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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, August 09, 1918, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062268/1918-08-09/ed-1/seq-1/

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The Weather
RENT
THAT FtTRXISHKD ROOM-RENT IT
WITHOUT DELAY. AND RENT IT AT
A VKlil PRICK TO A DESIRABL.E TEN
ANT. A Li. POSSIBLE THROUGH THE
CLASSIFIED.
Fair Friday and probably Saturday,
light west winds.
Highest temperature yesterday, BS de
gree; lowest, 78 degrees.
V
VOL. XXL NO. 221.
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA, FRIDAY MORNING, AUGUST 9, 1918.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
SMSBBSBaaMStfl c OV II
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Posotfoims
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Ml
B DRIUEH
SIX W11LES BYFREKGH RI10VE
ALLIED MAT
Germans Lose 7,000 Prisoners
and Suffer Heavily in British
French Surprise Attack.
CROWN PRINCE'S
FORCE IN RETREAT
)
At Last Accounts Smashing
Blows Caused Boches to Give
Much Ground.
Paris,-7 -p. m., Aug. 8.- Prog
ress of the Franco-British offen
sive .continues favorable. In some
instances the advance hsa reach
ed a depth of more than six
miles.
SEVEN THOUSAND
TAKEN PRISONERS
London, Aug. 8. Seven thou
sand prisoners and one hundred
suite have been captured in the
France-British offensive, Chan
cellor of Exchequer Bonar Law
announced to the house of com
mons tonight. Their advance is
between four and five miles on a
.ront of fifteen miles, and at one
- oint-sveen miles hare been
. .::ned, ha said. 23 -
GERMAN DIVISIONS BADLY
, DISORGANIZED, RETREATING
British Army Headquarters in
France, Aug. 8. (Reuters) On
the horizon, enemy motor trans
ports a;e visible, scurrying away.
The 27th, 43rd and 108th divisions
of Crown Prince Rupprecht's army
suffered heavily, while the 117th
division, which only came into line
last night, was badly cut up, and
the only determined enemy stand
maae around Morlancourt, where
' there was righting throughout the
day. The enemy made several
counter attacks, but failed, to re
cover any ground.
French fortes have also done
wonderfully. -
AMERICANS CONTINUE TO
PUSH BACK GERMANS.
"Washington, Aug. 8. "North ot the
Vetle locaV ibom'bat! resulted in a gain
of ground for our troops," eays Per
shing's communique covering today's
operations, as given out by the war de
partment. '" , . , .
U. S. ARMY OFFICERS ARE '
ELATED OVER NEWS.
Washington. Aug. 8 American ar
my officials were deUghted tonight
with the news t that . Franco-British
forces had launched a smashing blow
at the enemy on a wide front, tn Pi
cardy theatre. The outstanding fact
to observers here was that Foch was
ablj to strike again on the heels of the
Marne victory, which i still being
pressed.
The enemy faces alternative opera
tions on, at least, two fronts. He must
bolster up the bottom of the PIcardy
salient or undertake immediately a
great withdrawal there. If he with
draws troops from the Alsne-Vesle
line. It Is certain he will be forced
back there. If he summons reserves
from the north, a British attack to
flatten out the Flander salient Is al
most certain.
Secretary Baiter said the new Pro
gram of the war department of five
milMon men by spring was recommend
ed by the military secUon of the su
preme war council at Versailles.
ALLIES MERCILESSLY DRIVE
SURPRISED GERMANS TO COVER
15Y THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
British and French In the first day's
battle on the historic field between
Amiens and Montdidier have deeply
penetrated the German positions on a
front of more than twenty miles, reach
ing from the region of Braches to the
neighborhood of Morlancourt- Follow
ing a short Intensive artillery prepara
tion, and aided "by misty weather, the
allied attack took Germans by sur
prise and they fled almost everywhere
before tanks, motor and machine gun
batteries, cavalry and Infantry sent
against them.
All allied objectives were attained
In remarkably quick time, and the line
was still making progress Thursday
night. Wherever the enemy turned
to give battle he was decisively
defeated. Thousands of Germans were
ma le prisoners, and numbers of guns
and a quantity of war material was
capture.
BRITISH HMD
on THE
Satisfactory Progress Made Des
pite Very Strong Enemy
. Resistance. .
GERMANS FIGHT
'V
IN SAVAGE MANNER
Try in Vain to Repel TankLed
Hordes of Their Al
: lied Invaders. . 1
BY' THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
, On the French Front in France, Aug
8. A combined attack by the French
and British was begun at dawn today
along the front between Albert and
! Montdidier. Satisfactory progress was
made despite strong enemy resistance.
