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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, June 16, 1918, Image 5

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THE PENSACOLA JOURNAL, SUNDAY MORNING, JUNE 16, 1918.
People
Edited by CELIA MYROVER ROBINSON
Telephone 38 10
A SONG OF THE SHIPS.
Ethel Watts Mumford
' of The Ylflllantes.
Dless the Seas with yoar myriad ships,
America, my own I
Call them forth to the longing sea,
T'latmt hir khIU tn the urrfnr hreez.
And bring the Hun to his begging knees
In his cursed Danger Zone!
Bet the sails of your Outward Bound,
America, my own!
For sure as ye 6end o'er the outward
track,
Ye shall bins your strong sons hom
ing back
To hearths and homes that shall know
no sack
Of the Hun and his Danger Zone.
Put out, put out, good seamen all! -
Good builders, ply your trade.
Never for us the sable pall.
And Liberty dead in the Council Hall.
By Iron and Blood shall the debt fce
. paid, .
That we owe for the He and the
dastard raid.
The tortured child and the ravished
maid.
And the Hun trail over all.
- " t
Caress the Seas with your myrid ships.
America, my Own!
Nor steep nor rest shall the builders
. know ;
Till out of their hearts of oak shall
prow,
Like O.-iUeons bold of the long ago.
The Fleets of the Danger Zone!
Ch. lenl ami true arc your Chuldren
strong
Arrwr'i-H, my own!
And Her... Is the rainbow arch that
f-prinH
ff ii-ir 1,1 f-b'ol nnd the Fire's wings!
Oh, Proiliirs of Mn, how the strong
I''.ii t s'njrs
'As we wild thu' rivets home!
put-willful- out, good fcarnen all,
f:i, YLU SHOE CO.
Pcnr; cola's Popular
S.'ioe Store
-mi Romana Sts.
"'"CAFE
I.IAj ti;e delicacies
the season
OF
3:a Foods fresh daily.
lub,Prt -.akfasts, 35c and more.
Blue Ptate Luncheon, 50c.
;,The San Carlos Electric Grill
r.p Lunch Counter will be open
ed shortly.
"tR SAYINGS STAMPS
tUIUKDITTHS
UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT
T3EAUTY enshrined
: in qualities of long
wear gives Wallace
Silver Plate distinc
tion. Wallace Silver Plate
is guaranteed without
time limit.
On sale at the leading
jewelers whose names
appear below.
WILL C. DIFFENDERFER
Jeweler-Optician
Hie floase of Reliable Goods
Vis
" ' : SS.M If,
J ' " I al
Eyeint;
a.
m. to 8 p. m.
Good Builders, ply your trade !
Never for us the slaver's rod.
That we lick the dust at a despot's nod,
With power and will let the keels be
' laid
And the builders shall be as a stourg-
ing blade
In the battlehand of aod I -
BAKING POWDER LOAF
BREADS.
Mix the melted fat, liquid, syrup and
egg. Combine the liquid and well mix
ed dry Ingredients. Bake as a loaf in
a moderately hot oven lor one hour or
until thoroughly baked.
Nuts, raisins or dates may be added
If desired.
Oat and Corn Flour Bread.
Ground Rolled Oats and Corn Flour.
3-4 cup liquid.
4 tablespoons fat.
4 tablespoons syrup.
2 eggs.
6 teaspoons, baking powder.
1 teaspoon salt.
1 1-3 cups corn flour. ,
i cup ground rolled oats.
Corn Flour and Buckwheat Bread.
Corn Flour and Buckwheat.
1 cup liquid.
4
tablespoons fat.
4
2
6
1
tablespoons syrup,
eggs.
teaspoons baking powder.
1-3 cups corn flour,
cup buckwheat.
1
Indian Pudding.'
4 cups milk (whole or skim)
1-4 cup corn meal.
3-4 teaspoon salt.
1 teaspoon ginger.
1-3 cup of molasses.
Cook milk and meal in a double holler
20 minutes; add molasses, salt and gin
ger. . Pour Into greased pudding dish
and bake 2 hours in a slow oven, r
use your tireless cooker. Serve with
milk. This makes a good and nourish
ing dessert. Serves six.
DORCAS SOCIETY TO DO
RED CltOSS WORK.
