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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, October 24, 1918, Image 1

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life ttftr'iiilk-.::j i'SrCTT'
The Weather
F0R FLORIDA: Rain Thursday and
Jav fresh east winds probably strong
Vn t'e northwest coast.
v,sterdaya temperature: Highest, 75
THE PENSACOLA JOURNAL
Prints more -want ads than any other
paper of like circulation in the world.
Journal Want Ads bring results.
de5
arees; i' "
v : j i ii i ii i -J J iili hi m ? i ii i ii i sit w ill . ss I i I !i I ii.i i ii II I M I II I II I I III if II I 11 II III
VOL. XXI. NO. 297.
THE PENSACOtA JOURNAL, THURSDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 24, 1918.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
PISS EDEBBT
BACK TOIIHD
OH BOEDER
WAR CORRESPONDENTS AT FRONT.
Advance Made Foot by Foot in
Face of Heavy Machine
Gun Fire.
STIFF DEFENSE
AT VITAL POINTS
Sharp Resistance Offered on
Sectors Which Threaten
Stability of Line.
Tlarr, Oct. -2. The whole prov
ide of Mcslern FJSidersi and part
of eastern rianders and Ilainault
Jiac been recovered from the Ger
man. 1 he Belgian government has de
cided lo establish its administra
tive deparlment at Bruges.
rySfe '
i , j : - i l '
ALLIES JILL
A DROP FROM THE SKY.
President Suwoma:
- - - i.
- Plea to Military Advisers
0 ,a-.0SUIllBBii
jrci mail j a
of Our Allies.
,NO PEACE UNTIL
TERMS ARE MET
Gives Warning That No Dealing
Will Be Had With Military
Masters of Germany.
(By The Associated Press)
A...cci armies in France and Belgium
ni.j still driving the Germans toward
lii'-1 border.
un sectors requisite to the stability
(if ih.j entire German line, most stuh-
t:n resistance is being offered by
:!!- rncmy and the allies' gains are
virtually foot by foot in tha
I 'ire or machine guns. Notwithstand
ing the frantic endeavors of the en
in 10 maintain its positions, male
Mat iTo'cress has been made.
British Storm Defenses.
:5;itii. troops again are storming
t;: German defenses west of Mau-
l" i--c. The new attack, launched early
i...i;iv hptween Solesmes and Le Ca
ll au" is reported to be making good
Kogress.
Field Marshal llalg is. driving for
-ard on the seven-mile front north
i- Le Citcau also is increasing the
ennce to Valenciennes, through the
V'strrn suburbs of which the Brit
Mi are flfihtinsr. North of Valen-
r - nnes the city has been outflankei
tv tiic capture of Bruay. It is not
i -h.ii'e tfie Germans will be able to
hurl out in Valenciennes much -long-e
i.nt once the Scheldt is crossed here
t ;-1 British will be in position to
1!.:-oatcn seriously both Mons and
Muubeuce.
(.ain Ground East of Selle.
Between Le Cateau and Solesmes,
trie British are on the high ground
-i.l of f!i3 Selle river and -it is from
tin's favorable .position today's attack
as beg-un. The German resistance
?! i"1 has been bitter as the line is
Mfal to the security . of the German
M-f'.n?es over a wide front to the south
tiiui southeast. - . I
Close In on Tournai.
b soutlnvestern Belgium the Brit
continue to close in on Tournai.
North of the town they have forced a
rowing of ths Scheldt while on the
south tliey have reached the western
i;.nk of the river on a four-mile front
:om Bruyelles to Bleharics.
Hit!i of Le Cateau, the enemy is
'e-iVting stubbornly French attempts
truss the Serre river and take in
':iB roar the German positions east of
' Oi?e. South of the railroad iunc-
the Germans out of France and Belgium.
(By Associated Press)
"Washingrton Oct. 23. President "Wil
son has submitted the German plea for
Cal C. Lyon, whose special articles appear regularly in The ' an-armisuc and peace to the allies
" " . I and a tliB GamA jm Inf Armor! T?ai-ltn
Journal, firing an anti-aircraft gun at a Boche airplane, which has that there can be no armistice except
just made its appearance. Herbert Corey, the famous humorist Ptes w.nich make it impossible
and special writer, is the other correspondent in the picture.' Both The president gives the German au-
are now with the allies in their present drive and are sending their .rities ns J if .e united
... , I SStatps must dAal with thsmilitarvma.(-
papers thrilling accouts of the great offensive which "is - forcing ters and monarchical autocrats of
Germany now, or it is likely to have
to deal with them later, in regard to
the international ; obligations of the
German empire, it nmst -demand liot
peace negotiations, but surrender.
