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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, September 29, 1918, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062268/1918-09-29/ed-1/seq-1/

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The tWeathei:
BENT
A FAIR PRICE TO A J ES1RABL.1! TEN
ANT. ALL POSSIBLE I THROUGH THE
THAT FURNISHED JtOOM RENT IT
WITHOUT DELAY. AND RENT IT AT
CLASSIFIED.
Local rains Sunday; Monday probably
fair, moderate shifting winds.
HIS" xamparaxurv jriurai o
Tees; loweat, 66 degrees.
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA, SUNDAY MORNING SEPTEMBER 29, 1918.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
VOL. XXI. NO. 272.
k IS.
L 1 ?
f
ROLL UP
DEFEfiSEFROl
On Front of 250 Miles Allied
Armies Advance Prison
ers Total 27,000.
AMERICANS PUSH
v
ON IN ARGONNE
Fall of Cambrai Imminent.
Would Force German Outly
ing Defenses if Taken.
Over a front of 250 miles from the
North Sea to Verdun the Allies are
smashing German defen'es on impor
tant sectors. The enemy faced the
nreatest allied offensive movement
since the beginning of the war. Ser
ious inroads are made in the German
defensive systeT north of Ypres,
around Cambrai, north of the Aisne
and the Champagne-Verdun sector.
Additional prisoners are added to
the allied total of 27000 in the last
rhree days and hundreds more guns
are taken. Capture of Cambrai by
the British appears near. Douai, the
great German base and outlying de
fense of Lille is threatened by Cam
brai operation. It is reported that
Austrian forces in Albania are being
vit hdrawn.
Marshal Foch is putting the Ger
mans on the western front to the
;nr-stsevere test of the w:--. On four
important sectors from W-rdun to tho
North Sea allied troops are fighting
iv'ir way into and beyond the Hin-
i nburg line.
Cambrai. it would appear, is about
o fall. The British having captured
he important heieht of Bourlon
wood, are reported beyond Fontaine
Notre Dame and Sailly within ono
anrhree:fluarters of a mil? of Cam-
it-s4. . The menace to -uamorai is
-rrater than at the height of Gener
al Hyng's stroke of last November.
J-'outhw est of Cambrai the British
are lighting toward the important
Scheldt canal at Cantaing.
Field Marshal Haig"s thrust r
of Cambrai already has progressed
note than three miles. The British
iave cut the high road between Cam
rai and Douai and have the rail
road between the two cities dominat
ed by their guns. The fall of Cambrai
military observers believe, would re
sult in a German withdrawal from
Douai and St. Quentin, which might
possibly lead to a retirement to the
French border.
Hit Hindenburg Line
On the north the Belgian and Brit
ish armies are fighting through tho
Hindenburg defense on a front of
more than ten miles from Ypres to
north of Dixmude.
J This operation is apparently direct
ed toward the German submarine bas
tes In Belgium and tho outflanking of
the bastion of Lille.
The French-American drive west
and east of the Argonne to the Meuse
'continues successfully today. The
French have moved their line forward
fwest of the Argonne forest and cap-
rtured important positions on thelt
lwestern flank.
Take Many Prisoners
In the last three days the British
French and Americans have taken
(more than 27,000 prisoners. In their
Cambrai drive the British have cap-
ured 10,000 while the Franco-Ameri
cans have increased their total to
more than 10,000. The Belgians and
British are reported, to have caD-
ured 1,000 Germans.
Serbian and other allied forces in
-Macedonia are pressing vigorously
heir pursuit of the disorganized Ger-
pnans and Bulgarians. In the north-
rn Russia and far-off eastern Siberia
he allies also are successfully pur
suing their advances. South of Arch-
xngel, American and other troops
have advanced more than 50 miles.
Northwest of Vladivostok, Japanese
ravalry have taken Zeyapristan, on
he Zeya river.
