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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, July 03, 1919, Image 1

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9 The Pensacola Journal
K Pensacola's Only Sunday
Newspaper
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K Partly cloudy In north with HI
local ahowers south and central C3 .
'St jortlons. Thursday and Friday E
8 moderate east winds. 63
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VOL. XXII. NO. 182.
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA. THURSDAY MORNING, JULY 3, 1919.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
'AMERICAN ARMY ON RIME PAOTlHf TO START WME
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POIT TIE-UP SERIOUS; MASS MEETING SUGGESTED
MJERICAFJARTJYOF OCCUPATION
IN GERMANY IS TECHNICALLY AT
AN ED; MOVING OUT HAS BEGUN
War Department Announces
That, Only Little More
Than 400,000 Remain
Overseas.
ONLY ONE REGIMENT
TO REMAIN ON RHINE
Judge Advocate is Called On
to Decide if Marriage of
German Girls to Soldiers
is Permissible.
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Iaris. July 2. The army of
occupation technically ceased
to exist today when removal of
the units still in Rhineland be
ian. It is expected that within
a comparatively short time there
will remain on the Rhine only
one regiment, with certain aux
iliary troops, totalling approxi
mately five thousand men.
Washington, July 2. Only
one million men. of whom little
more than four hundred thous
and remain overseas are now
under arms, according to an
nouncement by the war depart
ment. At the present rate of
v homeward movement the Amer
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ican army of occupation would
consist of only "two divisions
Ausuit first. It was said.
k x x a x s k ar kkksskssk
Coblenx, July 2. The judge advo
cate's department at army headquart
ers here was kept busy today with
inquiries from various parts of the
occupied area as to whether marriages
Ulwfrn American soldiers and Ger
man girls would be allowed, now that
the peace treaty has been signed. More
ttan 140 inquiries were made today by
various individuals, including several
officer. These came from the divi
sion headquarters of five of the divi
sions f the third army and from vari
ous other units, a number of men
inquiring personally at headquarters.
A ruling on the question will be
made in a few days. The order against
fraternizing with Germans rtlll is in
force nominally at least, an ; will con
tinue probably until Germany ratifies
the treaty.
Parts. July 28. The Turkish situa
tion is giving the peace conference
much uneasiness. Reports received
here indicate there have been organix- i
I l.latlo Tnrliif triroo Tirlrih I
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rmies wnose grnrraia iriunr iu uinrjr
orders from Constantinople. These
'" ' , ' ' ly. - V . o'clock. Greeenwich time, was approx
Itallkesri. and Konia. The Turks at!lmate,y 300 mUea weat of Penzance,
while those at Calikesrl are opposing
the Greeks.
As the position of Constantinople
has been much weakened by the re
fusal of the conference to consider pro
posals from the Turkish delegates im
mediately, it is feared independent
movements will develop throughout
Asia Minor.
Berlin. July 2. Plot to blow up
elevators containing American food
shipments has been uncovered at Ham
burg, to the Lokal Anzieger. Those
Involved, Jt was said were some of
the convicts released from the Ham
burg J.U1 by mobs during the recent
riots there. '
Paris. July 2. Polish forces Satur
day started a counter offensive along
tho whole Galician-Volhynlan front
according- to advices from Warsaw.
The Poles claim they have everywhere
broken Ukrainian resistance.
The enemy suffered severe casual
tics, prisoners, thirty machine gut.
ind huge stores being captured.
LAND BANKS ARE
CHARGED WITH
LAW VIOLATION
Washington, July 2. Violation of
law regarding farm loans la charged
i gainst the federal land banks, "as
guided and controlled by the federal
f irm loan bord," by Representative
McKadden. republican, of Pennsylvania,
under extension remarks printed today
In the Congrestjonal Record. He as
trted the requirement that loans be
ro.iUe only, to resident land owners was
iti--cpart!ed. urged congress to make
land ix nk bonds taxable, asserting It
e.-au:j enhance tb value of Liberty
t iUil.
BIG DIRIGIBLE
IS EXPECTED
FRIDAY NIGHT
Everything is In Readiness
to Receive Big British
Flyer At Mineola, New
York.
Minneola, X. Y., July 2. Lieutenant
Colonel Frederick W. Lucas, of the
royal air force, one of the advance
party here, arranging' for the recep
tion of the British dirigible now en-
roll 1m t r triA lTnit Ktn t fm from Srnt.
