OCR Interpretation


The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, May 22, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Florida

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062268/1918-05-22/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

The Weather
VT7
r
Pensacola, the Third Time Over-the-Top
City of Gulf.
Fair Wednesday and Thursday, gentle
to moderate cast winds, except soutn
over northwest portion.
Highest temperature yesterday, 83 de
jrees; lowest 73 degrees.
VOL. XXL NO. 142.
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA, .WEDNESDAY MORNING, MAY 22, 1918.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.!
tb i
HUE VICIOUS
BLOWS OFTEN
Allied Forces Preventing Tutonic
Armies From Perfecting
Studied Plans.
AMERICANS READYi
HELP CRUSH HUN
Germans Have Lately Shown
Little of Thek Habitual
Fighting Spirit.
(Associated Press Summary.)
Striking viciously at the enemy at
various points along the-western bat
tie front, and meeting each outburst ot
German artillery with a thunder of
cannon fire, and maintaining mastery
of the air in every sector from the
-North Sea to the Swiss frontier, the
Entente allied armies are preventing
Teutonic armies from quietly perfect
ing their preparations for the coming
battles. With the knowledge that each
day that brings new American legions
to help crush the next German offens
ive, the Allies are finding satisfaction
in the fact that the Germans are yet
unable to launch a new blow. F.or the
most part th eGermans have shown
hut little of their habitual fighting
spirit along the line in France. They
have been thrust back in four sectors
and the Allies succeeded in winning
ground which will be of great impor
tance in the future. The Germans
counter attacked but once, this time
with such lack of dash it was easily
broken up.
REPORTED DEATH OF VON
HINDENBERG SPREAD RAPIDLY
WITH THE BRITISH ARMY IN
FRANCE, May 21. The rumor that
Field Marshal Von Hindenberg died re
cently has become current very gener
ally among the enemy in back areas a"5
well as among civilians. What basis,
if any, for the rumor is unknown
here.
TURKISH TROOPS MUTINY
AND SOLDIERS FOLLOW SOON
ATHENS. May 21 Turkish troops at
Aidin, Asia Minor, have muitnied. Two
thousand soldiers who were sent to
quell disturbances have deserted.
c;erman women in u. s.
must register june 17-26
WASHINGTON, May 21- German wo
men in the United States are required to
register with chiefs of , police or post
masters between June 17 and 26 under
regulations of the department of Jus
ties, were issued today.
MANY DUTCn SHIPS NOT
PERMITTED TO COME OVER
WASHINGTON, May 21. Holland has'
been notified by the United States gov-j
ernment her request for three ships'
now in American ports to carry the!
balance of grain promised by President!
Wilson canot be granted, and to pre-i
vent further delay in the movement of j
grain much of the ships should be sent
for it immediately. The fact that thisj
step was taken became known todayj
soTVn after the receipt of press dis--patches
announcing the Netherlands!
government has prohibited the depar
ture of Dutch ships from Its ports. Of
ficials are at a loss to understand Hol
land's action, though It was assumed
that Germany's attitude IftTfirp-onsIble.
More than four hundredTThdusand tons
of Dutch shipping are Idle in Dutch
ports, according to Information in pos
session of the state "department.
AMERICAN AVIATOR IS
WOUND m IV FVP-xiT' nncniTii
WITH THE AMERICAN ARMY, May
Captain James NormaiFHall, of Col
fax, Iowa, missing since May 7, is
wounded and a prisoner In a German
hospital. Captain Hall, attached to the
American aviation service, dTSappearen
fter an aerial engagement over Ger
man lines.
DR. USSHER TO BE
HEARD HERE SOON
Dr. Clarence D. TTsaer. ranked as
general by the former Czar of Russia
for his bravery at the siege of Van
fill lecture here within a short time
on his war experience as a medical
missionary. He comes under the
auspeces of the American Committee
for Armenian and Syrian Relief.
Dr. Usser nae spent twenty years
as a medical mlsalionary in Turkey
and built up a practice that extended
throughout the Turkish empire. He
Is the author of literary war work
entitled "An American Physician- tn
Turkey.
K. OF C HALL CLOSED
FOR THIS EVENING ONLY
On account of the hall being used
by the Daughters of Isabella to conduct
nn initiation this evening, the K. of C.
hall, on West Garden street, will be
fnrmally closed. This announcement
Is made for the benefit of all concerned.
