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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, May 19, 1919, Image 5

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THE PENSACOT.a jnTrmsJAT; MnmAv Tvm-Dvrrvm r Ar Vn - r- s
I l .
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. : ; .-
LIST SCHOOL
HISTORIES ARE
HELD UNFAIR
HOUSE HAS APPROVED COM
PLAINTS OF U. D. S.'S AND SONS
AND DAUGHTERS OF VETER
ANS.
Tallahassee, May 18. The house has
proved the complaint of the United
re federate Veterans, and the Sons
and Daughters of Veterans regarding
the use of certain histories In the pub
4' schools. Mr. McKenzie of Putnam
county introduced a concurrent reso
lution declaring as unfair the Mat of
histories as reported by these organi
sations, and disapproving their use in
schools.
The resolution is as follows:
A concurrent resolution disapprov
ing certain histories for use in pub
lic schools and public libraries of this
state.
Whereas. There has arisen a cause
for grievance against statements con
tained in certain histories and pub
lications now to be found in portions
of this state and the United States
relative to the causes which brought
about the Civil war and conditions
arising during reconstruction, and,
Whereas, It is the sense of this body
that we do not want southern histories
nor northern histories for our schools
and iiublic Ibiraries, but in this re
united country we want and should
have histories conceived in a national
spirit which is fair to all alike and
written with a due sense of perspec
tive and proportion:
Therefore be it resolved by the
house of representatives, the senate
concurring:
That it is the sense of the legisla
ture of the State of Florida that our
stamp of disapproval should be ex
pressed against the use, either in the
schools or public libraries of this state
of the following publications, which
have been investigated and disapprov
ed by the historical societies of the
United Daughters of the Confederacy
and Sons of Confederate Veterans:
History of the United States, by
Adams and Trent.
Student's History of the United
States, by Edward Channing.
Essentials on American History, by
A. B. Hart.
American History, by D. S. Murrey.
THIS WEAK, -NERVOUS
MOTHER
Tells How Lydia E. Pinkham's
Vegetable Compound
Restored Her Health.
i !IiFlUililll
Philadelphia, Pa. "I was very weak.
always tired, my back ached, and 1 felt
sickly most ox tne
time. I went to a
doctor and he said
I had nervous indi-
f estion, which ad
ed to my weak
condition kept me
worrying most of
the time and he
said if I could not
stop that, I could
not sret well. I
heard so muchabout
Lydia E. Pinkham'a
veeetable Com
pound my husband wanted me to try it.
I took it for a week and felt a little bet
ter. I kept it up for three months, and
I feel fine and can eat anything now
without distress or nervousness. Mrs.
1. Worthline, 2842 North Taylor St.,
miauelphia Pa.
The maioritv of mothers nowadays
overdo, there are so many demands
upon their time and strength; the result
is invariably a weakened, run-down,
nervous condition with headaches, back
ache, irritability and depression and
ooa more serious ailments aeveiop.
It is at such periods in life that Lydia E.
Pinkham's Vegetable Compound will
restore a normal healthy condition, as
K aid to Mrs. Worthline.
7
v
ORE THROAT
or TonaOitis, gargle
with warm salt
water, thea apply
YOU BODYGUARD--3O0!??20
H
History of the American Nation, bv
Andrew C. McLaughlin.
Advanced American History, by S.
. Forman.
A History of the United Statesby
Wm. M. Davidson.
The Student's American History, by
. II. Montgomery.
History of the United States, by J.
. Larned. -American
History and Government.
by Woodburn and Moran.
History of the United States, by John
Fiske.
High School History of the United
Stakes, by Johnston-McDonald.
History of the United States, bv
Charles Morris.
An American History, by Nathaniel
W. Stephenson.
The Boy a of 61, by Coffin.
That this action is taken at the be
hest of the Sons and Daughters of the
Confederacy in order that Florida may
be placed in the list of States where
fair and impartial histories are used
as text books In the schools and in the
public libraries.
SAN CARLOS
Main Cafe
Club Breakfast 35c and up
served 7 to 10
Luncheon 60c and 75c
served 12 to 2:30
Dinner $1.00
served 6 to 8:30
Saturday and Sunday
Dinner DeLuxe $1.50
served 12 to 8:30
Service a la carte at Grill Room
prewar Prices
Coffee Shop and Grill Closed
for Summer.
