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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, October 24, 1919, Image 1

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Read the Real Estate Advts.
in today's Journal. To sell or rent
Real Estate, advertise in The Jour-
naL The Journal has been the lead
ing Real Estate medium in Weit
Florida for over 20 year.
' FLORIDA WEATHER.
Local showers Friday and
probab1 Saturday, not much
Enge in temperature, moderate
south winds. - " ' '
VOL. XXII-N0.282.
THE PENSACOLA JOURNAL, FRIDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 24, 1919.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
i it i iii i . i i iiii in in in
PUBLIC GROUP
HAY FORM
LABOR PARLEY
president Asks Them to L,on-
tinue Labors or inausinai
reference Which the Union
Leaders Decided to Abandon.
r AVE ORDERS FIRST
CONFERENCE ENDED
HomDers Reiterates Assertion
That Labor Group Will Not
Take Part in Session Unless
Bargaining Clause Is Kept.
iva.hlnirton. Oct. 23. Out of the
industrial conference which
11. ... .
hesan sessions here thirteen days ago
with representatives or laDor, employ
es and public in attendance, there
remained tonight only the delegates
.he president appointed to act for the
public. Secretary Lane read a later
message from the president today
nskinir them to carry on the work for
he establishment of a new relation
ship between capital and labor. They
ere undecided tonight, however,
whether it meant they were merely to
make recommendations as to the or-
jsnlzatlon of a new conference or
.hmild undertake the mission of the
original body. In official circles it
was said later that this was what the
president had In mind.
After announcing that he had re
vived President Wilson's message,
ITuirman Lane declared the national
ndustrial conference as originally con
sumed adjourned and immediately
.-ailed the members of the public group
nto session as a new conference.
Both the public and capital groups
T?re present at the conference meet
ng place today awaiting the word from
President "Wilson. Spokesmen for each
iaUl further deliberations appeared
lopeless since the representatives . of
organized labor had withdrawn from
the conference, but the public dele
gates were expected to comply with
Mr. Wilson's request to continue their
ibors. ?'.'',.; 17'' ' -a -
TNTiHe Samuel Gompers.-president of
the American Federation of Labor, re
terated today that the labor delegates
would not again meet with the em
unless a. maiorltv of
:he employers' representatives changed
heir attitude on the issue 01 coiiecwve
Targainlng. officials had not abandoned
ope that labor would assent to prin
ciples which might be formulated by
he public group, acting alone.
Whether canital's representatives
ould assent to the arrangement pro
nosed remained to be developed. Their
-pokesmai said, before the presidents
nessage was received, that tney liaa
tood for what they regarded as just
rinciples and were content to rest
neir case before the public on the
,Jiuerence recora.
After the conference was adjourned
'r. Lane said it was probable the
esident would increase the member-
:ip of the public group so as to make
at bodv more representative. Orisan-
ed labor may be asked to participate
rough delegates to De named Dy mo
-esident.
The nubile representatives probably
name sub-commitees to study and
wt on various phases or tne m-i-trial
situation, and then consolidate
;ir findings into the pronounce
ment of the conference, Mr. Lane said.
Tiis course is similar to that urged
a the original conference Dy me
iairman.
DESTROYERS ARE
LEAVING TODAY
FOR NEW PORTS
According to an announcement made
Hordav. several ' of the destroyers
" in port will leave today for Dry
tttugas. Others will go ' to Mooue
New Orleans and later in the
''k the flaeshlo Rochester will go
1 the Crescent City."
The vessel In tor are to nroceed
-rth to the Carolinas but are to re
to Penaacola. for manoeuvres.
3ers to the ships are somewhat in--nite.
their future movements de
eding on the activity of the recruit-
campaigns now being conducted.
EXPORTS REPORTS
SHOW DECREASE
OR SEPTEMBER
Washington, Oct. 23. Record break-
e country's foreign trade in Sep
revealed today by the depart
"x f commerce. The September
ns ere three hundre1 anj forty-
mm; ...
iv aoiiars. a new nign recora.
"Ports for September were only
b'dred and ninety-three million.
RICAN SHIPS
POSTED AT
LLOYD'S BUREAU
A
' ct- 23,Two Afj-rican
v?ssels were posted at XKiyd s
the schooner Her y "W.
Oct. 13. Two
m Norfolk, via Berm -j
1' as missing, and tl i
M
t. i
j
iu UURia' for San Franc-
PRISON FACES
VIOLATORS OF
03)
NEW FO OD BILL
Profiteering's Now Legally a
Crime and Maximum Penalty
. Is $5,000 Fine and Two Years
Confinement.