FRENCH CAPTURE
SOMME VILLAGE
P-.ris, Sept. 28. In the successful
"nunuation of the offensive east of
'" Argonne, the French have cap
ered the village of Somme Py an ad
vance of about four miles, says the
par office statement today.
The heights north of Fontaine en
pormoise also have been taken. The
Tench have taken additional prison
ers. The fie-htinsr continues.
MQUOR in demand
WITH WORKERS HERE
AT SATURDAY SALES
Vhile last night was not the final
;-ght before Pensacola saloons close,
iauor was much in demand by many
vho had Just received a full pay en-
f elope. There were many amusing
cen.es, as some saloons where dozens
" men with money in their hands Ht-
p rally fought for a chance to pur
phase liquor, which hard worked sell
ers handed out as fast as they could.
londay nie-M is the expiration date
or license e.
VERDi TO SEA UAl PAHIC
BULBAR PEACE
OFFER USES
publication on Move in German
Newspaper Brings About
Greatest Panic in Berlin.
OFFICIAL PROOF
GIVEN OF OFFER
Ministerial Block Announces
Plan Admiral von Hintzs
Tries to Quiet Germany.
Copenhagen, Sept. 28. The leaders
of the ministerial bloc of the Bulgar
ian parliament, according to advices
from Sofia, published the following
official " note in connection with the !
government's proposal for an armis
tice:
"In accordance with orders of the
leaders of the ministerial bloc the
government at 5 o'clock Wednesday
afternoon made an official offer of an
armistice to the adversary. The lead
ers- of the bloc are in accord that the
army and people must maintain mili
tary and public discipline, whicn is
so necessary for a happy issue in
these times wheh are decisive for the
recently begun work of peace.
"Parliament has been summoned to
meet on September 30."
GREAT PANIC IN GERMANY
London. Sept. 28. The publication
in Berlin semi official newspapers
of Bulgaria's armistice request was
the cause of the greatest panic in the
German capital, according to advices
received at Copenhagen and forward
ed by the Kxchange Telegraph corres
pondent there.
Admiral Von Hintze, the German
foreign secretary, according to the
advices, in a speech before the malD
committee ;of , the " Reichstaff,.f Baid 'the
difficulties of the Bulgarians" between"
the Vardar and the Cerna evidently
had not been , favorably explained by
Premier Malinoff and the Bulgarian
(Continued on Page Sixteen.)
LAY KEEL IN
MILLVILLE; A
SHIP A MONTH
FIRST AMERICAN LUMBER COMPANY
VESSEL BEGUN SATURDAY TO
RUSn CONSTRUCTION OF OTHER
VESSELS
Millville, Sept. 28. More people than
were ever assembled at one time before
in Bay county gathered today at Mill
ville, where the laying of the first
keel at the American Lumber Com
pany's big ship plant was successfully
carried out. Over 2,000 people witness
ed the ceremony, which was preceeded
by the opening of the company's store
and motion picture theatre.
Flags of the Allies along with Old
Glory were raised over the yard and
the Ft. Barrancas band from Pensacola
lead a parade of the 2,000 employees of
the company, while ship workers were
led by their own band. Speeches were
made by Governor Catts, Mr. Watson,
of Pensacola, and President Wilson of
the ship building plant.
Governor Gatts in iis speech re
minded that their big day was also the
opening day of the Liberty Loan drive
and since shipbuilders were being paid
more money than ever before, they
ought to buy Liberty Bonds and insure
their safety.
President Wilson of the company ex
plained how - the Kaiser s money was
being used to defeat him by the erec
tion of great ships. Mr. Wilson's speech
was well received ana jay county
pledged it's quota of Liberty Bonds.
The heavy rain which had been fall
ing just long enough to permit the
ceremonies to be successfully carried
out, and they were held in bright sun
shine, which was considered to be a
good omen by the ship workers.
Three more keel3 will be laid imme
diately in the yard and beginning Janu
ary 1, the yard will launch a vessel a
month, according to an announcement
made by President Wilson of the com
pany.
