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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, January 18, 1918, Image 6

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J
SIX
THE PENSACOLA JOURNAU FRIDAY MORNING, JANUARY 18. 1918.
)
I THE MARKETS
NEW ORLEANS COTTON.
New Orleans, Jan. 17. A break of
5 to 6 dollalrs a bale on cotton
preet'd the holiday order of tae gov
ernment when the market opened to
ri v All r-.ther factors faded before
these new developments. . , In the j
first hour of business prices ieu vj
to 117 points on 'the most active
months under heavy liquidation and
selling for short account, inspired 1'
the belief that the closing of mills
would greatly curtail consumption.
Early shorts took their profits and
new buyinjr for long account came in
at the decline and checked it. The
market was also helped by reports of
a better demand for the lower grades
of spots.
No wide prices changes occurred in
the afternoon. At 1 o'clock the
active: months were at a net loss of
LG to 59 points.
The market closed steady at a net
decline of 67 to 87 points.
High. Low. Close.
Jami-irv . v ..29.90 29.47 29.48
March 29 55
May . . 29.15
July 29-15
October 27.60
28.80
29.27
28.60
28.42
27.00
29.02
28.76
27.26
NEW YORK COTTON. .
New York. Jan. 17. As a result
of the action of the fuel administra
tor, cotton had a violent and semi
demoralizezd opening today with
first prices from 53 to 57 points
" lower. March contracts on the call
were even lower, selling at 29 cents,
or a drop of 202 points, exceeding
' $10 per bale. January sold at 30
cents, a break of 137 points Late
positions opened from 35 to 85 points
lower. .
The excessive weakness in near
positions was due to the execution
of a large number of stop orders
which were not present in the later
months. It was feared the holiday
period ordered would have a drastic
: effect upon the market.
January contracts sold down to 30
cents and March to 29 cents on the
first call. It was feared that the
1 'holiday orders would mean a heav.
decline in consumption by the New
England mills-
Almost as rapidly as it broke, the
. market had a later rally which car
ried prices from 35 to 150 points
abovo the lowest . level with March
shewing the greatest advance on sales
Kick to 30.50. May rallied from
- 29.50 to 30.15 and at the end of the
first half hour the market was only
about 50 points . under the precious
. nifrht. There was heavy covering by
some big shorts, together with New
Orleans and Southern buying and a
bior demand from the trade and Liv
erpool. Southern advices indicated
that holders of spots were not af
fected by the temporary break in
futures.
Late forenoon wires from the
South Southern mills influenced by
the firmness bf hoi lers, - had been
larp-e buyers of contracts on the
early break. This with continued
trade buying from other quarters
kept the market very steady around
midday, at which time prices were 37
, to 43 points ret lower with March
selling at 30.59; May 30.22 and July
29.93. Much of the excitement at
tending the opening of the market
had disappeared and it seemed to be
come more settled with a disposition
to take a calmer view of the fuel
situation.
Increasing pressure of . tha after
noon caused covering and the market
sold off from 30 points from the top
with March trading at 30.30 and
May 29.9C A steady demand from
trade interests however absorbed the
offerings fairly well and prevented
any Teturn of the demoralization
which, was noted in the first hour.
Thtf market closed barely steady.
High. Low. Close.
January 31.00 30.00 30.63
March ...30.60 2900 30.29
May 30.28 29.35 29 95
July 29.95 29.55 29.66
" October .... ..28.51 28.15 28.18
CHICAGO CASH GRAIN.
Chicago, Jan. 17 Cash: Corn No.
2 yellow nominal; No. 3 yellow 1.80;
No. 4 yellow 1.62. Oats No. 3 white
81 1-4()S1 3-4; standard 81 l-282;
Rye No. 2. 190;; barley 1.40(3)1.59;
timothy 5.008.00; clover, 21.00-
28.00. Pork nominal; lard 24.90;
ribs 23.6024.35.
LIVERPOOL COTTON.
Liverpool, Jan. 17. Cotton prices
steady. Good middling 23.96; mid
dling 23.44; low middling 22.91; good
ordinary 21.91. Sales 3,000 includ
ing 2,600 American. Receipts 5,000
bales, including 900 American. Fu
tures closed easy. New contracts
January 23.33: February 23.17; March
22.80; April 22.60; May 22.39. ,
CORN MARKET EASY.
Chicago, Jan. 17 Government
coal saving orders tended slightly
EALKCGn DRUQ CO.
Vh Prescription Store."
Phone 19 or 123.
