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The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, February 24, 1921, Image 1

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PEPfSACOLA'S IIAKBOK
Can Accommodate tha Navies of
tbe World.
WEST FLORIDA
The Ail-Year Playground of
America.
ONLY ASSOCIATED PRESS PAPER IN PENSACOLA MEMBER NEWS ENTERPRISE ASSOCIATION.
VOL. XXIII, NO. 302.
THE WEATHER
Fair today and Friday; warmer.
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA, THURSDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 24, 1921.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
Jl w, Mil AGRICULTURE
UNITED ST A
ECONOMY PLEA
AGAIN IGNORED
Objections by Many Senators to
Duplications in Rill Are
Over-ridden.
kt .
SMOOT LEADS OPPONENTS
Announces He Will Ask New
Secretary to Clip Numer-
ous Items from Bill.
(By The Associated Press).
WASHINGTON, 1-V1. 23. Over a
running fire from senators who pre
sented detailed objections to its' pro
posal for Increased expenditures,
the senate tonight passed the agri
cultural appropriation bill carrying
approximately' $41,000,000 for the op
eration of that department for the
year banning: next June. This
amount is nearly $9,000,000 in excess
of appropriations for the coming year
and almot $6,a00,00' In except of
which It was sent for conference af
ter the senate's action.
'T am going to ask the next secre
tary of agriculture to go through
thin bill as soon as he takes office
and take out of it all the appropria
tions that allow work to be dupli
cated by two and sometimes more de
partments of the government," Sen
ator Smoot, republican, Utah, de
clared in an unsuccessful attack on
numerous sums allowed In the bill.
"They ought to bo cut out before
another eatimate comes to congress.
"This must stop; congress has got
to show the departments of this
government that two and three of
them cannot ask public money to be
spent for ding the name kind, of
work over and' over atfnln, simultan
eously, and year after yir.
'One trouble is that different bu-
reft.ua are enabled to go before differ-
-nt congressional committees and du-
pilcato the appropriations in differ
ent bills."
"I hope the senator from Utah
won't atop at the agricultural depart
ment. Chairman Widsworth of the
military affairs committee interrupt
ed. "We find the war department get
ting money In in or three different
Mils."
larger Items added by the senate
to the agricultural bill Included $150,
000 extra for wood utilization exper
iments at Madison, Wis.; $100,000 for
weather bureau forecasts ifor avia
tion: $114,000 for road materials in
vestigations, and $100,000 for Inves
tigation: of foreign markets for farm
jiroducts. Senator Thomas, democrat.
( '(dorado, checked several other minor
uddltkma on points of order, but the
senate added heavily to amounts
recommended by its own agriculture
committee.
TUMULTY OFFERED
COMMISSION SEAT
(By The Associated Press).
WASHINGTON, Fob. 23. Presi
dent Wilson today proffered Joseph
1. Tumulty, his private secretary for
ten years, an appointment on Uie in
ij entrusted with sir-bit rat ion of dis
putes between the United States and
Canada. In confirming the tender, of
the appointment, Mr. Tumulty said:
It is true that the president has
fest asked mo to accept an appoint
ment on the International Joint com
mission. I very much appreciate the
generous offer of tho president, but
J have not bad time t decide the
matter. I have been exceedingly busy
in finally disposing of the affairs of
my office In preparation for engaging
In the practice of law."
BASS CONVICTED
OF SLAYING WIFE
(By The Associated Press).
DUBLIN. Va., Feb. 21 Marshall
jtass was convicted here tonight by a
jury of a charge of killing his wife. near
1 1 ere several months ago.
F.ass pleaded that the shooting was
accidental, the gun being discharged
when hi ilve-yenr-olil son grabbed It as
jie and his wife and boy weru walking
along the road. Mrs. Lias was carrying
her baby In her arms at the time and
according to her living statement "as
related to the Jury y lr. W. II. Brig
liam. Pass shot her In anger over a visit
he paid her father. f
Counsel for Buss applied for a new
trial and March 24 waa set for a hear-iiiff-
(DR. GAMBIULLIS
SERIOUSLY ILL
(By The Associated Press).
