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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, May 05, 1919, Image 4

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THE PENSACOLA JOURNAL MONDAY MORNING, MAY 5, 1919.
DAILY WEEKLY SUNDAY
Journal Publishing Company
LOIS K. MATES, President.
Conducted from 1592 to llli TTnder the Edittorhlp and
MMttmnt of Co I. Frank L. Mayea.
MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
American JCe-wapfiper Publishers Association
Florida Pre Annotation
Southern Newspaper Publishers Association
I SUBSCRIPTION RATES: " -
one Week, tay and Sunday 9 .1
Two Weeks. Daily and Sunday .2
One Month. Daily and Bunday .5
Three Months. Daily and Sunday !.
Six Months. Dally and Sunday .. 4.
One Year, Dally and Stinday
KitnTlay Only. One Tear , 1.5i
The Weeklv Journal, One Tear ; 1.00
Mall subscriptions are payah'e in advance, and papers
will be discontinued on expiration date.
OFFICE
Journal Bid.. Cor.
fntendencla and De
Luna Streets.
PHONES
Editorial Rooms, ss
President 48
Business Office, .1500
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication f all news credited to it or not other
wise credited In this paper and also to local news pub
lished. -...-
Entered as second class matter at the postoffice in
Pensacola. Florida, under Act of Congress, March 2, 1879
Represented in ta General Advertising- Field by
CONE, LORENZEN & WOODMAN -New
Tork, Chicago. Detroit. Kansas City. Atlanta
MONDAY MORNING. MAT 6, 1919.
FLORIDA IS PROUD OP FLETCHER.
Senator Duncan U. Fletcher arrived in Pen
sacola Sunday night, and will take part in launch
ing the last week of the Victory Loan drive in
Pensacola.
Senator Fletcher has closely identified him
self with the Liberty Loan campaigns which
have been a part of the expression of patriotism
of the people, as well as an indication of their
realization of the value of the government se
curities, from a business standpoint.
Pensacola is honored in the visit of Florida's
senior senator, who has given many evidences of
his interest in this city and section, and has him
self been honored by his country by having been
placed upon some of its most important com
mittees. . -
Florida has reason to be proud of the repre
sentation received durinsr the incumbency of
Senator Fletcher, whose career is a striking com
mentary on the opportunities for usefulness
which present themselves to the American who
has a real desire to serve his country.
Senator Fletcher was born in Sumter county,
Ga., January 6, 1859. His parents, Captain
Thomas J. and Rebecca Ellen McCowen Fletcher,
moved the following year to Monroe county, Ga.,
where he resided until July, 1881. He was edu
cated in the country schools, preparatory school,
Gordon Institute, Barnesville, Ga., and Vander
bilt University, Nashville, Tenn., from which he
was graduated in June, 1880. He studied law
at Vanderbilt, and practiced his profession in
Jacksonville, in the state and Federal courts, in
eluding the United States supreme court ; he was
a member of the legislature in 1893, served as
mayor of Jacksonville from 1893 to 1895, and
from 1901-1903. He was chairman of the board
of education of Duval county, 1900 to 1906, chair
man democratic executive committee 1904-1907.
He was nominated for United States senator in
tne primary election oi oune id, vvo anu unau
imously elected by the legislature next conven
ing. He was president of the Southern Com
mercial Congress for a number of years. He was
nominated the second time for the senate in 1914
and elected in November for the full term of six
years, beginning March 3rd, 1915, to succeed
himself. His term of service will expire March
3, 1921.
However one may differ with Senator Fletcher
politically, the entire state of Florida is agreed
that he has reflected honor upon his country and
the people whom he has represented, and that
his public life has set an example which may
well be emulated by others. He has been hon
ored by some of the most important appoint
ments in the gift of the nation, and in every
instance his attitude on public questions has
been broad and far reaching.