ATTORNEY'S OFFICE
SEES LOWER PRICES
Europe Now Has Food Enough
to Last Two Months So that
Food Shortage in That Period
. Means Hoarding.
By GEORGE B. WATERS
It's prison for profiteers from now
on."
The law which went into effect Oct.
20 sets the Department of Justice on
the trail of trousers.- And th-i machin
ery of federal authority optvates with
out fear or f ivor. "
Whether it's a packing magnate or a
corner grocer, the man who gets caught
at the old game of "begar my neign
bor" through unjust prices lands in a
celL ?'-'
Prison sentences will be , urged In
every case.
President Wilson asked for this law
ten weeks ago. . As it now stands, its
action extends omy until peace is for
mally ratified by cor.gress.
The . Department of Justice urges
that congress extend the life of the
anti-profiteering act so that the Amer
ican people can be protected from the
exploiters until the high cost crisis is
past . :
Meanwhile, cases against profiteers
will be rushed and prosecutions start
ed now will proceed after peace is
ratified. "
Howard Figg. special assistant at
torney general, said today that the
people of the United States can bank
on lower prices. 71,
"I am not just optimistic over the
outlook: I am positive," said Mr. Figg.
'"Profiteering is now legally a crime.
The maximum penalty for profiteer
ing $5,000 fine and two .years in.
PrnnveryTtase "poseceirn0l
ask jail sentences, j- .
"We will obtain our evidence throu0n
the bureau of investigation, the at
torney generals of states, county at
torneys, fair-price commissioners. fed
eral district attorneys and , directly
from consumers. .By Nov. 1 we
know the location of every pound of
food in the United States and we are
going to keep a dally check on it . to
determine where it goes." "
Nobody is serving in jail at the pres
ent time for hoarding: there has benn
no federal law. until the one enacted
by this congress, against profiteering.
Mr Figg said prosecutions have been
difficult under the laws against hoard
ing as it was hard to distinguish be
wSen hoarding and storing But the
task of discovering excessive profits
r..rnlexinsr. he declared.
Will IlUli tJ . .
. , kn 81 prosecutions in
connection with our food Investiga
tions." said Mr.. Figg. m
24 states the owners of the food turned
it over to the district attorneys and it
was distributed at mucn xower . i v
than it was being held for. In these
cases the prosecutions were dismissed
by agreement. Seven cases are pend
ing and six cases of hoarding are up
for hearing. .
"There should be a gradual decline
of prices , to the pre-war level, com
mencing at once. At. .
"The tremendous increase in the ae
mands for exports waf one- of the
causes for high prices. But at this
time all Europe has enough food on
hand to last two months. This means
we do not have to export - any more
food for that period, and if this doesn't
lower prices, we will know it is Je
cause of hoarding and .profiteering.""
PLANES REMAIN
HAMPTON ROADS
ACCOUNT OF FOG
Advices received at the navy yard
last night stated that both planes in
the" flight to Rockaway. Long Island,
were still at Hampton Roads. Weather
conditions at that point are . such as
to make the. trip impracticable at this
time. It is not known when they, will
resume the hop.
Farrockaway. New York. Oct. 23.
A telegram to naval air station here
tonight said one of the two naval
planes that left Hampton Roads for
this station today returned to Hamp
ton Roads because of the fog. No
word from the other but it Is assumed
here It also put back. The planes
started from Pensacola.
SENATORxWATSON
DENIES CHARGES
OF COMMISSION
,Washlngton. Oct. 23. Senator Wat
tr, rep-ublican. of Indiana, made an
emphatic denial in the senate this aft
rr noon of the charees acainst him
mde yesterday by the federal trade
, t..tement of the commission that he
w,iS friendly to the packers. He ac-
- ned the commission of bringing "IP
vkX and dlsproven charges.
The Root of the Trouble
1 ' . . , . r l
'iJBUrt3
OPERATORS ARE
OF SETTIEIENT
Following" Suggestion of Secre
tary Wilson They Will Meet
Miners as if No Proposals
Had Been Refused.
"Washington, . Oct. ' 23. Without
breaking off negotiations, soft coal
mine operators Jointly with Secretary
Wilson adjourned tonight until " to
morrow with a pledge meanwhile to
consider a new proposal to negotiate
a peaceful settlement of the strike
called for November 1.
Secretary Wilson said the new pro
posal he made is that - they go Into
conference with .each other without
reservations, as if no demands had
been made or refused, having in mind
the Interest of respective groups,
The United Mine Workers of Ameri
ca today formally rejected the pro-
posal by Secretary Wilson for settle
ment of the coal strike called for
November, 1. -
John - L, Lewis, ' preslder. of the
miners organization announced rthat
the proposal was Indefinite, Inade
quate and failed to meet the situation.
