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Sword and shield. (Clinton, Miss.) 1885-1888, February 21, 1885, Image 3

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OFFICIAL ORGAN *
— 0» THE—
PROHIBITION UNION OF MISSISSIPPI.
CLINTON, MISS.
Saturday,
February 21, 1885.
Entere« at the Pott-office at Clinton, Mitt., ot
Stcon«-clatt Matter.
9
BUSINESS MENTION.
All aomniunication* intended for publi
cation, should be sent in Thursday morn
ing, and should be written on only one side
of parier. Everything intended for publica
tion should be written on separate piece* of
paper from the business communications.
fcThe columns of the Swobd and Shield
will beopen to a limited number of reliable
advertisers at reasonable rates, but frauds
will not be advertised at any price. If,
however, one does creep in, it will be
promptly exposed when found out.
Address all communications to'
SWORD AND SHIELD,
Clinton, Miss'
NEWS AND NOTES.
New Orleans is flooded with stran
ge. _ - »
Over nine inches of snow fell at
Macon on the 12th.
England is pretty well stirred up
and her sympathizers are few.
New Orleans is enjoying the most
remarkable period of her life.
The little town of Beauregard was
almost destroyed bv fir* on the
loth.
a
It is thzusht that Mr. Cleveland
has already given the appointment
of Secietarv of State to Senator
Gen. Walthall comes out in
card, declining to run for Governor
in the ensuing election.
At Poplarville, Miss., on the 12th,
two citizens became involved in a
fight, in which both were killed.
I. K. Jones, recently elected from
Arkansas to the L T . S. Senate,
born in Marshall county, this State.
was
Bayard.
Nine passenger trains went down
the I. C. R. R. Sunday night last to
the Crescent City. The coaches
were jammed.
Waco, Texas, is soon to have a
fine Government building, Congress |
having recently appropriated 8100,- i
000 for that purpose. ;
* The late trial of the murderers of
Cap. Murphy, in New Orleans,
goes to show that justice is thrown
overboard in that city.
The bill to place Gen. Grant on
retired list, with the salary of a gen
eral of the army, was defeated in the
House on the 16th inst.
The Hon. Thos, S. Ford, qualified
on the 16th as attorny-general, vice
T. C. Catchings, and entered at once
upon the duties of the office.
Mr. Luther Benson, the celebrated
tcmberance lecturer, addressed a
large assembly in representative
Hall, Jackson, Sunday and Monday
evenings.
The Philadelphia Almshouse was
destroyed by fire on the 12th inst.
There was fearful struggles of the
inmates for life. Ten lives were
lost.
On account of too great an ex
pense, the beautiful strains of the
Mexican band, now in New Orleans,
will not be heard in Washington on
fhe 4th of March.
Just at this moment it seems pret
ty certain that Mr. Bayard, of Dela
ware. and McDonald, of Indiana,
will each fill a Cabiuet position un
der Mr. Cleveland.
J udge Mayers says,
county is in a good financial condi
tion," and it is our belief that, if the
sale of whisky was stopped, Newton
would be, also, in a good moral con
dition.
The new type-setting machine,
which will soon be on exhibition in
New Orleans, is said to do as much
work as twenty or thirty men.
Pon't be alarmed, "prints"; black
berry times will come again.
Mr. Watterson made a very pun
gent remark in his address in the
Exposition the other day. He said
the Southern people are more enter
prising in their hospitality than in
their business.
Newton
To run, or not to run—that is the
question ; whether it is better to sit
still and let the othor fellow collar
collar the officer, or braving the
chances of defeat, walk off with the
same myself.—Kosciusko Star. By
all means, run, Johnnie. The peo
pl* could not find one more qualified
than you. A good Prohibitionist, a
born Democrat and well educated,
what more would they want?
•>
Wm. Ilay, an escaped lunatic
from Seneca Falls, N. Y., was ar
rested in St. Louis on the 12th, for
threatening to remove President
elect Cleveland. A long sheath
knife was found upon him.
it is the opinion of the Harrisburg
(Penn.) grand jury that skating
rinks jjie detrimental to the health
of the xftung people and destructive
to the morals oi the young folks—in
other words, they are a nuisance.