The members of Dorcas Society are
requested to meet at the Red Cross
rooms Tuesday afternoon at 2:30. The
afternoon will be spent in work for tne
Red Cross. There will be one business
meeting held during each month, the
other three meetings being devoted to
Red Cross work. -
AT FIRVr PAPTIST
WIU'RCII.
- At the morning services of the First
Baptist Church Mr. W. T. Noakes will
sing "Ave Maria" by Millard. The
Young Ladies Chorus will sing "We
Shall Crown Him King." by Morris.
At the night services Miss Pearl Ken
nedy will render the beautiful select
lion, "Clinging to Jesus," by Beazley.
FOR MISS CAROLINE
MERTINS.
Mrs. F. E. Dunham was a hostess ot
Friday evening, entertaining at her
home on North Spring street with a
kitchen shower in hoqor of Misa Caro
line E. Mertlns. whose marriage to Mr.
Mr. Clarence J. Stokes Is an event
of next week.
Flag's and patriotic banners added
their color to the attractively appoint
ed rooms, among those enjoyed the
courtesy being Miss Mertins, Misses
Clara and Mae Stokes. Miss Dalmatla
Jadrlvich, Miss Elizabeth XClumker,
Misses Annie and Juya Mertlns,
Misses Clara and Stella Relnhart.
Miss Katie Hartman, Miss Edna Rie
del. Miss Annie Krone, Miss Helen
Stokes. Miss Martha Mertins. Miss
Emma Licati, Miss Daisy Hallmark,
to!
TMLiOTNCS STAMPS
4S9X7KB snr TSB
UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT
WOMEN OF ESCAMBIA COUNTY MEET
TUESDAY AFTERNOON AT SAN pARLOS
Called by the central chairman of the
Escambia County Woman's War Work
Committee, Mrs. J. Walter Kehoe, an
women of Pensacola, will.,, meet on
Tuesday afternoon at five o clock, at
the San Carlos auditorium, to meet
Mrs. John T. Fuller, state chairman of
the Wpman's Conservation Committee,
Braxton Beacham, state director, and
other members of the Food Conserva
tion committee, who come to' Pensa
cola in the Interest of war work. ,
Mrs. Kehoe, in her call to the wo
men of thi3 county, says : "Every one
of the two hundred and thirty members
of the Escambia County Woman's War
Work Committee are expected to be
present, and I wish each to feel that
this is a personal appeal for her to be
present."
Miss Bertha Peterson. Miss Marie Zlr
kelbach, Miss Mabel Wilson, Miss Edna
Gonzalez, Miss Leola Berry, Miss Eva
Pfelffer. Mrs. F. E. mirham. Mrs. John
English, Mrs. Chris Mertlns, Mrs. Ida
V. Powell, Mrs. F. R. Mertins, Mrs.
George Mertlns, Mrs. John Stokes.
Mrs. James Wilson, Mrs. C. P. Ucati.
Mrs. II. J. Pape, Mrs. E. Rledel. Mrs.
J. C. Hendrlx. Mrs. E. C Nicholson,
Mrs. James Aiken, Mrs. O. C. Hall
mark and Mrs. W. Berry.
SENDING OUT WAR
SAVINGS LITERATURE.
A wonderful spirit of patriotism ac
tuates the women of Pensacola. who
are working sealously In the war sav
ings campaign, and among those who
were busy yesterday at the post office,
sending out copies of the president's
proclamation and other literature
were: Captains. Mrs. I Partridge and
Miss Lucille Grey; lieutenants. Mrs.
W. H. Watson and Miss Mabel Gon
zalez; privates. Miss Doris Merrltt,
Miss M. Hlggins, Mrs. M. B. Clark,
Mrs;A. B. Rivers, Miss Gail Blnkley,
MisiT Wllma Horning, Mies Pattle
Gray, Miss Isabel Grant and Mrs. R.
E. McCune.
TO ATTEND SUMMER
SCHOOL.
Miss Beth Walton left yesterday for
Tallahassee, where she will attend the
summer school. Miss Walton, who is
president of the college L. W. C. A. will
also do work In connection with that
association, while at the college.
MEETING PRISQLLA
CLUB.
The Priscilla Club of the First Chris
tian Church will meet on Tuesday af
ternoon at 550 o'clock, at the home of
Mrs. J. C. Long, 1625 East Gadsden
street. As this is the second donation
meeting, the members are requested to
bring in their donations. 'All members
are asked to - notify the hostess, If
they cannot attend.