The note iras handed to the Swiss
charge tonight and will be transmitted
to Berlin immediately. .
.WTiile the president accedes to the
request that he take up with the allies
the proposals of the new spokesmen of
the German people, his gives notive
vthat'a virtual surrender of the teuton
ic armies will be the price of interrup
tion of the beating now being admiri-
istered.
.He ignores entirely the German pro
tests and denials in the matter of at
rocities. ' .
President Wilson informed the Ger-
men - government; that-- he has trans
nlitted "its orresMBdentMli mtat
seeking an armistice and peaces to the
allies,, with the suggestion that if these
governments are disposed to. effect
peace upon the terms and principles
indicated lby their ) mUitary advisers
; and the military advisers of the United
States, the allie3 will be asked to
submit necessary terms To rsuch an
armistice as will fully protect the in
terests of the people' involved and en
force the details to which the German
government has agreed.
He says that should such terms for
GERMANS ASK
ALLIES NOT TO
FOLLOW THEM
GROTESQUE PROPOSAL FOLLOWS O.N
CONFERENCE OF I 'GERMAN GEN
ERAI; STAFF AND WAR CABINET
TO c6NSUDR;VACUATld!C
2,000,000 U. S.
SOLDIERS ARE
NOW OVER-SEAS
HEAVY ..EMBARKATION : ADDS EM
PIIASIS TO ASSURANCE OF NO IN-
SltUTARV
TERRUPTION v OF .TOE
PROGR.M OF AMERICA.
''a of Montcornet, the French have
rna io progress between Mihy le Comt
ssi Lo Thour.
Reiehstafi Given Power.
D"incf; .Maximilian, the German ehan-
f ' . A " Ilia nfAmicArl 4h a nAi'Aft
is that it will be made responsible
: " .r and peace. lie added the pro
however, that such a step will
income effective until afttr the
r and hen a league of nations is in
"t utai operation.
Paris , Oct. 23. Germany's- high
command ': is . ready to evacuate the in
vaded territories of France and. Bel-
on the . express, condition that the al
lied troops will not ' follow them in
retreat, - but will remain where '. they
are now- located, according to the lat
est information from Berlin, says the
Zurich correspondent of the Journal.
This grotesque- proposal Is theout-
come of. the latest conferences at Ber-r
lin between the members . of the gen-
ral staff and ' the .war; cabinet, it is
said. The militarist ? party is rapidly
gaining ground, but ' the members of
the moderate factions believe that be
fore long grave . internal events will
help to improve the situation.
The aispatch says that the existing
government r remains very hostile to
the retrocession . of" Alsace and Lor
raine to France. Emperor William
himself is reported to have denounced
emphatically - such - an event at the
meeting of the Crown 5 Council-on Saturday.
GERMANS PROMISE RELEASE
OF BELGIANS AT EVACUATION
Tiome, Oct. 23. Baron von der Lan
chief of the German nolitical de
partment at Brussels, has informed
yardjnai Mercier, primate of Belgium,
L' '-it when the Germans varnat tYtnt
nntry. the deported Belgians and po
;cal prisoners will be spontaneously
"eated. according to the Osservatore
;v;manoJT. the semi-official organ. He
. Cardinal Jlercier, it is said, that
Part of the Belgians who were de
; ted would be free to return to thi3
jntry cn Monday.
ENEMY OWNED STOCK OF
INSURANCE COMPANY SOLD
fT J?Vk' ct- 23. Enemy-owned
;s-rnn AUicacdn insurance
rormerly the German-Amer
:Q msuranr r-r,, ,j
--uiiiia.nj', soiu oy
AMERICANS ENGAGE IN STJFFEST
FIGHTING OF THE OFFENSIVE
With the Americans Northwest of
Verdun, Oct. 23. By The Associated
Prless) The stifTest fighting of the
American offensive west of ;the Meuse
is under way, today. , ; ;
The line is 1 swaying back and .forth
in the region of Grand , Pre - on ; the
western end Of the front The Ameri
cans repulsed repeated violent German
counter attacks..