On the 15th of the present month,
at Cincinnati, Miss Ada Armstrong,
daughter of ex-Senator Armstrong,
committed suicide, by shooting her
self with a pistol. She was led to
the deed by fear that she was going
to lose her eyesight.
*
ot
of
If,
be
The mistrial in the case of J udge
Ford and others, of New Orleans,
for assassinating Cap Murphy in
fnat city, awakens a feeling of dis
gust throughout the country. Th#
only stalle juryman, it seems, was a
sable^onji^ ^ #
Lee Linn, editor of the Wabash
(Ind.) Courier, has been acquitted
for the recent killing of William
Hickey, while he (Hickey) was try
ing to thrash him. Moral: It some
times seems right, but it is seldom
expedient to thrash the newspaper
man.
at
up
the
If Prohibition don't prohibit,
what's the matter with the whisky
linen? What are they so awfully
a i stirred up about? If theirargument
is good they can sell more liquor than
ever, w ithout the license and trouble
of getting petitions, and will not
have to violate law any more than
they tlo now.—Clay County Leader.
- •«-»«• -
That potential business argument
so often made in the interest of sa
loons means just this : We can mike
money by opening places of debaüch
er - v and we are for the mone - v ' no
matter who suffer8 > or how luuch -
I Any man should be ashamed .to
a
; make such an argument.
During the war, the 9th Connec
ticut regiment captured the flag of
the 4th Mississippi regiment. It is
the wish of the survivors of the 9th
on
paper is
We have received of Mr. C. T.
Dorwin, Decatur, Ind., a photo of
St. John hung in effigy by the Re
publicans of that town. On one
board we read,John,Judas,Annanias,
Devil John. On one other, John
Peter St. John,whisky inspector and
Prohibitum Democrat. All this is
by men who talk of Southern out
rages, and intolerance. We have
known nothing so intolerant in this
a
Connecticut volunteers to return
| this flag to the survivors of the 4th
i Mississippi regiment.
; be carried to the Exposition, and on
of ^ ie -0th inst. delivered to any of
the 4th Mississippi regiment who
may be there to receive it. This is
a graceful act, and betokens a better
day coming.
The flag will
"The plan of stopping the drink
ing of liquor by prohibiting the sale
of it is like trying to stop a hen from
setting by ducking her in water."
—West Point New Era. We have
seen the plan tried, with the most ob
stinate of old hens, and it suc
ceeded. Just duck 'em enough and
they'll quit. The Prohibitionists of
Mississippi will not be thrown off
their plans by any wise-acre, who
does not know that much about
chickens.
a
It was said on the streets yester
day that the Prohibitionists had
made arrangments to start a news
paper of their own in this city in the
nesr future. A party from Winona,
it is understood, will move here and
bring presses and other neccessary
equipments with him, for carrying
the work.—Columbus Dispatch. So
it seems that the fight isn't over yet
in Columbus. If the new
started, it has our best wishes. We
hope and believe that the good peo
ple of that city will keep agitating
the question. That is all that is
necessary
The proposition to reduce postage
on mailable matter of the second class
appears to be favorably received in
Congress. Postmaster-General Hat
ton recommended that the postage on
newspapers mailed by publshers shall
be reduced from two cents to one
cent per pound. Chairman Money
and a majority of the House Commit
tee on Post Office and Post Roads fa
vor the measure and we have no
doubt all the members of Congress
from Mississippi will vote for it, and
will see to it that not go over as un
finished business. The present tax
is simply oppressive. It should be
repealed altogether.—Clarion,
are glad to note that our immediate
representative, Mr, Barksdale, is
doing hiÿ tulf.duty in this matter.
We
■Mi
ar
for
her
to
section. St. John's offense was aw
ful ; he raft for President on an anti
whisky platform. It begins to look
as if the God and morality party is
neither for God nor morality. Any
one wishing to see this photo can re"
ceive a copy by sending fifteen cents
to the artist above-named.
For several years the friends of
whisky in the town of Chester, South
Carolina, have affirmed that without
licensed bar-rooms the exp nses of
the town could not be paid and the
existing debt must increase. When
they were in power it was, of course,
very convenient for them to say
that, for it was good capital on elec
tion day between "the wet and dry."
