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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, June 07, 1919, Image 1

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VOL. IX No. 156.
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA. SATURDAY MORNING, JUNE 7, 1919.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
J A 11 I II III III II III 111 II II III II
W5 WW
RMAKY WILL KOTGET ANSWER
GE
TO HER COUNTERPROPOSALS TO
ALLIES BEFORE LATE NEXT WEEK
Associated Governments
Will Probably Adopt Mid
dle Ground in Fixing Defi
nite Indemnity.
MATHAIS ERZBERGER.
ADVOCATES SIGNING
American Delegates Are
Disturbed By Reports
That Copies of Treaty
Have Reached New York.
Germany will know the . decision of
the peace conference on her counter
propoa ils to the treaty by Thuraday or
Friday of next week, according to" the
latest tliapatchea from Pari.. Jt i un
derstocd that allied and associated gov
ernments have decided to adopt "mid
dle course between fixing the definite
um to be exacted from Germany and
the previsions of the draft treaty hand
ed to the Germans.
Claui.es concerning responsibilities,
punish -nent of the former Kaiser and
the dit position of Germany's colonies
likely will stand as set forth in the
original draft, while the plebiscite in
upped Silesia regarding the future sov
ereignty is believed definitely decided.
Cop?
herger.
nhagen, June 6. Mathlas Erz-
hcad of the German armistice
commit
ision. according to the Berlin
es Taaes Zeltung. Is preparing
Deulsc
a mem
the pei
advoca
jrandum which after discussing
ice terms in all their aspects,
tes signing the treaty.
Paris, June 6. Members of the
American peace delegation are disturb
ed by the report that copies of the
German peace terms have reached
New York. They are undertaking a
check v p of the copies issued In order
to ascertain if any are missing.
Washington. June 6. Resolution
asking the state department for the
text of the treaty with Germany and.
direct ir.g the foreign relation com
mittee to investigate how copies of the
unpublished document have Teachcd
private hands in New York .were
adopted by the senate today without
rpll call. - v ".
The request for treaty will be re
ferred by state department officials to
Pre-'dent Wilson and Secretary Lan
sing at Paris, pending the reply no
official opinion is available here wheth
er the text will be forth coming. Under
the investigation resolution, introduced
at request of the white house by Sen
ator Hitchcock, it is expected a far
reachin ginquiry will begin within ' a
few days. The committee will meet
Monday to formulate plans.
Austrian peace activities seem likely
to be renewed at St. Germain tomor
row. Dr. Karl Renner, the head of the
Austrian delegation, has been in con
ference at Fledtkirch with Dr. Otto
Bauer, the Austrian foreign minister
and is expected to be back in St. Ger
main on Saturday with his five col
leagues who also took part in the con
ference:! with Dr. Bauer.
As reflecting Austrian official opin
ion on the terms of the treaty pre
sented at St. Germain last Monday,
President Seitz, of the Austrian repub
lic is quoted as stating the terms could
not be -nforced upon the Austrian peo
ple and "that it would be dangerous
for the man who signed the treaty.
Formil protest to the peace confer
ence has been made by Count von
Brockdorff-Rantzau as to the alleged
activitie s of the allied armies of oc
cupation in furthering movement for
the esteblishment of a Rhenish repub
lic. Prem:er Paderewski, of Poland, has
made representations before the coun
vil of four relating to proposed changes
in the frontier between Germany and
Poland. Important alterations in the
boundaries are said to be under con
sideratian and efforts are being made
to induce the Poles to consent to a
p1ebiciti which will determine the sov
ereignty of Silesia.
WELL KNOWN AUTO
MECHANIC SHOOTS
SELF IN ABDOMEN
Ed Harris, a well known automobile
mechanic, living at 510 East Wright
street, accidentally shot himself in the
abdomen last night at 11:03, while
transferring a pistol from a bureau
drawer. He was rushed In the polica
ambularce to the Pensacola hospital,
where an operation was performed by
Drs. Nobles. Kennedy and Plerpont.
Tolice Captain Harper, who was pres
ent at the operation, stated shortly
after midnight that it was not be
lieved that the wound would prove
fatal, uiless complications developed.
At about the same time a report
reached police headquarters that a
boy out at Big Bayou had shot him
self wit a a rifle and the police were
asked t send a physician to the
scene. As the shooting occurred be
yond xh i city limits, the party calling
was advised thai nothing could t
done b the police. Definite details
the shooting were not obtainable.