PURITY CROSS
Chop Suey
30c and 60c
per can
2720 Pfacao 1721 ,
EXPANSION OF
CHURCH WORK
TO BEJJRGED
NATION-WIDE CAMPAIGN PRO
GRAM WILL BE PRE8ENTED TO
DIOCESAN CONVENTION IN
JACKSONVILLE.
THRIFT WILL
BE TAUGHT IN
THE SCHOOLS
Twenty thousand teachers attend
ing summer normal schools in the
Sixth Federal Reserve district will
take up a new course of study in pre
paring fo rtheir work next fall in the
public schools. Through the co-op
eration of the state superintendents
of education, arrangements have been
made by the savings division of the
war loan organization for the presen
tation of a series of lectures at these
schools on the subject of Thrift.
These lectures will cover the fun
damental principles of thrift wise
spending, intelligent saving, safe in
vestment, production, conservation and
industry, and the application of these
principles in the study of history,
mathematics,, languages, reading and
spelling . When the fall term begins,
it is hoped to have the subject of
Thrift made a part of the regular
studies of the children in connection
with the organization of War Savings
societies in the school room
Through the splendid co-operation
of W H. Sheats, state superintendent
of education, W. G. Cooper, educa
tional director of the war loan organ
ization ,is rapidly completing plans for
this work to be carried on in the sum
mer schools of Florida. In fact, the
work ha salready bee narranged for
in the summer normals of Tallahassee.
President Conradi of the Woman
College will put on the course. These
lectures will also be given at the col
ored normals of Tallahassee. The
matter has also been taken up with
President Murphree of the niversity
of Gainesville.
The normal term will begin In June
and will continue through July.
REDUCTION COTTON
PRODUCTION SURE
SAYS PRDICTION
New Orleans, May 17. Pointing out
that the south will never again raise
as large a cotton crop as in the past,
because of what were termed ''suc
cessful efforts towards acreage reduc
tion," the crop report committee of the
newly formed American Cotton Asso
ciation made public its findings at a
meeting today of the members. The
lack of potash, the detrimental effect
of certain domestic fertilizers, bad
weather conditions and prospect of a
heavy toll to be taken by the boll
weevil are the chief points commented
on by the report, the reduction per
centage for the entire southern belt
being placed at twenty and two-tenths.
Jacksonville, May 18.- The program
of the nation-wide campaign of the
Protestant Episcopal church, under
taken for the expansion of the activi
ties of the church at home and abroad,
will be presented to the convention of
the diocese of Florida, which will be
held in Jackosonville on Wednesday,
May 21, by the Key. L. 2. Wood, of
Charleston, S. C.
Since the preliminary announcement
of the plans of the board of mission
of the Episcopal church for a great
awakening to the problems of recon
structaion, a large majority of the
bishops of the church have pledged
their support to the movement. The
program has ,been presented to nu
merous diocesan conventions In the
last few weeks and in every case the
responsen has been emphasized by the
appointment of a campaign committee
It is expected that such a committee
will be organized in the diocese of
Florida as a result of the Rev. Mr.
Wood's address to the convention.
The first step of such a campaign
committee would be the compilation
of the results of an accurate survey
of the problems of this diocese These
local needs would receive first con
sideration according to the program
proposed by the board of missions in
co-operation with the board of religi
ous education on social service and
other . agencies of the church.
Already much has been done to Start
off the campaign in a way that will
insure its success. Each diocese con
vention that has been held thus far
and was accessible has been address
ed by leaders of the movement who
have outlined its scope. Without ex
ception these conventions became en
thusiastic when they learned how
great was the effort to be made, and
they have been unanimous in agree
ing to back the campiagn to the limit
of their resources. The first of these
conventions was that held in Pitts
burgh on April 23, and the program
outline, as presented by Rev. Robert
W. Patton, D. D., national director of
the campaign was listened to with pro
found interest. At the conclusion of
his speech a general sentiment for co
operation was voiced and as a result
a committee was appointed there and
then to confer with the bishop of the
diocese, the Rt. Rev. Cortlandt White
head, D. D., for the purpose of select
ing the best committee obtainable in
the diocese to undertake the campaign
That has been the characteristic at
titude of all subsequent conventions
and the leaders are certain of the solid
backing of the clergy and the laity.