TO TRAIN AT VASSAR
AS RED CROSS NURSE.
Miss Lola Lee Daniel, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. R. E. L. Daniel, who grad
uated recently irom ine university oi
Kansas, leaves Thursday for Vassar
College, where she will take a three
month's course of Red Cross training,
at the end of which time she will go
to Bellevue Hospital to complete, her
course, before going abroad for work
in the Red Cross corps.
One thousand college graduates will
train at Vassar this summer after the
three month's course, each woman go
ing later to soma hospital of hed own
choice to complete her training, iss
Daniel's friends here will be mueh
interested In her decision to serve her
country in this way. There is an ever
growing demand for Red Cross nurses,
which is being met by volunteers from
every section eager to serve the na
tion. '
TO VISIT MISSES
YNIESTRA.
Miss Rosa Demeranvllle arrived yes
terday from Mobile to visit her cousins.
Misses Carre Louise and Adelaide
Yniestra. Several social gatherings
have been planned for the attractive
visitor.
FIVE O'CLOCK TEO
AT COUNTRY CLUB. '
Mrs. R. F. Mitchell entertained with
a five o'clock tea Thursday afternoon
at the Country Club In honor of Mr,
and Mrs. M. E. Wilson, Jr.. of Tampa.
Fla., and . Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wilson, of
Starke. Fla., who are visiting their
parents Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Wilson.
OLD CUSTOM IS
STILL OBSERVEO
IN NEW. ORLEANS
New Orleans, June 15. A pushing,
scrambling, heaving mass of women, to
the stranger unique even in a city of I
strange scenes and customs. Scores of
them, from the old gray-haired black
mammy of "befor d' war" days to the
young white girl in her teens with evi
dences of poverty in her bearing and
attire. Many have broods of children!
around them, others carry babies in
their arms. Color runs riot, the ban
danna kerchiefs of the negroes and the
vari-colored -clothing of all combining
to surpass the imagination.
It is the usual Saturday morning dis
tribution of five cent, pieces to the
poverty stricken, a custom begun in
New Orleans many years ago by a
tery company, the old residents
'Ot-
say,
and still observed weekly as a neces
sary rite by at least two of the largest
business concerns in the city. In the
halcyon days, says fradition, the lot
tery gave to all comers coins at certain
times and on holidays, cheered the
hearts of those in financial straits by
Every woman In the county, whether
a member of the War Work Commit
tee or not, is urged to be present at the
meeting, for Mrs. Fuller , and other
members of the committee have a mes
sage which, they will deliver, which
will be of interest to every woman who
wishes to serve her country.
The members of the Escambia Coun
ty Woman's War Work Committee, or
ganized only a few weeks ago, are al
ready doing splendid work for the coun
ty. Their Interest In the War Savings
campaign and their work In connection
with the canning centre here have al
ready demonstrated their patriotism in
no uncertain terms, and all are urged
to be present on Tuesday afternoon to
hear the message
has to deliver. .
.which Mrs. Fuller
doubling the amount.
"It Is Just one of our bobbles." de
clared the head of one of the concerns
when asked why the firm observed the
custom. "We have done it for years
and are going to keep it up. And this'
in spite of the fact that we belong to
the Charity Organization Society, which
discourages Individual giving."
Chaos usually precedes the distribu
tion of the "Jitneys" as the negroes
eall the coins. The money is given
away at 8 a. m. but an hour earlier
a crowd already is on hand. By 7:30
o'clock the numter has Increased and
when a small window Is thrown open
the street is a mass of struggling hu
manity. The appearance of the cash
ier electrifies the crowd. With shouts
hands are held in the air,, the mass
surges forward, each woman Intent on
being among the first to receive her
coin. As each is supplied she leaves
the crowd, to make her way to one of
the many public markets where she
usually purchases "seconds' of various
vegetables from the produce dealers.
then goes home to prepare dinner.
The doling out of coins finally Is con
cluded, the window slams down, for
the sum to be distributed has become
exhausted. Many are disappointed but
there is the consolation of looking for
ward to the coming Saturday. They
resolve to be on hand earlier next
week. ""
Pathos and disappointment were
written plainly on the face of an old
negro mammy one recent Saturday as
she hobbled down the 6treet, assisted
by a battered crutch and a cane.' a
nroKer wno naa been watching, ac
costed her:
"What's the matter, Mammy? Were
you left out?"