Americans -tonight. are .fighting north
of Bantheville hills 297, '29 r and 281,
Bantheville having changed hands, sev
eral times in the last, few days, v Bri
eulles has also ieen cleared ; of the
enemy. Hill 2S1 was the scene of se
vere fighting -'for four-days, -the Ger
mans having- numerous machine : gun
nests on , its summit. Capture. or tnis
hill gives. Americans - command . -of
Clery Le Grand and the valley along
the Landon river.
Washington ' Oct. ? 23. When the
President's reply to Germany was mad
public, the' White House gave out cor
and ,the President - showing that more
and ; the President : showing : that Mo
than 2,000,000? American soldiers have
embarked over seas during the war.
Responding' to the letter of Secretary
Baker informing him of . the big over
seas embarkation, , the i President said :
'T am . sure ; this will be a matter of
deep gratification and - reassurance to
the country, and everyone wiir join me
in .congratulating the" War -and 'Navy
Department's steady . accomplishment
of this all important application of
force to the liberation of the world."
Secretary Tumulty gave ' emphasis to
the assurance given by all. members of
the government that no. interruption of
the military program ; Is contemplat
ed, by making public the correspond-
7 J V. 1
1z ' ' j '
mm.
This picture was snapped j ust
as a ; German -, observer leaped
from his balloon, whicch had
been -fired by : an .allied aviator.
His . parachute had not begun to
open when the picture was snapped.
DRIVE STARTS
FOR GARBYinG
1 0-RfllLL Till
Intensive Campaign Begins at
Once to Insure Success .of
the Amendment
rriA,TTTTTr"T'I7'17iC t
ARE SELECTED
Chairman Appointed in Each
Precinct to Co-Operate With
County Organization.
DR. SHARP IS
TO AID RELIEF
1M0NTG0MERY
RECEIVES ORDERS TO REPORT TO
ALABAMA CAPITAL t TO5 ASSIST IN
COMBATING INFLUENZA
"IN" THAT STATE. , : .
'BAGING
(Continued on Page Six)
Official Text of
President's Reply
Washington, D. C, Oct. 23. The Sec
retarv of State makes public the fol-
ence between Secretary Baker and the lowing:
President showing. more, than 2,000,000 "From the Secretary of State t
soldiers have embarked overseas. thn Gharee d'Affairs ad interim, in
j charge : of -German interests ' in . the
united fetates.
RED TERROR BECOMES
MONSTER WHICH CREATORS
ARE UNABLE TO CONTROL
"Department of State, October 23,
1918.
"Sir: I. have the honor to agknowl-
- I 1 A 1U .
Stockholm nnt eage tne receipt oi your noie oi iud
rr.s s ;.r..-: ::cr 23rd. transmitting a communication
Dr. W. K. Sharp, I of the United
States Public Health Service, who has
been assisting "in.' Emergency Relief?
work' in Pensacola;1- left yesterday for
Montgomery, ; Ala., under instructions
from ' Surgeon-General : Rupert Blue.
When Dr. Sharp lef t " Pensacola he was
not certain as to whether his serv
ices were desired in Montgomery, or
whether . he would , receive ''.. instruc
tions there, and 'proceed ;to Mobile.
He will return, to 'Pensacola -.at. a. later
date, - resuming ; his' ? work "under ' the
public - service regulations, in connec
tion with the sanitation of Pensacola,
which . was interrupted by, the need of
attention to the- . emergency relief
work here.
It was stated : yesterday afternoon
that relief headquarters would prob
ably be closed, shortly, as the influ
enza is well 'on the wane.
George P. Wentworth, director of
emergency calls - Jor doctors, Mr. an J
Mrs. W. K. Hyery H.-H. Thornton, with
Chairman Lee MacDonell, and a num
ber of men of , the navy are at head
quarters, but , the calls are less fre
Y.M.C.A. PLANS
PROGRAM OF
WINTER SPORTS
LEAGUE OF STRONG BASKETBALL
TEAMS TO BE FORMED AND ATU
LETICClJiSSES ORGANIZED UNDER
DIRECTION OF JULIAN OLSEN,
counter revolutionary commissions!
and central and local Soviet oreaniza-
tions is. the predominant .-menace to'
proletariat . dictotorship.