In January, 1884, those who became
members of the council were in favor
of running the town without bar
rooms. At the close of the year
they had paid all current expenses,
reduced the debt by the payment of
$866, and the interest to January,
1885, on the balance of the debt.
Yet during some ot the years that
Chester lîitd licensed liquor ' saloons
the debt bad not been reduced at'
all 1—Cor. Baptist Herald.
udge
in
dis
Th#
a
#
try
some
"Could you not put the Sword
and Shield at a dollar a year?"
No, not and make it a creditable
representative of the Prohibition
cause. Upon this subject we wish
to say that the price of the paper is
just what it has always been—four
cents a copy. Dr. Hurt published
two copies a month at a dollar a
year; we publish four copies a month
and two copies over, at two dollar*
a year. Most of papers of this class
try to give something for nothing
and fail. Prohibitionists want a live
paper, neat and attractive, not over
run with advertisements, and this
can not be had for a trifle. Two
than
not
than
sa
mike
no
-
.to
dollars is the usual price for papers
of this size, and four cents a week is
not much for a live, earnest Prohi
bitionist to give for a clean, wide
If we had 10,000
awake paper,
subscribers, we could issue a dollar
paper.
of
is
9th
POLITICAL Et ONOMY.
This age maire* very little of the
wisdom of former generations. Men
like Benj. Franklin used to say that
industry and economy are the pil
lars of prosperity, individual and na
tional. This is reversed now. It
is ascertained that the way for a
people to grow rich and pro#perou*
is by drinking whisky. Thi# is the*
great argument, made by board# of
trade, and business men in the towns.
We must have whisky to make busi
ness lively. They certiinly do not
mean to say that they, as towns, are
willing to prosper at the expense of
their country patrons. No, they
would not say that. Nor do they
mean to «ay that the towns can
really prosper when the country is
not prospering. That would be
idiotic. As well to say that the
rise or fall of the tributaries cf the
Mississippi have nothing to do with
the lower river. We are not pre
pared to call these modern political
economists idiots ; they know that
the towns and the country go up or
down together, and the proposition
is to get rich by drinking whisky.
That is it, drink whisky and build
up business. We are not going to
say in a snap that it will not succeed,
on because a great many people think
it will. But, really, it does trouble
us to know how it can. Mississippi
is has been drinking 815,000,000 a year
for several years, and we are not
rich. The waste fields, and dilapi
dated homes all over the Stat* do
not indicate prosperity. Merchant*
complain that their customers can
not pay them, and every week nu
merous failures are reported. Sure
ly, if whisky will enrich us, we
ought to begin to get the benefits of
it, and yet we do not see it.
And, further, we have known a
great many men, lawyers, doctors,
farmers, mechanics and men of all
trades, who tried getting rich by
drinking. They drank long, drank
hard, drank much, drank wine,
lager beer, rum, whisky, brandy,
and finally pure alc*hol, buff with
all their heroic efforts they never
got rich. We have heard, too, the
merchants abusing these men for
not paying their debts. We have
seen these men kill themselves in
their heroic efforts, and die paupers.
We have seen them lowered into
their graves in plain, board coffins,
T. while their wives and children stood
of round in rags. And we have seen
the farms and homes of these m*n.
Upon our word, we can't quite be
liv* in the new way ot getting rich.
Two to one, we would rather risk
Ben. Franklin's plan. It maybe,
is however, that we are behind the
times,
4th
on
of
who
is
will
sale
from
have
ob
suc
and
of
off
who
had
the
and
So
yet
We
is
in
on
one
fa
no
tax
be
is
Local Option by counties!
aw
anti
look
is
Any
re"
cents
IS »ET. I
"THE MORNING STAR
99
Beaurégard, Miss., has the best
arranged saloon we have seen re
cently. The doors are close-fitting
and securely fastened, the window
shutters are pushed to and strongly
held in position by bais and holts of
iron, so that no one can disturb the
quiet of t?fe inner parts. For the
first time in a long series of years
there is not
of
of
the
say
elec
dry."
favor
bar
year
of
debt.
that
at'
an open doggery in
Beauregard. We were there on
Saturday evening, and could not
fail to note the quiet and good order
of the town. We were told by sev
eral prominent citizens that when
The Morning Star" and other
saloons W^re open, a dozen or more
citizens would carouse and leave
town drunk on Saturday evening.