Around Mdrisel and Moreunl the
German resistance is terrific.
Along the French front the artillery
s preparation .ed for 40 minutes ai
j ter which the .. oops left their trenches
j with wonderful f'.aah. Before 8 o'clock
considerable - progress had been re-
corded and the first objectives had
been attained.
TANKS CROSS VALLEY AND
ROUT OUT ENEMY FORCES
"With the British Army in France,
Aug. 8 French and British tanks
have crossed the Avre-Lure valley in
the new drive this morning.
The German positions just south of
the Anore river -were heavily attache
by the British. Their assault extend
ed to the south where their right wing
Joins the French lines. Three-quarters
or an hour after the British attacked
the Germans, the French took up the
battle. '''."
A very considerable number of vil
lages have ' been captured In' the
Franco-British offensive and substan
tial progress has been made, accord-
ing to news received here this after
noon.
Reports received up to mid-afternoon
indicated that the offensive -was
progressing favorably. The average
advance was approximately 2 1-2 miles
on a front of slightly more than 23
miles.
The allied advance at some polnt3
was more than three miles.
Important material has been cap
tured by the advancing troops. "
BRITISH HAVE ATTACKED
OVER A 12-MILE FRONT.
: With f the i British Army in France.
Aug. 8. The British attacked over a
12-mtle ' front on both sides of the
Somme. Theyr gained " all tneir ob
jectives within four hours and have
captured . a considerable number or
prisoners and guns.
The line attacked this morning ex
tends roughly from the neighborhood
of M or lan court, about three miles and
a half southwest of Albert, to the
Avr river south of . Moreull.
Details of the fighting are coming in
slowly. "Going fine, constitutes . the
best available information. The Brit
ish launched their attack in a mist
after only three minutes of artillery
preparation.
According to advice received in
London, the French and British forces
which attacked this morning In the
Piardy sector have advanced at somo
points to a depth of more than three
miles. The attack must have taken
the Germans by surprise as the weath
er has not been such as would gener
ally be chosen for the commencement
of new operations.
On Monday there was a continuous
downpour of rain along the Amiens
front, but advices state that the Brit
ish troops were congratulating them
selves that the ground was not as bad
as they had experienced In Flanders,
where sheU craters were filled with
water and there was no means of
draining then.
GREATEST SECRECY SURROUNDS
PLAN OF ALLIED ATTACK
The greatest secrecy surrounded
plans for the attack. During the night
the Germans heavily bombarded the
British lines but their shells were in
effective. An extraordinarily large
number of tanks accompanied the
storming troops, clearing the way for
them in the gray light of dawn and
helping to overcome enemy strong
points.
The allied attack on tne Albert
Montdidier front today was apparent
ly unexpected by the Germans and
many prisoners were taken. One Ger
man division was surprised as it was
coming up to relieve the front line
troops.
The main weight of the allied blow
was directed against General von
(Continued on Page Six.)
0
. " - - -
I ON TO L AON!
f ' -.---. ..!. . Vf : ' .
" i , v ; 1 , 11 1 ,J
;V7JJL. 1 ... 3 - & ,..
hludllllMAMiMtefariiiii ilia 11
Just when the Germans thought they could stop in their big flight and rest awhile, those
Yanks and Frlsh hit 'em again at Soissbns and started them toward the Aisne. It looks now as if
the allied armies won'tvstop until they; chase theHuns back to Laonand St. Quentin. The lower
white line is the battle line f of Aug. 2, when the big advance was resumed; the upper is today's
line.-..-; 7 '. "- : ' ' - " ' ' . :" '
SUBS WORKING
OFFCOASfSIM
AMERICAN SHIP
FORMER GERMAN , STEAMER ME-
RAK SENT TO ' BOTTOM "NEAR
HATTERAS, BUT ALL MEMBERS
OF CREW ARE REPORTED SAFE,
New York, Aug. 8. Information that
the American steamship Merak, 3,224
tons gross, was sunk by a German sub
marine off Cape Hatteras on Tuesday
night, was received today in Marine cir
cles here. One small boat containing
18 members of the crew is still un
accounted for. .
The captain and twenty-three mem
bers of the crew have been landed at
Norfolk.
Th Merak, one of the former Dutch
cargo vessels which were taken over a
few months ago. by the United States
shipping board, was on her way from
an American port for ' Chile, carrying
coal. :
TWENTY SURVIVORS
ARRIVE AT AMERICAN PORT
Elizabeth City, N. C; Aug. 8. Twen
ty survivors of the crew of the Ameri
ioan stea-mship Alerak, ; ; which i was
sunk by a German submarine off the
North Carolina coast Tuesday landed
here today, accounting for all persons
aboard the vessel. " - . .