DRAFT LIMITS 18
TO 60 IF NEEDED
TO BEAT ENEMY
NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J., May 21.
Before another summer -the United
States will have built enough ships, not
only to "carry a million troops to
France, but millions to France, and
enough destroyers to see them there in
safety," Secretary Daniels today de
clared In an address here.
If ncessary to get these ien to beat
down Germany, congress will make the
draft limits eighteen to sixty. Daniels
said. The secretary made an address at
commencement, exercises of Rutgers
college, which conferred upon him an
honorary degree of doctor of laws.
GERMANS AND
SINN FEINERS IN
BIG CONSPIRACY
DISCLOSURES THAT GOVERN.
JMENT HAD GATHERED EVI
DENCE TO PROVE COLLUSION
FOLLOWED BY ANOTHER IN
TERESTING STATUTE
WASHINGTON, May 21. Disclosures
today that the government has gathered
evidence in this country of conspiracies
between Irish Sinn Fein leaders and
German agents to precipitate a rebel
lion in Ireland, were followed by the
announcement that government agent's
had uncovered similar intrigues with
other nationalistic groups in the
United States. German money, it was
said, had been used to finance the agi
tation among negroes, Finns, Lithunians
and other socalled "oppressed national
ities." DILLON' SAYS POLICY SINN
FEINERS WRONG AND FOOLISH
DUBLIN, May '21. John Ditfon, na
tionalist leader in an interview with
the Associated Press Correspondent to
day, emphasized the divergence between
his party and the Sinn Fein, whose
policy, he declared, was "wrong and
foolish and bound to end in disaster."
COLORED PEOPLE TO HEAR ,
TALK FROM MR. HYER
W. K. Hyer, it was announced last
night, would make an addres to the
colored people in the interest of the
Red Cross campaign in the Big Zion
church, on North Reus street. Rev. J.
H. Hall, pastor. A cordial invitation is
extended, all to be or hand and listen
to the message which Mr. Hyer will
have for all.
TWO ATTACKS OF
HUN REPULSED
LONDON. May 21 Heavy German
counter attacks against British lines
northwest of Merville along a front of
about two-thirds of a mile failed under
strong British resistance. Field Mar
shal Halg reported tonight.' French
also repulsed an attack north of Bail
leul. PROHIS WIN IN
FIRST SKIRMISH
WASHINGTON. May 21. Prohibition
advocates in the house today won the
first skirmish in a fight to force the
president to exercise war time author
ity top rohibit the manufacture of light
wines and beers as well as whiskey,
when as a committee of the whole the
house adopted an amendment to the
food production bill prohibiting tie ex
penditure of any part of the eleven
million dollars. The measure carries
untfl the president Issues a proclama
tion prohibiting the use of foodstuffs
In the manufacture and Intoxicating
liquor of any form.
SCHOOL NO. 40 CLOSES
SUCCESSFUL TERM
School No. 40 closed May 21 after a
very successful year. The honor pu
pils were as follows:
Grade 1, Section A Byron Roberts.
Hubert MoGill. Helen Briggs and
Katherlne Levy.
Grade 1, Section B Finlay Mc
Davld. Florence . M organ and Henry
MeDavid.
Grade 2, Section A. Edna Fay De
Witt and Hazel Glttings. !
Grade 2. Section B Ruth Hasklns
and Edsar Odom.
Grade 3, Section A Edwin Fggart
and Annie Kate Roberts.
Grade 3, Section B Edwin Pond.
Jane Hall, Glen VIckery and Elizabeth
Qulna.
Grade 4, Section A Louise Harper.
Nelda Porter. Qulna Quigley and Carl
Daw.
Grade 4. Section B Margaret Mc
CaskiU, Charlie Bingham, Bernice
Brock, and Marion Vickery.
The following children were pre
sented with certificates for a four
minute Liberty ? Loan speech: Lucy
Davis Tonge, Eggart Stewart. . Eliza
beth Quina, Horace Fleming, Kathleen
Schambeau. Tommy' Lewis and Eu
gene Tatum.
.A successful Red Cross campaign
was also brought to a close with the
ending of this school, and a purse of
$58.50 was presented to the committee.
PRESIDENTSOF
ALL HfllUHTS
ilRE REMOVED
Director McAdoo Relieves From
Active Duty As Executive
Managers Large Number.