MACON. Oft.. Feb. 23. Pr. J. , Osm
l.r'etl. resident Of tn Southern Bap
tit convention, and former president of
lroer university. Is critically 111 In
accruing to
j .alia, Texas, awr-rain o mem.ng rtce, , 34 3a5 for with 410;o against, ed the building. C. Talbot t Your.g. on
..tvd here tonight His son and . ., . . . ... ... ....... ..I - , 1 ,.
., aMn the latter a Ked Cross nurse wni,e lmposai ao. . sirenguieningi .u im- iou, uue.us in me ouimins
1 r"iK U world war, left here tonight lhe suffrage laws was defeated by a at the time, jumped from the second
L'al aa, x lVOt ot 46,981 to 2S723 J story, window, unhurt.
AIRPLANE MAIL LEAVES FRISCO
IN MORNING AND IS DELIVERED
IN NEW YORK NET AFTERNOON
Feat of Crossing Continent in 33 !
Hours and 20 Minutes is
Accomplished.
NEW ERA 1N AVIATION
Pilots Flew from Cheyenne,
Wyoming, to Chicago Over
night, 839 Miles.
(By The Associated Press)
HAZELJlUftST. X. Y.. Feb. 23. Eight
hags of mail, despatched from San Fran
cisco by airplane at 4:20 yesterday
morning, arived at ilazelhurst field here
today at 4:&0 p. in., establiHhing a cross-i
country mail record of 33 hours and 20 1
minutes with allowance for time zone:
changes in the coast to coast flight.
The mail was transferred from plane i
to plane in a relay flight ordered by the
postoffice department to establish a new
cross continent mail plane record. The
plane, which arrived at Hazelhurst, was
piloted by E. M. Allison, a member of
one of the four teams which took part
In the trans-continental race, two planes,
leaving Ilazelhurst field and two start
ing from San Francisco at the same time
yesterday morning.
One of the westward bound planes
came to grief when Pilot E. M. Leon
hard was forced to descend yesterday at
Dubois. Pa., on account of bad weather.
The second west bound plane reached
Chicago yesterday and was unable to
get away today. The other east bound I
plane crashed to earth at Elko, Nev..
yesterday, killing the pilot, Capt. W. F. I
jewis. lapiam Ainson piloted one
westward bound plane as far as Cleve
land, wnere it was taken over by an-j
other pilot . on the secpnd lap of the!
relay, which ended at Chicago, lie then
took the winning plane in charge at
Cleveland and returned " to Hazelhurst
field this afternoon, bettering the time
set for the flight by the postoffice de-
finales "
WASHINGTON. Fob. 23. Postoffice
department officials while gratitied at the
achievement of the air mail service in
landing at New York tonight, which left
San Francisco yesterday morning, said
the most remarkable part of the entire
performance was the all-night flight from
Cheyenne, Wyoming,, to Chicago, a dis
tance of 839 miles.
The all-night flight made by Pilots
Frank Tager and Jack Knight, demon
strated the feasibility of niRht flying, of
ficials said. With this statement they
coupled the announcement that orders
had been issued to prepare for regular
night flying on the New York and San
Francisco route, probably about May 1.
Otto Praeger. assistant postmaster
generat, described last night's flight
between Cheyenne and Chicago as "the
most momentous step in civil aviation. '
He added that it would mean "the
speedy revolutionizing of the letter
transportation methods and practices
throughout the world."
IARDINGWILL
BORROW BIBLE
Will Use Same One That Wash
ington Kissed When He
Was Inaugurated.
(By The Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Feb. 23 President
elect Harding, plans on taking the
oath of office March 4 to press his
lips to the Bible that was used at the
first inauguration of George Wash
ington. In accord with Mr. Harding's
wishes, KHiott Woods, superintendent
of the eapitol. arranged today with St.
