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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, February 10, 1919, Image 1

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Fair Monday; colder on the peninsula.
Tuesday, fair; warmer north portion;
moderate northwest and north winds, be
coming south Tuesday over northwest
THE PENSACOLA JOURNAL
Prints more want adds than any other
paper of like circulation in the world
Journal Want Adds Bring Results.
prtlon.
Hlchest temperature yesterday,
Iwest temperature yesterday, 40.
59;
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA, MONDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 10, 1919.
VOL. XXII NO. 41.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
wbw Mm m i tfilW
'
CLEMENCEAU
GREAT TROUBLE WIT
RUSSIANS IN
French Premier in an Interview With the Associataed Press For
sces War With the Headless Masses of the Stricken Nation
and Says War Is Over Only for Breathing Spell.
WARMLY PRAISES THE VIRTUES
OF THE AMERICANS IN FRANC!
The Premier Expresses Heartfelt Thanks for the Glorious Way in
Which the United States Had Come to the Rescue of the Civ
ilized World and Had Shed Blood to Save Democracy.
Paris, Feb. 9. (By Associated PPress). Premier Clemen
ceau in an interview with the Associated Press today declared:
"While I have said the war has been won, it would perhaps bo
more accurate to say there is a lull in the storm.
"Although Germany has been beaten in a military way and
largely disarmed, there still remains," the premier pointed out,
"The chaotic, but fruitful Russia, from which groat help may be
drawn by the Teutons.
In the Society of Nations, the premier said, each nation must
be willing to renounce traditional aloofness, and employ force out
side their own country. The premier pointed out the difficulty of
Prance in meeting debts owed abroad, when her creditors. Amer
ica and Russia, had stopped payment.
Premier Clemenceau warmly praised the help tha American
troops had gi.rcn in winning the war for democracy, and ex
pdesscd his disbelief that there was a man in the American army
of ricc'Tt:on, who regretted he had "f outfit on the side of free
dom," because he had found more creature comforts in Germany
than in France.
There would be danger, he thought, of "reopening a military
debate, but for the assurance President Wilson had v :'" I recent
ly that whenever France or any other free people wa menaced.
the whole world would be ready to vindicate its liberty." I
Clemenceau continued, "Recent disclosures have enabled us to '
look deeper into the purposes'of the enemy than we could hereto
fore. It was not purely a dream of military domination on.the part
of Prussia, it was a definite, calculated conspiracy to exterminate
France industrially and commercially as well as in a military sense.
In these efforts, German bankers and manufacturers joined their
general staff. The exposures of Dr. Muchlon, of the Krupp works,
and of Kurteisner, at the Berne socialist conference, make this
clear.
This fact explains many activities of the German army, which
we were not able to understand. We can now see why they stole
machinery from our factories, why they destroyed the coal mines
of Lens, why there wa3 all the wanton devastation of French ter-
ritory, even when they were in
Paris Feb. 0. (Havas). The supreme war council is report
ed to have reached a decision at yesterday's meeting, finding it
necessary to impose more severe conditions on Germany for a re
newal of the armistice because of Germany's attitude towards the
fulfillment of its obligations.
Decisions are also said to have been reached for the conditions
.governing German demobilization, and the production of plants,
formerly engaged in making war material.
(By The Associated Press.)
Paris, Feb. 9- "Tho most im
portant part of the preliminary
work cf establishing a society of
nations has been concluded," said
Professor Ferdinand Larnaude,
dean of the law faculty of the
University of Paris, and with
Leon Bourgeois, French delegate
on the commission on a society of
nations, in discussing the work of
the commission today.
"We have reached the fourteenth
article," he continued, "and we
expect to conclude preliminary dis
cussions early next week. The ar
ticles which have been adopted
deal with the desire of the society
to prevent future wars. What re
mains to be investigated concerns
international transportation, com
merce and financial affairs, and
we expect the delegates to agree
promptly."
When asked if the departure of
President Wilson, Premier Lloyd
George, and Premier Orlando
would affect the continuance of
the commission's work. Professor
Larnaude replied: "No, the work
will go on. Colonel House will,
represent America on the commit
(ion, Lord Robert Cecil will ap
pear for Great Britain and Pro
fessor Uhilloga will tak the place
of Premier Orlando of Italy."