JERRY CARTER
ISSOJOURNiG
IWASH
Well . Known Florida Politi
can Says He is Attending
to "His Own Business" in
Capital.
. . BY GEORGE H. MANNING.
. Washington; June . C. Jerry W.
Cartel, generally known all over
Florida as ""Jerry on the job," one of
Oovernor- Catts' strongest supporters,
has .been, .spending .a few days in
Washington engaged in what he calls
"his own business." Jerry ( Carter,
who is one of the best known poli
ticians in Florida, says he Is still as
strong a, Catts man as eve. t .
When asked why he was so strong
for Catts when so many other well
known men have turned against him,
Jerry said: '
"Because he's got more guts than
any man in the state and they are
non-Skid and nobby treaded,"" Indicat
ing that Jerry thinks well of the gov
ernor. While here Jerry cemented a close
friendship with Congressman J. II.
Smlthwlck, of the third district, and
was shown all over the ' town by th-
new congressman. Jerry's business in
town Is still a profound secret.
Congressman Smithwick has nomi
nated Herbert F. M. G. Mathews, 'of
Pensacola, for entrance to the Mili
tary Academy at West Point. Mat
thews is now a student at Virginia
Military Academy where he has been
preparing for West Point. He was
formerly at the head of the .Boy
Scouts of Pensacola, and is very well
known about Pensacola. He will en
ter West Point In July. .
Sego Sanborn, of Jacksonville, who
served In the 42nd machine gun com
pany, has been discharged from the
army and is visiting his. brother, Sam
Sanborn, secretary to Congressman
Smithwick. He came to Washington
from Camp Knox, Kentucky, where
the machine gun training camp is lo
cated. When he concludes his stay
with his brother, he will depart for
Jacksonville to take his old position In
the postoffice there.
The house has increased the appro
priation for exterminating the sweet
potato weevil in the agricultural ap
prapriatlon bill from $86,000 to $136,
000. This weevil has Injured the
sweet potato crops in Florida and
Louisiana more seriously than in any
other part of. the country.
Congressman Smithwick ' received
many letters and telegrams from his
district asking that the appropriation
be increased by $50,000. He took an
active Interest in the matter, held
conferences with Chairman Haugen,
of the agricultural committee, and
Mr. Lever, the ranking democrat, to
explain the seriousness of the situa
tion to them, and was much gratified
when the appropriation was increased
by $50,000. -
ALABAMA WOULD
PUT 25 MILLION
IN GOOD ROADS
Montgomery, June ,6 The joint
committee on convicts and road's this
afternoon endorsed unanimously the
proposed constitutional amendment
providing for issuance of $25,000,000
Of State bonds for building good
roads.
FLYING OFFICER
KILLED IN FALL
AT MIAMI FIELD
Miami, Fla., June 6. Lieut. Leland
Muggs, of Interlachen, Fla., was in
stantly killed here today whe .... .
plane in which he was a passenger
fell at the marine flying field. Lt
Needham pilot, escaped with a few
bruises.- Muggs was recently ais
charged from the army.
WOULD-BE HEAD
OF MEXICO OUT
WITH MANIFESTO
San Antonio Texas, June 6. Copies
of a long manifesto issued by General
Alvaro Obregon in announcing his
candidacy for presidency of Mexico,
were received here today. Obregon
states he has the united support of
a strong liberal party and will in
augurate a broader policy .regarding
foreign relations. The election will
be held the first Sunday in September.
HON
iSil SSS SIS SH SSSS
LEAGUE AGAINST
ALCOHOL FORMED .
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Washington, June 6. With
the view of carrying prohibition
to all parts of the world, tem
perance workers assembled here
for the annual national conven
tion of the Anti-Saloon -League
of America to organized a world
league against alcoholism. Four
presidents for the new organi
zations were elected, represent
ing England. Switzerland. Bel
gium and the United States.
Ernest H. Cherrington, of West
ervllle, Ohio, was elected gen
eral secretary and instructed to
open permanent offices in Wash
ington. Miles Vokes, of Toron
to, was chosen treasurer.
Countries expected to be rep
resented in the league are said
to . be Canada, Mexico. Japan,
Scotland, Ireland, England,
. France. Belgium, Denmark,
Switzerland, Oustralia, New-zealand-
Sweden, Czecho-Slovakia
and Italy in addition to
the United States. Under the
terms of the constitution adopt
ed, meetings of the league will
held once in three years.
