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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, June 30, 1918, Image 1

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The Weather
vrr
nr iii i v. v fix
Generally fair Sunday and Monday,
continued warm, light variable winds.
Highest temperature yesterday, 87 de
grees; lowest, 78 degrees.
VOL. XXL NO. 181.
Only Activity Worthy of Men
tion Was - by Entente
Allied Forces.
GERMANS MAKE
START BIG DRIVE
Believed Preparations Nearly
Complete for Resumption of
Enemy's Interrupted Drive.
By Associated Press.
Another week has been passed with
out the Germans resuming their of-
tensive aiong: the western front. In
fact, the entente allies have shown
the greatest activity during this period
una strengthened their fire when
needed bolstering and at various pla
ces In jeopardy the enemy's venture ot
certain parts of the line. They ex
tended their control over wide sectors
of the front, and there Is reason for
believing that preparations are near
ly completed for a resumption of the
German drive somewhere on. the west
front on a scale eclipsing ail former
attacks.
SAFE ARRIVAL OF U. 3.
TROOPS IN ITALY.
WASHINGTON", June 29. The safe
arrival In Italy of the first contingent
of a. military force which will repre
sent the United States, is announced
by General March, chief of Staff. They
wer cent direct from this country,
and the troops landed yesterday , were
to supplement other8 ordered from
France by FerBhing. Sanitary unit
composed the greater part of the
first arrivals, but other special units'
alsi were included." No denlte plan
for an in creese in this force from the
United States lias been reached, 8ec-
retary Baiter fald. ;
QUIET PREVAILS ON
THE BRITISH FRONT.
LONDON, June 29, Quiet prevails
on the British front in Northern
France according to Gen. Haig's report
tonight.
GERMANS CLAIM BRITISH
ADVANCES WERE CHECKED.
BERLIN, via London. June 29. The
German war office admits In an official
communication the advance of the
British into Vleuxberquin, but adds a
counter attack and drove the British
beyond the western border of the.vil
lave. At other points, it is declared,
the British attacks broke down.
NOTHINGS TO REPORT SAYS
THE FRENCH WAR OFFICE.
PARIS, June 29. A war oflTfce an
nouncement tonight Bays there is noth
ing to report except a marked artillery
activity between Qurcq and Marne and
the Rheims region.
KEYSER ATKIN
PIES OF WOUND
Information 'was received by relatives
. in Pensaoola yesterday of the death
! from wounds in France of Keyser At-
i kins. 25 years of age. a member of the
;. Royal Flying Corps. This young man.
who l9 a nephew of Wm. 8. Keyser, of
finis cny, is wiaeiy-tnown among the
society people of Pensaoola, from his
visits here some years ago. Among the
, first to respond to his country's call.
,he served with marked distinction but
. in the great German drive in May re-
ceivea a wound from which he died
J no. a otn.
An Incident of this young man's life
in rTanee was related by Dr. S. R. M
Kennedy. One day In a certain part of
r ranee, ur. Kennedy told, he met young
, jur. -nuns ana tney became acquainted
jne young physician, who held tiff
ran oi captain, asked Dr. Kennedy If
j he bad been in the states long, and if
he had ever been in Florida. Of course
the doctor answered in the affirmative.
Then you hare been In Pensacola''"
,w xt question, which Dr. Ken
1 nedy replied to quickly and with natural
intercsL
ABOUT SCORE OF PERSONS
EURIED IN FALLING BUILDING.
SIOUX CITY. Iowa. June 29. More
than a score of persons are missing,
snd believed dead In ruins of the Run
building, a three story structure whicl,
collapsed today, burying an adjoin
ing grocery and butcher shop filled
wim customers, a few f
escaped.
whom
MOB STRT-i? UP
' A NEGRO CONVICT.