(Fv The Associated pre j
Paris, Feb. 9- President Wilton
spent a quiet Sunday after m
itrenuous week. He went to
ihurch with Mrs. Vilson in the
morning. After luncheon he took
a long automobile ride in the
clear, frosty air, and later received
William G. Sharp, American am
bassador, who has just returned to
Paris from the United States.
After his business meetings with
the commissions and councils of
which he is a member, the presi
dent will tomorrow receive a dele
gation of students from the law
colleue of the University of Paris,
PRE
DltTS
H THE
NEAR FUTUR
retreat.
and a committee of English wo
men, who are in Paris to attend
the conference of inter-allied wo
men, about to be held.
CHURCHES CONFER
TO STOP RADICAL
MENACE IN U. 3,
Atlanta, Feb. 9. The first of a se- I
ries
of ten conferences to oe neat
throughout the country under the au
spices of the "Inter-Church Movement
of America, representing all Protest
ant churches, opens here tomorrow.
Nine southeastern states. including
Florida, will be represented. Plana i
are being laid to combat Bolshevism
and other radical socialistic ideas
being antagonistic to Christianity.
as ,
effort will be made to organize union !
denominations. Many prominent cur; h
denominations. Many prominent
church leaders, both clerical and lay.
have already arrived.
AMERICANS OVER
THERE TRY TO AID
COTTON GROWERS
Columbia, S. C. Feb. 9. Christie
T:-net. attorney for a group of sou'h- 1
-rn roiion on nuns, wno are lonnmg
nn export corporation to st;mt.la.te
over-pea trade, received a cablegram
tod-iy from H. K. Paruch chaiman
of the wiir industries board, from Paris
fin follows:
"Kvery ffort is being made by
IIoov-r anl McCormick toward
the
removal of blockade restrictions on
all products of cotton seed."
Mr. F.enet stated that this cablegram
was In response to one he had sent
Mr. IJaruch asking the active support
of Mr. Hoover to stimulate trade overseas.
PEACE CONGRESS SNAPSHOTS
pUVivo--' ?l . l.-J -
n z Tic v ? - . vjj
Ik -.u4 " f r.fe
President Wilson as lie leaves the mcetirjr of peace delegates
l.'.s custpir.ary smi! ; nd apparently in deep thonjuFT.' - ILioyd
una Jbonar Law, holding h:s mm.
i'"" v.i. i. v i.i
Tans to inform the dt'-iegatcs of
FREEZING
WEATHER F
jO Hp T p
J I I 1 1
WEATHER MAN PREDICTS THAT
TEMPERATURE WILL DRCP TO
25 OR 30 DEGREES HERE TODAY
Columbia, S. C7, Feb. 9. The
first snow of the season fell for
several hours here thfe afternoon.
Although the ground was covered
for a time, rain foilowedt and the
snow was soon melted.
Fair and. freezing, with furs out an
pipes bursting; is the prist of th? lon-
distance forecast which V'a rhin en
sent Pensacolawani
which Rave out the
dope for this section,
wise last nisht. and
last tiicrht. and
official weather
Those who were
scented the no-
proach of real winter, in the brik
winds which played on every street
corner anl sent hate swirHn - U tho
du;t yesterday, turned in wjrfi extra
cover, and took the precaution to r-hui
i of f the water, prepriratc-y to the drop
or irom 4 deprrees or thereabouts, to
23 or 30. Kor them, the predicted cold
wave hrl(1 no terrore:. lt was a nit
for open fire?? and snoozlntr.
Others will call tho p'nrrber torliy,
and the city is expected to face a
tough situation, due to the shorn-re
of water, which mad it ncces-ry
durinir the -st freeze in shut off the
mains in certain SPTMns of the c'tv.
and
to seek aid of the 5hinhu'.?d!ns?
I . . r i " j - . .
piariL 10; auuirionai waver p'-eo.re.
j The cold wave has it? br'rht side.
however. Tntok farmer? ill not s-
ter, ror tnere is very pt'le ero-i to
be hit by the sndden d-on ?n tem
perature nO"V. ?OT!llr Of srr'n? rrnm
has b"n dekived. prid thre w!'l vq
no WMited hopes for West Florida
farmers.
