OCR Interpretation


The Pensacola journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, August 08, 1921, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Florida

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062268/1921-08-08/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

MUTILMXD
WEST FLORIDA
The AH-Year Playground of
' America
PENSACOLA'S HARBOR
Can Accommodate the Navies of
the World
ONLY ASSOCIATED PKEC9 PAPER IN PENSACOLA- MEMBER NEWS ENTERPRISE ASSOCIATION.
VOL. XXVI, NO. 101 THEMwnEd1 PENSACOLA, FLORIDA, MONDAY MORNING, AUGUST 8, 1921
PRICE FIVE CENTS
FORTY-SIX LIVE
ST W.
ALASKA
S LO
HEN STEAMER
CR
SE.
ES ON
CKS AND SINKS
FLORIDA TROOPS GUARD NEGRO AT DUVAL COUNTY JAIL
1KCEI OIK TO POTTOS! HITIIRf 2 lose lives in ENGLAND'S REFUSAL'
f UvJUUU UUIiU IV IPJ 1 1 Vlfi II JLiifiiniQTTPF OFF NORTH !ta
a i . x-v -w- -w-. -r a a jx m , J .
UAKU1JJNA UUAST
THIRTY INUTES AFTER STRIKING
ROCKS OFF THE CALIFORNIA COAST
Contained 214 Persons, Including Passengers and Crew, 166 of
Whom Have Been Accounted For, Having Been
Landed by the Rescue Ship.
PRISONER CENSURED
LEGIONNAIRES OFF FOR FRANCE
CAPTAIN OF THE ALASKA UNACCOUNTED
FOR AND BEIEVED TO HAVE PERISHED
Launching of the Life Boats Was Accomplished Without Delay
or Disorder; Three of Them Successfully Rode the
Waves, But the Fourth Capsized.
(By The Associated Press)
EUREKA, Calif., Aug. 7. Forty-eight persons, 36 passengers
and 12 of the crew, were lost last night when the steamer Alaska
of the San Francisco and Portland Steamship company, south
bound from Portland, Oregon, to San Francisco, sank 30 minutes
after crashing into the rocks off Blunt's Reef, 40 miles south of
this city.
The survivors, numbering 166 persons, were brought here to
day by the rescue ship, Anyox, the first vessel to reach the scene
of the wreck in response to the Alaska's radio signals. The coast
guard tug. Ranger, dispatched early today from Eureka, returned
to port with the bodies of 12 men. Eight were members of the
crew and four were passengers. Captain Harry Hobey, master of
the Alaska, is still unaccounted for and is believed to, have gone
down with his ship. '
Of the survivors landed by the Anyox, 30 were more or less
seriously injured and received medical treatment at local hospitals:
The Alaska struck the reef bow-on ina, denfocjwmir
to tha survivors' and immediately began to list. The work of
launching lifeboats was accomplished without delay or disorder.
Three of the boats successfully rode the waves but the fourth
boat capsized, throwing its occupants into the sea. The greatest
loss of life, the survivprs said, resulted from this mishap. A few
who wore life belts succeeded in keeping afloat until picked up.
Captain Hobey, when the last of the life boats had been sent over
the side of the rapidly filling Alaska, went to the stern of his
vessel and he was there when it started its plunge to the bottom.
The Alaska was bound from Port
Two Women Are Drawn by the
Current Beyond Their Depth
While Bathing
(By The Associated Press)
WILMINGTON, N. C. Aug- 7 Miss
Louise Parka Sloan, of Statesville, N.
C-, and Marlon Avant, Wilmington, 24,
lost their lives in the surf at Wrights -ville
Beach near here shortly after 8
o'clock this morning, having been
drawn by the current beyond their
depth. Both bodies were, recovered.- ,
Life guards had not gone on duty
when the ill-fated young people with
a number of others went in bathing
from one of the inns on the beach
and both were beyond help when a
hurriedly manned life tboat put out
to rescue them. The crew picked up
the body of Miss Sloan, which was
floating face downward, in the surf,
but the body of Avant disappeared to
re-appear half a mile down the beach
where it floated ashore. Mrs. A. R.