U. S. AND GERMANY TG
PAY OFFICER ?
"RS
Washington, Sept. 2?
States and Germany, th
tions conducted by the . '
sador at Berlin, have
stated monthly sums to r J. i i
as prisoners of war. Hi.?; r,
may be revised by the
the general subject . of tr:"
war now in progress at Uerjj
zerlancL
United
jOtia-
Arabas-
t" pay
trs held
-'ment
ni e on
n.a of
e, Swit-
GENERALS
N&b ft I .
j; w U , m
11 mm i j'lkiJ X ft
, ffi M -
This is one of the latest pictures showing General John J. Pershing:, commander of the Amer
ican forces in France and General
French attack near Verdun was planned by General Pershing and the St. Mihiel successes were car
ried out under his personal supervision in the field, with the full consent of Foch.
SUFFRAGE
BE-
BACKERS
SAY
ADMIT CERTAIN DEFEAT OR WITH
DRAWAL . NECESSARY BECAUSE
OF CHANGE OF HEART . OF CON
GRESSIONAL LEADERS
Washington, Sept. 28. With certain
defeat or withdrawal admitted to be
the only present alternatives, the house
resolution proposing the submission to
the states suffrage amendment, furn
ished another sharp but brief fight in
the Senate today, and went over until
Monday. The loss of the vote of Sena
tor Bennet, of South Carolina, which
wa counted to be for the resolution.
caused advocates to admit possible de
feat. The resolution may be brought
to a vote for the purpose of providing
a record for the November election.
Washington, Sept. 28. Because of ob
structive tactics in the senate by op
ponents of the women suffrage ameua
ment, leaders of both factions agreed
today that no- vote would be reached
before Monday.
Senator Benet of South Carolina, in
his maiden speech in the senate today
announced that he would vote against
the resolution. He had been counted
on by suffrage managers to support
the resolution.
"In view of the fact that the senior
senator from South Carolina is against
the resolution and all of the South
Carolina members of the house voted
against it, and because suffrage is not
an issue In my state, I feel that it is
my duty to vote against this resolu
tion," said Senator Benet.
Were the resolution a war, measure,
or the success of the war in any. way
dependent on the success of the resolu
tion. Senator said, he would unhesti-
tatingly vote for it, but he declared he
could not see how the fortunes of the
war are in any way bound up in it. ;
Favors It Later
Citizens of South Carolina, he de
clared, believe they have the right to
say who should be allowed to vote.
Senator. Benet said he believed in a
state's right to determine this -question
and to adopt this resolution would be
to give up. the fundamental rights of a
state to decide. South Carolina he said
has a situation of illiteracy which it
is trying to overcome, and as soon as
those conditions improve, he said, he
believed he would vote for woman suf
rage. To do so now would be going
against the wishes of the people of
South Carolina.
OCCUPATIONAL TAX ORDINANCE
PASSED AT THIRD READING
The occupational tax ordinance
was passed at a meeting of the city
commissioners yesterday, being unani
mously adopted at the third and last
last reading of; the measure. Among
lines of indn. hich have been in
creased i"i !(? Vn .-are laundries, bot
tling worjL-. I ji!. "r, ..,--nd fire insurance
companies.'
TO
DEFEATED
WHO PLANNED BIG BATTLE
Foch," generalissimo of all the
BIG NEW YORK
LOAN LOTftLS
$55,000,000
METROPOLIS OPENS DRIVE AUSPI
CIOUSLY FARRAR SINGS FOR
DRIVE IN WASHINGTON, D. . C,
MARINE BAND PLAYS
New Tork, Sept. 22. Two subscrip
tions totaling $55,000,000. were - an
nounced -when the second federal re
serve district committee formally in
augurated its - drive . for the Fourth
Liberty Loan at 9 o'clock today.