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PAN-AMERICAN
UNION LEADER
SEES NEW ERA
Inauguration of New Epoch
In All American Trade
Will Date From Confer
ence Says John Barrett.
Washington, June 6. Inauguration
of a new epoch In Pan-American re
lations .will date from the second
Pan-American commercial confer
ence,' Director General John Barrett,
of the Pan-American Union and re
siding officer of the conference, -clared
in summing, VP. the achieve
ments of Hhe meeting at thconclud
Ing session today.
Its outstanding characteristics have
been the expression of all-American
idea and viewpoint, in which the in
terests . of the Latin Americans Just
as much as those of the United States
have been frankly considered and dis
cussed by the most - eminent authori
ties of both North and South America,
Barrett said.
EUROPE IS IN
NEED OF HELP.
SAYS VANDERLIP
BY GEORGE H. MANNING.
Washington. D. C, June 6. If the
Germans sign the peace treaty some
time this month General John Persh
ing, ' commander of the A. E. F., will
return to the United- States in July
after a stay, of about two years in
France, war department officials be
lieve. It is expected that with the probabil
ity of a renewal of the war against
Germany removed . General Pershing
will come home without delay and leave
the American army of occupation in
charge of Major General Hunter Lig
glt who is now actually in command
of the American forces in the. occupied
enemy territory.
The war department i3 maintaining
the greatest secrecy about the probabio
return of General Pershing, for obvious
reasons. It is realized that if the Ger
mans refuse to accept the peace treaty
the American army of about 200,090
now centered about Coblenz will im
mediately go forward into German ter
ritory along with the French and Brit
ish forces. That General Pershing wi'l
bein charge of the American force if
hostilities are resumed there is no
doubt. His return if peace is not con
cluded, therefore, is beyond conjee
ture. Secretary Baker when asked upor
his return from France when General
Pershing was coming home said:
"General Pershing told me not to ex
pect him before the first of July." Then
he ouickly added: "But that is of
course if nothing happens, and there is
nothing very sure about it either."
The question has often arisen at the
war department as to who will know
when it is time for Pershing to re
turn home and who will give him his
orders. It is generally believed that
General Pershing will himself deter
mine when his task is done and will
suggest his return and the issuance of
the proper instructions.
"What shall we do with Pershing af
ter we get him home?" is the question
most seriously agitating Secretary
Baker and war department officials.
OHIO LEGISLATOR
SURRENDERS ON
CHARGE BRIBERY
Columbus. O.. June 6. Frank Dele
hanty, Cleveland member of the Ohio
legislature. late today surrendered
himself to the Sheriff of Franklin
county .tp .answer . two. .indictments
charging him with soliciting aid and
offering bribes in connection with
pending legislation
CALM MARKED
CLOSING ACTS
OF FLORIDA
LEGISLATURE
Differences of Opinion and
Bitterness Engendered in
Heat of Debate Blotted
Out.
TWO-PRIMARY BILL . .
TALKED TO DEATH
No Action Was Taken on
Governor's Special Mes-
. sage Urging Adoption of
Woman Suffrage.
(BY ' HERBERT FELKEL.
Tallahassee, June 6. No excitement
marked the closing of the legislature,
which adjourned sine die today, offi
cially at noon and in fact at 2 o'clock
the gravel struck and President Calk
ins announced the senate adjourned
sine die. Misinterpreting the signal
Speaker Wilder had struck his gravel
ten minutes earlier.
But little business was attempted in
either house today except receiving
messages and adjusting matters sub
mitted to conferences.
To make assurance doubly sure both
bodies reenacted a bill providing for
accepting federal aid for building state
highways, there being some question as
to whether the original bill to which
the ' Wilder Scruggs amendment had
been attached afterwards striken from
had ever been read in the house in
full. As a matter of precaution the
bill was re-enacted.
The house met the senate's objec
tions to amendments to Cash's bill
repealing the Bryan primary law and
providing for return to the two pri
mary system but the': bill was after
wards lost in the senate by being laid
on- the tble ubJect---J.bca4I.'-i A filli
buster was organized on this measure
and it was talked to death.
Resolutions thanking the press for
full and fair reports of legislature
proceedings were adopted in both
houses. ; "
Difference of opinion and all bitter
ness engendered in the heat of debate
were blotted out when the hour for
parting came to members of the house,
and the greater part of the morning
was spent In exchanges of courtesies
and affectionate good-bye's.