Last Saturday not a single individual
went from Beauregard to his family
intoxicated. To the women and
U
children of the town and surround
ing country this is a most blessed
change in affairs, surely, and ought
it not to be a relief to the conscience
of form^fliqtoor dealers ter know
that they are distressing no one ?
We noticed two old men, whose
heads are white for the Reaper, and
who have well-nigh killed them
selves, we are told, drinking, sitting
on the steps in front of "The Morn
ing Star," a bit nervous, but clothed
in theii right minds. We thought,
as we looked at the two old fathers,
most likely the closing of the Beau
regard saloons by the good people of
Copiah county, will save these from
the horrors of the drunkard's hell.
How strange, we thought again,
that men like these will hang around
the haunts of vice and immorality,
thougli there be obtainable there
nothing to satisfy the demon whisky
thirst. The presence of these gray
heads at the closed saloon shows two
tilings : that there would he drinking
if the temptation were there, and
the force of habit. For long years
these two old men have gone at reg
ular intervals to "The Morning
Star," and poured down their well
worn throats the body-wrecking,
reason -de throning and soul-destroy
ing fluid.
No merohant with whom we talk
ed seemed to think prohibition
would injure his business, but on the
contrary, it is believed that the
bars of iron across those saloon doors
and windows will help all legitimate
business materially. We were told
that one merchant has noticed that
hie oash receipts are larger already.
This is not surprising when it is
noted that the 8500 to $1,000 for
merly spent each week tor whisky
now is spent for dry goods, clothing,
provisions, etc. Prohibition pro
hibits at Beauregard.
Pulverize the. liquor butine tt.
wish
is
a
month
class
live
over
this
Two
is
Prohi
wide
10,000
dollar
the
Men
that
pil
na
It
a
the*
of
busi
not
are
of
they
they
can
is
be
the
the
with
pre
that
or
to
year
not
do
can
nu
we
of
a
all
by
the
for
in
ABERDEEN, MI8S.
Aberdeen, Feb. 15.—The question
of license or no license for retailing
in this citÿ, which has agitated the
public mind for several months, has
been effectually settled by the City
Council. W'hen license was granted
to Mr. T. G. Elliott his petition was
regarded äs the strongest of seven
on file in the Mayor's court, and the
prohibitionists exhausted every ef
fort to defeat it, forcing the with
drawal of several others that came
up a few days prior that were bur
dened v.'ith irregularities.
The law requires a majority of
legal voters, and a canvass of the
registration by the board to-day
showed that Elliott's petition con
tained 412 out of 675 names. The
counsel did no confine itself to the
city registration, but admitted names
of voters on the county registration
who reside in Aberdeen and are not
on the city register. This is a pre
cedent thaf may or may not be adop
ted elsewhere in the State. The
action of the Council will probably
put the prohil ition question at rest
here, at least for several years. El
liott s petition was signed by a large
majority of leading citizens and bus
iness men, and was regarded by all
as the test case of license or no li
cense.—-Times-Democrat.
It seems from the above that
when the prohibitionists contested
the petitions of several applicants
for license, the City Council allowed
the applicants to withdraw their pe
titions, which, we submit, th:- Coun
cil had not the statute authority to
do. After a petition is filed, lies
over one month and is published
three weeks, the board ot mayor
and alderme a pass upon it, granting
the prayer or rejecting it, according
to its merits. This thing of permit
ting a withdrawal is entirely a new
dodge in favor of the saloous, not
warranted By law or reason. We
serve notice now that we will make
it warm for those town councils that
undertake to play this trick hereaf
ter, and we admonish prohibitionists
to take such irregularities and their
perpetrators up to a higher authority
and give them full benefit of the
cold steel of the law for their dodg
ing proclivities.
The contest was over a petition
for license to retail liquors within
■fikiÉfiB
a
»ET. I the corporate limits of Aberdeen,
but it is stated "the Council did not
confine itself to the city registra
tion.
best
re
of
the
the
years
The law says expressly, "If
such liquors are intended to be sold
within any incorporated city or town
then the petition shall lie signed by
a majority of the legal voter» rendent
therein.