The freeze not only hit t?s seet!or.
hut has set n'l Sniem A'--T"i pnd
Kastern and Sotithm Oo'-e-i t'llvp--ing
in its erip. Lot temperatures are
recorded there also.
QC0TJ?$l$t STARTS
BUSY SESSION
Washington. Feb. 9. The vote to
morrow by the senate on the f!''rnee
resolution, and by the house on th?
naval expansion program, will mark
the beginning of th final ru'a of con
gress to clear tm the Tr:lative sl-ite
of the session be'ore its end. thee
weeks from Tuesday. Vtiv other im
portant bills are apxroaching a fin.il
stage.
IS
AY,
I
, ,
a sthey leave Llcya George s
m l.-.-v; 'i nn vn.
conditions in Get many.
Tsfcivs In B?-;ef
From All Over
The Universe
T'efast. Il. 0. It :is uneffifi
stated that employers .of union 1;;
h.'ivo xisk 1 !t r;kin. v;rkni.'ii to
ftimc w oi k on u r.f 47 hi.-.ir
week wiiii a. j.romi e of i 4 1 hoi! r v.
v. lu ll the tiva :y of j'..i e is si'.:p.t--i
Uiy ;
!or j
re-
Va.-l;iii4ic;-;, I'd.. O..Ij
Pre ...... I lie I a , u a V.
ers, telephciie.l d pa rtneh t
fu-ials tul.iy that t':e te
ti!e workers iti kiwrcn j .
n
Gold, n,
-;.rk-.l.or
of-
.ke t
a;.-..-:- .
tk-,: a f;d'
i tual'v
adjusted
.iRre in, nl was
by Monday.
eel C to bo
Chicago. Foli. 0. In t st ir,at ion w.i.s
be? tin today into the fcu:.-e of u fin
last niht whioh do ttjt-1 the Nina,
one of the three p'.cf iie.sq ue caravels
and a du;-.l;cato of tii one in vhn h
Columbus made his vijajje, that hae
been an alfiietioa sjt- the world's
Columbian e::poitionun iM.,. wiu n
they were present, d Sain. ;
New York. Feb. t-Arra!i':omen!S '
have been concluded Jr a $3-.UHo,.(:.
b an t i i:, '";::n by aAmerlcan syn
dicate including J. P. Morgan v- Co., ;
it was learn-.l here bday. No an-
nouneement was mat!) as to the rate :
of interest, but it wai reported to be j
7 per cent. ;
! j
Constantinople. l'el. The Turkish
go-, crrnio.'it Ins arr-ied about forty''
members of The unn of -,rorress '
party, charged with Profiteering ;m 1
the mas-s.-iecre of Aieniars, the d.--Tortation
and spoilatjn of Jree;S and
the ill-treat men
wa r.
o:
pr;su
crs of .
he gen-
'! e ceil- ;
cattle. Feb. ? T rarest in
l1 strike of 3,",00 inrkers 'n
tered yefterday i t- re:
nouneement by i Ole
tm'ess the syn-.j! .1 s:i
rv:terated an-
I Ian sen that
nKe, called
February f. to aid 00 striking ship
yard workers, wa stalled off at s
o'clock this morni! he would pro
ceed to operate all eniial industries.
"Uiider protec. on." j
a.-iiij.tiuii. i K-ftV. ueaicatea as
a memorial to Th.ore Roo-evelt. a
recreation rouse pr$ded bv the Vnw
gue cf the Unit states has been
Unit states h
o- i-J ers, sai'.c
opened here fo
ors and
nutrinc-s. Officers
i The
navy Ieatru"
s-d today thr thymus, would pr.i'i
i bty lo a permjrif r.t?ist itution for the
use of veterans of teetn: war on
iheir visits to ike j icial capital.
Pittsburc.
steps were
Pa.,
a ken
ij. P. 1
hf yester.
'ho first
lay look-
ing to tho organ.