BATTERY &
SUPPLY CO.
SPECIALISTS ON
ELECTRIC LIGHT
ING AND STARTING
SYSTEMS
1G North Palafox Street
The Central Pharmacy
"IN THE HEART OFTENSACOLV
THE HOME OF QUALITY
ICE CREAM
177 Phones 173
NAVAL STORES
PENSACOLA MARKET.
Pensacola, Fla., Jan. 17, 1918.
The spirit market was steady at 45
with no sales.
Receipts, Casks.
Last Yeai
loaay . xoi
This month 1,184 2.414
This season 53,975 65,466
Shipments, Casks.
Today .. 122
This month 1,534 10,173
This season ... 34,256 52,872
Stocks, Casks.
Today . . . . . . . . . . .44,348 31,312
April 1 24,629 18,718
The rosm market was steady with
no i sales.
Receipts, Barrels.
Today 270
This month 7,358 11,797
This season .. ..178,114 212,890
Shipments, Barrels.
Today 1,022 1.807
This month 11,244 13,205
This season .. ..179.198 207,126
Stocks, Barrels.
Today 92,709 107,683
April ,1 93,793 101,918
(Quotations were as follows:
Close.
X., WW. 7.32
WG , 7.12 V-2
N 6.92 Va
M .... ' 6.47 Vz
K. 6.35
X 607 s
11., G., F., E., D., B. 6.02
JACKSONVILLE MARKET.
Jacksonville, Jan. 17- The spirit
market was'steady at 45 1-2 with no
sales.
Receipts, Casks Last
Year
Today 251 304
This season 123,208 133,877
Shipments, Casta
Today 1
269
This season ... ...90,458
Stocks, Casks
Today 62,261
123,999
35,777
April 1 29,511 22.899
The rosin market was firm, with
no sales.
Receipts. Barrels. Last
Year
Today 1,129 1,428
This month 395,707 451,543
Shipments Barrels.
Today 1,985 2,200
This season .. ..889,764 419,648
Stocks, Barrels.
Today ; 163.069 180,189
April 1 .112,640 148,294
Quotations were as follows:
Close.
WW 7.6065
"GJ 750
7.2o
M 6-8590
K. .... 6.65
I 6.3035
II. , G.. F., E., D., B. ........ 6.30
SAVANNAIX MARKET.
Savannah, Ga., Jan. 17. The spirit
market was steady at 47c, with no
sales.
Receipts, Casks.
Today 145 130
This season 82,343 96,027
Shipment,' Casks
Today 200 2,208
This season . . 69,046 85,359
Stocks, Casks.
Today 26,230 19,192
April 1 ...11.169 7,620
, The rosin market was firm with
sales of 980 barrels.
Receipts, Barrels. ' Last
Year
Today 622 725
This season 277,883 342,757
Shipment, Barrels.
Today 800 7,226
This season .. ..308,175 343,509
Stock, Barrels.
Today 90,245 78.612
April 1 103,456 72,832
Quotations were as follows:
Close.
WW . ...7.70
WG : 7.40
N 7.20
M. .
K. .,
I. H.
.6.70
.660
.6.40
G. F. E. D. B.
today to ease down the corn market.
It was contended by some traders
that the effect of such orders would
be to relieve traffic congestion and
therefore would help indirectly to fa-
Gives Quick Relief for
CABLED 3 and
DLA GUSDIPIPIE
PRICE, 25c and 60c PER BOTTLE
DOINGS OF THE DUFFS
WIL5UP, D,r HOW Vc?U JKE 3LAT 1 1 VEU, K?M, AREMV VoO GOMG THE SIGHT IS
Ul lTpfLl lo WOOL AV,N5 CLOTWE? PPLLARS-NOO
THE OUTBURSTS OF EVERETT TRUE
By CONDO.
But t ivoocdN't hws smid a uor
ABOUT IT I T MADMT 0aEK tOR H4RRY,
AND THCM, THef2S'S
TU1T tiJ OKI -
T . ' - ' " I
I kJ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! I I M Lurf 5 ,
l l I ggiiiiiiim.ffc?w
. .. 7 : : : " :
Zeppelin Bogey Vanquished
Due to Activity Allied Craft
French Front, Jan. 17. The Zep
pelin bogey has been laid or, at least,
the major part of it3 terrors have
vanished, since reliable information
shows the reported existence in Ger
many of great armadas of these aer-
iial dreadnaughts to have been ab
solutely mythical. Altogether only
just over one hundred of these dirig
ibles have been constructed since the
late Count Zeppelin launched the
first one over Lake Constance-
Up to August, 1914, the total of
those built had numbered twenty
five; since hostilities began the two
great works at Friedrichshafen and
Staaken have constructed between
seventy-five and eighty, probably
nearer the lower than the higher
figure. This means ag, average of
two. per month. As the mean
cilitate the movement of corn to
market Opening- prices, which
ranged from unchanged figures to
3-8c lower with January 1.27 1-2 and
May 1.24 1-8 to .1-4, were followed by
a little reaction in some cases.