M
Under the law no man is
a legal voter, except he be register
ed. Every man's name counted on
Mr. Elliott's petition, not on the
city register, was illegal and a fraud,
perpetrated in the face of the statute
intended to guide the hoard in the
premises. It the prohibitionists of
Aberdeen have not thought of it, we
merely suggest that the Circuit
Court is a very good institution to
learn some people the importance of
obeying law in their official capacity.
We dare say that the unlawful
precedent of the Aberdeen City
Council will not, with impugnity, be
adopted by other municipal author
ities in this State. if it is, we will
venture the opinion that in the
years to come some men will feel
famty every time a city council i
referred to. We mean to do justice
to all whisky men included, and we
shall demand, in every instance,
that city councils, saloon keepers
and all obey law or pay the permit}'
for disobedience. Mark it down.
in
on
not
order
sev
when
other
more
leave
and
ought
know
whose
and
them
Beau
of
from
hell.
again,
there
gray
two
and
years
reg
well
talk
the
the
doors
told
that
is
for
pro
is
Well, not to any comforting ex
tent is the prohibition question "put
to rest'
in Aberdeen for several
years. If we are correctly iuformed,
autl we think we are, the war on
the whisky dens of the beautiful
city, Aberdeen, has just commenced
and will continue with increai-ing
zeal until the fair city is no longer
disgraced and menanccd by a dog
gery. This controversy between the
homes and saloons will be "put to
rest" only by the death of one or the
other of the opposing interests.
"Leading citizens and business
men" who stultify their conscience,
if they have any, while they out
rage, degrade, morally and socially
prostitute a whole city, by establish
ing haunts of vice, will not much
longer be able to lead the young
down to hell, ai d make business for
o!
ly
or
of
self
his
he
bus
side.
ui
it
and
• All
courts. Truly called "leading citi
zens and business men" that class,
who sign whisky petitions. They
are "leading" men to drunkenness,
vice, crime, the p* nitentiary, the
gallows, drunkards grave«, widow
hood, orphanage, want and pauper
ism. They are making business lor
city marshals, mayors, city tax-pay
ers, lawyers, sheriffs, and county tax
Leadfng business men"
mo
payers.
they are, no pne doubts for a
ment.
THE PROHIBITION MOVE IN LIN
C'OLN COUNTY.
Prohibition in this county is un
mixed with politics. Some on both
sides oppose it. Men in both parties
are its advocates. The movement,
therefore, has no political signifi
cance and has no candidate. It is
able to take care of itself. When
the legislature meets it will find an
advocate there in any member elec
ted from Lincoln county, and if a
man is elected who opposes it, or is
inefficient or unskilful, one will be
sent from here with about one hun
dred other delegates to present
the petition and a hill that will
meet the case. There need be no
fear that the legislature will refuse
to hear the petition or the delega
tion. The right of petition is
expressly reserved in the Constitu
tion of the State. That reservation
does not mean that the petitioners
may send in their complaint through
a member ot the Legislature but
that they may present it in person.
This is an ancient right as old as the
revolution. It has fallen into disuse
but it will be invoked, by the peti
tioners of Lincoln for prohibition,
when the legislature meets.
We are coining about fifteen hun
dred strong—all voters—to elect a
delegation, say one hundred of our
best men to lay our petition before
the next legislature.—Ex.
The above paragraph appeared
before the meeting of the last legis
lature. These people, the good,
law-abiding ettizens of L'ncoln
county did their duty, but the "whis
ky ring" of Brookhaven, with the
money they could have at their com
mand from the Cincinnati wholesale
the
has
City
was
the
ef
came
bur
of
the
con
The
the
not
pre
The
rest
El
all
li
that
pe
to
lies
speeches of the antics were the
vilest and most shocking ever listen
not ed to in a civilized land.' One of the
ness as it is, and they will all be pro
hibitionists.
men, killed their bill in the senate.
So it is very important to have the
senator right. And on the 19th of
September, one of their citizens,
who is one of the lessees of the peni
tentiary, had the audacity to try to
defend the whisky traffic. The
whisky defenders helped to defeat
their prohibitory bill in the last ses
sion of the senate. Every senator
that cast his vote for the whisky in
terest should be set down on by all
voters that have any feeling for hu
manity. We wish we had more
joint discussions. Nothing does
prohibition more good. All the
people need is to look at this busi
DOING AWAY TO LEAVE US.