MADILL. Oklahoma, June 29 Loug
ious McGill, a negro convict, was
lynched here today by a mob of five
hundred persons after he had been
identified as the man who attempted
to assault and later stabbed the wife
of a farmer eighteen miles southeast
of Madill. The woman's wounds art.
said to be fatal
hubs INACTIVE P
FOR iOTHEH I
EHTII1E SEEK
ROFITEERI i: G
S CHARGED BY
GOVERN! E
"Inordinate Greed and Bare
Faced Fraud" Is Way Re
ports Refer to Some Acts.
LARGE PROFITS
IN MANY LINES
Investigations Carefully Con
ducted Have Led to
Such Conclusions.
WASHINGTON, June 29. Invest! -gallons
carefully conducted have led to
the conclusion that profiteering exist
among American industries, at the
present time, due in part to advant
age being taken of "war pressure for
heavy production" and in part to "in
ordinate greed and bare-faced fraud,"
the federal trade comission announced
today in a report sent to the senate
Outstanding features of the report
are:
"The heavy profit made by the low.
cost concern under a government-fixed
price for the whole country.
The heavy freight made by the meat
packers and allied industries and by
the flour millers.
Ti irade tendency to increase and
malmain prices againsht the forces of
competition. .
The report is baaed on cost findings
by the commission for the war indus
tries' board, the food administration.
the fuel administration and other exe
cutive departments, on industrials,
surveys, and through enforcement of
law against unfair methods of com
petition. JThe products investigated
and which the report covers are steel,
copper, zinc, nickel.' sulphur, lumber.
coal, petroleum and its products, meat,
leather and leather goods, flour, canned
milk , and ..canned . salmon,.., J5alarfe.i
and boittig paid high officials were also
the subject of inquiry., . .. . . t.
Price fixing by, the government, the
report says, has tended to prevent the
market from running away but at the
same time it strengthens the stronger
factors in industry in their position
and enriches them by profits "which
are without precedent."
While the price of flour has been
stabilized by fixing a price for wheat
and maximum margin of profit for
flour, the report' shows that profits in
creased from 12 per cent, on the In
vestment for the four years ending
June 30. 1916. to nearly 36 ner cent
in the year ending June 30, 1917.
The report declares that unprece
dented profits are shown in a survey of
the packing industry. In this connec
tion it Is said: 'five meat packers. Ar
mour, Swift. Morris. Wilson, and Cud
ahy. and their subsidiary and affili
ated companies have monopolistic con
trol of the meat industry and are reach
ing out for like domination in other
products. Their reward, expressed in
terms or profit, reveals that, four of
these concerns have pocketed in 1915,
1916. 1917, $140,000,000. However del
icate a definition is framed for 'profi
teering these packers hare prayed
upon the people unconsciously."
Investigation in the coal mining in-
austry reveals in the opinion of the
commission that despite government
pricenflxing large margins of profit
have been made.
In the oil industry large proflts are
now being made Ir fuel oil and gaso
line, the Industry being one where the
law ofjjply and demanl still operates.
Steel companies made abnormal
proflts before the government fixed a
price for the product, and it Is shown
that some have since made unusual re
turns. In practically every one of the other
industries covered it is shown usual
ly heavy profits .have been made in
the last few years. Abnormal sal
aries are also shown to have been paid
executive officials.
L. E. THORNTON
IS ASSIGNED TO
DUTY BY NAVY
Washington Bureau,
The Pensaeola Journal.
BY GEO. H. MANNING.
WASHINGTON', D. C. June 29. Mr.
I Karle Thornton, of Pensacola. re-
portea toaay to tne Chief of the Bu-
reau of Yards and Docks. Navy De-
parxment. xor assignment to duty In!
accordance with Navy orders.
Mr. Thornton was recently commis
sioned in the Naval Reserve Force as
Civil Engineer with the rank of Lieu
tenant (senior grade) following a com
petitive examination to secure such
oflUrero held early in this year.
POPE PRAYS EARNESTLY
FOR PEACE IX WORLD
ROME, June 29. A a midnight mass
for peace and the re-establishment of
ustice, charity and fraternity through
out the world, Pope Benedict raised his
voice In prayer In SL Peters cathedral
this morning. He continued in praver
for two hours. - i
, PENSACOLA, FLORIDA, SUNDAY MORNING; JUNE 30, 1918.
