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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, January 01, 1919, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062268/1919-01-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE PENSACOLA JOURNAL
B.m Wednesday, except fair .outh por-
ti,n' If win. central and south portion
Thur, rth portion colder.
"Eianerf temperature yesterday 67 de-
J Harei.
Prints more want ads than any other
paper of like' circulation in the world.
Journal Want Ads bring results.
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?OL.XXII-N0.1
ifiSss
FEATURIPJETO CELEBRATE
; i L S I i : TALK DAI
jeveal Uneasiness in Divergence
of Views Between President
and Clemenceau. u
LEAGUE PROPOSED
CAUSES NEW VIEWS
ftilson's Speech On British Fleet
Subject of Comment By
French Premier.
i Fan's, Dec. 3L The declaration by
'resident Wilson in his Manchester
ipeech on Monday gainst the balance
power among nations is regarded
,y high American quarters here a di
tct rejoinder to the speech of Pre
ttier Clemenceau in the chamber of
leputies, in which he declared his
iupport of the "balance of power" idea
ind his purpose to make it the guid
ng thought of peace negotiations,
hther it was intended or not- The
resident's speech has led to a con
rast between the two declarations, as
iefining two sharply opposing view
wints on the subject.
: London, Iec. 31. Morning news
fepers give great and equal prom
aence to the ' speech of Premier
"emenceau before the French cham
r of deputies and President Wilson's
ddrtss at Manchester. By their
valines and by placing in juxta
icsiuon, the striking passages and by
ls:r comment, the newspapers reveal
i certain uneasiness in consequence of
Ja apparent divergence between JI.
"Imenceaa and Mr. Wilson!
There is an obvious endeavor, huw
tver, to avoid anything suggesting the
silence of a substantial . disagree
nent or promoting '.- anxiety regarding
he conference. - Their desire seems
naSnly to show that'M. Clemeneeau's
rtanupoiat Is rtOtso-;jemdte -from -Mr;
ft'Uson's as might apear at first sight
mi that any differences ; that exist
vfht to be arranged ; with pains and.
tetience. M. Clemenceau's version of
ilr. Wiison's comment on the British
fleet receives much prominence. - .
Wilson's Speech .
The Chronicle, says: "President
tTiison's speech at Manchester
'rought out what perhaps are the es
sential points in a league of nations,
lamely, common devotatlon to right,
hat it must be world-wide and in
'luding ail i,nd that it must have con
inuing machinery."
Erasing anj emphasizing these
!nts, the paper thinks the peace
ronferenco should be regarded as the
i-st session of a body which will re
convene from time to time in perpe
?ty. Thus, it would, the news
apers say, itself become automatic
;y a league, for unless it does so, its
ork win ultimately be torn up by
fesh wars." -
Paris, Dec. 31. Great interest" is
infested among conference dele
tes and in French political circles
a President Wilson's trip to Italy be
jse of the importance of the sub-
he is expected to discuss there.
Italy Awaits Wilson,
.foremost among these subjects. It
a supposed, will be questions relative
the Adriatic, Flume and Dalmatian
ast, concerning which the Jugo-
m lS and the Italiansj not in ac
c!'1 The Pretensions of the Jugo
cnl!! t0 FUlme and the Dalmatian
wast are founded on their claim to
Preponderance of their nationals in
Ue Doi-.il-)):.,
the
the
'-.nuua mere. According to
views of the Jugo-Slav leaders,
COntrnvorci. i 1 . , r
of , j uirwives ue principle
th.l ,risht ot Peoples to dispose of
conrr0?''tS- This 13 one of 010 A"t
PrTJ,i questions of this kind that
iSsi11 Wilson wU1 be "xUed on to
the? ? !"istorlc claims, together with
'onP '"terest n ample protection
10 DrS " Adriatic coast, naturally al
W,"'" considered. Talks by the
SirafTrith Premier -Orlando and
a m7t n dl Revel- an authority
aa cerS pertainms to the Adriatic
ei rtmanler of kalian naval for-
ast -I "tcuPyinsr the Dalmatian
cnc'liarn expected to clear up and
ara mafy 'C the claims put for-
di side.