NAME FEDERAL
DIRECTORS SOON
New Officials Will Receive More
Than $15,000 Yearly, It
Becomes Known.
WASHINGTON, May' 21. Every rail
road president in the United States was
relieved from active duty as executive
manager of his road today By Director
General McAdoo, who will appoint a
federal director for each road, responsi
ble only to the railroad administration.
In many cases the road's president may
be named federal director. McAdoo
also created two new operating districts
the Allegheny region,1 consisting of
trunk lines east of Pittsburgh and the
Pocahonjas district, consisting of the
east and west trunk lines terminating
at Hampton Roads. C. H. Markham
will be assigned to the Allegheny dis
trict. To safeguard stockholders interests
and maintain roads individually, the
federal directors whenever possible will
be appointed from among the operating
officers of the property, McAdoo an
nounced. Regional directors for the Po
cahontas district and Southern district
to succeed Markham will be appointed
soon. Other smaller districts may be
created from time to time In the south
ern and western regions, now operated
as units by the regional directors.
New Federal directors probably will
receive more than '. fifteen thousand
yearly, it became known tonight.
C W. HUNTINGTON FIRED -
FOR "DISOBEDIENCE: TO ORDERS'
WASHINGTON. May 21. C. WY Hunt
ington, of New York, has been removed
oy Director uenerai xvicaooo as presy
dent of the Virginian Railway for d
nnpnipnrp nr t n rai man nnmmictA
uuu oraei s i or maintenance ana4j
provemem oi nis roaa. J. ti.
or Norfolk, va., nas been a
federal director for the road.
The Virginian is a coal carr
riinninar from DeemvAter V 'i
Norfolk, Va. Huntington is-t
railroad president to be remove
Director General McAdoo, but it was
hinted today at railroad administration
headquarters that similar action might
be taken against otfier executives who
do not co-operte well with the federal
management.
The complaint against Mr. Hunting
ton was that he failed, to comply
promptly with suggestions and orders
of the railroad administration, insisting
of technicalities involved and consult-
(Continued on Page 8)
FOUR HEROINES OF THE
Above, Louiee Young of Chelsea,
Mass. (In circle): - and Gladys MeTn
tyre of Mount. Vernon, , X..; T.. (in
square). - - '
On the right Ensign Burdlck of
New York (in circle) ; and Irene Mc
ln tyre of Mount Vernon,--X. Y. (in
square).
There are' not only heroes, but. he
roines galore, in the fighting on the
American front in France. - ,
Here are four Salvation Army girls
who divided the honors of the Battle
of Seicheprey with the Sammies who
beat the Germans.
For these girls helped the Sammies
to do it.
Two of them, the Mclntyre sisters,
were mentioned in . the : dispatches
from the mighting scene.
All four disregarded dangerr and
comfort and stuck' to their posts at
the Salvation Army canteen just back
of the front trenches, serving hot cof
MUST WORK OR
MAY NOT EAT,
ORDER SAYS
MERIDIAN, Miss., May 21. Clif
ford Williams, superintendent of
the sixth district of the United
States employment .service, with
headquarters here, has requested
the governors of Mississippi, Ala
bama, . Georgia, Louisiana and
Florida, comprising this district,
to . issue proclamations urging a
tsirct enforcement of vagrancy
laws. He said the time Is rapidly
approaching when men that won't
work may not eat.
FOOD SITUATION
IN GERMANY IS
MOST CRITICAL
EVEN WITH REDUCED RATIONS.
NOT ENOUGH TO CARRY POP
ULATION THROUGH UNTIL THE
NEXT HARVEST.
WASHINGTON, May 21 The food
situation in Germany, officials have
believe. Is ' the most critical it has
been at any time. Information reach
ing Washington from , many source
indicates that even with the reduced
ration planned' for June 15. the coun
try will not have enough food to cary
the population through . to the next
harvest and that- further reductions
will have to be made. . ,
The reduced ration was to have
been put ' into operation March 1. but
the measure was " postponed in the
hope that grain would be forthcoming
in large quantities from the Ukraine
When this hope vanished, the Ger
man government saw the reduction
was inevitable.