U. S. General and Staff Commended 1 FtQlTIIE
If v4a' ' - i DDCKPOS!
C5 1P sb jsa i rr it!
. O - G O Q
I , . -5g. J
ocnera? Robert L. Bullard 'indicated by tile arrow.asd his staff, consul
the American army in France who vyon Jiigh commendation frm Genera P. t
in which they led the American soldiers who captured Cantigny.
FISHING TACKLE
STOLEN FROM
CASEONPALAFOX
CONSIDERABLE PROPERTY CAR
RIED AWAY AFTER DISPLAY
CASE WAS SMASHED BY RATH
ER MERRY THIEF.
Some; time early Saturday morning
there was a party or parties, appar
ently preparing- for a Sunday outing
at the least possible expense, so far
as unceremoneously taking certain
material was . concerned. The . show
case which i3 in front of ; the Wilson
BiggS Co., dealers in sporting- goods.
wa -brolf n,tspei nd ti i- rl pocket Ii
knives, razors and shaving brushes
stolen The firm yesterday stated it
did not know how much the robbery
would amount to from a mnn a rv t
standpoint. -
The case is a rather tall affair, stand
ing in the doorway, displaying certain
wares of the company. It is a movable i
case if one wants to move it and those
who smashed, the glass in it moved
merchandise and then dropped some
as there was fishing tackle and othei
articles strewn along thts sidewalk, be
ing evidence that the marauders wert
frightened away.
The method of entry was by forc
ing the locks in the rear of the case
where there Is a door and also prying
away the wood work.
ARMY BILL GOES
TO CONFERENCE
. ;
in. T.
'
pnazea its seniimn ioi enuirsius
army beyona tne tnree muuon
men
provided in the measure, but declined
for a while awaiting the department's I
new expansion program, specifically j
to direct the president to raise an
army of five million, after weeks ot j
debate and without roll call or a dis-!
senting vote the huge supply measure j
was sent to conference with the view-1
that its enactment Monday when ap-j
propriations are needed.
None of the appropriations for the!
army's part in war for fiscal year be
ginning July first was reduced by thej
senate. Instead it Increased many
Items, approved without change the
house clause clothing the president
with unlimited authority to increase
the army by further draft calls, and
added scores of Important degislative
riders.
BURYING PARTY
; LATE, HENCE FEW
HUNS REMAINED
WITH THE AMERICAN ARMY IN
FRANCE, June 13. (Correspondence of
the Associated Press) The attack made
last night by the Germans on Bour
esches. which the Anerican troops
were holding was so violent that the
(worst was feared. A reoort was re-
jceived that the town had been occupied
by the Germans and a maior was spnt
down from headquarters to ascertain
the facts. He fell in with the officers
who had been entrusted with the de
fense of the village.
"Are the boches In Bouresches?" he
Inquired hastily. '
"Yes sir," was the reply.
There was lurid Interlude and the
staff officer was then understood to say :
"Was it not the order that no Germans
were to be allowed to remain in
Bouresches?"
"Yes sir."
"Then WJiy trie htfl have you left
them there?" was demanded.
"Burying party not yet arrived, sir,"
was the quiet answer.
I
i
ARMORED
; I -
! I
2
4 S f I
1 1 t i
I II
i I cs Ml
s i i r -. ..-e i i
Troop9 on the western front' have
gone back to the middle ages for pro-
Photograph shows a Beau soldier on
sentry duty in the trenches
wearing
one
of the new helmets, which pro-
itec not only the head but the face.
REFUND OFAUTO
LICENSE AFTER
GET AUTHORITY
Auto licenses, because of a ruling
lately handed down by the Supreme
Court, will in due time be refunded to
all who' make claim for sue funds,
but as the money has been paid into
the state treasury it cannot be refund
ed until the legislature passes a law
authorizing, such action.