Senator Fletcher has been much criticised by
the suffragists of Florida, and in a letter to the
Federation of Women's Clubs recently, made his
position clear by declaring his belief in the equal
franchise for women, when granted through the
state legislatures, instead of through a national
amendment.
WHAT ARE THEY WORTH?
School teachers themselves have been saying
i for years that they were underpaid, that they
could barely live on their salaries. But they kept
on living and teaching, and guiding and loving
our children so nobody paid any attention.
Now, suddenly, a great many persons are be
ginning to pay attention for the school teachers
are quitting work. They are turning to other
professions. The . normal schools which train
teachers have few to train. Those now in the
profession who can leave it are leaving, and no
new teachers take their places. To meet the war
emergency the government itself issued pleas for
more teachers, accepted part time teachers, even
urged married women to give some of their time
to teaching. All to no avail. A sane woman will
not accept an ill-paid job when she can get a bet
ter job at more salary.
Just what is the salary situation now existing
in the teaching profession?.
The figures here quoted are from the reports
of the United States Bureau of Education itself,
an unquestioned authority. The average salary
paid school teachers in the United States during
the year 1918 was $243 a year, less than the
average scrub women in theJLJnited States navy
yards !
A recent study of teachers' salaries in New
York city showed that during the last five years,
while teachers' salaries remained practically un
changed the cost of living jumped 75 per cent. In
two years the wages of industrial workers in
creased 60 per cent. It required 19 years for tike
teachers' salaries to advance 11 per cent.
There are 600,000 teachers in America. Of
these 100,000 are less than 20 years old. Thirty
thousand have had no education beyond the
eighth grade, and 200,000 have had less than a
complete high school training.
At the very time when the greatest demands
are put upon the public schools to train children
as true Americans, to give them technical train
ing for self-support and cultural training for
happiness, to guard their morals, perfect their
manners, and make normal and useful their
minds and bodies-at this time the wages paid
the teachers who must bear this responsibility
are so low that competent workers are driven
from the profession, and inferior workers put in
charge.
The problem of living wages for teachers is
not a "class problem."
It is the question of whether school boards and
public shall decide that for American children
"nothing is too good" or that "anything is good
enough."
One of the very earliest of women writers
mentioned by historians was Mary of France,
who, in the thirteenth century, versified the old
traditionary tales of 'Armorica'into those Lays
of the Romance language, of which the manu
scrift still exists among the earliest specimens,
of romantic fiction.
At one time in Switzerland eggs were used as
money, and dried cod were used for the same
purpose in Newfoundland.
Marshal Foch has been asked to tell the con
ference what to do in case the Huns refuse to
sign. We can tell 'em. Encore the marines.
A GOOD INVESTMENT.
If you were to invest $100 today in any busi
ness concern you would feel that you had to keep
an eye on that business. You might make mon
ey out of your investment and you might lose
money.
It would worry yoififiore or less.
If you put $100 in the bank, you'd have times
in which you wondered if your money was ab
solutely safe.
If you bought industrial stocks or bonds with
your money you would give many an anxious
moment to thinking about the security of your
investment. ; ;
If you loaned your $100 to another person you
would keep your mind's eye on him until he re
paid you.
If you bought real estate with your money,
there'd be a chance the value might drop, and
always there'd be taxes to pay.
If you bought an automobile, why, there's the
upkeep and "gas" to consider.
But if you invest that $100 or as much more
as you can rake together, why you can forget all
about it, caling your investment to mind twice
a year when it's time to clip the interest coupons.
You can't lose your money if you don't sell your
bonds. You know exactly how much interest you
will get ; and you know that the concern in which
you invest your Victory Loan dollars will not
fail, cannot fail, and will never pay a cent less
in interest than what it promises.
Think of that when the Victory Loan sales
man comes to your home.
WHY THE DIFFERENCE?
Dispatches from Paris tell of the opening by
the French government of a chain of Paris res
taurants which wil serve to the public not less
than 400,000 meals each day.