Memory books and autograph al
bums were circulated, and on every
hand was evidence of genuine regret
at severing the associations of the
past sixty days. A pleasing Incident
of the closing hours was the presenta
tion of .a handsome silver service to
the speaker of the house by Mr. Way
bright, of Duval, on behalf of the mem
bitrs of the house and an exquisite sil
ver and porcelain after dinner coffee
set presented by Miss Myrtlce MCas
klll, to the spea'kei-oil'lehiilx6f the
house attaches,
Attaches also presented a handsome
gift ty Chief Clerk John G. Kellum,
who has served continuously for eigh
teen years at the chief clerk's desk.
In acceptance , the speaker thanked
the members and attaches for their
splendid co-operation and said thnt
the legislature Just closed will be
known as one of the most construc
tive in the history of the state.
Before adjourning the senate passed
a resolution introduced by Senator
Russell, calling upon Chairman George
H. Raney of the' state executive com
mittee to call a convention for the
purpose of adopting a. party platform,
it being understood' that nothing else
shall be taken up by the convention.
Delegates will be selected by county
conventions to be called by covinty
chairman of executive committees.
The session was adjourned without
acting on the governor's special mes
sage on woman suffrage.
U. S. SENATE GETS
BILLS TO CHECK
IMMIGRATION
Washington. June 6 Bills prohibit
ing immigration for five years, ex
cluding alien anarchists and others
who believe in overthrow of govern
ments by force and 4 denaturalizing
aliens who obtain t citizenship by
fraud or assist others to do so, ww.e
introduced today by' Senators King
and Sterling.
SENATE FAVORS
VOCATIONAL AID
FOR 4,000 MEN
Washington, June 6. After a brief
debate, the senate today adopted a bill"
by Kenyon, republican, of Iowa.-under
which about 4,000 men disabled while
In ? military service will receive vo
cational rehabilitation despite rulings
of the federal board for vocational
education that they were not entitled
to it because they were not receiving
compensation from the war risk in
surance bureau.
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THREE MEN OUT
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55
Out of a total of 2S employees
of the Pensacola branch of the
Western Union Telegraph com
pany only three have left their
jobs, and so far as known no
others contemplate going out, it
was stated late last night by
local manager, M. H. Luff.
Business, yesterday continued
nosmal from all points, Mr. Luff
stated, and so far as the local
business handled was concerned
was absolutely without delay. A
message received by him from
one of the high officials of the
company ' stated that not over
100 operators were out in the
entire district.
A slight change and increase
in hours on part of those re
maining on the job is the only
thing out of the ordinary occa
sioned as a result of the strike
at the local office.
51
U
m
H
K
NATIONWIDE
STRIKE MAY BE
CALLEDTODAY
As to Whether Contemplat
ed Order Would Affect
Postal As Well As West
ern Union Men to be De
cided. Washington, June 6. S. J. Koner -kamp,
president of the Commercial
Telegraphers' Union, announced p
nlght he ' would call, a nation-w .Se
strike of members of the union upon
reachIng"1Chicagrb tomorrow.. He said
the date and whether it would affect
both the Postal and .Western Union,
were undecided. The strike is to be
In support of the striking employes
in ten southeastern states.
. Atlanta, June 6. Three thousand
Western Union employes in the south
east have obeyed the strike order
of President Konenkamp, of the
telegraphers' union, according to a
statement today by Charles F. Mann,
third vice president of the union.
H. C. Worthen. general manager
of the southern division of the West
ern Union, asserted, however, busi-
j ness is being conducted on a normal
basis by his company except for some
delays on railroad wires. He termed
the strike a complete failure, saying
only 300 Morse and multiplex opera
tors struck.
Both sides expressed confidence to
day in the outcome of the strike call
ed by the Commercial Telegraphers
Union of America against the Western.
Union Telegraph Company, in ten
southeastern states.
In a t published statement comment
ing on Postmaster General Burleson's
return yesterday of the wire com
panies to private control, H. C. Wor
then, general manager of the southern
division of the Western Union, Said
the order, "gives our executives a"
full and clear hand to fight to a
finish and the public can trust that
we will do it."
"Business will continue normal," he
added, contending' that the company's
employes who are union men are in
the minority.