Johns Lsxlge, No. 1, A. V. & A. M..
of New York city, for the uso of the
Bible. It will ho brought to Wash
ington by a committee of Masons.
So far as the records show this will
be tho fourth occasion on which there
has been a departure from the usual
custom of having the clerk of the su
preme court furnish th Bible used in
an Inauguration.
The Bible is the personal property
of the lodge and ha been carefully
prose r veil.
ALABAMA VOTES
DOWN AMENDMENT
(By The Associated Press.)
MONTGOMFiRY, Ala., Feb. 23. The
state election board in session today
for the purpose oC canvas? ig the
votes cast in the special election held
Feb. 8, on two proposals to amend tho
Alabama constitution, announced the
defeat of both by decisive majorities.
Proposal No. 1 to amend the amend
ment to the constitution respecting
good roads,, authorizing the sale of
$3,000,0(10 of the bonds at six per cent,
TES DEM A NDS ISLAND OF YAP
WOMAN IS CHARGED
WITH COUNTERFEITING
(By The Associated Press.)
KOAXOKE, Va.. Feb. 23. Mrs
Samuel T. Wheeler. 72 years old, o,
Bonsacks, Va., near here," today
was arrested by Deputy V. S. Mar
shal Charles Hamilton on a charge
of counterfeiting.
According to Federal District At
torney . Joseph Chitevvood, Mrs.
Wheeler confessed that she had
raised a number of $5 and $10 fed
eral reserve notes to $50 and $101
and made purchases with them ir
this city. She stated she found the
utensils in an evangelistical meet
ing. FIGHT MARKS
RAIL HEARING
Erie Railroad and . Employes
Clash Over Authority of
Transportation Act.
(By The Associated Press.)
CHICAGO. Feb. 23. Sharu conten
tion- over the powers of the Unito.1
States Railway Labor board and the
provisions of tho transxiortation act.
marked the hearing of employes of
thu Erie railroad against their em
ployer before the' board today. The
( petition of the employes charged vio
lation of the act and of decisions of
the labor board. Representatives uf
the road denied both. The case re
sulted from an order, effective Feb. I.
reducing common labo wages and de
ducting ono day's pay a week from
the salaries of all employes paid on a
monthly basis.
Most of the argument ' centered
about whether a ruling of the board
on Feb. 12, ordering tho road tu make
no change in wage rates was compul
sory upon the road, which had al
ready put a reduction into effect. It
was conceded by the rail representa
tives that the intent of the order was
to maintain the rates of the wage
award of July, 1920. They denied,
however, violation of ' the law in
changing those rates. Business de
pression and revenues below operat
ing expenses were given as the) reason
for the reduction order.
During his testimony, R. s. Parsons,
general manager for the road, was
asked by Henry T. Hunt, public mem
ber of the board, whether the road's
position meant that it would not obey
the orders of ,the board.
"We can't do it." Mr. Parsons re
plied. "We want to do everything
possible to get along with the board!
but I don't know what we would do if
the board issued impossible orders"
CARUSO MAY SAIL
FOR EUROPE HOME
(By The Associated Press).
N-DW YORK. FcU 23. Dr. Antonio
Stella, one of the specialists attend
ing Enrico Caruso, tenor, who is ill
here with pleurisy, said tonight that
the tenor will sail for Europe about
the end of March if his conditioa con
tinues to improve. A trip to Atlantic
City has been planned during his
convalescence.
Mr. Caruso's condition was reported
as improving steadily.
AMERICA IMPORTS
BIG WOOL STOCKS
(By The Associated Press).
BOANOKE. Va., Feb. 23. Addressing
the Virginia sheep and wool growers'
association here today. Oeorge Willing
myer. wool specialist for the United
States bureau of markets, declared that
O00.o00.0u0 pounds of wool are consumed
annually in the United States, half of
which amount is produced in this coun
try. According to Mr. Willingmyer.