He added that he woulds so report to
the Joint conference this afiernoon. .
VISCOUNT FRENCH
SAYS SINN FEIN :
HAS SECRET ARMY
London, Oct. 2 3. g peaking a Wal
lasy, Chaeshlre, tonight. Field Marshal
Viscount French, lord lieutenant and
governor general of Ireland, made a
bitter attack upon the Sinn Fein gov
ernment of Ireland. Among otheV
things he said;
The self -constituted, illegal and In
sane Sinn Fein government Is pos
sessed of a , great secret army called
the 'Irish ' volunteers, " to which are
attached assassins 'whose .business It
is-to murder police and soldiers who
question their decrees In any - com
munity. The people are frightened
into screening the offenders and cour
ageous efforts on the part of the police
are abortive. ; We are anxious to give
self-determination and 'to be faithful
and Just .to all. but little can possibly
be done until law and order' are estab
lished. When the people hear of 'coer
cion,' I hope they will consider the
matter In a just light,"
GERMAN OPERA
PRODUCED UNDER
POLICE GUARD
New York. jOct. 23. While more
lhan. three hundred patrolmen, de
tectives and mounted police , stood
guard. -the German opera was sung
tonight "at the Lexington theatre for
the third time this week. Although
the crowds surged through the streets
near tho theatre, there was no serious
disorders as previously. -
SK JIOPEFUL TOJUlEaAE iff 15I7MT0EIG
vwk.- ,-, y rrx -
CATTS PROTESTS
LEPER
Takes Delegation of State Health
Board Officials to, Washing
ton to Appear Before Surgeon
General.
Washington, Oct. 23. A Florida del
egation consisting of Governor Catts,
President Earman," of the state board
of health. State Health Officer Green,
Fish Commissioner Williams, P. Mason
Smith, superintendent, Chattahoochee,
T. R. Hodges, and members ' of the
Florida delegation in congress appear
ed before Surgeon General Blue today
vigorously protesting against the loca
tion" of a leper colony in Florida
Members of the United States Pub
lic Health Service appointed by Blue
have personally visited Three Keys,
near Cedar. Key, which comprise four
hundred acres, and have unanimously
recommended the establishment of a
leper colony there. The Florida dele
gation had "a five " hour ' session with
Blue and final decision is in his hands.
Blue announced ' at the close of the
Conf erence that . every consideration
would be "given the protest. The dele
gation was " presented by Earman.
Catts delivered the opening and closing
protests after all, including' four pub
lic . health board members. - had , been
heard. Green discussed the medical
side of the subject. , The public health
experts admit they know nothing of
the manner in which the disease is
transmitted from human to .human.
The surgeon general has a most seri
ous problem to consider. .'It is expected
he will make a final decision , within
ten days. ,'- '
SENATE TREATY
RESERVATIONS ARE PROPOSED
Foreign Relations Committee
Recommends Congressional
Approval .' of International
Representatives.
Washington, Oct. 23. The 'senate
foreign relations committee today ap
proved four more reservations as part
of its new program for a qualified ac
ceptance of the peace treaty. Its ac
tion brought the number of resolutions
it has approved to fourteen and while
it was said no more are to be consid
ered for the present, it is considered
likely there will be additions -if the
senate consideration of the treaty pro
ceeds. ' ! .
The four accepted today provide for
(Continued 'on' Page Two.)
COLONY
By Morris
PYTHIANS LOOK
SESSION HERE
Pensacola: Is 'to Be Made Head
quarters for Knights of Kho
rassan Throughout the West
Florida District.
. Pensacola is to become the great
headquarters ' of Pythlans in West
Florida. Following out a program
tentatively submitted at a meeting of
the late summer, at which a temple
West Florida Pythlans at Milton in
of the Dramatic Order, Knights of
Khorassan, was formed, a ' meeting of
the elective officers of the Temple was
held yesterday, and " it was decided
that all ; officers of the new temple
should be sworn in by the grand secre
tary on the evening of November 13.
On this date arrangements will t be
made for ceremonies which. , are to
follow. The occasion will mean much
to Knights of Pythias from Tallahas
see to Pensacola, it is announced.
Teams will be present from Birming
ham. Montgomery and Mobile and the
ceremonial will attract Pythlans from
all West Florida. .
John- L. Neeley, United States Dis
trict Attorney, Is Royal Vizer of the
Dramatic Order, Knights of Khoras
san, and other officers include the
following: John Collins of Milton; J.
A. Jacobl of Molino; J. E. Keen of
Bagdad, who is treasurer; M O.