DOVT OVERLOOK
UN CLE SAM WHEN
YOU MAKE UP A
BLDGETFOR 1919
'Sdomd h dwn of Oreater
every k f.P a" th world,
take th m?C?n cIti" should
libmi. ar" the torch of
"il0 !ny' .merIcan man or wo
o thl J U,d overok hi. duty
? Thl.T9 rth Liberty Loan.
th'd LJ.1iy whieh mu,t and
Bood in meU w must make
th eVu-i n?xt Librty Loan, if
po"'b.ht;,. which rest upon it.
ji
CLOSED CITY
fl OF 1919
Service Men to Benefit By Many
"Open Houses" Throughout
the City Today.
COL. HUGHES WILL
RECEIVE OFFICERS
Five Hundred Girls Take Service
Men to Movies Norwegian
Hold Memorial.
Pensacola will observe the dawning
of 1919 with a closed city today.
Stores and offices shut their doors
last night until tomorrow, and city.
county and federal officials will take
a holiday.
The busy hum of Industrial plants
will cease for one day, at least, and
practically every employer has de
creed a day off In order that New
Years will be properly celebrated.
At the Naval Air Station and the
army posts as many men as can be
spared will " be given leave and city
streets will be a swarm with soldiers,
sailors and marines off on furlough.
Col. J. I Hughes, of Fort Barran
cas, commandant of the post, and Mrs.
Hughes, will greet the officers and
their wives at a New Year's celebra
tlon, in accordance with the ancient
observance of the day. . Tonight the
enlisted men of the barracks will hold
a dance as a jolly way of ushering in
New Year's.
This afternoon BOO . girls will be
"hosts" for an equal number of ser
vice men at a movie party. They will
meet them at the Army . and Navy
Club and escort them to a theatre.
In memory of the 1.000 Norwegians
who were killed by German submar
ines and the 700 missing ones, the
Norwegian Seamen's church will hold
a iNew Year's memo lal service today
at eleven o'clock.: -
The Salvation Army held a watch
service 1 last night at. headquarters,
whlelr blasted ; until ''after, "midnight.
Prayers were" offered for the new
year and 'the blessings ; which have
come with peace.
Theatres Entertain.
Johnny Jones, local representative
of the Saenger Amusement company,
entertained 40 employes of the Lais
and Bonita theatres at the San Carlos
hotel last, night at a. New Year's
party. Mayor Frank Sanders and At
torney George "Wentworth, of the
company, who acted as toastmaster,
were honorary guests. Music by the
orchestra of the theatres was a fea
ture. The af air was held in Parlor A.
A dinner was served at a watch
party given by Manager D. P. Hop
good, of the Pastime theatre, to the
theatrical troupes playing at the Lib
erty and Pastime theatres ' and em
ployes of these two show houses.
Tables were placed on the f spacious
stage of the Pastime theatre and cov
ers for 45. guests were laid. Catering
by Hugheys restaurant.
W. ALLEN KINDELL
TAKES UP DUTIES
WITH THE JOURNAL
"W. Allen Kindell, formerly business
manager of the Columbia, (S. C.) Re
cord, has been appointed advertising
manager of the Pensacol Journal, and
enters upon his new duties today. ,
Mr. Kindell comes to Pensacola up
on the reoemmendation of N. Buckner,
well known to the business and pro
fessional men of Pensacola, Mr.
Buckner having been associated with
advertising work in Pensacola, before
going to Ashevllle, N. C, where he
is secretary of the Board of Trade.
Mr. Kindell comes highly recom
mended by Mr. Buckner, and by the
Columbia. Record, with which he has
been associated for the past two and
a half years, first as advertising man
ager and later as business manager.'
Mr. Kindell is a newspaper man of
long experience, although he is com
paratively young in years. For nine
years he' was connected with the
Nashville Banner, first as advertising
man and later as circulation manager.