5$ j land, said today he was without ad
r3 j vices as to the time the giant airship
i might be expected to arrive. He was
;g j inclined to believe, however, it would
; I not be before late Friday.
Everything Is In readiness to re
ceive the craft at Roosevelt field,
where she will be moored while wait
ing to put back immediately to Eng
land. Three special wireless stations con -
structed , at . the field in . connection
with flight will be tuned up to catch
the first message from the dirigible.
Officers expect, communication will
be established when she comes with
in 600 miles of the coast.
It is expected the landing will not
be made until after dark in order to
permit the gas bag to cool and its
contents to contract, thus decreasing
the lifting tendency of a dirigible
lightened by a long flight. Mora
than one thousand members of spe
cial balloon companies, contributed
by American army and navy authori
ties., will be on the field to assist in
making the giant air liner fast to its
I moorings.
A special fire detachment will be on
guard to prevent fires starting In the
vicinity and endangering the air
ship. London, July 2. The British dirigi
ble R-34, which left East Fortune.
Hcotland, at 1:48 o'clock, Greenwich
mean time this morning, had reached
50 degrees 7 minutes north, latitude
14 degrees 50 minutes west, longi
tude, at 12 o'clock, Greenwich time.
(8 o'clock New York time) in her at
tempt to cross the Atlantic
Maior Scott, the commander, in his
wireless dispatch, said the dirigible
l
that time was making thirty-two
knots an hour in a thick fog.
The position of the R-34 at 12
the big airship
had traveled In a southwesterly direc
tion along the coast of Ireland since
she made her previous report at 8
o'clock. Greenwich time.
Weather reports Indicate the R-34
will meet unsettled conditions, with
variable wipds. until she is some dis
tance out into the Atlantic. Then it
is expected" she will have following
winds which will assist her.
Not more than a score of people
motored the 21 miles from Edinburgh
to the airdrome here to witness the
start, but among them was one Amer
ican woman who presented a silk
American flag to Lieut. Com. Za ch
ary Lansdowne, V. S. N.. Just before
he stepped into the gondola.
The air ministry received a report
from Commander Scott at 4:15 this
afternoon. New York time, that the
dirigible R-34 was flying westward
at 30 knots, 2.000 feet above Xhe sea.
At the present rate of speed the diri
gible expects to reach Mineola, New
York. Friday morning.
FIGHT FANS ARE
CROWDING THE
CITY OF TOLEDO
Toledo, July 2. Sweeping down upon
this city, situated on the shores of
Lake Erie, by every means of modern
transportation, thousands of boxing
enthusiasts tonight are seeking places
to lay their heads during the forty odd
hours Intervening before Wlllard and
Dempsey meet for their heavyweight
championship fight Friday.
Both boxers finished training this
afternoon. Tomorrow will be a day of
relaxation. Dempsey. after an exhaus
tive examination by the boxing board's
physician, was pronounced an excep
tional athlete, ready to engage in the
hardest kind of contest.
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The big British dirigible R-34 Is n ow somewhere over the Atlantic In her trip in Mineola, N. T., It is ex
pected she will reach her destination late Friday. Shown In the picture are the wireless cabin and navigators
quarters. She has four other cabins and engines in -each.
YACHT CLUB
IS PREPARED
FOR VISITORS
y,"-. .4 -v?r '.' -.
Plans Have Been
unecKea
Over 'and ;3 New
Yachtsmen . Are
Royal Welco'me.
Orleans
Sure of
A final business session of the Pen
sacola Yacht Club, preparatory to the
regatta here ' tomorrow, was held at
the club last night. All tag ends of
the preparatory plans were gathered
up and everything is now ready for
the big day.
The New Orleans yachts leave West
End this afternoon and the first of
them are due in Pensacola before
eight tomorrow morning. Fleet Cap
tain J.'C Watson will be on board
the L-38 to welcome the visitors 'as
they come in. He will be accompanied
by other officials of the Pensacola
Yacht Club, guests and newspapermen.
The program for the entertainment
to be accorded the visitors is as fol
lows: Friday, July 4. 1 p. m., lunch at
Pensacola Yacht Club house)' after
which autos will convey guests to
Barrancas, guests of Major ' Hughes.