' The Prudetlal Life Insurance Com
pany of. America took $30,000,000 of
the 'issue and the New York Life In
surance Company $25,000,000. This
supplemented a purchase of $40,000,000
worth', of bonds, announced last night
by the United States Steel Corporation.-
'
coughing or sneezing over the heads ;
Washington," Sept 28. America to- of others,- thus spraying', the infect
day set itself to the task of. raising five material over a wider range.'? 1
a loan of $6,000,000,000 in three weeks.
Although' this was twice the minimum
of any previous Liberty Loan and by
far-the greatest war credit-ever .un
dertaken by any nation, the treasury
department officials were certain that
the sum would be oversubscribed.
OffDcials felt that It was a favorable
augury for ,the Fourth. Liberty Loan
that the campaign got under way
when the American army was pressing
forward in a great offensive .in France.
Loans Pour In
Subscriptions began pouring In to
day ' at all federal reserve banks
Many communities had oversubscribed
their quotas before the campaign offi
cially began. Thousands of workers
were out early and in practically ev
ery city, town. and hamlet; special cer
emonies ushered in the drive. "
In Washington the campaign be
gan-with exercises on the steps of the
Farrar sang the "Star Spangled Ban
ner,", and the Marsallles and a con
cert was given by the Marine band.
GERMANS DEPEND ON
MACHINE GUN
FIRE
With the American Army ' North
west of Verdun, Sept. 28. The Amer
icans are using their artillery freely
to break up the enemy dispositions.
The Germans are depending upon ma
chine gun fire - at every advanced
point in their effort to check the
Americans.
YPRES FRONT. SCENE t
OF ALLIED ADVANCE
Paris, Sept. 2S$ Allied troops be
gan an attack on the front north of
Tpres today and the advance at some
points ;has been more than, two and
one-half; miles. The attack is being
made by the Belgian "army and is on
the larger part . of their front ; south
I from the North sea. . . r
allied forces. The great American
MOVE TO STOP
INFLUENZA IN
EPIDEMTC HERE
DR. PAUL MOSSMAN OF UNITED
STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE
GIVES METHODS OF HOLDING DIS
EASE IN ABEYANCE
Dr. Paul Mossman, of the United
States 1 public health, service, who is
In charge of . extra-cantonment sani
tation here, has addressed letters to
the managers of the local theatres
requesting their cooperation . In pre
venting the spread of the Spanish in
fluenza which is widespread over the
entire country. ?
Lieut. Mossman says: "As this dis
ease is spread by coughing and sneez
ing, it is more likely to be communi
cated in crowded places, where ' per
sons are standing close-together and
In order to avoid Infection or pat-
rons of the theatre managers" are. re
niipstpd not tn admit mnr nprsona
than the seating . capacity will, ac-
commodate and to maintain adequate
and continuous ventilation. It Is stat-
ed that , this precaution will make
more drastic regulations ' necessary
and that- the managers of the thea
tres have .expressed., their willingness
to cooperate fully with the health
service. ' , -
Dr. Mossman has "been in the 'city
about -two weeks,- p'anning-the exten
sive : sanitation wt rk , which . the gov
ernment will undertake here. A gov
ernment inspector, is now visiting the
restaurants and soda fountains of the
city and the campaign will be ex
tended rapidly.
While, the work is carried on pri
marily to.' improve health conditions
for the thousands, of service men sta
tioned . here, it is pointed out that
every resident-, of 'the city will bene
fit through it as -upon completion of
the" campaign local health conditions
will be as nearly perfect as science
can make them. - '
CLEARING HOUSE BANKS
X SHOW SLIGHT DECREASE
New York. Sept. 28. The actual con
dition' of clearing house banks and
trust companies for the week show
that that hold 846.825,730 reserve in ex
cess of legal requirements. This is a
decrease of 118,709,440 f ronv last week.
AMERICAN TROOPS ARE :
. O.N ARCHANGEL FRONT
Archangel. Sept.28. By the A." P. Am
erican 'troops who are taking-part in
the operations In virtually.all sectors on
the Northern Russian front have cap
tured several villages in recent fight
ing.' -
INITIAL DAY
T
SSI 00
FOR LIBERTY
Stormy Weather Does Not
Dampen Loan Workers' Ardor.