From Nashville he went to Ashevllle,
where he was, for eleven years, con
nected with the Ashevllle Citizen as
circulation manager and secretary pf
the company.
The Columbia Record, which speaks
in high praise of Mr. Kindell and his
work, says: 1 "During his stay in Co
lumbia, Mr. Kindell has made many
friends, especially among the business
men, who will regret . his departure.
The Pensacola Journal, T of which he
becomes advertising manager, is the
morning paper of Pensacola, and Is a
progressive publication, s Mr. Kindell
is accompanied to Pensacola by his
wife and family.'' -
SCOUTS WILL MEET
THURSDAY NIGHT
Troop numbeir two - of the .Boy
Scouts . will . meet Thursday night - at
the Y. 1 M. C. A. Instead of the usual
Friday session, according to an j an
nouncement made last night by As
sistant Scout Master C "Wills, i of
the Naval Air Station. The scout are
to plan ; a hike for ' Saturday and a
full attendance is desired at Thurs
day's meetins. , '
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA. WEDNESDAY MORNING, JANUARY 1, 1919.
I MAY HIS WEAPON PROVE AS WORTHY AS THE SWORD I
1 . ' . : 1
lpw&9m wao J ysbI'mIS .AMI
I . a-. i.. : . 's if rancor . -' -
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DANIELS ASKS I rmmmc ,(ajsr PROPOSE NEW
PERSONNEL OF
NAVYINGREASE
SECRETARY ASKS HOUSE NAVAL
COMMITTEE TODAY FOR 250,000
MORE MEN JULY.
Washington, Dec 31. Secretary
Daniels asked the house naval com
mittee today to provide for a tem
porary increased naval personnel of
250,000 men for the year beginning
next July,; leaving the question of .a
permanent peace time personnel to
be determined after a detailed study
of complements for ships to be made
during the summer. ; He also sought
authority to transfer one thousand of
ficers from - the reserve force to the
permanent naval establishment.
The reserve officers proposed, for
transfer would rank - from Ensign to
Lieutenant ' and ' their addition, with
460 ensitrns to be eraduted from the
Annapolis academy next June and 600
in June, i 1920. will provide the 2,000
additional officers necessary in the
permanent , establishment by July,
1929. v
Asks More Pay.
Mr. Daniels also -asked the com
mittee to write into the new appro
priation bill a provision making per
manent the . wartime - pay increases
for enlisted men. This would give in
creases of 6 to $15 a month over the
pre-war . scale, making their pay
nnra frnm tSS tO $51 & month. , '
"Without this, it ; would be difficult
to keep 250,000 men to man the navy,"
explained the secretary. "The ship
ping - board and outside merchant
ships pay about $75 a month. Before
the war the navy men were the worst
underpaid in the world."
. Fourteen battleships and ten cruis
ers have been converted into trans-:
ports to return soldiers from over
seas. Twenty thousand men, the sec
retary : said, would ' be brought back
monthly by these vessels. While these
vessels are not as comfortable as
transports, the secretary said, their
utilization kept many soldiers from
waiting six weeks for other shipping
facilities. The cost for the navy in
returning ; these is $25 a man as
jempared with S35 for their return on
other ships, ! the secretary said.
MoNEIR ISSUES CALL
FOR NAVY YARD MEN
-Peace has not brought with it any
lessening ( of the demand . for labor at
the Naval Air Station and officials
have senthurry-up calls for - workers
to W. V McNelr, of the Federal-Employment
ureau. The navy yard
needs an unlimited number of ma
chinists. 10 electricians, four plumb
ers, two pipe coverers and 200 labor
ore., - ' - . - '
esses & im, v 'tsswajasBo,
Paris. Deo. 31. Th8 plans for the
departure of President Wilson for
Rome on Wednesday night will not be
affected by the Crisis in the Italian
cabinet. The cabinet . situation la
Rome is said to be purely political,
and outside the. range of the presi
dent's visit to Italy. ;
"Copenhagen, Dec. 30. The -cruiser
which arrived here yesterday with the
American- destroyers Wicks and Ayln
wan left today for Danzig, the port or
German ' Poland. The destroyers have
gone , to Lubeck, also a German Baltic
port. : The warships will take on
board sick Americans.