7 p. m., return to city in autos.
9 p. m., banquet at San Carlos, in
vitation by card.
Saturday, July 5. 10 a. m., boats
leave for Fort Pickens, guests of Major
Hughes, for bathing and lunch, thence
back to Aero Station for inspection and
guests of Captain Bennett. At conclu
sion this honor boats will return to the
city.
9 a. m., dance at Osceola club, with
New Orleans yachtmen as honor
guests.
Sunday, July 6. 9 a. m., boats leave
for New Orleans.
There will be open house all day
July 4th at the club house and mem
bers, the ladies and out-of-town
guests will be welcome.
SERIOUS CUTTING
AFFRAY REPORTED
AT WALNUT HILL
That a man was killed in a cutting
affray at or near Walnut Hill late last
night was made known fn long dis
tance telephone message to Sheriff
Van Pelt, who, accompanied by Depu
ties Hall and Bowman, left for the
scene immediately after receiving the
message about 11 o'clock.
The name of the dead, said to iiave
been a white man, was not known here.
It Is reported that three or four par
ties were participants in the fight,
though details were not learned.
GEORGIA HOUSE
WON'T INVITE
SENATOR REED
. Atlanta. July . 2. The lower house
of the Georgia general assembly today
voted down 84 to 54 a resolution in
viting Senator Reed, of Missouri, to
address the house o nthe League of
Nations. Senator Reed will make a
public address here next week in op
position to the league.
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DR. ANNA HOWARD SHAW
DIES AT AGE OF 71.
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Philadelphia, ' July 2. Dr.
Anna Howard Shaw, honorary. iC
president of the National Amer- M
lean Woman's Suffrage Associa- 5?
tion, died at her home, at Moy-
lan, Pennsylvania,- at 7 o'clock M
this evening. She was seventy- C
one years tdd." : $
XX X K JS WS S S?,2S 3? 2S $
' NEWS IN BRIEF J
s FROM ALL OVER
THZ2 UNIVERSE
Boston, July 2. As a means of
making up part of the loss of reve
nue at their bars, hotels here raised
their rates today for rooms fifty cents
per person.
Wimbledon, England, July 2. Su
zanne Langlen, of France, defeated
Miss Satterthwhite today in the semi
finals of the International ' Tennis
championship and qualified to meet
Mrs. Lambert Chambers for the
championship.
Charleston, July 2. The transports
Otsego and Accomac reached port
this afternoon with overseas . troops
who entertained for Camp Jackson
where they will be demobilized. The
transport Matoika with Germans seek
ing repatriation, passed out as the
transports came in.
Washington, July 2. Government
assay officers have been instructed by
Director of Mint Baker to pay mar
ket prices hereafter for silver found in
gold bullion purchased by the office.
Before July first the government paid
a dollar an ounce for such silver,
although in open market it rose as
a dollar and fourteen cents after the
embargo was lifted.
NEWSPAPER AND
HOTEL LOSE IN
DAMAGE SUITS
New York, July 2. A verdict of $80,
000 damages against the Florida East
Coast Hotel Company was awarded to
Miss Elizabeth Hoffman in the supreme
court here today for injuries she suf
fered when she fell down an elevator
shaft at the Hotel Breakers. Palm
Beach. "
Belton. Texas, July 2. Former Gov
ernor James E. Ferguson was awarded
a verdict for $10,000 damages against
the Houston Post by a Jury in the dis
trict court here today, as a result of
alleged libelous matter printed by that
paper during the last gubernatorial
race. Ferguson asked a hundred thou
sand. ORGANIZATION BY
COUNTIES COTTON
BELT IS PLANNED
New Orleans, July 2. Plans for a
systematic campaign in the cotton
belt for organizing counties of states
for handling the annual crop were
launched here today at a meeting of
directors of the American Cotton As-,
sociation. Four hundred million dol
lars will be needed for forming a
planned corporation to properly dis
pose of one-fourth of the crop, it was
stated.
HIGH DENSITY
COTTON PRESS
PROsPEcrse
Promoters Big Enterprise
v Repair t? Encouraging In
terest is Being Manifest
ed By Business Men.
Canvassers for stock subscriptions
for the $100,000 high density cotton
compress which will be erected in Pen
sacola, found business booming yes
terday and are optimistic over future
successes. Immediately after sufficient
stock is subscribed the organisation
will be perfected and building Claris
made.