Hardwick. of this city, a cousin of
Miss Sloan, was also in the surf, but
was easily rescued.
Miss Sloan was a daughter of J. L.
Sloan, of Statesville, and a graduate
of North Carolina College for Women
at Greensboro. Mr. Avant was an ex
service man and was well known in
this city. The remains of the young
woman were sent to Statesville this
evening.
BULGARIAN ARMY
TO BE DISBANDED
Plans Have Been Drawn Up and
iFprce of Volunteers to U
: -iH5 "Ttccruued.
land, Oregon, to San Francis.
Captain Harry Hobey, skipper of the
wrecked vessel, Is missing and believed
to have gone down with his ship.
A dense fog concealed the treacher
ous rocks off the Blunt's Reef, which
protects far into the ocean when the
Alaska crashed at 9:40 o'clock last
night. Within twenty minutes, the
crippled steamer listed, turned and
Bank to within four feet of the tips
of the masts.
The passengers were placed in life
boats but one overturned as it was
lowered into the water.
Of the twelve bodies recovered four
have been Identified as passengers and
eight of officers and crew.
The known dead are:
Passengers: E. Plckall, Hubbard,
Oregon; Thomas Johnston, Brooklyn;
A. N- Hutchinson, Portland, Oregon;
S- Kumazawa. (steerage passenger).
Crew: Chief Steward Heane.
Officers:' Stewart F. K. King; Frank
Comm; Ralph J. Mockett, seamen.
Larsen, engine hand, Portland. Oregon;
Janitor, name not known; bell boy,
believed named Baldwin, of Oakland,
CnlJfornla: Captain Harry Hobey,
m.fster of the Alaska, with two pas
sengers, were .the last on the ship,
The captain is missing. He was with
out a life-preserver. On of the two
Ti.iesengers. George Glenn, of Ne
braska, was saved.
The steamer, Anyox, with the known
16(5 survivors, arrived here late today.
According to the stories of the sur
vivors, three life boats were launched
The last was but a few feet from
the wreck when the Alaska, which had
listed to starboard, suddenly righted
and then plunged, bow first.
The steamer, Anyox, towing a barge
to Vancouver, was twelve miles distant
when the first "S.O S." signals of the
Alaska flashed out.
Within an hour the Anyox arrived
at the wreck and with order that won
higH praise from the survivors, the!
crew of the Anyox speedily picked up'
those who were drifting in life pre
servers or in life boats.
Through the night other ships Joined
In the rescue work.
Twelve bodies were found which
with the arrival of the Anyox and a
tug bearing the bodies here left the un
accounted for at thirty-two passengers
and four members of the crew.
The Alaska, of the San Francisco
and Portland Steamship Company, left
Portland, Oregon, last Friday with 131
passengers of whom 123 wera in the
cabin and eight in the" steerage. The
majority of passengers were summer
tourists.
The Alaska hailed from the home
port of Port Townsend, Washington,
Its net tonnage was 3,709 and its
(Continued, on Page Eight)
AVIATOR IS KILLED
IN PARACHUTE JUMP
Was Giving Exhibition Before
Thousands of Spectators
at Chicago.
(By The Associated Press.)
SOFIA,4 Aug. 7 The Bulgarian Gov
ernment has drawn up a plan for the
disbandment of the army and the re
cruitment of a volunteer force. It is
Inclined to believe, however, that It
will be impossible to enlist the min
imum of 12,000 volunteers by October
1 as demanded by the Allies.
May Cause Repudiation of Truce
Between England and
Ireland.
REFUSE TO RELEASE
ONE OF SINN FEINERS
With Exception of McKeown the
Irish Parliament Members
Are Not Pardoned.