300,000,000 pounds of wool are imported
to the United States every year from
South America and Australia
FRAT HOUSE AT
VIRGINIA BURNS
(By The Associated Press)
CHARLOTTESVILLE. Va.. Feb. 2i.
Fire starting in the furnace room
of the Chi Phi fraternity house at the
University of Virginia today, destroy-
e
If in An ati irnrpn
lawk mmiii
TO INJUNCTIONS
Demands Enactment of Law by
Congress Exempting Un
ions from Trust Act.
TO IGNORE INUNCTIONS
Realizes Result of Course But
Insists That Liberty Must
be Guarded.
( By "hev Associated Press.)
WASHINGTON, Feb. 21 Enactment
by congres . f a law declaring that al
bor organ iaUots are lvt co-partnerships
and "shall no' he so treS'iccin law or in
equity," is demanded (jy organized la
bor in a d clarfction of principles adopt
ed tonight by representatives of na
tional and international unions affiliated
in the American Federation of Labor.
The declaration which was approved
after an all-day conference here at
which Samuel Gompers, president of
the federation presided, also called for
the immediate restoration of exemption
from or the repeal of all anti-combination
and so-called conspiracy laws."
Condemning the use of the injunction
under present laws, the declaration as
serted that the "only immediate course
through which labor could find relief lies
in a flat refusal on the part of labor to
recognize or abide by the terms of
injunctions which seek to prohibit the
doing of acts which the workers have a
lawful and guaranteed right to do."
"Labor realizes fully the consequences
of such a course," it was added, "but
in the defense of American freedom and
of American institutions It is compelled
to adopt this cours, be the consequences
what they may."
Organized labor in the declaration sets
forth at length the principles for whlcb
it stands and calls upon the peop- of
the Umtctf SttuB to rally with labor
"to the defense of our imperrilled Ameri
can institutions."
AQUITANIA HELD
FOR FUMIGATION
(By The Associated Ftess.)
XEW YORK, Feb. 23. Detained
for 3C hours at quarantine while
health officers sought any typhus
carriers in her steerage, the steam
ship Aquitania finally docked this
afternoon. But even then her pfassen
gers, who included Ir. S. Alfred Sze,
new Chinese minister to the United
States, did not immediately step
ashore, for city health inspectors
detained them for nearly half an hour
while they conducted an examina
tion of twenty second cabin passen
gers boarding the ship from disease
infested areas of Europe.
CITIZENS A
ASKED TO MEET
Protection of Womanhood of
Community Will Be Dis
cussed This Morning.
Citizens of Pensacola who haw
viewed with alarm the influence for
evil which a small group of men have
been able to wield have determined
to bring to an end the conditions ot
lawlessness which have become all too
prevalent .according to an announce
ment made yesterday afternoon after
violence was generally discussed. Ac
cording to this announcement a num
ber of citizens, who have been much
stirred up about a recent occurrence,
learned that others were also inter
ested and had gone so far as to plan
a radical step to express their indig
nation. Upon learning this they has
tily gathered a group of soberer heads
and prevailed upon the other group to
postpone their action until the matter
could be given more thought and at
tention. This conference resulted in a call
for a mass meeting of all citizens who
are interested in the welfare of the
community, both men and women, to
he held at Armory hall at 10 o'clock
this morning. More than fifty citi
zens have pledged themselves to be
present, tho announcement says, and
the men behind the call believe that
several hundred will attend.
The question to be discussed will
be the protection of life and property
and particularly the protection of the
womanhood of the city. The men
making the call for the mass. meeting
are among the most influential in the
city. The call follows:
"All citizens of Pensacola, male and
female, who are Interested in the wel
fare of the city, the protection of life
and property, and particularly the
protection of the womanhood of the
community, are requested to be pres
ent at a mass-meeting to be held at
Armory hall Thursday morning, Feb.