In explaining the decison, Ernest
Amos, comptroller, announces that in
due time the refund will be made but
it will require legislative action for
such authority. . The statement from
Tallahassee follows:
The Supreme Court of the State of
Florida has decided "that Series B of
Chapter 7275, Acts of 1917. provides for
a license tax of only-five dollars nn
any automobile or other motor driven
vehicle with a seating capacity of one
and not more than five passengers,
without regard, to horsepower."
This decision applies to all such ve
hicles having a seating capacity of
one and not more . than five ' persons
regardless of horsepower, but .does not
include vehicles having a seating ca
pacity of more' than fvie persons. New
registrations will be made -at this of
fice in accordance with the decision of
the court. 'The money, heretofore re
ceived for registrations has been' paid
into the State Treasury and under the
Constitution cannot be refunded until
the Legislature shall make an appro
priation for that purpose. " "
ERNEST AMOS.
Comptroller.-
andin the first regular division of
C. March, chief of staff for fhe manner
t ,
ASSESSMENTAND
COMPLAINTS TO
BE CONSIDERDE
COUNTY V COMMISSIONERS
WILL
HOLD SPECIAL SESSION MON
DAY FOR SUCH PURPOSE, AND
CONSIDER PAVING PROBLEMS.
The county . oommHssioners will
gather in august session Monday
morning at 9Vo"clock on the sound of
the bell over! the court house which
rends, the air witiv its piercing tones
every half, hour .and hour. There can
be no-mistaking" an houror a half hour
has ,arrifea whett that bell strikes. If
TmrM4 bit- -rt-iCvous :tHe. &r.ir
clar.ging"on '- the metal wilt pull the
i listener up on his feet.
The occasion for the meeting of the
commissioner is to receii'e testimony
as to the value of any property, a
fixed by the county assessor of taxe3
and reviewing and eouaiizing the as
sessments. This was stated in the call
for1 the session.
Tuesday morning the commissioners
will also get together and It. is their
hope" they will be able to decide vnp on
some method to pave the road from
Bayou Grande to the naval air sta
tion. a
Bids for this work have been ad-,
vertised and there were offers to. do
the work but the contract price was
so high the commissioners believe they
can devise a means which will save
the "county at least eight or ten thous
and dollars.
RAILWAYS BACK TO
-PRIVATE OWNERS
WASHINGTON. June 29. About sev
enteen hundred short lines of railroads
were turned bnck to private manage
menT'today by the railroad administra
tion. A few' hours before congress
passed legislation intended to prc.nt
their relinquishment, and betv t '.n
three and four hundred f those relin
quished had sought to remain under
government management. About four
hundred short lines are retained as part
of a national system.
More than twelve hundred of the
roads turned back to private manage
ment Were indus'fal y Plant facility
lines, or others which "did not seek to
remain under government control, and
over which no issue existed. Many
may be taken back later, it was An
nounced and all be given fair diviPions
In Joint ' rates, and insured a reason
able car supply and protected against
undue disturbance in traffic routing.
HUGHES AGAINST
ZONE RATE POST
WASHINGTON, June 29. The
zone system of postal rates for news
papers and periodicals was character
ized as an "ill advised and decidedly
looking backyard and walking back
ward "measure by Charles E. Hughes
who headed " the commission on
second - class mail matter in
1911. in a letter laid before the bouse
way3 and means committee today at
hearing on the new revenue bill.
COULD DEFEAT
ENEMY IN AIR
NEW YORK, June 29. A claim that
Handley Page, the British airplane con
structor, could turn out ten thousand
"Superaerial dreadnaughts" in the
United " States by April 1, next,1 was
made in a formal statement tonight
by W.'H. Workman, spectal represen
tative in this contry. of Handley Page,
limited. Workman declared these
planes could be under their own power
with enough guns, bombs and aviators
to "defeat Germany within thirty to
sixty days, if we start now."
; DRY
SIBLE
Journal's Washington Corres
pondent Says More Than
Reasonable Chance.
SHIPPING BOARD
IS INTERESTED
Woeful Lack of Knowledge of
Pensacola's Harbor Fa
cilities Uncovered.
Washington Bureau.
The Pensacola Journal.
BY GEORGE H. MANNING.