Brawner of Pensacola, who is secre
tary: E; E. Johnston,, W. L. Moyer,
Madsen, Pensacola; C. G. Hall,
Molino; W. J. Williams. Jr.. Milton.
R. F. Cobb, Milton; J. E. Cox, Bag
dad. ADMIRAL KOONTZ
TO BE CONFIRMED
AT NEXT SESSION
Washington, Oct.. 23. Republican
members of the senate naval committee
announced today that objections to
confirmation of Admiral Koontz as
chief of naval operations had been
withdraw., Confirmation of the nomi
nation at the next session of the sen
ate is planned.
BULLETIN SHOWS
PRESIDENT TO BE
STILL IMPROVING
Washington, Oct. 23. "The president
is satisfactorily maintaining the im
provement which he has recently
made," said Dr. Grayson's bulletin to
night. 7v-.;' :
AMERICAN WINS
OVER AUSTRALIAN
IN THREE ROUNDS
London, Oct. 23. Fred Fulton, the
American heavyweight, tonight knock
ed out Gordon Coghill, of Australia,
In the third ' round of what . was to
have been a twenty-round bout.
PENSACOLA FIRST FLORIDA CITY
TO RECEIVE CHARM OF KITOIS
CHUG HERE
OF C011,i ISSIOII
IS NOT CERTAIN
Chairman Borein Indicates Meet
ing Will Be Held But Com
missioner Burguieres Unable
- to Attend.
MAYOR SANDERS HAS
ASKED CONFIRMATION
Pensacola Committee Will Not
Present Claims Unless - Full
.Commission Is Present to
Hear Them.
Whether or not there will be a
meeting In Pensacola tomorrow of the
State Purchase Commission is still
undecided. Mayor Sanders was noti
fied by Chairman Broerln yesterday
that an attempt was being made to
hold ' the meeting and that Commis
sioner . Burguieres of Palm Beach,
might be able to attend.
Postmaster Hancock, chairman of
the executive committee, received a
telegram from Mr. Burguieres saying
that he would be finable to attend
because of business engagements
of the state.
Mayor Sanders laid these conditions
before Chairman Brorein by wire last
night and is expecting a definite re
port today. In the meantime plans
must be made to entertain the visitors
should the session be held. Pensa
cola, centennial workers are confident
of ultimate success. West Florida con
tinues to ' send s. ' news of favorable
nature and every1, effort will be made
to create a favorable . Impression and
maintain the impression made . last
Monday at Tallahassee. -," St w-."'--
' The telergams so far exchanged,
follow: ' , - -- -
. ' , . Tampa, Fla Oct. 23.
Hon. F. D. Sanders, Mayor, Pensacola:
Trying to reach Burguieres at New
Orleans to arrange meeting twenty
fifth. Understand Senator, McWilllams
cannot attend meeting first. Will keep
you advised. Thanks, for hearty wel
come. 1 ,
' . - - W. G. BROREIN.
New Orleans. Oct. 23.
Ben S. Hancock. Chairman, Pensacola:
Thanks for your telegram of twen
tieth. Regret that trip outside of
elate wilj prevent my being present
Saturday.
J. M. BURGUIERES.
' ' ' ' - Pensacola, Fla., Oct. 23.
W. S. Brorein, Chairman Centennial
Commission, Tampa, Fla,:
Hancock received telegram from
Burguerles stating he could not be in
Pensacola Saturday. Please advise
quick.- .
F.D. SANDERS,
Mayor.
BILL PROVIDING
JtETURNOF ROADS
IS REPORTED OUT
Washington. Oct. 23. The bill pro
viding for return of railroads to pri
vate ownership and operation under
federal supervision was reported out
today by , the senate Interstate com
merce committee. No changes were
matte in the measure as finally revis
ed last week, the anti-strike and all
other important provisions remaining.
Chairman Cummins plans to have it
in position for senate debate immedi
ately after the peace treaty is dispos
ed of. . ',
PROSECUTOR SAYS
BILLY DANZY IS
IN MIDDLE WEST
Hammonton, N. X, Oct, 23. A
woman kidnapper is in possession of
missing Billy, Danzy somewhere in the
middle west. Prosecutor Gasklll. of
this county, made this assertion today.
Information received by his investiga
tors from a passenger on a railway
train leads to this belief, he said.
; The three year old child wandered
away from home near here fifteen days
ago. Since that, time a country-wide
search has been in progress.
ALL CLOCKS TO
BE TURNED BACK
ONE HOUR SUNDAY
Washington. Oct. 23. Railroad of
ficers and employes have been in
structed to turn their watches back one
hour at 2 a. - m., next Sunday when
the daylight savings law becomes In
operative. Director General Hines said
today. Trains in terminals when the
change occurs will be held until the
schedule time of departure under the
new time. .