A patrol brought , the men from
the Kenneykeet coast guard station af
ter they had landed there in their
boats subsequent to the sinking of the
ship. The captain' and other members
of the cerw - were landed last night
at Norfolk.
The submarine sank' the Merak about
two-thirty o'clock Thursday fternoon
off Cape Hatteras. According to the
story told' by members of the crew
who were landed here forty warning
shots were fired at the steamer before
they, took to the boats. -The Merak
sank within ten minutes after she was
abandoned.
The Merak was bound from New
York to a South American port.
STEAMER IS SHELLED
TORPEDOED AND SUNK.
New York. Aug. 8. Sinking of the
small unarmed American steamer Me
rak by a German submarine off the
coast of North Carolina was reported
today to the navy department. No
details were given. The navy's dis
patches' said :
."The American steamship was shell
ed, torpedoed and sunk by an enemy
submarine at 1:50 p. m. on Tuesday,
15 miles northeast of the Diamond
shoal light ship off Cape Hatteras. N.
C. The Merak was of 3,023 gross tons."
This was near the time the Diamond
shoal lightship itself was sent down
by the enemy raider.
LAKE STEAMER AND A
BRITISH VESSEL. SUNK.
Washington. Aug. 8. German sub
marines operating off the French eoast
on August 3rd sank the nall Ameri
can steamship Lake Portage ami the
British steamer Berwin. A belated of
ficial report announced here today told
of the sinking without details. The
Lake Portage, of i.908 gross tons, was
built last year at Duluth, Minn.
'""w!:ifr'""'w'' ,,L"1' ' "" ''m. ..jm..M. lwi.u j'- i i'r'wi
x if
-
EIGHTEEN DEAD
IS LATEST TOLL
OF HURRICANE
DAMAGE TO" ?AE RO v F IELD ; NEAR
LAKE CHARLES SAID TO HAVE
BEEN EXAGGERATED IN FIRST
" REPORTS. '
V Lake Charles, La., Aug. 8 The known
dead as the result of the hurricane
which struck ; southwest Louisiana
Tuesday afternoon stood this morning
at 18. .Many points believed to have
been in the path of the sttrm, howev
er, had not been heard from and it was
believed the - list was. incomplete. The
number of injured will probably reach
one hundred. The property loss will
total ?i,000.000 according .to conserva
tive estimates. - .. , ,
The dead includes: ....
Nine at Lake Charles, one at Sulphur,
three at Grand Lake, three at Gerstner
Field and two at Dequincy. . ;
; The property loss at Gerstner Feld
according to unofficial reports will not
be .as heavy as first believed. It was
stated today; that many of the air
planes thought to have been destroyed,
were later found to have escaped dam
age and that a great number of those
damaged could be quickly repaired. It
was also declared that sufficient build
ings weathered the storm to accom
modate all the men stationed- there.
AH passes, for men to leave the camp
except on Important business wera or
dered suspended today." 'Communica
tion with outside points was partially
established but telephone, telegraph
and electric light wires-and poles are
down ; in all parts of the city and it
probably will be several days before
this service is entirely restored. .
Hundreds of houses not; completely
wrecked by the storm .were made, un
tenable and about 300 persons unable
to obtain shelter elsewhere owing to
crowded? conditions were taken . care
of at the court house Tuesday "night.
Every church in the city was damaged,
several of them being entirely demol
ished. . Anotner death due to the storm oc
curred at Gerstner Field today. The
name of the victim was not given. '
The body of Corporal AY. S. Williams,
killed at the camp when a hangar coir
lapsed was shipped to his former home
at Nettleton, Miss., today. The home
address of private George' S.. McGhee,
who suffered a broken back during an
airplane accident two weeks ago. and
died , during the storm, was Tenafty,
N. J.
Mayor Trotti, of Lake Charles who
has received many offers of outside
assistance today declared that all the
help Lake Charles needs is labor.
MAJ.-GEN. GRAVES
GETS HIS ORDERS
Washington, Aug.. 8. Confidential
instructions were handed Major Gen
eral Graves at Kansas City bj' Secre
tary Baker, covering the American
military expedition to Siberia, which
Graves will command. On his return
to Washington Mr. Baker said the ob
ject of his trip west was to confer
with Graves, who came from Califor
nia to meet him.
. . 44 v-v t T T rrVi v -
TEACHERS ASK
WAGE INCREASE
SCHOOL BOARD
DELEGATES APPEAR BEFORE THE
BOARD OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
AND PRESENT. STRONG ARGU
MENT FOR MORE MONEY.