(By The Associated Press)
DUBLIN, Aug. 7. Repudiation of the
truce between England and Ireland is
considered a possibility should the Brit
ish government persist in its refusal to
liberate John J. McKeown, a member of
the Irish republican parliament, who Is
under conviction of murder. Responsible
Sinn Fein leaders identify themselves
with McICeown's act as part of the war
and consider refusal to release him as in
dicating a want of good faith on the part
of the government. ' "
General Sir Nevlel MacReady, in com
mand of the British forces in Ireland, re
cently had a conference with Premier
Lloyd George and responsibility for the
present situation in connection with Mc
Keown's imprisonment is considered by
the Sinn Feiners to rest on him. Strtong
efforts are being made tonight by In
fluential persons not connected with the
Sinn Fein who fear consequences injuri
ous to peace to secure a reversal of the
Bovernment's decision. It is reported that
a special courier -has been sent to see the
premier. . ,
All the Sim Fein members of the Irish
republican parliament now in prison will
have been released by tomorrow, except
John J.' Mcteown, who is under -conviction
for havhg murdered District Inspec
tor McGrata
Though 4kopen tw u a-liament
is st,ne f off." the immediate Telease
w prisoners nS been fiectZ
s n p c
essary to atf ord them opportunity to con
fer with tliWr colleagues.
The geneial impression expressed by
the newspapers is to the effect that the
government's anion in freeing the pris
oners has beenmarred by making an ex
ception in thf case of McKeown.
tl,' ;v --vt .... h jr i
r--. If. A tSiy'fV
fit t ' . c . x a m jL-er- vi
(By The Associated Press.)
JACKSONVILE, Fla, Aug. 7. Ap
proximately 150 Florida National
guardsmen, including a machine gun
platoon, now in annual encampment
at Camp Johnston, near here, wera
tonight guarding the Duval county
jail in, which Henry Hamilton, negro,
is held in connection with the murder
of Mrs. J. B. Lee, wife of a railroad
mechanic late last night.
The troops, who are in command of
Colonel Turck. were rushed to the
jail, following report's to Sheriff Mer
ritt that attempt; were to be made
to lyjich the negro tonight. Mobs
were forming two sections of the city,
according to these reports.,
Hamilton was arrested today at his
home about a mile from the scene of
the murder after officers say they had
followed a trail set by bloodhounds.
Mrs. Lee was found unconscious by
her husband when he returned hom
frtm work' last night. She had been
beaten over the head with a Hun:
instrument and lived only a f.w min
utes without regaining consviousn?--..
after physicians were summoned. Au
thorities gave the motive as r"bb.-y
after they had found missing n sm iil
NEGRO WHO HAD SHOT TWO WHITE BOYS TSitSrJo 'wtVf
i
un.
Left
Here are the leaders of the American Legion on the S. S. George Washington
bound for France. There they will participate In ceremonies at the
veiling of a monument to commemorate the valor of American soldiers.
to right are John G. Emery,, national commander; John J. Wicker, business
manager of the commission and Franklin DOIler, former national commander.
Wicker carries the check book and strong box for the party.
ACCUSED OF MURDER
OF MRS. LEE, WIFE OF
RAILROAD MECHANIC
Was Captured and Arrested Af
ter Bloodhounds Had Been
Put on His TraiL
ROBBERY EVIDENTLY
MOTIVE FOR THE DEED
Late Last Night There Was Ap
parently No Disorder
Around the Jail.
DETROITLMOB MAKES ATTEMPT TO LYNCH )
A dispatch from Sofia Saturday said
the Inter-Allied Military Commission
had demanded the complete demobili
zation of the Bulgarian army within
' two months and the formation of an
army of volunteers. The dispatch
added that a semi-official note had
been issued protesting against the
order, declaring that the present Bul
garian army did not exceed the aggre
gate provided for by the peace treaty.