The food is to be scientifically prepared so that
the calory content of the day's meals will be
scientifically proportioned to the .needs of the
human body. '. .
The price of the three meals is to be 39 cents.
But, the most interesting and significant thing
about the proposition .is that practically all of
the food to be used in these restaurants comes pyine to float the mth and victory loan
from America.
Now, the man or woman who would, under
present conditions, try to live in an American
restaurant on 39 cents a day would be -well, we
don't like to characterize him. s i
The question that seems to propound itself
insistently is this:
STATESM AD
PUBLISHERS TO
SEE DRIVE OVER
With nearly three hundred repre
sentative men and women present,
fifty-four ot whom were from Flor
ida, the convention of statesmen and
publishers which was held to Atlanta
during the past week under the aus
pices of the Liberty loan committee
of the Sixth federal resrve district.
stimulated to renewed effort and as
sured the carrying; of the Victory Joan
over the top before the close of the
week, according to the opinion of rep
resentative leaders in the life of the
nation.
In attendance from Florida were:
FLORIDA: -Apalachlcola:
H. "W. -osnston.
Times.
Avon Park: C. A. "Mercer, Avon Park
Press.
Bartow: A. G. Mann, Courier Inform
ant; J. G. Gallenmore, the Polk County
Record. ; -
Bradentown: J. H. Humphreys.
Bristol: R. H. Weaver, Free Press.
Brooksville: E. R. Russell, Russell
Publishing: company.
Clearwater: Charles H. Evans.
Daytona: H. C. Sparkman, Journal
Printing company; T. E. Fitzgerald,
Gazette-News.
Fort Lauderdale: George G. Math
ews, Fort Lauderdale Sentinel.
Homestead: A. C. Graw, Homestead
Enterprise.
Jacksonville: Arthur -Keep,-The Ar-
tisan.
Jasper: Ben M. Caldwell, Jasper
News. ' ..
Kissimmee: W. B. Harris, Klsslm-
mee Valley Gazette.
Lake City: H. L. Dodd, The Citizen
Reporter. :'
Lakeland: Lynn W. Bloom, Lake
land Daily Star.
Leesburg: Gilbert D. Leach, ? Lees
burg Publishing and Printing com
pany. V
j Live Oak: Burr A. L. Bixler. Pres
ent Truth Messenger.
Marianna: Mrs. Eva Lilliam Moore,
Times-Courier.
Melbourne: Stanley S. LIchty, Mel
bourne Times company.
Miami: E. Taylor, Miami Herald.
Moorehaven: Will H. Stevens, The
Moorehaven Times.
New Smyrna: H. L. Rood, New
Smyrna News company.
Okeechobee: B. E. Davis, Okeeche
bee Call.
Orlando: William Glenn, Morning
Sentinel; R. B. Broscier, Star Publish
ing company. -
Palatka: H. P. Norwlck, Palatka
Morning News.
Palmetto: A. M. C. Russell, Jr., The
Palmetto News. '
Panama City: G. M. West, Panama
City Publishing company. -' '
Pensacola: C. M. Robinson, Pensa
cola, Fla.
Perry. R. L. Thompson, Taylor Coun
ty Herald. ""-';'
Plant City: F. M. Prewitt, Plant
City Courier.
Funta Gorda: A. P. Jordan, Punta
Gorda Herald.
Safety Harbor: A. E. Shower, Safe
ty Harbor Herald.
Sanford: A. M. Haynes, The San
ford Herald.
Sarasota: Mrs. C. V. S Wilson.
St. Augustine: Harry L. Brown, St.
Augustine Evening Record.
St. Cloud: Claud F. Johnson, St.
Cloud Tribune.
St. Petersburg: Lew B. Brown, Eve
ning Independent.
Summerfield: P. W. Collins, Chron
icle. Tallahassee: H. S. McKenzie, Flor
ida legislature; Milton A. Smith, Daily
Democrat.