Statements by local union leaders
on the other hand, were just as op
timistic regarding their outlook and
P. G. Fonvllle, president of the local
council of the union, speaking for
himself and for C. F. Mann, southern
organizer o fthe union, predicted vic
tory for the union forces. A nation
wide strike of C. T. U. men. he inti
mated, will be calleu If necessary to
win. '
The strike over the southeast was
ordered late yesterday by President
Konenkamp in support of the local
trike against the Western Union.
This walk-out took place . Wednesday
in sympathy with telephone employes
who went out here Monday, alleging
discrimination against union mem
bers. .
MONSTER PARADE
TO PROTEST FOR
WINES AND BEER
Washington, June . Permission
was granted the District of Colum
bia labor unions today, by SUperin
tendent Woods of the capitoi . build
ing, to conduct a parade and demon
stration before the .capitoi June fi. in
opposition to war-time prohibition as
applied to light wines and beer. Or
ganizers said 100,000 persons wouid
assemble in line of march and delega
tions would te sent here from manv
cities
TEXAS OIL COMPANY TERMINALS
WILL BE OF GREATER CAPACITY
THAN WAS ORIGINALLY PLANNED
YELLOW RIVER .
BE BRIDGED AT
FAULK'S FERRY
Government Forestry Ser
vice Expected to Cooper
ate With Santa Rosa
County Officials in Plan.
I
A bridge over Yellow river, at
Faulk's ferry, on the road connecting
Milton with Camp Walton, by way of
East bay, will - be constructed at a
cost of approximately $15,000 if plans
that are now well under way go
through all right as Is expected. The
bridge, together with the trestle sup
ported roadway would be about 5,200
feet in length.
quest upon the government fore' t '
authorities for preparation l'3!,ns
specifications and estimate;on the
bridge and Supervisor L. JBishop for
the local district, stat,e that the for
estry service experts to be able to
cooperate in th, project with assist
ance in eniriffeering and a cash con
tribution The road that would be
mad' aiore available with the bridge
is an important one to that rapidly
d' reloping section and for about half
is distance leads through the land
of the government forestry reserve.
Much interest is manifested in the
enterprise among the people of Santa
Rosa and Walton counties.
Mr. Bishop returned to the city yes
terday from a two day's trip over the
forestry, reserve and he reports very
aatisfactoy pogress being made on the
ICestview-Camp Walton sand-clay
hard road. About five miles of this
road is practically completed in the
vicinity of Niceville, where three
crews are at work a short distance
apart. It Is expected that the entire
length of the road will be completed
not later than next spring.'
PERSHING MAY
RETURN T OU. S.
DURING JULY
Washington, June 6. Frank A: Van
dcrlip, former president of the National
G4ty Bank of New York, told the Pan
American conference here that trading
between South America and Europe could
rot be resumed as formerly for some time
to come as the situation overseas "is
more serious than lias been grasped cn
this continent or even by the large pro
portion of the. Europeans themselves."
Kurope," said Mr. . Vanderllp. "has re
ceived a shock as cannot be measured by
those .who have not seen at close range.
Men all over the country are idle. The
disorders are the result of want, idleness
and revolution and cannot be confined to
any one locality. Do not think that I am
predicting a conflagration in Europe, but
I believe that continent is now balanced
upon a knife edge and that trie future
alone can tell whether there will b a
conflagration or not.
"Aid can and must be given. The help
must be to restock the industries. Only
its own people can save Europe by the
sweat of their brows and by labor. The
difficulty comes in starving them. Men
are being supported by the millions in
F.urope by unemployment irold. as they
are earning no wages. In England alone
more than a million men are drawing
$6,000,000 weekly from the unemployment
fund. In Belgium the conditions are
similar. There is no labor.
"This gloomy picture is true and a
catastrophe may come out of the present
situation which will affect us all. If the
fcatastrophe is averted, as I believe it
will be, the position of those countries of
this hemisphere which are rich in re
sources and unharmed by war, is of su
preme importance.
"Europe cannot live except on industry
with the present population. The Indus
trial cycle must be resumed. A respon
sible minister of England said to me thut '
rcsumVrfre B-ritish ZorlZZZ
speedily supply finished products :o
European countries the government must
export at once five or six million English-
"Europe must have help. We of this
hemisphere must grant it and it must be
in material things needed so that Europe
can help herself."
Mr. Vanderlip suggested the formation
of a group of nations made up of the
Latin-American republics, the United J
States and some of the European nations
to lend aid to. the afflicted countries of
Kurope in the form of materials, ma
chinery, equipment and food.