Local Tribe Directs President
Holsberry to Wire Congratu
lations to Tampa Indians Who
Arc Honored Today.
LIEUT.-GOVERNOR , BAILEY
PRESENTS CHARTER HERE
Nearly a Hundred Members and
Guests Took Part in the Fes
tivities Ladies Joined in
Trip Around the Bay.
. In the midst of one of the most
enthusiastic settings ever staged In
the club life of Pensacola, the local
Klwanlan braves received their char
ter yesterday afternoon at the San
Carlos hotel at the hands of District
Lieutenant Governor Jeff Bailey of
Birmingham. In connection with the
presentation speech the cat was al
lowed to escape from the bag to the
effect that Pensacola is the first city
In Florida to receive a Kiwanls char
ter. Tampa has been loudly claiming
the honor of having the first Kiwanls
club in the state; but Tampa Is re
ceiving her charter today,' a day be
hind Pensacola, at the hands of Gov
ernor Arrant of Birmingham. When
this fact was learned. President Hols
berry was Instructed by a screaming
ly unanimous vote to telegraph con
gratulations from the first Kiwanls
club in the state to the second. It
was stated that Jacksonville will be a
poor third.
Those who had attended the charter
presentation at Mobile a few weeks
ago and were able to compare the two
occasions, spoke in highest praise of
manner in which Lieutenant Gov-
or Bailey conducted the ceremo
ni . After the presentation speech
uiu ibltion of the important docu
ment, . r. Bailey caused the club
members to rise, and repeat in chorus
after him, line by line the following
obligation:
"I obligate myself as a Klwanlan
to attend meetings promptly and reg
ularly; to do my part before being
asked and more than my part when
called , upon; to help increase the
.it m .v. i i . t.
change of ideas and business methods;
to help inculcate and encourage among
fellow members high ideals and bust-,
ness Integrity, coupled with a spirit
of generosity and unselfishness in
service for the common good, with the
realization that service brings its own
reward and a true man lives not for
himself alone."
Mr. Bailey gave the membership
many excellent Ideas on methods of
maintaining a high personnel and
spirit In the club and working har
moniously with all other civic organ
izations for the betterment of the
community.
President Leroy V. Holsberry, in be
half of the club, made the formal ad
dress of welcome, laying stress on the
double advantage to be enjoyed In a
welcome to the natural attractions of
Pensacola and the spirit ' of the local
Kiwanls Indians.
B. G. Betty, of the Montgomery
and neighboring clubs, stating . that
he had been specially commissioned
club, responded on behalf of visiting
by his club to gather pointers to aid
them in their similar function to be
staged in a few days. He declared
that the enthusiasm and geniality dis
played by the Pensacola crowd was a
revelation and inspiration to him.
Local Director W. C. Dillard enter
tained the assemblage with witty re
marks of an impromptu nature . and
Harry W. Thompson led the best yell
ing that has yet been heard in the
local wigwam. The jazz orchestra on
the balcony stirred enthusiasm to a
high pitch In its rendition of the cen
tennial song, "Pensacola Town," the
Kiwanians Joining heartily in the
chorus, and filling the measure with
vigorous shouting, a strong echo of
the trip to Tallahassee.
The customary "oral boost" was
given by W. H. Bradford, who men
tioned several new and interesting
evidences of the high favor locally en
joyed by the new club; as well as re
counting the results accomplished in
the past four months. His nomina
tion of "Chicken" Tebault as club
candidate for Congress was a feature.
A T1 nnn lr A - . .
.yca&cia were vigorously ap
plauded. '
While the guestsl were still seated
at the "K" shaped tables after par
taking of one of the best banquets
ever served, by the San Carlos man
agement, a flash light photograph was
taken by Klwanlan Rox Cowley. A
talkative parrot was exhibited In mem
ory of "Buffalo Bill" Wright, organ
izer of the club. -
t, Nearly a hundred members and
guests were present at tile festivities.
It had been arranged for the ladies
of .the party to attend? a matinee at
the Pastime while the gentlemen en
Joyed a trip on the bay on the govern
ment steamer swartout; and Rotarian
Johnny Jones had generously invited
the entire party to be his guests at
the Is is matinee; but at the last mo
ment all plans were changed, and aU
hands, ladies and gentlemen, took the
About 25 wives of Kiwanians graced
the occasion; which was keenly en
Joyed by all. Light refreshments were
served on the boat. .
At eight o'clock the gay assemblage
reappeared in , the San Carlos for
Continued on page 2)

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