'"Prospects for securing a high dens
ity cotton compress at Pensacola look
bright at the present time but it must
be understood that it is necessary for
the business men of the city to give
thein entire co-operation and to come
forward with stock subscriptions," said
E. G. Carter, one of the promoters of
the movement last nizht.
"The biggest asset of Pensacola is
her harbor and nothing will do more
to increase the amount of business
handled than a high density cotton
compress. The shippers of the city
have expressed themselves as being
very favorable to this proposition and
understand the necessity of having it
here if this port is to be used as it
! should and they say one reason a larger
amount of cotton is not now passing
through this port is that we do not
have a high density cotton compress;
that American ships will not take cot
ton unless It has gone through this
process, as will no other ship only at
an increase in freight which makes it
prohibitive.
"The information given out by the
shippers is that there will be no great
difficulty in securing ships, provided
we can secure the cargo and there is
no reason why this port's facilities
should not be in use, while those of
other ports are over-crowded in handl
ing cotton.
"The establishment of this plant here
would mean not only the labor in
handling the cotton and operating the
plant, but it would also mean a large
amount of work along the water front
in handling ships in loading the cot
ton, and a large amount of business to
those furnishing fuel and other sup
plies needed on a ship, and besides
the commerce which would be stimu
lated and the good resultinfl to the
city. It is a well known fact to those
who are acquainted with this line of
business that a high density cotton
compress located at a port has paid
large dividends to the stockholders and
no one need have any fear that the
money which they invest in this In
dustry will not receive proper returns
from the investment.
"It would therefore seem that the
business men of Pensacola would read
ily come forward because of the good,
resulting to the city from an estab-'
llshment of a high density cotton com
press here and for the reason that they
will receive large returns, larger pos
sibly, than they would receive from
any other investment which they would
make.
"Some of the business men of the
city seeing the great need of this plant
(Continued on P TwM
RESERVE BOARD
IS OPTIMISTIC
AS TO OUTLOOK
Monthly Statement, How
ever, is Tempered With
Warning Against Undae
Speculation.
PRICES CONTINUED
. ON RISE IN JUNE
Manufacturing Took Strong
Upward Turn During
Month Report Shows;
Building Revival Con
tinued. Washington, July 2. Optimistic as
to the business outlook reported to
day In the federal reserve board's
monthly statement of conditions was
tempered with renewed warning
against undue speculation.
"In nearly all districts," the board's
statement said, "the opinion is enter
tained that the prospects for a suc
cessful and prosperous year with very
large output of goods and almost un
precedented financial returns to man
ufacturers, agriculturists and laborers
now are positive.
"The possibility that speculation
may be carried too far and may exert
an injurious influence, aided and fur
thered by the existence' of free credit
and speculative tendencies, 'apnears ft
the, principal offeettlog" influence in
the situation." ,f . - i . - .
Prices .continued to rise throughout
June, ! the board's statement showed,
and - enormously, heavy 'demand for
goods for export had rendered pro
ducts in many lines scarce. In nearly
all districts it was reported business
men had decided they could rely upon
heavy demand and continuously sus
tained prices for some time to come,
while a feeling of apprehension en
tertained early in the year was dis
appearing, jobbers and retailers read
ily entering into large commitments
for fall and winter.
In many respects the agricultural
prospects of the early spring are be
ing more than justified. Wheat, corn,
cotton, tobacco and Pacific coast
crops will be harvested in record
quantities. Livestock continues high
in prices.
Steel and iron experienced a dis
tinct turn for the better. The fuel
situation has been much below nor
mal, with prospects of a tight situa
tion next winter. Metal mining in
dustry was again improving.
Manufacturing likewise took a
ftrong upward turn during June. De
mand for fine cotton goods exceeds
production. Shoe factories are pro
ducing at maximum oapacity, while
heavy demand from Europe has drawn
off much of the available supply.
1 Wood products are sold ahead for
months. Automobile manufacturing
is running in many plants at record
levels.
Building shows continuation of the
revival noted in previous months.
Heavy buying of lumber by retailers
has become general. There is much
trading in houses and business pros
perity. 'The labor situation has now reach
ed a distinctly advanced stage of full
employment, the board's statement
said in commenting of unemployment
conditions. "There is apparently no
present condition of unemployment;
indeed, many industries report they
can not get the men they need, while
wages are fully up to past levels or
higher. The requirements for farm
help are arbsorblng surplus labor in
practically all parts of the country.