24. at 10 o'clock. AH good, law-abid-1
ing citizens should be present at this
RE
FLORIDA LUMBER COMPANIES ARE
NAMED IN FEDERAL SUIT AGAINST
SOUTHERN PINE AND ASSOCIATES
DEAD HERO RETURNS
VERY INOPPORTUNELY
(By The Associated Press.)
LA FAYETTE, Ga., Feb. 23 Fred
Williams, who went away to war in
1917, will return home in a few
days, to find his "body" buried
here, his war insurance policy paid
and his bride, the wife of another.
The war department reported
Williams killed in action soon after
he; went to France, paid his widow
his insurance and then sent a sol
dier's body here as his. William'
wife whom he had married but a
few months before he left, mourned
him and then married a former
sweetheart, Joseph Robertson.
GUTS
TO BE REPLACED
i Interstate Commission Favor
j ably Reports Bill for Replac
; ing Navigation Aides.
(By The Associated Press.L
WASHINGTON, .-freb. 23. The in
terstate commerce committee of the
h-lpte today in, importing favorably
otf,th bill p ying $70S.00O to au
thofixr iip o navigation, included
$50,000 for such purposes on the
coast of Florida and approaches to
Key West.
'Twelve of the beacons marking the
Florida reefs were destroyed by the
hurricane of 1919, and tho others are
in bad condition, the report declared.
"These are among the most impor
tant minor aids to navigation in the
world and assist in marking the Flor
ida reefs for a distance of 135 miles,"
the report said.
"Key West," the report continued,
"is now one of the largest seaports of
the United States, and its exports
amount to over $80,000,000 per year
and imports over $S,000.000. The re
port also set forth that Key West
"is an Extremely important military
and naval base, and a submarine base
is now in course of preparation for
which an expenditure of $2,000,000
has been authorized.
"It is now proposed," the report
continued, to establish a complete
system of range lights on permanent
structures which will not be de
stroyed or displaced by the hurri
canes that frequently strike this
port."
LANDIS OPPOSES
BALL GAMBLING
(By The Associated Press)
BOSTON. Feb. 23. The arm of the
law should be long enough to permit
it to reaeh to the bleachers and stands
at baseball parks and call to account
all who bet on games, in the opinion
of Judge K. M. Landis, baseball's su
preme arbiter. Judge Landis, in a let
ter received today by Representative
Hugh J. Lacey, of Holyoke, comment
ing on the latter's bill in the legisla
ture to penalize players or others par
ticipating in the throwing of games,
said he thought the offense should b
a felony with a penalty of from two to
five years imprisonment.
REVENUE OFFICER
DENIES HE'S DEAD
(By The Associated Press.)
LYNCHBURG. Va., Feb. 23. United
States Deputy Collector J. N. Wood, re
ported killed yesterday in Fluvanna
county by a moonshiner, proved the ex
aggeration of the report today by ar
resting two men near Lynchburg and
confiscating nine gallons of whisky. CoL
lector Wood will testify tomorrow before
United States Commissioner O'Brien in
the case of Mr. and Mrs. M. A. McCoy,
charged with selling whisky. The latter
Is also charged with attempting to kill
Woods by firing at him when he jumped
on the running board of their automo
bile. CONEY RESUMES
FLORIDA FLIGHT
DALLAS, Feb. 23. Lieutenant
W, D. Coney, who arrived at Love
field at 12:40 p. m. today, resumed
his transcontinental flight from San
Diego, CaL, to Jacksonville, Fla., at
10:14 o'clock tonight. Following his
arrival in the Florida city, Lieutenant
Coney intends to begin preparations
for a flight back to California in a
second attempt to establish a cross
country flying- record,
i
FLORIDA I J
1
Stearns, Bagdad, Harbeson and
Standard Companies Are
Included.