According to information, brought by
travelers, even Lenine i3 unable to save
men he-did not wish executed.
The Red .Terror,- spread from Mos
cow, has become a monster, which Le
nine and the. central government can
not. control. - - ..
BRITISH CONTINUE TO SMASH
I THROUGH THE GERMAN LINES
MISSISSIPPI TOW BOAT
SERVICE IN OPERATION
St: Louis. Mo., Oct. 23. The tow
boat Xokomis and two, barges which
inaugurated the government Mississ
ippi river service," September 28, com
pleted the first round trip today from
New Orleans. 'la
under date of the 20th from the Ger
man government and to advise you that
the President has instructed me to re
ply, thereto as follows
" "Having received the solemn and
explicit assurance of the German gov
ernment that it unreservedly accepts
the terms of peace laid down in his
address to the congress of the United
States on the 8th of January, 1918, and
the principles of settlement enunciated
in "his subsequent addresses, particu
larly the address of the twenty-seventh
of September, and that it desires to
discuss the - details of their applica
tion and that this .wish and purpose
FRENCH RULER
VISITS LILLE
Ir'n11 PrPerty custodian today for
' A !aw firm acting far th
fesS2?tJid ia th stock which is
QiStiorZer cent of the comDanya
C,.ld ia stock which is
ion.
EVACUATION OF GHENT SAID
TO BE IN FULL SWING
4nofler,dam' , CU 23 The evacua-
Ghent is in full swinjr. accord-
? to
-V.
Lilt! LflipiraTflar
Anns L
r
",i'- ooats in mint v.-;..
ih. 'owed toward Koit-
ta rrnUer. the -dispatch adds. I see and . Ltns.
Paris. Oct. 23. President Poincare
accompanied by senators, deputies and
other officials, . visited Lille yesterday
and received an enthusiastic ' ovation.
In reply to the address of welcome,
the President said' that -"the hour of
defeat for the enemy. will strike soon."
He bestowed the Cross of the Legion
of Honor.: upon the mayor of Lille.
The -party then wrent to Roubaix
where there are many persons from Al
sace and Lorraine. During an address
there, M. Poincare ; said that no peace
was possible, without the return of
Alsace ' and Lorraine to -France. At
Douai, the President was met by the
Prince of Wales. During the trip, the
party also , visited ' Tourcoing, , La ' Bas-
irSJ 3UllS i rrP.e.c emanated not from those ? who have
Jy'X3 iV531; hitherto, dictated Germany's policy
, - "J. u"usu rwuru ana i and conducted the present war. on
iouna armies toaay smashed through Germany's behalf, but from ministers
SfiK Gernian defensiva positions Who speak for the majority of the
r a . 'n." u us rouna reichstag and for an overwhelming ma
to a dep th of more, than 5,000 yards iOPv: of the German people: and hav
on. an extended iront, capturing many
important ; villages .and several '.thon-
sand. prisoners, together .with numer
ous-guns and driving a wedge into the
enemy" positions at probably the most
KP,J-n n the lmes tn Germans President of the United States feels that
one umuius. .
J? ighting is " of a desperate nature.
jority of the German people; and hav
ing received also the-explicit promise
of the present German government that
the humane rules of civilized warfare
will be observed ' both on . land and
sea by the German armed forces, the
he cannot decline to take up with the
German machine-gunners are holdine ' u- i-nit ctais'ia 9n;tH
IO Xne ial. t, v Mf.'An an amictiVa Ma
The advance continues and the men-Li ?f h; Hntv.tA1 sv'inviinn-.
co. u .luo iiius uunu ana soui.1 everi that'the only armistice he-would
0.u,U8.,iUU1,J. ruruier re- fi inatiriwi in sucmittme top con
ireaus ire expeciea. ' UwBMtinn would bi one which shnul.1
iavft the United States and the now-
nMrL.tsiui mills ouk in ers associated with ner in a position
ACCIDENT AT FORT SMITH to snforce any arrangements that may
hp pnfred into ana to make a re-
Fort Smith, . Ark., Oct. 23. C. V. newal: of hostilities on the part . of
Riley and Thomas E. Morrison, officers 1 Germany Impossible. The President
of the Fort Smith . Commission Com-lhni? . therefore, transmitted his cor
pany, and two negro employes were I respbndeno with the present German
killed in the explosion of "an; ammonia I nuthorities to the governments with
tank and resultant fire which destroyed which the government of the United
several buildings in : the - business dis- States is associated as a belligerent,
trict of Fort Smith yesterday. Twenty with the suggestion that, if those gov-
other persons were injured. The ernments are disposed to effect peace
property damage - was - estimated at
5640,000.; u . I Continued on Pase Eight
quent each day and the probability is
that the rooms will soon automatic- simultaneously vfith the
ally close. Tuesday there were not events.'