Washington, D. C. June 29. There
is more than a reasonable chance that
the United States Shipping Board may
have a floating dry dock built at Pen
sacola, and that the Railroad Admin-
istration and the Shinnine Board.
working in co-operation, may adopt a
plan of making much greater use of
Pensacola harbor for foreign, export)
and imports in connection with the
general plan of using the gulf and
South Atlantic ports to relieve the
congestion of the harbors at New
York. Philadelphia, Boston and Hamp
ton Roads.
Taking heed of the complaint made
in some quarters in Pensacola that
the excellent harbor facilities at Pen
sacola are being neglected in favot
of other Gulf and South Atlantic ports
where there is congestion and where
the harbor facilities do not compare
with those of Pensacola, the Journal
Correspondent set about to make a
j careful investigation as to the causes,
j From conversation with officials of
me ivturyaa Administration ana snip
ping Board with .whom he is well ac
quainted, the. Journal correspondent
dfSi1 t"e-eit fnattpere an "eftrmou
impression abroad aroo"ng TVlishicgtrnj
officials regarding the . commercial
capabilities of Pensacola.
It was found, for instance, that of
ficials of the'Shipping Board and Rail
road Administration, following infor
mation given them by other branches
of the government, and contrary to
Strong representations made to them
by Senators Fletcher and Trammell,
entertained the belief that while Pen
sacola has a fairly good harbor it had
but meagre loading and unloading fa
cilities for ships and very poor rail
road facilities for carrying the freight
between the port and the interior.
The Pensacola Journal Correspond
ent learned from oflicials of the Ship
Control Commission of the Shipping
Board that the harbor of Pensacola
was not being utilized as a port of en
try and debarkation for supplies for
Europe to relieve the North Atlantlo
congested ports because of the belief
that railroad facilities were inade
quate for making it practicable for
transporting materials in and out of
the port by railroad. ne correspond
ent expressed to these officials his
confidence that the Louisville and
Nashville Railroad and the G. F. and A.
could give ample facilities for export
ing great quantities r.f material
through the Pensacola harbor. They
promised to investigate the matter and
see if Pensacola harbor can be utilized.
From officials of the Port and Har
bor Facilities Commission of the
Shipping Board it was learned that the
reason po material consideration had
been given to locating a floating dock
at Pensacola was that as the Shipping
Board and Railroad Administration did
not intend to make V9m of Pensacola
harbor there would not be suffteient
traffic there to require a drydock
These officials, also, had the opinion
that Pensacola was woefully lackina
In roalroad terminals and railroad
trunk line connections.
It was also learned that this sup
posed lack of railroad terminals and
trunk line connections at Pensacola
was to a large degree responsible for
the decison of the Emergency Fleet
Corporation not to put a shhipj'ard at
Pensacola for building concrete ships.
All along the line wherever the Pen
sacola Journal correspondent went he
found almost all officials impressed
with the Idea that Pensacola had &
fine harbor but no railroad facilities
for taking advantage of it. There ap
pearea to oe no wen oennea idea a?
to where this report about Pensacola
lack of railroad facilities originated
but it can be said it was in somp
branch of the Shipping Board.
It will now be recalled that severa
months ago when the Agriculture De
partment contemplating landing a Shi;
from Chili bringing nitrate at some
Florida port, the ship was sent b
Pensacola and landed at Savannah be
cause the agriculture Department har"
been told, it alleged, by the Shippin
Board, that the harbor of Pensaeoi
was not deep enough to accommr
date the ship and the railroad faeili
ties there insufficient to distribute tb
nitrate. An attempt made then to t
the' responsibility for circulating th
report was fruitless, it will be remer
(Continued on page nine.)
DO NOT FORGET
THAT WAR SAVINGS stamps are
NOT FOR CHILDREN ONLY. MOST
OF THE SQUANDERING IS DONE BY
GROWN-UPS,
PRICE FIVE CENTS
HSI SHIP OF
rim ni si
vh rim I u
S1C0LMISS THE SEAS
One Vessel Ready for Launching-!
and Six Others on
the Ways.