"Mothers of Amerid
n of a national
Cemocracv." an
j outgrowth of the Peisyivania Mothers ,
in the Palaise D'Orsay, without
tecrgx. wi-irig- iij stick to a friend
houo in Rue Xitot Passy for th.i
- llii.lll 1 i U 0;eUci.U IVCS Sent tO
F T TS
is??
n to
l
u k A M
ADVISED
EVERY CHILD I N
NTY WILL EZ
F.SCAMEIA COU
M ADE PHVSIC-
ALLi' F!T CY FRO f 2
SCHOOLS.
CARE IN
l-erv
-. I"
ilia
!:.!.
-heels of
i-ins.e-dew
ji hv
11 v,
iiir prof::
nltii Of::. .
bi;t u:::'r'l.
I i !
bo::
!
tteni, i tii.
. is foietwd.
-.k plans for
'. i.-cta n of
h"o!.-. in 1...
; 1. i.vni' lit of
i:o wili fol
ions of the
:; make the
the nurse's.
1 . eoin. y.
. ; 'US" ' o 1 .e
. a sum an
as I r. Ta
il e stale.
: r of nau -:eal
in --j.ee-e
has been
t tint; of t!ie
1 J-
!
ird or"
1: . I
in a i
t i
n
l:Av
-'
I
V
ha'ary v. ill 1
i
Tie r.- wii
borne !,-,- ike :
prc-xii'iat ,og 5
icm's salary i
Final .'teti.-u
guratiujr etiai
1 icn and of n
pa a!
n l:-."
i.--ory
"Tin?-
,-fer-!
lit :
school hoar.
NATIONAL BANKS
OF COUNTRY SET
A GREAT RECORD
Was!.::
time -. p.
the ':;
passed :!
: vso a : ?s i
.Me e o : m .r
.loll ;r mar;
w:i::i7:is a-
r- n inereas
1 an 1 : --.;.
ing years t
b.
n :
omptro!
lioue.ced
of rruve
millions
f.v.-r th
N'gvtuI
l'.'I.
BOLSHFVJKI
EVATTA
CTT
BEF
7--rlnd. F"b. f.. f jf 1
m Krovr.-i assert thr t. a?
e -ucce-s. "f the L:th;ia-ar-l
nn rolvance by t'r.
Ksthor.i in t"wr., t!t :
ve evacuated Viln i.
.(lv:ces fro
' a result of t:
' nfan troons.
Fi"n:--h and
Bolshevik: v: .
of Dtmocrre
Jlothers of so". Vers expressed hope
that when the Mothers of JJemoeracv
beecmes n.ticnal it will be possible
to sj.read th.e association in every
home in the allied nations which fur
ii shed soldi:-rs for dc-mocr.iev' J,r.t
ties
i si
Was'iin -ton. f,
C" J T ' members of the
I f SH. If h ':,,t'
A. J an. I rnii.l.iry jioliee
i I'lin'.cil !'i-f si .lent
KILL
10
;ifl
Bolshevism Is in Critical Stage
Now in Stricken Empire Ac
cording to Reports.
ItUSS MAY RETURN
TO OLD NIHILISM
j This Is the Only Alternative Of
fered for the Failure of the
Bolsheviki Rule.
i My Tho As-s..-iat.-l IT.-.ss.
Warsaw, Friday, Feb. 9. Tliat
Bolshevism is in a critical stage,
cither turning to imperialisl-i. with.
Leon Trots!:', min-ster of anl
marine, as emperor, or slipping
bark to nihilism, with a sort of
orderly disorder, is the impression
0 ven by r.iany refugees of all na
tionalities, who have arrived here
fiom Russia.
It is said that the people are
tired cf fighting ?nd t;red of
vvanc'erirg from pillar to post
It is known that Trotsky at
tempting to obtain order and whip
the trocps into shape.
He is said to be dreaming of
becoming czar, knowing that Bol
shevism has failed. Recont ru
mors that the Soviet troops have
evacuated Petrograd are uncon
firmed. LLOYD GEORGE
IS IN ENGLAND
TO END STRIKE
T-OTidoM, 1-YK P. - l'ro: iir l.!oyil
i-orae. who retMrmM from l'aiis lat
irht, v;is ti;aKtMl today in disrus.---
,i
i n
tho la!. of troubles of the l'nitf.1
K;riprlum with tl
lliinrt minister
ami lioanl
tra,V of fa i a Is. Ma-iy
taiUvay workers were
ritisr th- d.iv.
nitftin:
in i-roj.
s with
ross d'.