Big Sum Subscribed.
ESCAMBIA ON WAY
OVER TOP MULDON
Chairman Mitchell Gets First
West Florida Subscription
From Jefferson County.
The heavy rainfall and lowering
clouds throughout the day did not
serve to deter the Liberty Loan
workers yesterday, J. M. Muldon.
chairman for Escambia county stated
last night that incomplete returns to
taled $100,000 for the first day of the
drive; reports from the woman's com
mittee gave their figures at $1800.
The first subscription sent In to R.
F. Mitchell, zone chairman, from oth
er counties in his district, was from
Chairman Simpson, of Jefferson
county, -who wired from Monticello
a total raised of $16,900.00. with no
reports outside of Moptlcello.
A communication from W. C.
Wardlaw, chairman of the Sixth Fed
eral Reserve district, to Chairman
Muldon gives the allotment of the dis.
trict as $193,000,000. "If you can inv
press your people each with his own
personal responsibility, your task will
be easily accomplished. We must
not fail , in this undertaking, and I
am looking to you to get best possl
ble results in your county."
While, the organization of all sub
committees has not yet been perfect
ed, the drive started off with spirit
and indicated splendid results.
? r; Postpone Relay
' The postponement of the relay race
was a , disappointment "to many; but
owing to the bad weather, it was fan
possible to make the race over the
course, which was very muddy and
almost Impassable at come points.
(Continued on Page Sixteen.)
TAMPA SCENE
OF HURRICANE
CROPS RUINED
SIX LIVES LOST AND THOUSANDS
OF DOLLARS DAMAGE DONE TO
CITRUS CROPS SATURDAY MUCH
PROPERTY DAMAGED
Tampa, Sept. 28. One of the heavi
est storms ever experienced here re
suited in the death of six persons and
damaged hundreds of thousands of dol
lars, worth of property early this morn
ing." The storm struck the west coast
of Florida 60 miles from St. Petersburg
and swept northward this morning.
It is estimated that the wind attained
a -velocity of over 100 miles per hour.
Buildings were blown down, and un-
roofed at Clearwater, Tarpon Springs
and other points. Telegraph and tele
i pn one wires throughout the section are
j down and roads have ben left almost
impassable by the heavy waterfall and
debris. .
Reports from fruit ranches indicate
great damage has been done to citrus
crops, one concern reporting ihatlS.OOO
boxes of orange and grapefruit have
been blown from the trees. The storm
is the worst experienced in this' sec
tion for over 50 years. No material
damage was done in the city of Tampa.
SPANISH INFLUENZA IS
HINDERING SHOALS WORK
Montgomery, ' Ala., Sept. 28. Two
hundred and seven case of Spanish in
fluenza have developed In the Muscle
Shoals district-up to Friday night, ac
cording to advices to the state health
department from Dr. Harran of the
United States, public health service, who
is in charge of the district.' ,
The advices state that there are 125
cases at Florence, 12 at Nitrate Plant
No. -1; 50 at Nitrate Plant No. 2: and
20 at Sheffield. The board of health
telegraphed Dr. Parren to .Uarantine
every case. , -
SCHOOL OPENING HOURS
J. M. Collier, principal of the Pensa
cola High School, urges all students to
note the hours for the opening of the
high school on Monday, and to be gov
erned accordingly: Seniors, 8:30: Jun
iors,' 950; Sophomores, 1030; Fresh
men; 1:30. ,
Pupils are reminded that if they ar
rive at school at an hour not appoint
ed, they will cause much inconvenience
and delay the routine of the day.
ROYAL DUEL
TELLS OF
CROSS
Field Secretary of Southeast,
Recently Returned From Bel
gium, Tells of Vork, jr
, .'rij
PRAISES SUCCESS '
OF ESCAMBIA WQRI$
Changes in Plan of W o r Ki
Throughout America Outlin
ed Memberships Change.