Germany began consuming her
1D17, wheat crop two months before
it was Intended to start on it, and
the German . potato crop has not
turned out nearly so well as German
agricultural interests had hoped
FAMINE PREDICTED ON
EAnlY POLITICAL ALLY
tKWDONralay 21 "I feel confident
that the Untie is at hand when famine
stark meilcal famine will join the
entente as a political and military
Germany and Austria,
ondent' of the Daily Mail
from Annemasse, France.
las, border.
spondent says he draws
on , from oral statements
cc
for.
ehtlc witness whose ob-
tj.
tended up to the end of
great masses on the Ger-
cr
ustrian peoples, this infor-
clares, are more sik of the
think and talk of nothing
and their morale is so lor
e governments are fearful of
evik movements.
ong the incidents given in sup
port of the story of terrible want Is
the case of two prisoners of war em
ployed at the g&a works in Vienna,
who. he declare, were murdered by
fellow workers who ate part of their
bodies. The Arbeiter Zeitung of Vi
enna demanded an Investigation and
the entire issue was confiscated in
consequence. The affair was referred
to the parliament but was hushed up
in the Vienna press.
The narrator said he and his fam
ily had lived tfor weeks almost en-
( Continued on Page Four.)
BATTLE OF
9Wt '"ft
I n,-
i l
J w
.y f
or r
FII BANQUET
IS WED BY
THE 1UHI
Graduates of Past Years Assem
ble for Evening of Much
Pleasure.
LARGE NUMBER
GUESTS PRESENT
Many Happy Speeches Made
Around Beautifully Deco
rated Table.
Shasta daisies and great clusters ot
blue and pink hydrangeas added then
beauty to the appointments of the
alumni banquet, which was given last
night with such success in the raaiu
cafe if the San Curios dining room,
Bertram Coleman acting as toastinaster,
Harry Levey, president of the senior
class, responded for the class of '18,
Dixon Carter for '16, and Clyde Doug
las for the class of '10. Others speaking
were Prof. Rogers and Mrs. C. J. Levy.
Among those who extended the cour
tesy of the evening were Miss "Florence
Halsey, class of 'OS; Bertram Coleman,
Dr. Bertram Dannheiser, Clyde Douglas,
'10; Miss Eola Williams, Miss Paula
Hirschkovitz, Ml"; Miss Vera Green
Bella Bowes, Florida Waite, Jessie Wal
ton, Christine Morrison. Margarita
Moreno, Roscoe .Davis, class "12; Miss
Jodie Sullivan. '13; Miss Kathleet Caro,
Lou Caro, Jennings Tlirschkovitz, Rosa
Bell. Montarie Barrineau, Mi; Elizabeth
Lind, Mabel Hiiliard, Marion Keeling,
Rhoda Benn, Julia Creary8, Tom Ken
nedy, Lucile Sellars, Elsie Burrow,
Mae Davis, M7; Dixon Carter. Vesta
Dilger,. Eleanor Mitchell, Erma Graham,
Will Daniel, Julia Bowes, Marguerite
Dewberry, Norma Holt, M 6. '
Their, guests of the class' ot M8, In
cluded ?lises RuHk Williams, Wiima
Horning, MiriamJ Crosby, Wilms Bark
dull, Clara Pepper, Harold Bennett.
Patti Grey, Ernestine Schambeau, Gail
Binklev. Lillian DuBuisson. Estelle
Hicks, Hermina Riss, Vivian Levy, Tes
sie Morgan. Hilda Hansen. Beulah
Greenhut. Dora Shepherd, Eulalie Oli
ver, Mae Stokes, Ethel McGonnell. Dor
othy Runyan, Ethel Paderick. Kathryn
Hughes and Harold Bennett, Earl
.Quigley, c. J. Heinberg, Harry Levey,
August Morgan, John Shepard.
Honor guests or the evening wre
Professor' Ross Rogers. Mr. Lee GouH-
!ng. Prof. William Tyler, Mr. and Mrs.
C. J. Lacy, Miss Anabel Calloway, Mrs.
Nita Osborne Benn, Miss Sybil Lempke,
Miss C. M. Robinson.
Th officers of he alumni are Dr. B.
V. Dannheiser, president., Mr. Jennings
Hirschkovitz. vice president, Miss Kath
leen . Caro, treasurer, and Miss Mary
Creary secretary.
Following the banquet there waS
dancing in the ballroom until a late
hour .