London, Dec. 31. Field Marshal von
Hindenburg has telegraphed to Ger
man industrial magnates, saying n
would support British occupation of
Berlin, according to a Berlin dispatch
to the Mail, under date of Saturday.
London. Dec. 31 King George - lias
presented a magnificently bound r and
illustrated history of -Windsor Castle
to President Wilson as a birthray
gift, according to the Mall.
; Rome, - Dec. 31 The supreme' corn;
mand of the Italian army has announ
ced that Italian5 losses on all fronts
during the iwar, totalled 400,000 dead.
Of this number, . 16,362 were officer,
of the 947.000 wounded 33,347 were of
ficers. - The number of men actually
-incapacitated by wounds and disease
.is estimated at 500,000.
NEW AUTO TAGS
READY; SHERIFF
RECEIVES SUPPLY
Delayed appl!cation , blanks for au
tomobile licenses . reached the office
of Sheriff ; Van Pelt yesterday, r Al-1
, ready .100 have applied v' ana a con
tlnued steady demand is expected.
I . Tal'ahaooeo - Tpr . 31. Tf pverv
auto owner is . not supplied with a
license tag for his car by January.
' 1, when , the old tags are of no
more use, it will not be the fault
of Comptroller Amos- and ' his
clerks, - who are working every
minute to rush the license . tag
plates as soon as ; application and
money are received.
The, 1919 tags are much more
attractive than the 1918 ones. The
numbers and letters are embossed
in black on - a background of
orange, emblematic of the range
state. ; -
Approximately $335,000 was col- ,
lected this year for automobile
licenses. This " ysar Comptr h.kt
Amos estimates that the revei.
will reach 1375,000.
DEMURRAGE ON
BUNKER COAL
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ASKS
.-VIEWS-OF. THOSE AFFECTED ON
NEW REGULATIONS PROPOSED.
- All parties interested in the pro
posed change in demurrage charges on
cars " containing bitumlnious bunker
coal for trans-shipment, or use by
vesels, are requested to communicate
at once with the Chamoer or uom
merce. Secretary Beck must return
objections to the proposed change
within fifteen days.
Under the new ruling, cars contain
ing bitumlnious coal or coke for the
use of . vessels are to be stored ror tne
use of vessels, when held for or. by
consignors or-consignees for unload
ing, forwarding directions or for any
other purpose, are to. be charged de
murrage at the rate of S3 per day, af
ter three days from notiflcatoin in
writing to parties interested, at the
point of arrival.
Exception to the rule Is to be made
for cars consigned or reshipped for
rail delivery or to another, rail desti
nation. These will be subject to the
car service and demurrage charges of
the" lines over which they will travel,
fixed by the Interstate Commerce
commission."
Allows Three Days.
An average of three days free time
per car is to be allowed under the
new ruling. Notice of arrival is to
be sent in writing to . consignee. Time
will be computed from the . first 7 a.
m. after, the day on which notice of
arrival is sent. Legal, state and mun
icipal holidays are to be excepted, fiui
not half holidays. . ' "
A car will be considered released at
the time the vessel registers for the
cargo or fuel supply of v which the
Coal or coke dumped into such vessel
Is a part, except that when cars are
undoaded beforo the vessel registers.
Continued on page- two
MILITARY UNITS
MAY SELL GOODS
AND DIVIDE FUND
Washington, Dec. 31. Under a gen
eral order issued today by . the t war
department property owned by mili
tary units, such as" pianos, -.phonographs,
libraries, athletic goods cu
such articles, may be disposed of or
the organization and - the funds there
by derived to i be added to- the s unt
fund. Should, the property be dispos
ed of after the unit has disbanded tne
.. :"inaer may sen iue fjruiiciijr au
ttW'-i the money among the; enlisted
.er. , . ;,i
HA
ECU DIES
n PLiiE
DHOPS II BAY
Trygve Johann Polnas, Athens,
Georgia, Killed; J. J. Ward
Gets Minor Injuries.