The meeting of the Escambia county
school board was featured last night
by a request from the principals of
the primary schools of the city for
an increase in salary.' Miss Annie Mc
Millan, principal of School 35, and Miss
Evelyn Thornton, ' principal of the
Eliza Jane Wilson school, formerly
known as School Number 2, presenting
the claims of the teachers, others pres
ent including Miss Florence Higgins.
School Number 27; Miss Allie Yniestra,
School Number 74; Miss Ethel Suter,
School Number 40. The principals of
School Number 41, 43 and 70 are out
of the city- ;
Miss "McMillan, in making the re
quest, declared she . voiced the senti
ments of the teachers of the primary
school when she said that they had
come with no complaints. She wished,
however, to call attention to the fact
that the primary teachers were filling
a dual role, that of teacher and super
visor, indeed, even more than this, as
they were frequently called upon for
many other services. She ealled at
tention to the fact that with the in
creased cost of living, in all lines, the
expenses of the principals were also
greater, and asked for an increase in
the salaries of all primary principals.
Miss Thornton, who . next spoke,
pointed put that in other cities in the
state the salaries of principals of pri
mary schools were in some instances
as high as $150.00 and averaged $133.00.
Miss Thornton presented a scale which
the teachers felt made an equitable
adjustment, which was taken under ad
visement by the board.
In calling attention to the higher
salaries paid principals of the primary
schools in other cities. Miss Thornton
pointed out that' these principals did
no grade teaching, but merely gave
their attention to the duties of prin
cipal, with an assistant teacher, in
many cases! , .
Miss Thornton also called attention
to the fact that the various lines of
war activity consumed much of jthe
principal's time and added to her oth
er duties, glad as she was to perform
this service.
The following fable gives tne present
salary of the primary teachers, with
the increase asked for:
Present Salary
School Salary Ask'd For
Number 40, 8 rooms $85.00 $100.00
Eliza Jane Wilson,
8 rooms 85.00 100.0.0
Number 74, 6 rooms .... 80,00 100;00
Number 27 72.50 85-00
Number 35 "2.50 85.00
Number 43 72.50 75.00
Number 70 ........... . 72.50 . 75.00
Number 40 72.30 75.00
The salaries of the Grammar school
principals, who are not rade teachers,
are, for the Clubbs Grammar School,
$125.00 and for the Lockey "School
$100.00. The salary for the principal
of the High School is $200.60.
It was pointed out by Doth Mr. Levy
(Continued on Page SIx.)
IG IS ARE
SPENT HERE
FORDSHIPS
Report of Chairman Hurley
Shows Vast Sums Paid
in Salaries.
LOCAL PLANT IS
QUITE A FACTOR
Senator Fletcher Receives Letter
Which Is Self -Ex-.
planatory.
Millions of, dollars have been expend
ed by the Emergency Fleet Corporation
in -the state of Florida since the be
ginning of operations, and Senator
Fletcher, has been furnished at his re
quest with a statement by the ship
ping board, showing the respective
sums disbursed in this state, in which
the Pensacola Shipbuilding Company of
course figures to no small degree.
There are upward of 1200 men regu
larly employed in the local ship plant,
according to late reports, and the wages
paid out here represent quite a figure
in the city's industrial life.
This is a copy of the letter which
Senator Fletcher has received from
Chairman Hurley, which is self-expian-atory:
Letter to Mr. Fletcher.
United States Shipping Board
Washington.
August 3rd. 1918.
Hon, Duncan H. Fletcher,
; United States Senate. -My
Dear Senator Fletcher:
.Sine , the beginning of. the , opera
tions of the Emergency Fleet Corpora
tion in the State of Florida, the fol
lowing amounts have been paid for la
bor. 1917.
August 43,608.77
September 55.088.57
October 65,113.92
November .... 70,849.67
December 108,255.18
Total for 1917 343,796.11
1918.
January $ 224,931.92
February 288.427.31
March . 402,249.96
April ....................... 588,301.58
May 1,073,909.94
Total for 1918 ..; $2,577,820.71
Trusting that this data will prove of
interest to you and with kind personal
regards, I am.
Very truly yours, -
(Signed) EDWARD N. HURLEY,
Chairman.
U.S. MAY TAKE
PACKING PLANTS
Washington, Aug. 8. Investigation
of the packing industry by the federal
trade commission culminated today in
an announcement the commission had
recommended tosthe president that
the government commandeer and oper
ate for public benefit, stockyards, cold
storage plants, ware houses and re
frigerator and cattle cars. Monopol
ists control of the food supply of
United States, its army and navy and
supply of the entente allies are charged
against the five great packing plants.