"Yessuh, yessuh. I reckon I ain'
young ez I uster be." she replied
bomehow all dem younger omans Jes
beats me to it. An' I needed dat
money to buy sumpln to eat wid, too."
And she resumed her Journey.
"Just a minute," called the broker.
"Maybe this will make up for it. "He
took a dollar bill from his pocket.
"Thanky ,suh ; God bless you honey,'
she said. And as. she showered her
thanks and blessings upon him he
waited into his office.
MAKES GLEAH THE
STATE SMPMD
SeniTor Fletcher recently
the matter of making: clear
ested parties the status of
took up
to inter-
shlpyard
workers In the draft, and has received
a ciear ana concise statement from
Provost Marshal Crowder, which has
such a local bearing and Interest that
ii is reproduced herewith, for the
Denent or all concerned. . The letter
follows:
Gen. Crowder's Letter.
Hon. Duncan U. Fletcher. United
States Senate.
My Dear Senator Fletcher:
Receipt Is acknowledged of your let
ter of June 6, 1918, relative to the
classification under the selective ser
vice law and regulations of men em
ployed in shipyards.
Employment In a shipyard does not
entitle a registrant to deferred classi
fication as such. Under the regula
tions the district board is given exclu
sive original Jurisdiction of all claims
for deferred classification on Indus
trial grounds, and its action is final
with respect to such claims, subject
to appeal to the president under Sec
tion 111 of the regulations. The dis
trict board may grant a registrant so
engaged deferred classification on in
dustrial grounds if In its opinion It
considers the industry in which he i
employed a necessary industry and the
registrant himself necessary thereto
within the meaning of Sections 80 to
Pensacola Library Association
200 and 202 Blount Bids.
Dues 25c per month
Free Reading Room 4 to t p. m.
Campaign for new members now on.
Made to Measure. Moderately Priced
Not Sold In Stores.
Write or Phone for Appolntfnent
MRS. L. F. SHELTON
121 W. Chase St.
Phone 1120
CHIROPRACTOR
W. C. GOELZ, D. a
329 Brent Building. Phone 393
GRADUATE OF P. S. C.
Residence Phone 1514
MEN DRAFT
89 of the regulations.
In addition to-the foregoing provis
ions of the selective service regula
tions. Sections 152 to 155 1-2. provide
a special list called the "Emergency
Fleet Classification List," upon which
registrants employed by companies en
gaged in the building or fitting of
ships under the supervision of the
navy department or Emergency Fleet
Corporation are placed when requests
are presented to the local boards
properly made out and signed by the
officials designated in Section 153. This
special listing Is equivalent to deferred
classification in Class V so lonsr and
only so long as the registrant remains
employed in this work. Imedlately
uponm leaving such employment a
registrant becomes subject to the
regulations and will be Inducted into
the military service in accordance with
his class and order number as pre
viously determined. It is not thought
that either the navy department or the
Emergency Fleet Corporation would
request to have a pay clerk or any
similar employe put upon the Emer
gency Fleet Classification List. Such
request would not be approved by this
office.
(Signed) E. H. CROWIDER.
Provost Marshal General.
USEFUL TOAOES TO
BE TAUGHT
Id
Brighton, England, June 15. Sol
diers who have lost a leg but- whose
hands and sight are perfect are learn
ing diamond cutting and polishing in
this Atlantic City of England. They
are employed almost exclusively in an
Industry new to England and expect
before the war is over to compete on
a favorable basis with the more highly
skilled diamond cutters of Amsterdam
and Antwerp, where in pre-war days
there was a monopoly of the business.
Two large, modern four-story buildings
are being put up which when com
pleted will employ 1,800 discharged
soldiers.
Only ex-soldiers with unimpaired
eyesight and perfect control of their
fingers are taken because everything
depends on a man's accuracy of vision
and control of his hands. Even with
these qualities It takes a man a life
time to learn the trade.
First the men pass through a train
ing school. When a man is first ad
mltted he is put to work on marbles
such as he played with when a boy.
He cuts up and polishes the marbles
as he will later do with the real stones.
