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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, May 25, 1919, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062268/1919-05-25/ed-1/seq-6/

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THE PENSACOL& JOURNAL, SUNDAY RIPENING, MAY 25, 1919.
EC1
,iLJ&E
JkVf$ MOWER
The Eclipse self sharpening' lawn mower is the best and most
perfect lawn mower on the market today. It's something new in
the lawn mower line no troublesome belts and screws to adjust
at every sharpening; no worrying about dirt in the bearings.
COME IN AND SEE FOR YOURSELF.
lay s
RIGHT AT RAY'S
TTTT
RIGHT ON THE CORNER
PRICES ARE
ID
ISCDSSIOIJ
CHOICE HAMPSHIRES
... "x
1 "til'-r-iiii Wf.-frtf ,u iln 'Till ' 11
Registered Hampshire Pigs, both sex, 8 to 10 weeks
old, can mate in pairs or trios, n kin. Prompt shipment;
$20 each, trio $50. Best blood lines. Order today. Satis
faction guaranteed. ""
W. I. STINSON
DeFUNIAK SPRINGS, FLA.
DAMAGED
Slye aid Barley Fl.
$2.50-
FOR SALE CHEAP
98 POUND SACKS-
$2.50
GOOD FOR FEEDING HOGS
TME (LEWIS OBEXES CCD),
PENSACOLA, FLA. 1
W. B. Frriss, President E. R. Ferris, V-President
Roland E. Lee, Secretary
PENSACOLA MANUFACTURING COMPANY
205 East MaiTr
We Sell Lumber, Shingles, Composition
Roofing, Doors, Sash, Blinds and Screens
Do Shop Work -
Phone 637
GILFILLAN SCOTT
Trains Concert Fianists, .Teachers and Beginners.
Half Hour Lesson, Two Dollars
Regular Weekly Lesson, at Pupil's Residence, One Dollar;
The Clutter Music House. Phone 15.'
ONLY THE BEST IS GOOD ENOUGH
The business world wants expert help. Let us train you.
Pan American College
PHONE 51
274-289 BRENT BUILDING
"EVERYTHING IN DRUGS"
HAMILTON RUSSELL, P. D.
"Only the Best"
212 South Palafox Street Phone 846
TRY UPTON'S TEA
The
WELLES-ICAHN CO.
AGENTS
FRED C WAITE
THE LIFE INSURANCE MAN
815 American Bank Bids'.
Phone 912.
SALVATIONISTS
WILL TAKE UP
SOCIAL UNREST
'BOOZELESS BARS" IS ONE OF
METHODS ADOPTED IN LARGE
CITIES FOR HANDLING BIG
PROBLEM.
Birmingham, Ala., May 24. The Sal
vation Army is now perfecting plans
for combating the great social unrest
in this country, by sane methods, and
a brief outline of the Salvation Army's
plans are given in the following tele
gram to headquarters, which contains
Commander Booth's statement: . .,
"With a determined grip upon the
decadent saloons in various localities,
they droop and die with the passing'
of John Barleycorn and with a pro
gram for holding and serving tho
groups of thirsty patrons who shall
henceforth learn to like boozeless bars,
the Salvation Army has taken another
stride forward and is about to assert
itself among te masses in big cities
where unrest among the toilers is
greatest.
Spike the discontent where it is, nail
the great unrest is the slogan with
which the Salvation Army, operating in
eighty-three citie sand towns of Amer
ica, will attempt to better serve and
thereby sooth the seething hosts of
working men and working women who
are trying to adjust themselves to new
industrial conditions after "the war, aad
who are battling fiercely with the high
cost of living with rent profiteers itnd
in some instances with lack of em
ployment. ..
. If it takes every square foot of space
under the roofs of Salvation Army
buildings in the United States. Where
our present charges can be crowdad
up a bit and consolidations of service
by made, we will go down into the
depths where social and industrial
scald tips lowest and put ourselves at
the serfrice of men, women and chil
dren, who need quick and practU-al
help. We know of no greater service
that can be rendered to our govern
ment or indeed to humanity, at this
moment than to confront and ; strug
gle With the great unrest. It must not
be forgotten that any discontent among
the masses which disturbs nationj to
day really exists among the class from
which we spring and indeed from the
people who made it possible for ua to
develope, for after all, we are an or
ganization of the poor, for tho poor
and by the poor, with all of our equip
ment with all our powers of persua
sion and above all with intelligent
help, wisely applied we shall aid the
poor to meet emergencle sof eviction,
hunger and idleness. We cannot do It
all, but we can and will do our utmost
and to that end, our program of hu
manitarian work for the future is now
being shaped up. Every dollar coming
to our hands in this drive must go
for sensible relief and we shall in
stantly widen and deepen our facilities
for reaching and caring for those Who
are now unhappy through privation,
and therefore, discontented and dis
satisfied. Our methods and facilities
are too well-known to need explanina
tion at my hands. If we were able to
serve Uncle . Sam in France, we are
sufficiently awarded by knowledge of
that fact, but perhaps we can now
render that country an even great&r
service. At least we shall earnest
ly undertake so to do." . ,
CHICAGO BANKER MAKES INTER
ESTING STATE. ME NT TO U. S.
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, EDU
CATION SERVICE.
M REALTY TRANSFERS. a
Edwin Bowen and wife to National
Land Sales ' Co., February, 1918, $1.00
and other considerations: Part of the
Thomas English grant, known as sec
tion 28, township 1 south, range 31
west, containing 40 acres, more or less.