65 WOMEN HELD
FOR BURNING OF
WILSON IN EFFIGY
P. Sixty-five
nafioJi-I ve:iii-n':;
.1 tofi::r,t l.y eiv"l
after tli.-v ha t
son in e:":'!crv i;i
i front
vh:t
as a
,r- V.:i;
! in 1
protect
of th-
SfK
1.1 per
ai--tin.t the t?,i' t;e:!i !
e.jlial SUffratje resol'lt;:
rit.. toTTiorrow. Several
sons wafhe-i t!;e ilemi
il -
nation hat
I t!
lit:
d!
-fr. i
START CAMPAIGN
TO STOP INFLUX
OF HOBOES HERE
In co-opera tioti v,'ii t'e railroad
authorities pob. j o; :. ; ils of F.s.-':m-bia
county have " i a ea in p. i;.;a .o
prevent train r'd.a c by variants )ne
arrest was in i ? - at .lo:n : .";t. nk.y
by Constjible W. . ; town a a ana J de
puty Sheriff i.eorge Hail, the mis
creant b.'ing brought to th county
jail. The ot'fiei;,is are d tei mined to
stop what seems to be an in! lux or'
northern hoboes, from invading this
territory. Mvmy of them are said to
be armed and to have threatened tram
men. as well as to have intimidated
people living
loni
the ra:!ro;t
MANY NEGROES
CAPTURED BY COPS
WHILE "DICING"
Tie
lv -.-re
t . rs.
cold weather yesterday caused
s to com: i -:a l- in unusual num
with tie- T.elt that Captain
1 iarper
e.l IS n
dif:-re
chance.
co"or-d
made
:nd i-
an Dryars arrest -.
e; i- found a I ."our
a I'd in gan-' -s of
hi-pest haul of
which lias been
f,r s. !!-. time.
rs.
ALT HUN PARTIES
AGREE IN FAVOR
OF NEW REGIME
, F.asel.
' jority so
and cent:-
Feb. ' . The German ma-
a".is. German democrat.;
ists have reached a comulte
u r. d e r s:
ticipatii
nding on the question of par
ser in the new German govern -iccording
to the Berlin Iyjeul
ment.
Anzeii
ELECTRICAL veourps
IN SYMPATHY
STRIKE
! Sjirinffeld. 11!.. Feb. !. J. '.
N'oonan, acting rr'-s:d-nt of the In
ternational P.rotbei !:ood of Kleetriea I
worker, with offices ir. this city, 'n
; a. t.-kgram t a i v. directed all ek-?-j
trieal worke rs of hi-s rjra nizat ion oa
pv-o'.-ithv --r-.-.--. ..r Seattle. Wn.
! return to work.
jTHOTSKV I
Or MfW P7
DFHUSSCUUM!
of r!ie
i
GITY
TRIBUTE TO
RGOSEVELT
Every Seat in the Theatre Is
Taken and Standing Room I
at Premium at Fete.
J JUDGE SHEPPARD
! IS ORATOR OF DAY
Prominent Pcnsacolian Delivers
Stirring and Patriotic Ad
dress on Great American.
Washington. Feb. 9. Besides
the service at the capitol, memorial
exercises for Theodore Roosevelt
were held today at the Pan-American
union building and theatre.
Several hundred wounded soldiers
heard John Barrett, director gen
eral of the Pan-American union,
extol the life and virtues of the
former president, while Senator
Poindexter delivcicd an oration at
the theatre.
i r.y Tho Assf,'!atiil l'rss.)
Coblenz. Feb. 9. Memorial ser
vices for Theodore Roosevelt were
Held today by the American army
of occupation. The order for the
services received at the various
headquarters was that such ser
vices be held in memory of the
former president of the United
States.
At army headquarters the ser
vice was conducted in the Church
of the Royal Palace, where for
merly, members of the German
royal family worshipped.