Tampa: Edgar A. Wright, Florida
Grower. ;
Tarpon Springs: L. L. Lucas, Eve
ning Leader.
r Tavares: J. W. Bell, Tavares Her
ald. v ,
West Palm Beach: E. P. Simpson,
Tropical Sun Publishing company;
James L. Earman, Palm Publishing
company; Howard Sharp, Palm Beach
Post; J. C. Barton, Lake Worth Her
ald; H. H. Curtis, Tropical Sun. -
Zephyrhills: J. F. Stebbins, Colon
ist. . '
Zolfo Springs: Stuart Hancock,
Zolfo Springs Publishing company.
Carter Glass, secretary of the treas
ury, spoke in the afternoon at four
o'clock, at the Baptist tabernacle.
Simple, direct, and with compelling
power, he appealed to the men of the
Fourth estate and the leaders of the
Liberty loam to put the Victory loan
over the top, speaking to them not
in the bald terms of commercialism,
not in the sterotyped pnrases of the
business man, but as an American pa
triot who relies upon the layalty of
a nation to the sons who have defend
ed that nation's hearthstones.
The secretary of the treasury has
two sons who have just returned from
France, both officers who have seen
service at the front. One of the dra
matic incidents of the speech of the
afternoon was the receipt of a tele
gram from the younger son, who had
wired the secretary from Norfolk of
his safe arrival from across the wa
ter. -
In calling upon the newspaper men
to pledge their best efforts to the
success of, the Victory loan. Secretary
Glass reiterated his faith in American
manhood and womanhood, who have
made possible the victorious consum
mation of this war for humanity, and
upon whose efforts the nation is re
' Don't you wish
you had one?"
Over four million bicycles are in
dailv use in the United States.
40
Nearly a millkm more
Into use this year, -v
will come
T. T. Wentworth Wilson-Biggs,
This is National Bicycle Week
May 3 to 10. This is the week to
buy a bicycle to get the greatest good
from it this Spring.
BICYCLE.
Sportsman's Supply Conbany
Mr. Glass declared that, as a father
of two sons who have offered their
lives for their country, he 'believes
that the loan will be a great Thanks
giving offering for the millions of men
whose lives have Seen sparedL in
reply to the charges of waste during
the war. he said that war and waste
and that he believed that he voiced
the sentiment of the American people
when he said that it were better to
waste millions of dollars than to waste
millions of lives.
He pointed out that when the muni
tions of war were contracted for and
the nation's indebtedness incurred,
that no leader dreamed that the war
would so soon be ended, and be urged
upon the .people of America to offer
up Thanksgiving for the lives that
were not wasted Instead of decrying
the, dollars that were. He urged a
realization of their tremendous obli
gations" to those boys who saved the
world from the Hun.
Senator Hoke Smith spoke particu
larly along the lines of legislation
in regard to the government's obliga
tions and pointed out the strength
which the federal reserve banks of this
country had given to the financial in
stitutions, not only of the United
States, but through the protection af
forded the allied nations of the world,
In stabilizing finance.
Senator Smith, "In expressing his
conviction that the federal reserve
banks had saved this country from
panic during the - war, and from fu
ture monetary panics, stressed the
fact that it is due to the sagacity
of Carter Glass that the federal Reserve
banks were made possible and that
this country was enabled to go through
the greatest crisis in history without
shattering financial and commercial
life, and was also enabled to finance
European countries.
The beautiful Piedmont Driving
club was thrown open to hundreds of
visitors, who were entertained at
luncheon in the great dining-hall.
Governor MeCord, of Georgia, and
Haynes McFadden, chairman of the
Liberty loan committee of the Sixth
federal reserve" district, made short
talks, introducing four minute speak
ers from the states represented in
the district, and following the lunch
eon, a number of good after dinner
speeches were made. "
Most of the delegates left Atlanta
on Thursday night, carrying with them
a renewed determination to do an ef
fective part in putting the Victory loan
over the top. To the initiative" and
untiring energy of St. Elmo Massen
gale, the success of the convention
was largely doe.