W. J. Etheridge and wife to Bessie
J. Richmond, May 21,-- 1919; $200.00:
3 -acres in K 1-2 lot 6, , section It,
township 2 south, range 31 west.
LIBERTY BONDS
Don't sell unless you are
forced to ; If you must sell see
John J. Arnold, vice president of the
First National Bank of Chicago, on
the solicitation of the division of pub
lic works and construction develop
ment. Information and education ser
vice of the TJ. S. Department of Labor,
has made a statement on "Inflation and
Prices' in -arhich he says it is futile
the popular opinion that the United
modify prices. Arnold's statement is
being circulated by the information
and education service.
The Chicago banker dissent from
the popular that the United States
states has become the world's "banker"
and 'points but that we are a creditor
nation only and as such bur responsi
bilities are heavy ones, not without
dangerous possibilities.
"The situation which confronts us is
serious", says Mr. Arnold, "and it may
be necessary that our government ac
cept from the European governments
further government bonds, or promises
to pay, for the interest which will ba
due from year to year.
"It is desirable from every view
point that government financing should
be discontinued at the earliest possi
ble moment. . Private enterprise should
be stimulated by private financing,
which will most quickly bring about
deflation. "- '
"The high cost of commodities and
labor of course, is partly due to the
increased- demand for raw materials
and the curtailment of production for
peace purposes. ' '
"The world .today is glutted with
government securities, which include
both bonds and the medium of circula
tion known as currency, and the sooner
we begin the process of reducing both
the sooner can we figure on a lower
cost of living.
"From the standpoint of the student
of economics, - it is absolutely futile
for peace industry to wait longer for
pre-war commodity prices, and. every
thing should be done to encourage the
resumption of peace business, which
alone can accomplish what we all de
sire. - :
"In other words, the production of
new wealth is absolutely essential for
the reduction of costs. The normal
way to reduce the price of wheat is
through the farms producing a large
quantity. That it to say, we must place
the emphasis on a greater production
rather than consumption of commodi
ties, while in the field of governmental
securities the opposite is the end to
be accomplished."
Mr. Arnold calls attention to the act
that increasing loans and deposits in
equal amounts, without limitations,
shows no added . ttrength to an Insti
tution and may prove even dangerous.
Loans within the power to pay are
legitimate and - reflect, probably, a
healthy state of affairs, but Mr. Ar
nold points out that in Europe gov
ernment obligations have been made
beyond the! rability to py -within a
beyond their ability to pay within a
to the fact that much of - the gov
ernmental borrowing has been for de
struction rather than construction, and,
therefore much of the money in these
loans has been spent for things which
produce no -vealth and have no earn
ing power.
Mr. Arnold suggests that the United
States use the interest paid by foreign
countries on - their loans for a "re
habilitation fund" to be spent in Eu
rope which would mean that for
the period of time required for the re
building of Europe we would be loan
ing our funds Without interest.
"I think it is generally admitted."
says Mr. Arnold, "that the greatest
Investment we, as a country, have ever
made was when we remitted China the
amount of the Boxer indemnity. This
has brought about an understanding
between China and America and a re
lation of friendship which could not
have been accomplished in so short a
time in any "other way. A contribu
tion such as I - am surgestlng , would
forever eliminate the charge of 'dollar
diplomacy" in our international life, but
even aside from the harvest which we
would be likely to reap In friendship,
I am confident that in the long run
It would prove profitable even in dol
lars and cents."
Mil 1
,1 ' '
mm
I - r A ' 11 1
. .-va 'a if 1 1 ftiiijf.Tii.'
, f'l & ' j
' ff
cakes, cookies, biscuits and
everything else in which bak
ing powder is used all whole
some and tasty when you use
(Qmmmmr
tl
"BEST BY TEST"
The Nation's best baking
powder and best suited to every baking
need. On the market for thirty years.
Long past the experimental stage. Use
Calumet and prevent waste and failures.
It is always reliable always
the same uniform in strength. You
save when you buy it. You save when
you use it. This makes it the most
economical of all leaveners.
Made in the world's
largest, finest and most sanitary
baking powder factory. Used by
the Army and Navy millions of
housewives and thousands of
chefs and domestic , scientists.
KOTE-
When you buy a pound of Calumet you get a full
pound 16 oz. Some nigh priced baking powders are
now Dcmgjut on the market in 12-oz. cans iastearf of a pound.
Be sure you are getting a pound when you want It. No short
weight with Calumet. ,
ah,
50T MADE BY 11 ""Trff
In T? HlliI
All . IK; Mi
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Mill
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me.
i
Baseball
Goods
SPEND THE DAY
OUT IN THE OPEN
TENNIS
GOODS
All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy, so why not benefit by this old saying-. What
ever your favorite outdoor sport may be we assure you we can fill your every want with the
very best and most dependable merchandise, be it
Baseball, Tennis, Fishing or Riding a Bike
You'll find here the largest aridmost complete stock of athletic and sporting goods in the
entire state. . This store is truly SPORTSMAN'S HEADQUARTERS. x : '
$50.00 Home of the Dayton Bicycle $50.00
TERMS OR CASH
BICYCLES
WILSON-BIGGS CO.
Established 22 Years
24 SOUTH PALAFOX PHONE 380
FISHING
TACKLE
Lee DanieL

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