The marbles are first sawn in half,
and then grround into shape on a steel
disc. This serves to give him some
idea of the finished shape of the real
diamond, but it is impossible to get the
face even approximately correct, owing
to the softness of the marble.
Instead of cutting the 68 facets or
surfaces found on the finished bril
liant, the men cut six planes on the
marble, and afterward grind the base
roughly into the shape of the collet
or neck. When a man does this skill
fully he is given a small diamond to
cut. and it is a great day In a man's
training when this stage arrives. The
feeling that he has a Btone worth from
$100 to $250 in his possession to cut
and polish gives him a sense of re
sponsibility. While undergoing training the men
receive no wages, but they receive a
government allowance of about $7 a
week. After they have advanced far
enough to b entrusted with a dia
mond they are put on a wage basis
of from $10 to $20 a week, depending
on their ability. Their training usual
ly occupies a period of from three to
six months.
CORN GOING UP.
rainAfin June 15. Corn ascended
rapidly today on reports of hot winds J
in the west. Opening prices wnicn
showed 1-4 to l-2o advance with July
$1.42 1-2 to 1.43 1-8 and August 1.44 1-2
to 1.45 1-2 were followed by a decided
upturn. v
ME
lira
New Blouses
3b41 $4.4 5o
Beautiful Georgettes of which we have just received 150,
a fortunate purchase that we are going to give you the benefit
of. Flesh, white and all- shades are represented, trimmings
are beaded and plain.
WIRTHMOR WAISTS
New styles received each
week. No duplicating styles.
Dresses
A wonderful line of beautiful Georgette and Crepe de
Chine Dresses, attractive colors that link up admirably with
the spirit of the times, styles are such as you will not find else
where, materials the, best there is to be had.
9 and
WOULD MODIFY
RATE INCREASE
Washington Bureau
Pensacola Journal.
Washington, D. C June 15w Sena
tor Park Trammell of Florida has
taken up with the Director General
of Railways the question of modify
ing the recent rate Increases applicable
to fruits and vegetables shipped from
Florida,
"The truck growers of Florida are
dependent largely on reasonable
freight rates and prompt car service,"
said Senator Trammell today, "and if
these are not secured the risks as
sumed in truck growing are too great
to invite the truck farmers to attempt
maximum production.
Senator Trammell said he had
brought these facts to the attention
o the railway administration several
times in reference to prompt car ser
vice and that he now has up with Mr.
McAdoo's office the matter of freight
rates 'and the advisability of modify
ing the recently authorised increases
In rates, particularly as they apply to
Florida products.
COTTON SEED Oil MARKET.
NEW YORK. June 15. The cotton
seed oil marwet closed quiet. Spot
none; June 20.00; July and August
20.10. Sales none.
onteel
I
a
TO have "developed a
rare,worv-ous odor, at
a cost of thousands of
dollars; and then to be
" abb to sell it in a beauti
ful package of talcum at
a price within every
woman's means is the su?
preme achievement of the
makers of Jonteel, the New
Odor of twenty-six Flow
ers. TryTalcJonteel today.
The Crystal Pharmacy
The Rexall Store
Mr
Your Old Shoes
Have them whole-soled. We'll do the job
and guarantee it.
Rogers' silverware redemption cards
given away. r
West End Shoe Store
PHONE 2032
WELLWORTH WAISTS
New styles in these also in
stock each week.
11 South Palafox
PAY CASH! PAY LESS!
at
DRY GOODS STORE
FREE! FREE!! '
With Every Skirt Sale
Above $1.50
1 THRIFT STAMP.
FREE
With Every Silk Waist
Crepe de Chine or Georgrette
1 TimiFT STAMP. FREE
With Every Hat
Above $1.50
1 THRIFT STAMP FREE i
This Offer Is Good i.
tt
ALL THIS WEEK .
. Help Win the War Help
Yourself to a
GOOD BARGAIN! .
DRY GUUDS S1UKE
"Everything New That's Good"
Phone 771 31 So. Palafox St.
Hats
All our Trimmed Hats,
everyone a pattern hat,
$7.50 values, will go on sale
Monday at
4.9.8
A superb line of Silk
Skirts, black and navy,
many pretty styles and
novel trimming effects, will
sell Monday for
Street.
POSS'
POSS'

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