Close affiliation between the packing
Industry and financial interests are re
ported, it being charged the packers
had representation on directorates of
large banks through members of their
families, officers, and directors or con
fidential employes.
CALL 130,207
REGISTRANTS
TO THE COLORS
Washington, Aug. 8. for 130,207
draft registrants to join the colors be
fore the end of August were issued to
night. One hundred thousand white
registrants from forty-three state?
were ordered entrained between August
26 and 30. Thirty thousand negroes
will entrain from August 22 to 24. The
assignments include:
White Florida, 1300 to Camp Jack
son, South Carolina; Georgia, 2750 to
Camp Gordon.
Negroes, Florida, 1,000 to Camp
Joseph Johnston; Georgia 1,1 SI to
Camp Jackson, and 2,000 to Camp
Gordon.'
SUFF. TROUBLE
IS DENOUNCED
Washington. Aug. 8. The suffrage
demonstration attempted . Tuesday,
which, resulted in the rest of forty.
eight of the national woman's party,
was denounced by senators at the
semi-weekly session of that body. A
number of suffrage senators declared
that such demonstrations were nn
calleed for and are hurtful to the
cause.
OF SHIP
PLANT Gllfl
S
CE
Inspiring: and Patriotic Address
Delivered by Distin
guished Speakers.
REPLEDGE OF
LOYALTTT B.Y ALL
Site Takes on Governmental Air
of Security by Cordon of Reg
ular Soldiers There.
Under the auspice of the United
States Shipping Board. Director How
ard I. Beal, of the national itrrjea sec
tion, and John C. Taylor. Canadian .
Expeditionary Forces, epoke to thev
men at the Pensacola Ship Building
plant yesterday afternoon at, 11:10
o'clock, introduced by Vice President
John M. Sweeney, one of the execu
tive heads of the ship building com
pany. Mr. Beat, who first addressed the
men, gave an inspiring and patriotic
talk which dealt most particularly
with the great importance of the worK
which the men of tha emergency flet
and Its allied activities were doing,
making possible the transportation of
ships and supplies across the water,
for the remmforeement of the allies.
Following Mr. Beal, ."Canada Jack."
as Mr. Taylor Is known to service men.
told a number of his experiences at
Vimy Ridge, stirring the men with his
message of service. At patriotic note
was struck when Mr. Beal drew out
an American' flag and called upon the
men to again pledge their loyalty to
the United States colors. with the
men responding with much enthus
iasm. REGULAR SOLDIERS ON
DUTY AT SHIP PLANT.
Forty or more regular soldiers from
the post are now doing daily duty at
the Pensacola shipbuilding plant, and
have been for the past week or more.
This guard is In addition to qute a
police force which Is dally on duty
there, working three shifts a day, un
der regular chief of police and making
reports from time to time w njei
haps more palthful regularity 'than
forces in many well-organized cities.
It is understood" that the soldier de
tachment is sent up by the war depart
ment at the Instigation of tht local
shipbuilding officials, but. It gives tht
Pensacola plant an air of govercmentat
security and it would not be wise for '
anything like an alien enemy to at
tempt anything out of tha ordinary at
the site.
NEWS GATHERING
IS INDISPENSABLE"
SAYS'MR. BAM hii
.. l a.
- J.
Washington, Aug.. 8. Newvp
gathering is an indispensable In
dustry. Secretary Baker said
day in discussing tha draft regu
latiens, though a particular mitfp
relations to that industry must eie.'
pend upon the facta in the aaa::
and tha possibility ; of replaoinf
him. '
NO VOLUNTARY t
ENLISTMENT IN, r
ARMY AND NAVY
Washington, Aug. 8. Voluntary,
enlistment In army and navy has "
been completely suspended to pre- .
vent a disruption of Industry, ...
pending the disposition of a bill
proposing to extend the draft age
to Include all men from 18 to 4a'..
Orders were issued today by Sec
retaries Baker and Daniels direct
ing, that no voluntary enlistments
be accepted after today until fur
ther orders. The orders also ex
clude civilians from appointment
to officers training camps until
further notice. .
CASUALTY LISTS
CARRY 442 NAMES
Washington, Aug. t. Army and
marine corps casualty lista today con
tained a total of 442 names, tha small
est number since a toll of the Alnse
Marne offensive began to come tn. In
the army the killed were 143; died of
wounds 16; died' from accident 5r
wounded severely 81; wounded degree
undetermined 31; missing 55. '
The marine corps killed was 2; died
of wounds one; wounded severely 20;
slightly, one; flegree undetermined,
eleven.
There were no Georgia or Florida
names in the night lists.
n
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