FAIL TO RIGHT
TAIL SPIN FALL
Drop Into Bay From Over 1000
Feet Near Santa Rosa Island
Near Naval Station.
' One man was killed and another In
jured in a hydroplane accident whicn
occurred at 11:30 o'clock yesterday
morning, at the Naval Air Station.
Trygve Johann Polnas, ensign, was
killed and his body was recovered
from the waters of the bay yesterday
afternoon. James J. Ward, electrician.
third class, received minor injuries
when the plane dropped, and Is expeo-
ted to recover.
Polnas hales from Brunswick. Ga.
Ward's address was not given by th
naval authorities. The plane wen
Into a tail spin at a helghth of over
1,000 feet shortly before noon yester
day, in which Polnas was unsuccess
ful In attempting to right the ma
chine. Just before the big flyer
struck the water the engine came
loose and swung around, crushing
Polnas skull, according to a report
given out last night.
A speed boat which was nearby res
cued Ward from the waters of the bay
almost immediately after the accident
the plane dropping into the bay near
Santa Rosa island, across from tne
Naval Air Station. Polnas' body was
recovered before night by workers
from the air station. The machine
was badly damaged" by the fall.
TELEGRAPH OFFICE
EMPLOYEES TO GET
SALARY INCREASES
Local employees of the Western
Union will receive a New Year's
present in the shape of a padded en
velope. Thirty-five, including the
manager, will be benefitted by the
new order from Postmaster General
Burleson, director of the consolidated
telephone and telegraph companies.
Every worker on the Western Union
pay rolls is included, except messen
gers, who are on a commission basis.
Manager Cole, of the Postal, stated
last night that he had received no no
tification of an increase in salaries.
From Washington the" following
glad news came for-employees: In
creased wages effective tomorrow for
employees of all departments of tele
graph systems under government con
trol except employees at "non-funo-tional"
offices and messengers, were
announced today by Postmaster Gen
eral Burleson. Employees In service
more than a year and a half get an
Increase of 10 per cent, and those
employed less than a year and a
half, 5 per cent.
FAMOUS BOXER IS
KILLED; BLOWS IN
FALL ARE FATAL
: New York, Dec. 31. "Terry Mc
Govern," of Philadelphia a boxer,
known in private life as Frank til
Leo, injured in a match last nighi
with Frank Britt, of New' Beiford,
died at the city hospital today. His
6kuU was fractured by hitting the
floor when he was felled by his op
ponent in the sixth round. Britt
was arrested early today at his home
in New Bedford, and was brought tj
this city for arraignment.
SIMS WILL HEAD
NAVAL COLLEGE
DANIELS REPORT
Washington, Dec. 31.--Vlce-Admiral
Sims will " be assigned to duty as
president of the naval war college at
Newport, R. 1 on completion of his
present duty as commander of Ameri
can naval forces in European waters.
Secretary. Daniels made this an
nouncement today, adding that the
assignment was at the request of Ad
miral Sims and that the navy depart
ment had asked for double the current
appropriation for the war. college in
order to expand the work there.
RED CROSS WILL
BENEFIT IN GAME
AT MAXENT PARK
. High - school players" and football
enthusiasts of the city will meet to
day at three o'clock, when a benefit
game : will : be played at Maxent park,
the proceeds to go ' to v swell the
Christmas Roll Campaign of the local
Red Cross chapter. All who are In
terested In the antional game - are re
quested to to meet at . the Maxent
fied and a good game Is promised.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
LEGAL ADVICE
TO BE SOUGHT
fli! OLUELAIS
War Camp Community Service
Governing Board Names
Investigating Committee
NO TEST CASE IS
PLANNED AT ONCE
Col. Hughes Urges Men to Pmv
chase Supplies Saturday
Ansiey rraises 1'ress.