(By The Associated Press)
CHICAGO, Aug. 7. Patrick Love, a
sergeant in the United States aviation
corps, stationed at Chanute Field,
Rantoul, Ills., was killed today while
making a parachute Jump from an air
plane before thousands of spectators
at the Pageant of Progress.
Love had taken the place of Lieu
tenant G. A. Shoemaker who was ill.
The airplane was only about 300
feet in the air when Love made his
leap. The parachute opened properly
but was caught in the wind and driven
against one of the towers of the
municipal pier. Love was knocked
from the harness and fell to a bal
cony at the foot of the tower. He
died while being taken to a hospital.
SCHOONER EMNOR
LIMPS INTO PORT
(By The Associated Press.)
DETROIT, Mich., Aug. 7. A fight
starting at a baseball game on the
Th a I outskirts of Detroit this nftor
murder for wicn he was convicted was tn the nhti . .
the shooting otoistrict Inspector McGrath " " Doy
during a figl in which the inspector K p iauuiy, ana an attempt to
tried to Bhoojhlm. McKeown also was I lynch Sam Griggs, negro, who is al
me organizeaoi several ambuscades in tn
County Londrd. in which rnemW., r,tl" " uul, uie 3nooun&
the crown foAs were blown up by mines. I was saved by the arrival of
At his trial tveral British officers tes-1 "cai police and reinforcements from
l?AV:X, T'TZL Hamtramck, a suburb, -after a crowd
held captiveby him. The sentence of men and boys had severely beaten
death has nl received the confirmation him with fists and baseball hats and
oi me comr-iaer-m-cnier as yet. hart tipA rftno a ,,
McKeown hs the commandant of the ' c wlLn
Irish republiln army in his district and j lile announcea intention of hanging
his acts w endorsed by his chiefs, him
Hence his dition in prison while others
are permitta their freesom Is regarded
by the newttpers as Indefensible. All
the men are I be releasd unconditional
ly. No paris have betn asked for or
given.
(By The Associated Press)
WILMINGTON, N. C., Aug. 7. The
American schooner Mary Emnor, New
York to Florida coast points, limped
into port here today badly damaged
by a collision with the Frying Pan
lightship Friday during a northwest
erly storm. She is of fifty ton3 and
was traveling light, to be put Into
service in Florida waters by a freight
company. Repairs will be made here.
The boys wounded we're Victor Bud-
kuski, 12 years old, and Peter Nad-
radowski, 12. The condition of the
latted is said to be serious.
They were in a crowd that had
chased Owen Griggs, negro, to the
home of Sam Griggs, his cousin, after
Owen Griggs was said to have struck
a white child in an altercation over
a seat at the game.
Owen Griggs sought safety in the
house, according to the police, and
when Sam Griggs came outside and
faced the crowd at his front door the
police were informed, Mary Andrews
nis sister, handed him a revolver and
he fired into the gathering, wound
ing the boys. Sam Griggs is said to
.have .admitted the shooting, but de
clared he was fired on first. The three
negroes were arrested.
liVered ice to the Lee home daHv.
Late tonight there was ap; ircit'y
no disorder brewing and officials ex
pressed the belief that their prorvt
action had served to forestall any ef
fort at mob violence. Machine guns
were placed about the jail at places
of vantage.
AMERICAN VESSEL
ON FIRE AT SEA
(By The Associated Preti)
NEW YORK. Aug. 7 The American
schooner, Cecilia Cohen, was reported
today as on fire and In a sinking con
dition about sixty miles off Cape Hat
teras. A radio message to the naval
communications service here said the
crew had been rescued by the steamer,
"West Keen, on her way to New York.
The Cecilia Cohen was a vessel of
1.100 gross tons, built In 1920. at Bath,
Maine. She was recently reported as
having gone ashore on a reef off the
Florida coast on a voyage from Tampa
Fla-
DR. STONE'S BODY
HAS BEEN FOUND
MONUMENT FOR
BELGIAN HEROES
(By The Associated Press.)