A mQK—M'i 0m A ^
While in Crystal Springs last
week Ar attention was attracted to
a man who was very boisterously ad
dressing a crowd gathered around
him. The weather was very cold*
and he was dressed in his wife's
shawl, his hat and shoes were full of
holes, his, coat and pants were patch
ed ail over, he wore no vest. In
this plight he was discoursing on the
evils and wrongs with which prohi
bition is fraught. He hurled the
most dire anathemas on the heads of
of prohibitionists for having taken
his "liberty" away from him, closing
with the declaration, "I have always
drunk whisky and I am to going to
drink it till 1 die. I am going to
leave this country and go where I
can get whisky." May he and all
others like him emigrate at
and never return.
A few minutes later, we heard the
same "liberty" man trying to make
arrangements to buy a year's provis
ions and clothing on a* credit. He
plead that he was perfectly good for
the amount, hut no merchant is
willing to credit him for a sp<^ol of
cotton. Tf some one don't furnish
clothes, bread and meat, that "lib
erty" man's wife and children
going to suffer during the year 1885,
and there are hundreds ot such
cases in Mississippi. Put whose
dnty is it to feed and clothe the
wives ana children, while the "liber
ty" husbands and father# drink
whisky? Somebody will have it to
do, bu* it is not the merchant's bus
iness.
once,
are
Luther Benson
Will lecture at the following places
and times in March :
Vicksburg.Sunday, March 1st, 7:30 p. ni.
i'ort Gib*<>ti...Tut*8day, March 3d, 7:30 p. m.
Fayette.Thursday, •* 5th, 7:30 p. m
Natchez.Sunday, " 8th, 7:30 p. m.
Thence to New Orleans, to be at Uie Tem
perance days at the Exposition, 12th and
13th of March.
Recreallon of Men of Letters.
» _
Wordsworth composed his verses
while walking, carried them in hts
memory, and got his wife or daugh
ter to write them down on his re
turn. When a visitor at Rydal
Mount asked to see the poet's study,
tha maid is reported to have shown
him a room, containing a handful of
books, lying about on the table, sofa
and shelves, and to have remarked :
" This is the master's library where
he keeps his books, but," returning
to the door, "his study is out of
doors," whereupon she courtesied
her visitor into the garden again.
Landor also used to compose while
walking, and therefore always pre
ferred to walk alone. Buckle walk
ed every morning for a quarter of
an hour before breakfast, and said
that having adopted this cuatom on
medical advice it had become neces
sary. Heat or cold, sunshine or
rain, made no differance to him,
either for that morning stroll or for
that afternoon walk, which had its
appointed time and length, and
which he rarely allowed himself to
curtail, whether for business or for
visits. Equally careful was Long
fell >w in the preservation of his
health. He persisted in outdoor ex
ercises even when the weather
the reverse of pleasant. Both in
spring and autumn, when raw and
blustering winds prevailed, he never
omitted his daily walk, though he
might go no further than the bounds
o! his garden. Darwin was at one
time fond of horseback riding, but af
ter the death of his favorite horse,
some ten or twelve years ago, he
never rode again, but preferred to
walk around the garden or along the
pleasant footpaths through the love
ly fields of Kent.
Walking was Macaulay's favorite
recreation, but, like Leigh Hunt, he
seems to have been unable to
himself from his books,
said that he would like nothing bet
ter than to bury himself fn some
great library and never pass a wak
ing hour without a book before him
He surely never could walk without
his book. "He walked about Lon
don reading; he roamed through the
lanes ot Surrey reading ; and
the new and surprising spectacle of
the sea—so suggestive of reverie ami
brooding thought—could not seduce
him from his books." Macaulay rt
reminds us of Thirlwall, who,
whether eating, walking or riding,
was never seen without a book.
The favorite recreation of Charles
Dickens was walking. By day, Prof.
Ward points out, Dickens found in
London thoroughfares stimulative
riety, and by night, in seasons of in
tellectual excitement, he found in
these same streets the refreshment of
isolation among crowds. "But the
walks on cliffs, or across the downs,
or by the sea, where, following the
tracks of his 'breathers,' one half ex
pects to meet him coming along
against the wind at four and a half
miles an hour, the very embodi
ment of energy and brimful of life.'