SHERMAN ACT IS CITED
Violation of Anti-Trust Law by
Curtailing Production is
Charged.
(By The Associated Press)
ST. LOUIS, Feb. 23. Charging viola-.
tlon of the Sherman anti-trust law, the
government today filed in the federal
district court here injunction proceed
ings against the Southern Pine assoca
tion, 61 corporations and G9 individuals.
Granting of a permanent injunction for
the purposes specified would amount to
dissolution of the association. It was
explained. '' n
The suit alleges the association has
operated to curtail production to enhance
prices and that as a result profits on
sales of yellow pine advanced from $6.41
a thousand feet in 1918 to $30.35 in 1920.
The suit was filed by District Attor
ney Carroll, in compliance with instruc
tions from Attorney General Palmer, and
is based on a report of the federal trade
commission which investigated activi
ties of the association. Judge Faris set
March 15 for a hearing.
The petition asserts that "because of
the rapidly increasing prices for yellow
pine lumber the price fixing committee
of the war industries board established
maximum prices for such lumber, which
were legally in effect on and after June
15, 1918."
"The defendants," the petition contin
ues, "concertedly adopted the position
that these 'maximum prices should be
regarded as in fact minimum prices and
frequently exceeded these prices."
Corporations named as -defendants in
clude: Stearns Lumber and Export company.
Pensacola, Fla.; Standard Lumber com
pany, Oak, Fla.; Bagdad Land and Lum
ber company, Bagdad, Fla.; W. B. Har
beson Lumber company, JeFuniak
Springs, Fla.
NEW ORLEANS. Feb. 23. The board
of directors of the Southern 1'ine asso
ciation will meet in Chicago on March
1 to determine what action shall be
taken in regard to the injunction pro
ceedings filed by the government in the
federal court at St. Louis today, accord
Ing to an announcement tonight by J
E. Rhodes, secretary-manager.
Secretary Rhodes further declared that
the association has not a?nd does not
intend to regulate prices or control pro.
duction in any manner, and that officials
of the association know nothing of any
effort on the part of the 61 corporations
and 69 individuals involved In the liti
gation to fix prices or control produc
tion. WHEAT TARIFF
IS DETERMINED
Conferees on Fordney Bill Com;
promise at 35 Cents Per
Bushel.
(By The Associated Press).
WASHINGTON. Feb. 23. A com
promise agreement fixing the tariff
on wheat at 35 cents per bushel was
reached today by senate and house
conferees considering the Fordney
emergency tariff bill.
The wheat schedule was one of the
principal stumbling blocks.
The house rate was 30 cents per
bushel and the senate 40 cents.
The agreement on 35 cents was said
to involve the question of the differ
ence in the rate of exchange. Dis
agreements over the sugar, tobacco,
hides and cherries schedules con
tinued among the conferees vho will
resume their work tomorrow.
Among minor adjustments agreed
on today was a change in the rate on
olives not packed in solution from five
to three cents a pound.
The senate conferees receded on the
cotton schedule, agreeing to placing a
rate of 7 cents a pound on cotton
having a staple of 1 3-S inches or
more in length, as provided by the
house. The senate had voted to re
duce the staple to 1 1-8 inch.
BAPTIST LEADER
SERIOUSLYILL
(By The Associated Press.)
DALLAS, Tex., Feb. 23. Dr. J. B.
Gambrill, president of the Southern
Baptist convention is seriously ill at
the home of his daughter, Mrs. Fred
erick Porter, this city. He is suffer
ing from a nervous breakdown,
brought down by overwork, physi
cians say.
It was reported at a late hour to
night that he has a fair chance for
recovery. lrt Gambri', is 80 years
Id.
CABLE STATION
MUST BE FREE
American Note to Council of
League of Nations is In
sistent on Claim.
JAPAN IS INFORMED
Secretary Colby Has Already
Laid Demands Before the
Allied Governments.
(By The Associated Press).