BFcUS SELLS. Aug- 7 In the prov
ince of Luxemburg today a monument
was unveiled to the memory of 283
Inhabitants of the province who were
killed by the Germans in August, 1914,
as vengeance for the resistance made
by French soldiers against the German
invasion. A representative of King
Albert and the ambassadors of France
and Italy were present.
ATLAff A DETECTIVE
GUILTS OF iRIBERY
FIVE DEATHS KEPT THE CORONER OP NEW
HANOVER COUNTY, N. C, BUSY SUNDAY
Case Was Mtgrowtlof the City
council inquiry Mo Oper-
oi maimers.
atu
-!
(By 1 Associate Press)
ATJjArsXJ ua., Aui 7. "VY. L.
i-ayne, ciiyietective, fa convicted
by a jury Jthe superi court here
today of cWges of ac$ting bribes
(By The Associated Press)
WILMINGTON, N. C. Aug. 7. With
five deaths called to his attention Sunday
was no day of rest for Coroner A S.
Holden, of New Hanover eoonty: At fr:35
a. m., the busiest day he has ever known
began when a patrolman reported the
body of a nego E. Wingless, whe feH
into Cape Fear -iver Friday, had washed
ashore. Two hours later. Ml
drowned in the surf at Wrightsville Beach.
At 11 o'clock the lifeless body of Chas
H. Wilson, negro, was found In his bed
death being due to natural, causes. At
1 o'clock the coroner was advised that
wniie Hood, negro, had died in a local
hospital from wounds received Friday
nigni at the hands of Special Of Deer K. J.
ai, in" the Seaboard Air Line yards,
who shot him three times when the of
ficer says he caught him trying to rob a
Parks Sloan nf of c..,.m : ""' nun irymff lo TOD a
Marion Ivan? o WlhS'ni'n0" and N-car- An inquest on the last death
.aianon Avant. of Wilmington, were will be held tomorrow.
l;r,T.0?iectirr CHICAGO MUSIC LOVERS PAY TRIBUTE TO
growth of je city coicil Inquiry rrrr-ri-t ---- t rsnwr
Amu MftiUUKi.un: JNOTED ITALIAN TENOR
Into operates of allbd "bunco"
men and gablers here, i which Mc
Whorter sa for more Ian a year
he paid thdetective $3 a week
"protection oney." Seence is to
be passed "Vdnesday.
CUBAN MISSION
IS AT CAPITAL
(By The Associated Press)
CALGARY. Alberta. Aug. 7 The
body of the late Dr. W. E- Stone, presl
dent of Purdue University has been
recovered and is being brought to
Banff, it was announced in a message
received here tonight- Dr. Stone lost
his life in an attempt to climb Mount
Eanon ori July 15, "last, and his wife,
who was found alive after living eight
flays On a mountain ledge also is on
her way to Banff.
Details regarding the discovery of
Dr. Stone's body were not contained
in the message. '
(By The Associated Press.)
WASHINGTON, Aug. 7 A Cuban
economic mission headed by Sebastian
Gelabert. secretary of finance of Cuba,
arrived here today from Havana- to
confer with administration officials re
garding the proposed 2-cent-a-pound-duty
on sugar, a loan by the United
States to Cuba and present economic
conditions in the Island Republic.
MANNIX RETURNS
TO AUSTRALIA
Bv The Associated Press.!
"BRISBANE, Aug. 7. Archbishop
Mannix, who has just returned to Aus
tralia from a round-the-world trip
during which he attempted to visit Ire
land but was not permitted to do so,
has expressed his willingness to take
the oath of allegiance to the king.
(By The Associated Press)
CHICAGO. Auer. -7 smmi thA.n.
pnee is to , , "
music lovers today paid tribute to the
The Jury out twentf our hours, j mernry of Enrico Caruso, taking part
in a program at Ravinia Park.
"Caruso is not dead," declared J.