Oats were governed by. the same
conditions as corn.
Higher prices on hogs gave firm
ness to provisions.
BREAK IN COTTON.
New York, Jan. 17- The drastic
action of the fuel administration
caused a serious break n the cotton
market at the opening hour today.
The decline ranged frcri 11-2 to 2
cents, a pound, equal to $10 a bale.
The early break in cotton was fol
lowed quickly by a vigorous rally
which carried March contracts from
29 cents to 30-40 recovering the in
itial loss.
Officials of the cotton exchange
said that closing the exchange under
the fuel administrator's order would
not be considered unless Governor
Whitman should declare a legal hol
iday on each Monday.
NEW ORLEANS LOOSER.
New Orleans, Jan. 17. The price
of cotton broke $5 to $6 a bale on the
opening today in the efforts of trad
ers to adjust themselves to the holi
day order from the government.
Holders of long contracts were heavy
sellers because they feared greatly
curtailed consumption as the result
of the closing down of mills. In
the early trading in the contract
market, prices lost 99 to 117 points.
NOTHR THING
a mmr.&x
iteff H
period for the building of a Zeppelin
is known with certainty to be two
months, there must always have been
four new airships on the stocks at
the same time.
, Most of the Zeppelins" launched
into the air before the war came to
grief, thus leaving in the service of
the German army and navy a fleet of
less than a dozen when fighting be
gan. Since then nearly all the dir
igibles old and new have been handed
over to the German navy, which has
used them for mariy kinds of work,
such as bombarding expeditions, pro
tection Of mine-layers and small torpedo-boats
at sea, chasing submarines
searching for mine-fields, and, last
and most important reconnoitering
for the High Seas fleet.
Disaster has attended the flight of
an overwhelming majority of these
air monsters, no fewer than thirty of
which are known to have been de
stroyed in one way or another, as is
shown by the following list:
L. 1 Destroyed just before the
war, when it fell in the North Sea
near Heligoland.
L. 2 Burnt at Buhlsbuettel jtust
before the war.
L. 3 Descended at Fanoe in Den
mark at beginning oi the war and
was burnt by its crew.
L. 4Descended at Blaavands
Huk, Denmark, at beginning of the
war and was burnt by its crew.
L. 5 Brought down on the Bel
gian front in 1915, part of crew
saved.
L. 6 Burnt at Buhlsbuettel in its
hangar in September, 1916.
L. 7 Brought down by British de
stroyers off Jutland, crew being
drowned, in 1915.
L. 8 Brought down by machine
guns in Belgium, part of crew being
killed, in 1915.
Lv 9 Burnt at Buhlsbuettel in its
hangar at same time as L. 6.
L. 10 Struck by lightning near
Cuxhaven during its initial flights,
and lost with its crew.
L. 12 Destroyed at Ostend in
1915 when returning from a raid on
England.
L. 15 -Brought down in the
Thames, England, in 1916.
L. 16 Destroyed on October 19,
1917.
L- 16 Destroyed on October 19.
1917.
L. 18 Burnt in a hanerar at Tnr.
defn in 1916. !
L.19 Fell in the Baltic while re-j
TOM DIDN'T GIVE,
'I
Ye Cm
You can buy an absolutely dependable Piano away below what it usually
sells for; you can procure it upon such liberal terms that you will never miss
the money. Remember this when buying a Piano, a Player Piano, Organ,
Music Roll or Sheet Music from Clutter's, you have access to quality of
Goods, Fairness of Price, and MOST LIBERAL TERMS.
R.S. Howard Resiilar Pianos
" V
R. S. Howard Player Fiaeo
PIANOS RENTED PIANOS REPAIRED
One Year's Free Tuning, Free Stool and Scarf with Every Purchase.
We Also Pay. Freight on All Out-of-Town Orders.
The -Clutter .Music Hoese
114 South Palafox Street.
turning from a raid ort England.
L. 22 Burnt accidentally while
coming out of its hangar at Tondern.