PARIS, Feb. 23. The council of th
leaeuH of nations 1fciHrl tnniirht ti rU-
j out only a summary of the American
uoie regaraing marinates under the
league .the text of which was submitted
to the council this morning.
The summary follows:
The government of the Unitod States
declares it seizes the occasion to send
the council of the league a copy of a
note jdressed to Earl Curzon (British
foreign minister) on November 20. set
ting forth in detail the views of the
United States on the responsibilities of
mandatory powers.
"A copy of that note has been sent to
the French and Italian governments. The
United States government draws the at
tention of the council to the request
made in that not thnt tiiA r,-w.
, mandate intended for the society of na-
tions, before they were submitted to the
council, oe communicated to the United
States government, and that it have
precise indications on the principles on
which the United States conditioned lta
approbation.
"The United States government has
received the text of the mandate at
tributed to the emperor of Japan- over
all former German islands situated in
the Pacific ocean north of the equator
which text was approved by the council
of the league December 17 in Geneva,
"The United States; government de
clares it has never given Its consent
that the Island of Yap be included -in
territories subjected to the mandato of
Japan.
"It recalls that it has already so in
formed the governments of Great Brit
ain. France, Italy and Japan, informing
them at the same time that its reserva
tion rested upon tho opinion that Yap
enters necewsarlly into any project or
system of practical communication bv
cable in the Pacific and that no power
.wi mini or control Its use.
"Consequently, the United States gov
ernment is moved to declare respectfully
that it cannot regard itself as bound by
the terms of said mandate and desires
particularly that note be taken of its
protest against the decision of the
league council of December 17 upon
this question.
"At the same time it aska the council,
whose action resulted evidently from
an inexact representation of tha facts,
to submit the question to a new inves
tigation which an equitable solution r
quirea." AMBUSCADE HELD
AT MT. CHARLES
(By The Associated Press.)
BELFAST. Feb. 23 The ambuscado
at Mount Charles, , countv Donegal,
last night, resulted in the death
two policemen and a young woman.
The body of the latter was found to
day lying in a yard. he had been
shot through the heart.
The fighting lasted for half an hou
and two members of the attacking
party were captured. Reprisals for
lowed the attack. Two shops i;.
Mount Charles, were burned to tho
ground and another house was set on
fire but was saved
juanRmmaausanKitii
. WEATHER FORECAST. M
Ba$JttnoonauaK;;
PEXRACOI.A 'AVI! Vtctvimv t,-
- . - - - i r air
Thursday and Fridav with Kiniri,. ..i.i...
temperature.
W INDS Hatteras to Key West Fresh
northwest winds and partly overcast
weather Thursday.
fcast uulf Moderate to ' fresh north
west winds and fair weather Thursday
West Z II 1 f Aftirloratn l-q r-1., .i i
becoming south, fair weather Thursday.
U. S. WEATHUR REPORT
Pensacoia, Feb. 24.
Sunrise . . . 6:20 a.m.
Sunset . . . 5:45 p.m.
oonrise. . 8:30 p.m.
oonset . . 7:39 a.m.
ext phase of the
moon (last quarter)
March 1st.
High tide . 10:27 p.m.
Low tide . . b;4!i a.m.
YESTERDAY'S
Temperature
Wet
Bulb
59
sr.
49
4
...67
. .4t
Ar j , a.m. ...
- 12 noon . . 67
7 p.m. ... 53
Hierheat 1 Loweot
Mean 57 Normal
Mean aam date last year
Accumulated excess this year to
date 137
Highest of record for Feb ;g
Lowest of record for Feb 7
Rainfall
For 24 hours ending 7 p. m. 54
Total thi month to 7 p. m 2.18
Normal for February 4.49
Accumulated deficiency this year to
date Z.9
Humidity
7 a- m. P"; 12 noon. 87: 1 r- in., 77. .
Barometer
I V 35,05i I f, in., 50.1

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