Hamilton Lewis, former UnKed States
Senator, w'.io delivered the memorial
address. "He, whose voice echoes in
the hearts of all earth and is destined
to resound in glory through the ages,
can never die, Caruso lives."
I
wn US TODY
I I
j H urn u
'
The program was conducted by Louis
Hasselmann and Gehnaro Papi, friends
of Caruso, and was composed of selec
tions from Beethoven, Verdi, Wagner,
Gounod and Rossini, the singer's fav
orite composers, sung by his former
associates on the Metropolitan and the
Chicago Grand ' Opera Companies.
Among the opera stars who took
part were Anna Fitziu, Frances Peral
ta, Florence MacBeth, Marie Sunder
lius, Marie Chamlee, Margerv Maxwell
Philine Falco and Anna CoretL
METAL WORKERS
OPEN CONFERENCE
ley ine Associated Press)
BERNE, Aug. 7. The International
Metal Workers' Conference, which
opens tomorrow at Lucerne, will dia
.cuss many questions, prominent among
wbich will be a proposal from the
Americans regarding the stopping of
the production of ammunition In casa
of a new war.
'Fifteen countries will be represent
ed by sixty delegates. The federa
tion has branches in eighteen coun
tries and its membership aggregates
3.340,000.
SEVEN INJURED AS
TRAIN HITS AUTO
(By The Associated Press.)
. SAVANNAH. Ga,, Aug. 7. P. I
Shackelford, his wife and five chll-
dren of Portsmouth, Va, were injured
this afternoon when a Seaboard Air
Line train struck their autnmnhito
Riceboro, Ga.
A local train following Mcked un
the seven injured persons and backed
with them to Savannah. Thev are at
a local hospital and all are badiv
hurt.
The family had been in Florida and
were on their way back to Virginia.
REPUBLICAN LEADERS TO TAKE UP RAIL
LEGISLATION UPON PRESIDENT'S RETURN
THE WEATHER TODAY
(By The Associated Press.)
WASHINGTON, Aug. T. Upon
President Harding's return from his
vacation, Senate republican leaders
are to take up the question of Vail
road legislation with ' the executive.
Whether the administration bill for
funding about $500,000,000 of carriers'
debts by the War Finance Corpora
tion shall be pressed immediately or
deferred until after the proposed sen
ate - vacation recess, is to be determined.
The president,, senators said tonight,
will be informed that it would be im
possible for the senate to secure any
vacation if the railroad measure should
be pressed. Weeks of debate, it was
said, are certain. If the president
should consent to house action first
on the bill, the senate leaders hope to
pass the anti-beer and Capper-Tin-,
cher grain gambling bltts this week
and adjourn for a month, or six weeks.
Pensacola and Vicinity Local thun3er
showers Monday aaad probably Tuesday:
little change in terpperature. utouy.
U. S. Weather Report.
.Pensacola, Fia., Aug. 8. 1921.
hunnse 5:12 a.m.
Sunset 6:37 p.m.
Moonrlse .. .10:24 p.m.
Moonset ...10:03 p.m.
Next phase of th
moon. First Quarter,
Aug. 10th.
High tide ..11:55 a.m.
Low tide ..11:13 p.m.
Yesterday's Weather:
Wet
bulb bu'.b
7 a. m.....8i 74
12 noon ....80 75
7 p m. 82 77
85 Lowest 7j
80 Normal ti
Mean same date last year. 74.
Accumulated excess this year to date.
59 de.
62 de-
Highest
Mean
44
Highest of record for August
grees.
Lowest of record for August,
Rainfall
For 24 hours ending' 7 p. m., trace.
Total for this month to 7 p. m.. 1 S3
Normal for Aujnist. 7.18 inches.
Accumulated deficiency this year to
date. 8.S9 inches. ar 10
Humidity
7 a. m., 74. 12 noon, 79. 7 p. m.. SO.
Barometer
1 a- c, 30.03. 7 p. m., 30.01.

xml | txt