L. 23 Fell on the English coast.
L. 25 Destroyed while being em
ployed as a training balloon at Wild
park. L. 31 Fell in London in 1916.
L. 32 Brought down in Lonoo.
1916 (Sept. 23-24.) , .
L- 33 Brought down in England
Sept. 23, 1916. and crew interned.
L. 35 Brought down in England.
L. 39 Brought ' down at Com
piegne, France, March, 1917.
L. 40 Fell in the woods near
Emden.
L. 43 Brought down in July, 1917,
at Terschelling. .
L. 44 Brought down afire at Saint
Clement, October 20, 1917.
L. 45 Brought down and burnt at
Sisteron, October 20, 1917.
L. 48 Brought down in England,
June, 1917.
L. 49 Brought down at Bour-bonne-les-Bains,
October 20, 1917.
L. 50 Fell at Dommartin, October
20. 1917.
L. 57 Broke tip on its first voy-afre-
L. 11 Put out of service in 1917
and believed to be in shed at Hage.
L. 13 In the shed at Hage since
May, 1917. ,
L, 14 School airship at Iordholz.
L. 17 Believed to have been de
stroyed at sea.
Jj. 20 Dismantled.
L.21 Dismantled, beTCeved burnt
at Tondern.
L. 24 Dismantled.
L. 2$ Planned but never con
structed. L.27, L.29 and L.30 Planned but
never constructed.
L. Si Believed destroyed off Eng
BUT SOME CLOTH DID
Dwfl a .Good Pi
WALNUT OR MAHOGANY FINISH,
ABSOLUTELY NEW. PRICE
. $350
EASY TERMS
$25.00 CASH, $10.00 MONTH
WALNUT OR MAHOGANY FINISH,
NEW AND UNEQUALLED IN;
TONE QUALITY. PRICES
$550
EASY TERMS
$50.00 CASH, $15.00 MONTH
land.
L. 38 Whereabouts unknown.
L.41, L.42, L.46, L.47. L.51, L-52,
L.53, L.54, L-55, L.56 In service in
the North Sea.
No information is obtainable as to
the fate of the remainder of the Zep
pelins, nor as to whether their con
struction was ever , completed, but
the few other, types of dirigible air
ships used by the Germans have not
been better served by fate than their
more renowned sisters.
The Schuette-Lanz dirigible fs
something like a Zeppelin but with a
framework of bamboo instead of
aluminium. There have been eight
of these in use since the beginning
of the war and their fate or present
condition is shown in the following
list: .
S. L. 3 Out of service since a long
time.
S. L. 4 Struck by lightning in the
Baltic
S. L. 6 Believed to have fallen
into the Baltic. ,
S. L. 8 In service in the Baltic.
S. L. 9 Burnt at Stolp.
S. L. 14 In service in the Baltic
S. L. 16 Believed to be still in ser
vice.
S. L. 20 In service.
There was also one Gross semi
rigid dirigible, which was put out of
service at the end of February, 1915,
and three Parseval non-rigid airships,
one of which was destroyed in Russia,
the second used as a school-ship and
the third understood to be still in
service. .
Grip Follows The Snow.
LAXATIVE BROMO QUININE. Tab
lets taken in time will Prevent Grip.
E. V7. GROVES signature on bvx.
50c. adv.
I I
MO
$650
Telephone No. 15.
EXTOA HlirJE WORK
BY ALA. CONVICTS
A special from 1 Mantgomery, Ala.,
eays: Governor Henderson 'ha an
nounced that plans have been worked
out whereby ptate convicts will work
one-half day extra Saturday arternoon
and evening, another half-day Sunday
afternoon and evening: in the coal
minel, and thus do their part toward
relieving: the coal shortage. Final plans
completed Wednesday and the con- '
victs will begin the extra work Satur
day afternoon. It is believed the coal
situation would be relieved for thia
state if all coal mined durlngr the extra
day could be diverted to Alabama
points.
Instead of leaving: the coal mines
when their tasks are completed Satur
day afternoon, the miners will continue
their work until they have completed
one-half day extra. After weekly re
pairs, ae made to the mines Sunday,
the men .will return-and work until
another half-day has been done. They
will be paid the market price for ev
ery ton of coal produced above their
tasks. v . '
JOHN WRITE & CO.
LOUISVILLE. KY.
Liberal assortment
and full value
for
FURS
Hides and
Coat Una
BY ALLMAN
wmXoo Close.
Vour. eus And ,
close em tight!

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