Conftnued on Page 4
SEICHEPREY
fee and - hot chocolate and cheerin?
words to the, American fighters who
dropped back for a brief rest.
Gas shells and bombs were bursting
and the- canteen was most certainly
in the danger zone, but the girls re
mained on duty throughout the battle
as cool and cheerful as though they
were handing out sandwiches at a
picnic back home.
Officers aie still praising them for
their bravery and service.
WOMAN ON TRIAL
FOR ESPIONAGE
HEARD ON STAND
KANSAS CITY, May 21. Mrs.
Rose Pastor Stokes, on trial here
charged 'With violation of the es
pionage act, in testifying in her own
behalf today declared she was not
opposed to America's entering the
war, but was opposed to war in
general, and said "no government
declares war for purely idealist Jo
reasons, and America dfd not do so
until her vital interest was affected
and the submarine threatened
commerce."
ABEL ACQUITTED
BY JURY IN THE
FEDERAL COURT
REQUIRED LESS THAN THIRTY
FOR DOZEN MEN TO CONCLUDE
THAT .CHARGE .OF .MAN
SLAUGHTER NOT JUSTIFIED
J. E. Abel was last evening ac
quitted of the charge of manslaugh
ter by the jury in the United States
District court. He was tried for
shooting- and causing the death of
Private George M. T. Wilson of the
army, on the nisht of April 12. at
Warrington on the naval reservation.
The Jury waa about thirty minutes,
after the court had placed the case in
its rands.
Throughout the day counsel for
both sides fought every inch of
ground. Uuited States IMstrtct At
torney Neeley bringing to bear every
angle of the law to secure a convio
tion. Abel appeared to have the well
wishes of the service men, there be
ing legal representatives of the gov
ernment as well as a civilian attor
ney looking after his interests.
The testimony of Private Miller,
who was wounded at time of the
affair by one of the bullets from the
pistol of Abel, was favorable to Abel,
Tha whoie case summarized was
that it was the question of the un
written law and self defense.
It - appears that on the nig'ht In
question Abel was in company with
a young woman named Rich and was
on the naval reservation,, preparing to
take a street car to the city. Soldiers
Jt was stated, had gathered about the
street car station and made some re
marks to the couple vhlch Abel re
sented. He approached the soldiers
and upbraided them for the kind of
language they we-e using.
Then it was testified that the man
now dead made a move as if to draw
a weapon from his pocket, where
upon Abel, who was a policeman at
the station, drew his revolver and be
gan firing, one bullet striking Wilson,
he dying from the effects of the
wound. Another bullet struck Miller
but the latter recovered.
SAYS REPORT BEING FIRED
FOR DISOBEDIENCE FALSE
NEW YORK, May 21. C. W. Hunting
ton, removed as president of the Vir
ginian railway by order of Director
General McAdoo, issued a statement to
day declaring that the statement tnal
he had been relieved for disobedience of
orders was false.
He made public the following tele
gram addressed to him by the director
general of railroads dated "May 18:
"It is hereby ordered, effective at
12:01 a. m. Tuesday, May 21, 1018, that
C. V. Huntington, president of the Vir
ginian Railway Company be retired as
the chief operating officer of the.'l
rond of that company and that there
after his compensation be paid by the
corporation so long as the corporation
desires to utilize his services; and that
Joseph 11. Young be, and he Is hereby
appointed federal manager of the Vir
ginian railway and placed In charge of
operations thereof, with office at the
Norfolk terminal station building, Nor
folk. Va., with full pdwer to do and
perform any and all acts which mayi
be necessary or appropriate in the ef
ficient operation of said railroad. and
in the making of all improvements andj
betterments which m3y be necessary or
appropriate to enable, said railroad ade
quately to serve the public needs.
"All officials, agents and employes ot
said road are required to obey order
issued by or under the authority of
sad federal manager."
"Mr. Huntington said," his statement
reoas. "that no reason has been as
signed for the action of the director
general rnd (hat he had no Information
on the subject except news reports that
his retirement as chief operating officer
of the Virginia railway was because of
failure to obey an order of the director
general to make certain Improvements
on the railway, but that this statement
is false as no such order has ever been
issued."