There is some surplus of unskilled
workers in some centers, but this is
not different from the condition in
normal times. No reduction in wage
scales is now foreseen.
"One of the principal problems in
the labor situation noted by thought
ful observers is the fact that clerks
and office employes, as well as other
workers receiving more or less fixed i
incomes, have not yet participated
in the advance in wages. Improve
ment for these classes of workers will
be necessary if prices are to continue
at their present level.
"Returning soldiers are being rapid
ly and steadily absorbed Into busi
ness, and the problem which for a
time seemed to threaten in this con
nection is now apparently minimized
In all directions. From the farming
districts particularly comes the re
port that the supply of labor is scanty
And likely to prove more so as busi
ness pr ogres sow."
Government credit was reported in
good condition, as evidenced by the
high and rising market for Liberty
Bonds of practically all Issues, partic
ulars Vlctorv Bonds.
PORT TIE DP
IS BECOMING
MORE SERIOUS
Number of Ships Allocated
to Pensacola Are Divert
ed, Some of Them After:
Arrival.
MASS MEETING AT
ONCE IS SUGGESTED
Longshoremen, Backed Byj
International, Say Ship
ping Will Virtually Ceaso'
Unless Relief Comes.
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That the ports of Pensacola
and St. Andrews are the only
ones on the gulf at the present
time at which the International
Longshoremen's association Is
not' being recognized and that
these ports are very soon to be
completely tied up or "black
listed" except as to shipping to
some Mexican and South. Amer
ican ports, was the statement
made last night to the Journal
by a Central Trades Council
committee, following a meet
ing at which the matter was
fully discussed. ;
The local, I. L. A. la being
backed. It i stated by practi
cally all t the local Ubor or
. gantsations 'and ' that unless
'some ways and means of early
adjustment are found the local
port , Is to seriously suffer
seems a foregone conclusion.
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As a possible means of solution it
has been suggested that the mayor,
president of the chamber of commerce,
head of the Rotarians or other busi
ness men's group call a mass meeting
for the purpose . of discussing ways
and means for bringing about such an
adjustment cs will protect the business
of the local port.
The fight is visibly between the
shipping merchants and the steve
dores on one side and the local long
shoremen backed by the International
association o nthe other.
Ships Turn Awsy.
It is known that one large cargo
Ship the Oregon which came in port
a few days ago with mahogany logs
failed to discharge here and was sent
to an Atlantic port; another that was
to have taken 20,000 bales of cottoft
is said to have been diverted to Gal
veston after having arrived off the bar
and the cargo, much of which had
been assembled here, was reshipped
to Galveston, it is stated.
For the pasl several days it has been
noticeable that not a single cargo
ship has entered the local port, and
according to the longshoremen's com
mittee there will not be any more
ships for oargo of consequence te
foreign or home ports until some ad
justment is reached and they assert
that repeatedly the shippers and steve
dores have decided to meet with them
for the purpose of threshing out the
differences.
If ships are loaded here by unor
ganized workmen they will not be un
loaded at any port where the I. L. A.
is recognized, according to the local
longshoremen, and if they should dis
charge at an open port they would be
blacklisted just the same and could not
load at a union port. This would ap
ply not alone to the one ship, but to
all her sister ships maintained and op
erated by the same concern. It is
claimed. For this reason it Is declared
that all Emergency Fleet Corporation
ships allocated to this port will be di
verted until the trouble is settled.
Crisis Coming 3oon.
The difference between the shippers
and stevedores with the longshoremen
have been smouldering for the past
several weeks and at times there were
indications that an adjustmnt would
be reached but so far none has, and the
crisis is expected Just following the
adjournment of the annual Internation
al Association meeting to be held In
Galveston opening on July 14. The lo
cal longshoremen will be represented
at the meeting by Wm. A. Shackleford
and Geo. W. Bonlfay.
Prior to the meeting of the Inter
national at Galveston there will be an
annual meeting of the Gulf Coast di
vision held at Houston, opening on
July 7. Messrs. Shackleford and Bonl
fay will leave tomorrow for the pur
pose of attending these meetings.
According to the local longshoremen

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