS PERFECTED
Grocers Resolve to Co-Op-erate
in Every Way With
Food Administration.
GREAT INTEREST
SHOWN BY ALL
Conservation of Food - and
Reducing Cost Were Key
notes of Discussion.
i
With nearly one hundred local re
tail and wholesale grocery dealers
present at a meeting held last night
in the cjty hall. a. temporary organi
zation was efTtcted to cooperate with
the I'nited States Kood -'.Administration,
through Braxton Beacham, ad
ministrator for Florida.;
Oreat interest was. shown by the
dealers in the short talks made by
J. B. Gonzalez and A. F. i'aderick
who were delegates to the Orlando
couference and who outllnfd the work
of the meeting. W. L. Moyer also dl.s
cussed the aims of the food adminis
tration, und the way in' which dealers
could cooperate with the oilk-ials In
conserving a iifl red uciiiK: the.c)ict ,t
food.. . .
I'pon motions l.eins made to form -a
temporary m-ganlzathuti W.. ,. Aloyer
" t u i iiii ( n.i)i n;tn, anu .. ir. J leii -ttett
secretary. . Another meeting will
be held whoi Braxton Beacham ar
rives here on or. about January J"t?h,
when definite work for the organisa
tion 'will be maped out.
No policies of ndruinistratioit wti
adoj. ted last night, thfiuvh svi'j :i
wci'e distuned. A plan wltirh v.ill r
dure the nitrating- expenses of
dealer' -rnd lower their n;r.?., ..
'o'i w-V.'l? h J--(n!niM. hv : Itr.--:oiisiimv.4HJllirul
Jat niirhf, ,i.r.-.-;4! -i (
fveonly one delivery:! dfty. . U- t
stated that a little Coop-ratio;i ir-i r. h
part of the connnmet-M in - -:en.'lr-tlieir
orders to the dealers, will mate
It pnttpihh' to deliver all orders rit .n"
time, without inconvenience to tin
consumer.
Organizations "of retail and' whole
sale grocers are being form-Hi tlirough-
ttt the country at the rtgiust or the
lood :i(lniinistratioiiM, and the assist
ance or the dealers in accomplishing
the aims f.f the administration is con
sidered valuable. Dealers who agre.'
to cooperate sign pledge 'cards, mi.l
nre given a certificate of service to
place tn disj.Ia.v. Because of the aim
of the administration, th;' necessity , of
food of winning-the war, and Ch
need of conserving the nation's fooi!
supply, such cooperation given 'bv t!i
dealers is consider 1 liitiK- .!.'.;-.
and it is hoped that all in ivn,a-ol.i
;l ...
will riiroii i or mis rvif p. .
RECREATIONAL PIER
BRING DISCUSSED
, Plans for a recreational ' pier were
discussed at the special meeting of the
Entertainment Committee of the Army
and Xavy Life Activities Committee,
held yesterday afternoon in the Cham
ber of Commerce, and while no de
cision was made, efforts will be usJ
to have a pier constructed before tho
summer season opens. "
Similar piers have proved great at
tractions at other bathing resorts, and
while It Is intended chlelly for the re
creation of the service men. its value
to the city, and pleasure to civilians is
also taken into consideration.
As soon as ' necessary Information,
can be compiled it is expected th-it
definite' aetjon will be taken by the
committee towards the erection of this
pier. r
STOP ORGANIZATION
OF U. S. GUARDS
Washington, Jan. 9. Further organ
ization of the . United States guard is
suspended. Secretary IJaker today" an
nounced." - It. was originally planned to
make the guard a special police force
of about twenty-five thousand officer
and men, for service largely in com-
arhunitiea where they enlisted. ThH
duty may be performed now by army
troops, i and federal guardsmen, and
changed conditions was the only reason
given for the new plan. ;
MORALS OF AMERICAN
, SOLDIERS ACELLENT.
' With the American Army In France,
Jan. Chaplains of both Protestant
and Catholic faiths have just issued
reports to the government in which it
is maintained the ; morals of men in
the' American expeditionary force la
nUft excellent.
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