PAMPHLETS ARE
BEING MAILED
J. R. Tucker. TV. J. Brown and M.
T. Dannheiser were assisting revest ra
tion officer EL. Davis, yesterday
afternoon and breaking- records In
sending: out to registered voters,
statements of candidates who are
running and the decisions will bs
made by the people at the primaries
June 4th next. All of the candidates
are announced and their protos are
Frinted In a pamphlet. All say they
will appreciate the support given them
in the approaching race.
PEFJSACOLA T
G00IOT0PIN
Very Encouraging Start In
augurated, But Must Be No
Slackening of Effort.
MERCY FUND IS
PRESSING NEED
Team Captains Named for Wo
men's Drive to Be Staged
Two Days.
"With the great drive for the Red
Cross well underway, prospects Indi
cate that not only will Pen sac 4 a
go over the top In this, as In every
other campaign which haa been in
augurated for war work, but that
the quota will be more than met,
statemtnts of receipts totaling S4100.
having wired to headquarters yester
day, as a, result of the intensive Red
Cross campaign, through which this
county is to raise Its quota, Chair
man Hyer said yesterday afternoon:
"This is encouraging, but it must
be remembered that P'ensacola must
do more in this campaign than It has
ever done before. Tor every dollar
that was given last year two dollars
nwst be glen this year, If this drive is
to be the success that it should be,
and if Pensacola is to register its
patriotism in & way that will be of
actual service to the men who are giv
ing their lives for freedom and hu
manity." Featured by a speech by I Iacoste,
who presented the needs of the Red
Cross from the ;worklngman,r stand
point, a.- great meeting of employers
and employes was held yesterday at
the plant of the Pensacola Shipbuild
ing Company, when each employe
pledged himself to give two days pay
to the fund which is to be rained
by the Red Cross, thus proving him
eeld a patrotio In the real meaning
of the word. J. C. Peterson and Mr.
Barclay of tha plant spoke at tha
gathering, which waa arranged by C.
W. Farley. Captain S. R. Mallory
Kennedy gave vivid war reminiscences
and made a stirring appeal for the
Red. Croes. Other members present
were J. M. Muldon and L. Carle
Thornton.
The Pensacola Chapter of the Amer-,
lean Red Cross met in executive ses
sion yesterday morning, naming team
captains for the woman's drive on
Saturday and Monday. One hundred
women will put this part of the drive
across with a systematic house to
house canvass of women and children.
On the committee of ten, each of
whom will select nine co-workers,
are Mrs. J. B. McNeill, . Mrs. Dave
Kugelman, Mrs. Bam Pasoo, Mrs. Wil
liam F. Breen, Mrs. Frank I Mayes,
Mrs. R. F. Mitchell, Mrs. R. MV. Good
hart. Mrs. Max Klein, and Mrs. F. 8.
Mellen. Th fact that each must feel
helself a part of the war work will
be emphasized in the drive. Sub
scriptions without limit will be urged,
but the small contributions will also
also be gladly received.
In accordance with that splendid
spirit which the students have demon
strated in all war work, contributions
were received yesterday from the
Junior Red Cross of the Pensacola
High 8chooI to the amount of $61.00;
School Number Forty contribute!
$58.41; School Number 35 contributed
J27.fi5; School Number 43. 130.05
splendid eums from the young pa.
traiots.
W. K. Hyer, chairman, announced
yesterday that through the courtesy
of the Saenrer Amusement Company,
of which J. A. Jones is local mana
ger, on Thursday, May 23rd, the en
tire proceeds of the Isis theatre will
go to the Red Cross fund. Mr. Jones
announces for that day the special
attraction of Walter Whltslde and
Valentine Grant, in The Belgian.
Headquarters present a scene of
great activity, the team captains and
their aides making such a canvass as
has never before been undertaken in
this county, and there is every prob
ability of the drive proving a success,
provided the enthusiasm does not ,
slacken and those interested, whether
workers or contributors, rely too sure
ly upon success has been achieved.
RED CROSS DRIVE
A POPULAR MOVE
WASHINGTON. May 21. Returns
from the Red Cross campaign for the
?econd hundred million war mercy
fund as received at headquarters tonight
ft on eleven district over the country
Hiow the drive is meeting with success
everywhere. While figures are far
from complete, reports how more than
tne-fourth of the fund has boen raised.
Michigan. South Dakota and Delaware
nave exceeded their quota ana still
driviug.
THSIPH
- 4
J
3
i

xml | txt