RAIL DEFICIT IN
THREE MONTHS IS
QUARTER BILLION
Washington, June 6. Director Gen
eral Hines estimated today that the
railroad administration Incurred a de
ficit of , approximately 138,000,000 n
April, making a total deficit of $230,
000,000 for the first four months of
the year
Tankage Will Be 120,000
Barrels or 6,150,000 Gal
lons; Construction Work
to Be Hurried.
2 ANNOUNCEMENTS
BOOST LOCAL PORT
General Superintendent Mo
ran of Oil Company Here
is Pleased With Prospects
for Rapid Development.
The local properties of the Texas
Oil Company, including tjtie docks and
large fuel oil sta
Ton now in course
of construction
Zt the foot of Clubbs
street, are be
"ng officially inspected
by D. J.Mo,
an, general superinten-
, " 7 -Texas company, who ar
rived in thl .j
Mr. Mran like R. P. Dorrls. local
supenntondent whQ w,n fee permp.
nentiy ln cnarKe of the terminals
ere' expresses himself as exceeding
ly Tvell pleased with prospects in im
Inediate sight for the development of
the port of Pensacola and for the oil
business, especially as a terminal for
oiling sea-going vessels, as well as
with a view to making this a distrib
uting center for a large area of their
products. .
iln connection with Mr. Moran's
visit here, It is asserted that the ca
pacity of the terminals are to be in
creased to a figure even greater than
have been heretofore contemplate.l
This announcement, together with tha
announcement made yesterday by tho
officials of the Bruce Dry Docks com
pany to the effect that work on a
5.000 ton lift capacity floating dry
dock is expected to soon actually -re
started, the Emergency Fleet Corpo
ration putting into the projeot ap
proximately $450,000. as soon as th
remainder of the required , local capi
tal is su-bscribed, are sources of grat
ification to , Pensacollans who are
heartily interested in the development
of the port of Pensacola. The an
nouncement of officials of the dry
dock company is to be found else
where in the Journal.
Concerning the status of the Texas
Oil company project and some of the
good things it means for the port
here, the fallowing statement is au
thorized: To Be Big Project.
"The facilities of the port of Pen
Bacola will be materially increased
when the construction of the oil fuel
station now being built by the Texas
company is completed.
"The station is accessible to ocean
going and coastwise steamers, and 13
located at their private wharf at thj
foot of Clubbs street.
"The Texas company, realizing the
growing importance of the port o
Pensacola, end being desirous of be
ing In a position to render complete
oil service to steamers entering this
port, is rushing construction.
"Tankage having a capacity of 120,
000 barrels, or 6,150,000 gallons. Is
being erected. Also a store of lubri
cating oils will be installed so that
any ship, no matter what size or type,
can have all its oil needs adequately
disposed of.
"Undoubtedly, many of our read
ers are aware of the trend toward the
use of oil for marine fuel and Its im
portance to this country, due . to its
abundance, accessibility and to the
paramount economies of operation it
introduces.
"Our entire export facilities will be
placed on a much more efficient basis
owing to the growing Use of liquid
fuel.
"Edward X. Hurley, chairman of
the United States shipping board,
brings out some points: 'Oil-burninf--vessels
will make from 10 to 20 per
cent more mileage than coal burners.
There is better control of steaming,
because fires can be started and stop
ped instantly, steam raised quickly,
and time saved in port through the
greater ease of taking on oil as con
trasted with coal. Coaling is always
a s4 ( nnrl a4 (aiIa nA a -i at 1 1
, f" , ble
bottoms quickly and without fuss or
I musa-'
; The foregoing applies to oil burn-
ed below the boilers, but with ths
Diesel engine or internal combustion
engine, the fuel economy is even
greater. He says:
"The motor ship will operate on
about half as much as the oil burn-
insr steamer. Its engine room force
is reduced still more from one to
three men are sufficient; and there
are no stokers, for the motor ship's
mechanical staff Is made up of skilled
men. A Danish - motor liner, the
'Fiona,' recently went clear around
the globe, making a voyage of 32,000
miles, with only one engineer.
"Naturally, in the coming race for
markets and the contest for oceat
freight, ports which can supply the
needs of the new type of shipping
are at an advantage.
"Thus, the port of Pensacola is to
be congratulated on having the proper
facilities to encourage marine traffic,
which means bigger, better buslnesa
for al'
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