"Willi every seat in the Card.'ii the
atre tak;i, aiitl with .f--' - - -:
at a premium. I'ensacola pai.l her tri
' bate l.j Th'-odoro. 1 ti .se . , .v . .
afternoon, when hundreds of people
took part in the memorial exorcises
for the former president.
Saores nf s r tee men joined th
civilian pojuiiation, and among the
spectators u.-re Siaui;-li war veterans,
j who attend, d in a Ldv, and mem-
bets of the local chapter :i.rd rmy
tf the Jtepulhe. 1 1 . re and t!n--e m
the audience also were Confederate
veterans, who had admiied Jtoosevelt,
the man. and gave him final homage.
The programme yesterday was ;i part
of a ere.it movement in :son cities of
the Fnitid States, Alaska. Hawaii and
l'oito K.eo to pay honor simultane
ously to l:..os ve!t.
In I'en;aeoi.i die army and navy.
viMi Caj.t. I'. M. p.ennett and Col. J.
1. I!ugi"n-s, representing the iespeet(o
bra.riehes of tile service, took part.
Chaplain II. .M. T. I'.arr-.. nave the in
Noealaui and Koosey. It's favorite
i!nm. "How I'irm a Foundation. " was
sung. I r. W ..'Ham Ackerman was
master of ceremonies.
The public and private life of P.oose
vit v. as lauded by Judge y. p.. Hh' p-
paru. oi-ator rl tho day, who
fe. P igly of him.
SpOKC
j "Tins universal memorial rlebra
: lion at this critical t ,m in the history
O'' the republic is of vist significanc -,"
!u lee sin ppard ait "Certainly It In
rot so miu h to i a v tribute to rhe.
tie.-ol. a it is to e,Tt) j,,,;, xn import
ance if tie man--: (xtmilf upon '.ho
living, and presen : ai.rl future r;en
a'ions It is in i o -.vise a paralbd
to ill..- j.-ricf ami lion t. r that has three
vrr.es ; lou.-rd the n.':tio? by the traga.
ti--at!.- of Lincoln. Oar field and Mn
Ivlnk ;-, but this uniy i sal expression
; o, praiitade from ; i appreciate pen.
fee. f ir that a grral men has fal.-ti
'n Isr, i.'
j "Fell it was not his unexamn'.-d
: leadership that m td.; t h - greatest irr -:
pre? irai upn the cinm'rv; It was ).?:
n.s j.-t .!-;ie .-tie per or. i !;!.; it was .lot
i t K- f lacular way he eld things, it
was .i' f because he was a during : -j
p." or lion htm ter, nor because he
.was in.- ln.ro of S.n ).:n Hill ror
' .vi o the president of the United
Sta. .-. which gave hiui rajch pirest'ge
aial i.ifluen.e v.i'a the nassr-s, I. .it
tl- eo.h reeogni;d in Km a fjenhii
fo.- j. oyr rrment; i: iiim the people
rf-eogni'ed all that is . :-rpressed in
tl-.eir .li.girince to the f ur w
trie pl-titi citiz.-n 'a Iks America; the.'
vojM rot doubt lii-i loyalty to tho
flag and his devtum :o the Instl'u
tie ns of the ronntr.-. it as this ur
reraittiag te.t of go d e i. .': enship thit
O-ought li.ra in cloi'; toucl. and svm
P ie. v. itl- all ckts;,. s of is country,
'men. vhrther .Jew, f:c-ntih Christian,
or Mohprnmedan. Mi ij;ized when
tre.r tau.-e was jus.- u.e had an ad
j -ccuto and unfaiiii l.iend in Theo
. elore lioosevelt. Tliat pre-eminent
quality, more thnn any other, assured
a fcfpjare deal to all, and endeared him
to all people; and it is that fact that
ma.-es his loss at this critical time of
I readjustment and reconstruction an ir
j retrievable e-alamity to his country and
irreparable loss to humanity. Roose
' velt was impatient with pacifism and
disloyalty in every manifestation. He
believed in American democracy and
he believed ihat the- ffovrrnment was
well worth the supreme sacrifice. Hh
loved the flag and the country with
an intensity that breoked no opposi
tion. Some present, no eloubt, know
how it saddened his heart when ha
(Continued oa Pae Five)

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