Plans are progressing at the Y. M. C.
A.; for the winter's campaign of sports.
J. O. ; Olsen, physical director of the
"Y," - is waiting on the improvement
of health conditions in Pensacola be
fore beginning active, training of basket-ball
teams, volley ball teams and
the various athtetic features which
obtain each , winter at the "Y."
The plan of having teams of the P.
H. S., the ?. Marines, naval and army
camps and the "Y" ' teams compete
will-be followed this year, and Mr. Ol
sen expects to have some of. the best
contests ever staged here, during the
coming months. Basket ball; which
has always been " a favorite among
Pensacola's indoor sporting events.
will . probably . feature the events this
winter. With , the athletic timber to
pick"; from : at camps, some hot con
tests may be expected.
Classes 'will be started in the imme
diate future among the business men,
high school students, among boys who
are :-employed through the day and
among younger , boys generally. In
addition to the athletic events, classes
in business work among employed
boys and fifth, sixth, seventh and
eighth grade work will probably begin
sporting
more than-twenty - calls for, supplies
and yesterday, not more than a dozen.
Police Officer .Jo.e Burke is still giv
ing his services ? to the organization,
and has won . the highest commenda
tion of h is co-workers.
A member of the committee said yes
terday: "It would not be possible to
say how great 4 a service Officer Burke
has rendered the Red Cress. He has
the kind of, personality which- com
pels respect, - and i at the same time
he has a way with him that makes
friends," the combination proving most
valuable to us; as the position he nas
held with the ; Red Cross has required
the greatest amount of diplomacy.
His fund of humor is irrepressible,
and has found vent in Irish stories
which i have heartened us up during
some of our. gloomiest hours. Officer
Burke will remain on duty with the
Red Cross until 'it is felt that his serv
ces, which have been invaluable, are
no longer necessary."
PROMINENT WAR I ANN A WOMAN
IS VICTIM OF INFLUENZA
Mr. Olsen is also to act as athletic
director forthe high school and will
coach the football team. '
JUDGE GUTHRIE RESIGNS -
BENCH TO ENTER "Y" WORK
Tallahassee, Fla., " Oct. 23. Judge
WilliamC, Guthrie : resigned , his posi
tion today as judge , of . the Juvenile
Court , for," Duval county. Judge Gu
thrie will enter the Y. M. C. A. army
service and will be stationed at Key
West. '
Judge Guthrie will be succeeded by
Walter Llddell, - of Jacksonville, the
appointment having ' been made today
by the governor. '
Mariajina, Fla., .' Oct.- 2S. Mrs. J. L.
Carroll -passed-away this afternoon at
3 o'clock after -an 'illness of several
days, r Spanish influenza -developed in
to, pneumonia -and otUer. complications.
Mrs. Carroll, who' is Marianna's first
white victiin of the disease, was the
wife of J. Ll Carroll, a prominent hard
ware merchant - and manager of the
Porter, Carroll Hardware, Company,
of this city. She was a young1 woman
of rare qualities of mind and heart,
and her, untijnely death comes as a
great shock to her family and wide
circle of friends. She is survjvea oy
her husband and three smaJl xmia
ren, heV mother,, Mrs. Eva. L. Solo-
atnon, one sister. Mrs. jonn u. xiornc.
and two .brother?, J. Z. soiomon, oi
this city, and Lieutenant Lidoon Solo
mon, of the United Slates Army, in
terment .will " be ;in ; the - city cemetery
tomorrow, - . . ... -
NUT GROWERS POSTPONE
. NATIONAL CONVENTION
Monticello, Fla,, Oct 23. Owing to
the prevalence of Spanish influenza
fhe Joint - convention of National -and
Northern i iXut Growers' Associations,
scheduled to be held In Albany, Ga.,
October 30, November 1, has been in
definitely : postponed. ,
STORM WILL NOT
COME THIS WAY
The following : bulletin ; was issued
by the local weather bureau last night
- Two depressions which ' have been
over eastern Texas and southern Lou
isiana apparently have united and to
night are over Central Louisiana. The
disturbance ' 13 moving slowly north
northeast and " will cause unsettled
weather tonight and Thursday, but the
winds will ..diminish.