NORWEGIANS BUY
INITIAL CRAFT5
Waste of Sand Been Trans
formed Into a Bee Hive of In-
, f v
.i i aai rewMonuis.
With Its first completed ship ou the
ways. ready fQr IaunchIll PJ 22
..on the Bullock and Caldwell Ship
Bunding Company, with plants In Pen!
with th?r M1Itn' 18 Ukin PUJJ
cerns of the country.
When the Maria slips out into Pen-j
m!oeaa anther hIp wi" Uk her
great When the othe
great th pi now under construction;
are completed, others will also be built.
. Jh? Mrla- w ready for launch-1
tng, has been sold to Norwegian In J
JV' iT,eter "W to b master
of the ship.
The- vessel is the highest class of
motor schooner. 760 tons dead wetghtJ
operated with two crude oil .nLO
a horse power each, with engines for
nand cargo, anchors and sail: 1
obstructed of solid oak and yui
" '""' """ers. graceful In ita lines
and with power supply to give a sped
o" 7 1-2 miles an v,. ,
represents the in '
and many vlsted the Bullock and Cald- 1
well Ship Building Company yesterday
on invitation of the managers!'
to see th great ship and
to go over the plant, which Is modern
and well equipped in every particular.
ith An A nfoln rx-m , 4 . T 1 , .
w-, .muauj compiet-
I rn -i r a Wl t. iia -
" ilo intra ana others in
proces9 of building, .the , Pensacola
yards prejmt a busy scene at all times-
... js. n mieresimg experience to
to over the plant and to vlw the var
ious stages of the enterprise which has
sprung up almost over night, trans
forming1 a waste of sand into a hiva
of industry. While most of th ves
sels are of about th same tonnage as
The Maria, one great vessel of 1500
tons is now under construction, and
others of the same type will be built
later on.
The Bullock and Caldwell ShirH
Building Company is practically a new!
me initial stera having
been taken last January, making the
time in building The Maria less than
six months.
About three hundred men are em
ployed at the Pensacola yard, and
about one hundred at the yard in Mil
ton, formerly the Hoodless Ship Build
ing Company, but now a branch of th
Pensacola company, where two shiss
are now being built
P.r f tne Jnsacola com-J
Hometning like $300,000 a
year, and is a tremendous asset to th
financial growth of Pensacola, puttln
nto circulation here each month
thousands of dollars.
One of the most interesting features
of the plant is the building with Its
modern equipment of every kind. wher
the patterns for the great ships are
made, and where th great timbers are
cut. planed and shaped.
From the molding room, with its
ship models, one may follow the con
struction of the ship from the tim
it takes Shane in fh .
builder, until it is completed and ready,
for its voyage across the ocean. In
the pattern room one may follow th
or Xne nip as they are sketched
upon the floor, may note the dimen
sions, and may later see the patterns,
"'h'h numbered, and stacked for
future use.
Downstairs the most modern ma-1
chinery has been Installed and thej
work is carried on under the direction!
of expert workmen. The superintend.'
cnt, Alex Cerutl. Is a man of experi
ence and initiative, and he has brought i
to bear on his work a wonderful j
knowledge of the ship building busi- '
nes. which Is invaluable to his em-,
ployers.
J he AJaria, which was to hav
been launched Saturday afternoon.
Til! r-robably be launched today or
Monday.
For some reason, known only to theJ
ji.iio.ie, me great snip rerused yester
day to leave the ways. As one seai
'arine man rsmarVwl- "TOn.. -...J
, - - - - rr rw ,
!aunch thirty a month, as they do upl
n Maine, we win Know the reason 4
wny.
rOPTIFICATION BILL
IS NOT OPPOSED.
WASHINGTON, June 29. Without
roll call or a dissenting vote, and
ut twenty minutes discussion, the
enate late today passed and sent to
inference, the record breaking fi'-fc
iliion. four hundred and ei?ht mil
tn dollar fortification bill providing
t an enormous Increase in ordnancf
.".nufacture,

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