Broadly speaking, the program of
the campaign falls into four distinct
purposes, which are: To bring the
spiritual power of the church to bear
upon the church's whole task; to ob
tain and train an adequate number of
recruits for Christian leadership, both
cleerical and lay; to care, on a yearly
basis for three years for the financial
needs of all the general agencies of
the church, and in connection with
the proper authorities to care for the-
financial needs of all the provinces.
Cioceses and missionary districts of a
missionary, religious-education or so
cial service nature.
That the needs of the church may
be brought out i na clear, definite and
accurate way, diocese by diocese, t
national survey is being made. To this
end, and for the other purposes of the
campaign, a central committee office
has been organized with the Rev. R.
Bland Mitchell as its manager and
With its head offices at 124 East 28tU
Street, New York city. The office al
ready has Seen organized and much o!
the preliminary clerical work has been
done.
To a great! extent the campaign of
fice will deal directly with the cam
paign committee of each diocese, but
where a province is organized suffi-
ACROSS
FROM
SAN CARLOS
PAHS
ACROSS
FROM
SAN CARLOS
SPECIAL HAT SALE
One Hour Only
TODAY
Unrestricted choice of any hat in our store
for hiuiANiim w
BOWMOOT FOR
WITH tKe unrest : an3 demoralization following tHe great
war, with Bolshevism injecting its vile and deadly poison
among the people of our country, we are face to face with the
greatest menace we have had to contend with in a thousand
years.
"isms"
In order to save the world from these destructive
and to save civilization from infidelity, the church must be
supported with the same liberality that you gave to your Gov
ernment in the cause of Justice and Humanity.
Your sons gave their lives"; you gave of your wealth. The
cataclysm that involved the world has been stopped tempo
rarily. Will you let all the sacrifices made for world peace go
unfinished? Undoubtedly not. But there can be no half way
measures. The Church must take up the work where the
sword left off.
You must get behind the Missionary Centenary Cam
paign for thirty-five million dollars conducted by the Meth
odist Episcopal Church, South, during the week of MAY 18tK
to 25th. j
You, whatever your creed, should contribute to this great
cause and save the religion you profess and the Christian civi
lization you enjoy.
Send your check to the Treasurer of the IVIethodist
Church in your city. Don't delay. s V.
STB A R N S L V M B B R COMPANY
h PRICE
cjently for the needs of this campaign,
tha ramnslpn committee may work
through the province In this way the
whole needs of the wnoie cnurcn, a;
home and abroad, will be known to
the central campa'gn omoe ana tne
mmiuiim can be conducted so tnnt
these needs can best be met
One cf the most striking features
thus far is the re
sponse everywhere which it has aroua -
ed Laity no less man ctfry mm U1
it an inspiration and a hope and are
deeply impressed with its vital need at
this critical time In the country's
fpiritua! development Now more than
ever Is the time to act, they say in
letters to the campaign office fof
were th church to fail in her mission
.day she will have lost the oppor
tunity for tomorrow
Hallmark Transfer Co.
All Kinds of Hauling
Heavy Hauling; a Specialty
Phone 618
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THE CLOVER STUDIO
196 N. Palafox St.
The Place Where Kodax Finish
Is Well Done.
Ii for
j 3 Good
Printing
Mayes' Printing1 Co.
Office Supplies
17-19 W. Government '
Phone 181
' COST SYSTEMS
AUD,TS B. T. RAINES
Public Accountant Auditor
American National Bank Building. Pensacola, Fla.
A MeCaskill Block, DeFuniak Springs. Fla u G1NEER
INCOME TAX REPORTS EFFICIENCY ENGINEER
ONLY THE BEST IS GOOD ENOUGH
The business world wants expert help. Let U3 train you.
Pan American College
PHONE 51
lies
.28
BRENT BUILDING
DELIVERED WHEN PROMISED
CALL ON, OR PHONE
! Herbert-Watkins Printing Co. 1
- R. D. LaMONT. Mgr. 5
Phone 931 110 W. Inlendencla St.
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HAMILTON RUSSELL, P. D.
"Only the Best" '
212 South Palafox Street Phone Sir j
Journal Waat Ads Get Immediate Results
)

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