Royal C. Daniel, field secretary of '
the south-eastern division of the Am- r
erlcan Rer Cross, spent yesterday lai
the city, meeting the members of the
executive committee. Later he made
an address to the members In the
court room of the federal building.
Mr. Daniels has spent much time,
in Relarlnm and France, closely in
touch with the men at' the front,' and ;
i xirid figures of speech told of the 1
courage and ardor of the men.
Mr. Daniels did not hesitate ta-
charge that the American people axe 1
selfish, not having yet awakened to i
the grim horror of the war. He paid j
high tribute to the spirit of France,!
aeciaring iu xo do iuvuiiui, t
many interesting stories. - -
At the close of his appeal, he-'urged
upon the members of the Red Cross j
a closer devotion to the work here at
home that the men over there may
know America , is back of them. . .
'The American Red Cross is seek
ing the co-operation of the chapters
to the end of putting behind the na
tion-wide orgaization a very precise
ad exacting business program, retain
ing of course, -the humanity, love and
tears- which- has maae.ine Kea-urow
the world-wide humane agency that
it Is today," he said. -.
Here are some of the things that
are being asked. of the various chap
ters In order to conform to the gen
eral ' plan as outlined by Mr. Daniel:1
That the fiscal year shall be from
July 1st to June 40th.
That the annual meetings of all
Wednesday in October.
That the annual membership drive
shall be held in December of each year
from the 16th to the 23rd.
All memberships in the Red Cross
hereafter will automatically expire ;
on December 31st. In the future they :
will be based on the calendar year. ,
This will save millions of dollars to f
the Red Cross. - , .
On account of the shortage In the
raw material marKer, cnapiers wii,.-
hereafter receive allotments, based on.
the forecast made every thirty day
by the war department. The chapters
will do only by request. No chapter J
can make purchases of materials out-,
side of the bureau of supplies of their?
divisions.
Daniel's Speech 6
"In other words," said Mr. BanleLj
"the production of the American RedJ
Cross will be controlled through gov-J
ernment allotment. This means ad
. . . . . i t.iM A
llimi&iion upon me twudura uu
Red Cross workroom.
"The reclamation of uniforms "wilt,
hereafter be done by the Red Cross."
patch the shirts and uniforms . amd;
The volunteers in the work room win
dorn the socks and sweaters, by the
majority of the women who are Tterirr
engaged In other work.
"A new bureau has been established
by the American Red Cross to , be
known as the Bureau ' on Conserva
tion. It Is under this bureau that the
drive Is on clothing for the Belgian.
This drive for used clothing is xiow!
on. - . ',:
-'The Red Cross chapter here is;
known throughout the division for
uine pleasure to meet the officers vrh
are responsible! for the reputat..cr
your city ias earned among her ne q s
bors. - ; ' .
Praises Pensacola '
"I had imagined Pensacola as : c ';
ing a typical seaport town, :t".t
sandy, unpaved streets except In ti.;.
fUfltUDO . 9 TV 1.11 TT OAUU UUtlU
ings, the majority of them unpalnt
ed, and with a slow-moving popula
tion and an idlfferet air. Imagine my
surpsJe, to be conducted into a very
modern and metropolitan , city In
which the stranger might easily per
mit his gaze to decoy him into the
idea that he was in one of the large
cities of the country. It's a dandv
town : pour people are splendid and
there is a very contagion In the tjr
that makes me hesitate to say good
bye." HOLD OPEN HOUSE FOR '
SOLDIERS AT FIRST M. E.
Over 200 service men attended the
open house night at the First Meth
odist church last, night, when the Ep-
wortn league or the church, .enter
tained with a program of songs,
games andi refreshments. Members
of Co. D, of the Fourth Battery, new
ly arrived soldiers for guard duty,
were special guests of the leagu.
RED
ABROAD

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