L. E. NOBLES & CO.
. Agents
HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX
and KIRSCHBAUM SUITS
"YOUR MONEY'S WORTH, OR YOUR
MONEY BACK"
29 South Palafr-x Street. Phone 790
- ;
C. J. JOHNSON
Dealer in
BICYCLES AND SUPPLIES
Agents for Iver Johnson Bicycles
121 EAST WRIGHT STREET
Watch for Sunday Ad
TRY LIPTON'S TEA
The
WELLES-K AHN CO.
AGENTS
GOOD FAITH OF
HOUSE CLERKS IS
HOT QUESTIONED
(By JOHN C. TRICE)
Tallahassee, May 3. Many of the mem
bers of the house who are questioning
the accuracy of the vote on the Phillips
amendment to the compulsory dlppinj
bill, have expressed a desire that the
public be informed that they do not ques
tion the gtod faith of the clerk of the
house. They are faithful to duty, ef
ficient and impartial in the discharge of
their duties. They have the respect ant
the confidence of all the members. -
But they point out that it is human
to err. That at the time this very vote
was taken there was considerable eon
fusion in the house, and as particular as
the clerks are, it is possible that they
have made a mistake.
In this connection, it is true that the
speaker several times during the day had
to rap sharply for order and reprimand
both the members of the house and the
galleries. At one time while the speaker
pro tem., Mr. Wilson, of Pajsco, was in
the- chair, he sent the assistant ser-geant-at-arms
into the galleries to re
store order and directed that he see
that it was kept.
BALKCOM DRUG CO
"THE PRESCRIPTION STORE"
Phone 19 or 123
Let Us Renovate Your Old
Mattress.
Pensacola Mattress Co,
940-948 E. Romana St.
Phone 1515.
We Furnish the
Home Complete
JNITUC COMMNY -r
tmui m'JUtmmmmiMmimii
MORRIS BROS.
LADIES READY - TO - WEAR
GENTS' FURNISHINGS "
ALL NEW STOCK
Belmont and Devilliers , Streets
Metropolitan C
For Ladies and Gen
We Serve Quicker.1
22 S. Palafox Stree
Merchant's Lunch
35c up.
Special Dinner
40c
nnd Satisfad
GOODYEAR SH
SHOP
Fine Shoe Repairii
111 North Palafox. Phone
416
r
ABBOTT AUTO
REPAIR COI
Palafox and Qfgory Streets
Phone 415
PEAKE ELECTRIC COMPACT
The Home of Exide Batte
Service,
30 S. Palafox.
Phone 3l
BIG BARGAINS IN SHOES
Canadian Shoe Store
516 N. Devilliers. Phone 1133
WM
1
McCann's Tire and
Repair Shop
Phone 404
113 North PaLrfox Street
EVER LASTING
FABRICS CO.
Pensacola's Representative Store
WILL YOU DO YOUR DRUG SHOPPING
TODAY?
v Please accept this invitation to make my store your
headquarters -fhen down the street.
You will find here, a complete stock of POUR favorite
Toilet Articles and Remedies, such as
Xadine Pace Powder.
.50c
Pompeian Massage Cream,
50c and 80c
Nadine Flesh Soap. ..25e
LaCreole Hair Restorer. . ..$1.15
Egryptian Cream ...50c
Oriental Cream ..$1.50
Antiphiloglstine,
35c, 65, $1.00 and up
Mothers Friend .....
Bradfield's Regulator
Rx. C-2223
Doan's Kidney Pills
$1.00
$1.00
75c
60c
"The Home of Gooph
Gone , 25 and 50o
Featuring "Meditation Week'
amilton
Russell, P. D.
"Only the Best"
Druggist and Prescriptionist
212 South Palafox Street

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