High pressure with cooler weather
is moving slowly. from the northwest
and should : give .-clearing and cooler
weather-by Thursday night or Friday.
The rainfall for the 24 houre at 7
o'clock last night was', .90 inches and
the highest - wind recorded was 53 j
miles per hour,' .from, the southeast at j
11.5 0 - o'clock yesterday ; morning. - 1
With the appointment of all local
committees yesterday, the campaign
for the ten-mill amendment to the
stale constitution, providing a higher
levy for the maintenance of the public
schools of the state, was launched, and
from now until the general election,
November 5, an active campaign will
be conducted in Pensacola and Escam
bia county.
The county committee, which wss
appointed by the state -superintendent
of public instruction, W. N. Sheats,
comprises A. S. Edwards, county sup
erintendent; P. K. Yonge, for years
connected with education in the state;
and James H. Jones, of Genturj'-also
prominent in educational affairs in
the state; and James II. Jones, of Cen
tury. -
The county committee has selected
the city campaign committee with
reference to work in the various city
precincts, each precinct to carry on
its campaign in whatever way suggests
itself as productive of the best re
sults, all work to be done with the
approval of the county chairmen.
Following are the committeemen,
representing the various voting pre
cincts tf Pensacola : ' . H-,
"Precinct, 2 John! Marble. ' "
: Precinct 12 Dan J. Hayes.
t Precinct 13 Patillo Campbell.
Precinct ii Dave Levy.
Precinct 15 G. A. Soderlind.
Precinct 26 J. P. Stokes.
Precinct 27 E. I). Beggs.
Precinct 28 C. J. Levey.
Precinct 29 W. C. Mackey,
Precinct 30 H. G. DeSilva.
Precinct 31 Joseph Riera.
Precinct 32 H. John Garo.
Precinct 34 W. B. Wright.
Precinct 35 E. J. Quigley.
Precinct 24 Gus Eitzen.
Other county precincts are already
actively engaged in tire campaign,
Gonzalez to hold the. first rally fn
Friday night, to which the public' i
invited1.
A. S. Edwards, in speaking of thfl
campaign yesterday, said that with the
strong organization back of the drive,
he felt that its success was assured.
Referring to the necessity for the
passage of the amendment, Mr. Ed
wards &aid :
"As the ratification of this amend
ment will be up to the voters in tin
general election to be held November
5th, the State Superintendent of
Schools several weeks ago named the
committee lo bring this matter to the
attention of the voters of Escambia,
County. ,
"About 30 teaching positions are'
vacant in the Escambia County schools
today from lack of teachers. Living
expenses (have more than doubled
while school revenue remains the
same. ' - '
"For 15 years the school boards of
Florida met the increase in cost of
operation with borrowed ; money,,, un
til the Legislature of 1915 passcdat
act prohibiting any further increase
in the indebtedness of any county.
"Several of the teachers .of Pensacola
are to receive a total of $3G0.00 for their
annual income for the present school"
year. Everybody knows that the
cheapest board to be had here is not
jess than ?30.00 per month. That
means that no person can teach un
less she has some other source of in
come or has some relatives who can
and will contribute to her support.
"The cost of labor and material fo?
the repair of lhe school building hus
doubled as well as has the cost of the
equipment and the necessary supplier
for the operation of the schools.
"The best teachers are leaving the
teaching " profession and .must be re
placed by those of less experience and
training.
Many of the school rooms of Es-
cambia County were overcrowded last
year while there is here in Pensacol
at present a great increase in school
population over that of last season m
be cared for, and there arc neither
teachers, buildings or equipment with
which to do it."
SLAVS, CROATS AND SERBS
TO FORM A DEMOCRACY"
BaSef, Switzerland. Oct. 23. (Ilavas)
The central executive committee, el
ected October 5 by the National Coun
cil of Sloveans, Croatlas and Serb
ians, at Agram, has issued a state
ment that the committee immediately
assume political direction of those na
tionalities and declare for th creation
of a sovereign state on a democratic
bais. , I, - , '
!! r
t
! ,
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