Decision as to the Sunday operation
of the Army and Navy Club canteen
still hung in the balance yesterday
afternoon, when :he governing board
of the War Camp Community Service
completed a lengthy discussion of the
matter.
However, the board went so far as
to adopt a motion to have a com
mlttee appointed to ''secure legal ad-
vice and act on such advice in a way'
as would best, serve the interests oC
the War Camp Community Service.'
P. K. Yonge, chairman, John A. Mer-
rltt, vice-chairman, and Capt. L H.
Aiken, chairman of the hospitality
committee, compose this special com
mittee. Conspicuous in the conflicting
views, expressed both for and against
the attitude of County Solicitor
Mackey, in enforcing the "blue" laws,
was that of CoL J. L. Hughes, com
mander of the coast defenses, who ad
vocated Sunday closing of the Army
and Navy Club canteen and suggested
that men of the service put in a week
end supply of cigarettes over the Sab
bath, and that of Dr. Louis deM.
Blocker, who asked that the churches
who employ organists and janiter,
close also.
The Rev. Dr. J. A. Ansle?, in re
ferring to statements that have been
made discrediting the local papers,
took occasion to heartily commend
the press.
, U , - Aiken ..Opens-alfcj.. .
fvlCiptain.,- Aiken "opened.i Mtne-tdlscus-
sion by saying that the club canteen
had been kept open the first Sunday
after notice had been given of the
intent to enforce the "blue" laws, that
he had no idea at the time that the
solicitor would, construe the law so
far as to effect the Army and Navy
Club, where only service men were
construed the law that way he had
oenstrued the law that way he had
remonstrated with him, but that the"
solicitor had declared that service
men were entitled to no more con
sideration than anybody else.
Speaking as chairman of the hos
pitality committee, under whose di
rection the clubhouse is conducted, L
said that disposing of fruits, candy
and cigarettes, "comforts and neecs
sltles.' was a good work, religiously,
morally and socially. He said that
the Sunday closing had met with the
discomfort and disgust of service
men. 1
Dr. William Ackerman, Rabbi at.
Temple Beth-El, said that he be
lieved that every member of the War '
Camp Community Service was a law
abiding citizen, anxious to see the
law enforced, but that it was not In
the province of the body to interpret!
the laws. - . ;
"It seems to me," he continued,
''that, if we are to take a sensible
view we must understand why the
law was placed on the statute books.
I can not believe that any legislature,
confronted with the little city of Pen
sacola, filled with several thousand
service men, clamoring for comforts,
would have made such a law. I be
lieve honestly and sincerely that we
will not violate the spirit of the law
if we allow the canteen to run on
Sunday, exclusively for service men.
Advises No Test.
The Rev. Dr. J. A. Ansley praised
Capt. Aiken for the skillful manner
in which he had handled the matter
and he said, "I don't want a head-on
collision with officials and an unen
viable notoriety. This is a dignified
body. We do not want to be anything
but law-abiding . citizens. I do not
Continued on page two
HERE'S A CHANCE
TO MEET A NICE
MAN, GIRLS, WILL
YOU HELP TODAY?
Will you be one of 500 girls to
make a soldier or a sailor happy
today. ; . . . .
There are 500 men in khaki or
navy blue who are away from
home and who have a right tS)
a home-like holiday. Won't you
give it to them, girls?
This is the plea which -came
trom the War Camp Community
Service last night. It is only ne
cessary to meet at the Army and
Navy : Club today at 2:30 o'clock,
meet the men. take one to a movie
and afterwards there wilt be a re
ception at the club, v
Mrs. E. C Maxwell, Miss Fannie
Aiken, Mrs. Max L Bear, Mrs. 1
C. Dunham, Mrs. Walker Ingra
ft am, Mrs. James White and Mrs
J. S. Roberts will act -as chaper
ones, -
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