Carlyle usually took a vigorous walk
of several miles, enougii to get him
self into a glow before commencing
his day s labor. Whether the spirit
moved him or notj he entered nis
workshop at 10, toiled until 3, when
he answered h>s letters, read, and
sometimes Imd a second walk. Victor
Hugo loves to ride ou;sidc
bus ; Carlyle was fond of riding in
side. Apparently, neither walking
ui the streets nor riding in a rickety,
bone-shakrng omnibus, aided Car
lyle's digestion, for a more dyspeptic,
ill-natured author never breathed,
it was he who called Charles Lamb
and Mary a "very sorry pair of phe
nomena," and pronounced his talk
"contemptibly small, indicating won
drous ignorance and shallowess."—
All the Year Round.
was
sever
He once
even
va
an omni
•rSaVo'
^
last
to
ad
of
In
the
the
of
to
to
I
all
the
He
for
is
of
"lib
such
the
to
bus
THE
P
9
-
B—f
A GENTLEMAN FARMER.
tie owned the farm— at least 'fwas thought
He owned, since he liTed upon it—
And when be came there. With him brought
The man whom he had hired to run it.
He had been bred to city life,
! And had acquired a little money;
Bnt, strange conceit, he and his wife
Thought farming must he something funny
He did not work himself at all,
Itul siMînt his time in recreation
in pitching quoits and playing bail.
And such mild forms or dissipation
He kept his "rods" and trolling spoons,
His guns and dogs of various habits—
While in the fall he hunted coons.
And in the winter skunks and rabbits.
His hired help were quick to learn
The liberties that might be taken,
And through the season scarce would «arn
The salt it took to save their bacon.
He knew no more than child unborn,
One half the time wbat they were doing—
Whether they stuck to hoeing corn,
hand some mischief brewing
His crops, although they were but few,
With proper food were seldom nourished,
While cockle, Instead of barley, grew,
And noxious weeds and thistles flourished.
Or had on
Hi« cows in «pring
Set upon lets, than living cattle; i . „
And when they «witched their dried-up tail«
The very bone« would in them rattle.
At length the sheriff came along,
Who «oon relieved him of hi« labor«,
While/ be became the jeet and song •
Of his more enterprising neighbor«.
Back to the place where life began.
Back to the home from whence he wandered,
A «ad, if not a wiser man,
He went with all his money squandered.
MOIiSL.
On any soil, be it loam or elav,
Mellow and light, or rongh and stony.
Those men who best make farming pay
Find use for brains as well as money.
—Tribune and Farmer.
looked more like rails
are
Stock-Raising in the South.
J. II. Moore, of Arkansas Post,
Ark., in a communication to Agri
culture, says : Some two years since
I wrote an article in which I took
the stand that the Cotton States
were a better grass growing eountry
than the Northern States. Since
that time I have given the subject of
Southern grass and stock-raising con
siderable attention, and I find
reason to change my opinion. There
is not a particle of doubt that upon
grass alone can meat be cheaply
raised ; and it is now being demon
strated that if properly utilized, will
afford grazing for all kinds of stock
for less than one-half the cost requir
ed in the North. Tnen when neces
sary to feed or mature for the winter
market, we have a cheap ami good
food in cotton seed.
Prof. John A. Myers, in his ad
dress before the Cotton Planters As
sociation at Vicksburg, stated that
the feed value of cotton seed
follows : When corn was worth $111
per hundred pounds, cotton seed was
orth $2 08. cotton seed meal 82 80,
oats 98 cents, c iwpeas $1 33, and
good hay 75 cents per hundred
pounds. Cotton seed is now worth
on the plantation 40 cents per hun
dred pounds; and if it ia worth
double the value of corn as feedstuff,
then, with our mild climate and
green food, we certainly can feed
beef cattle for market very cheaply.
Some two years since the Agricultu
ral and Mechanical College of Missis
sippi fed a lot of scrub steers
the 21st of January, and fed fifty-two
and a half days, and put on flesh at a
cost ot less than 2 cents per pound :
while to do the same in winter in
the Northern States will cost 10 cents
per pound.
As to grass for the Cotton States,
we have for summer grazing Ber
muda grass, than which there is no
grass that will carry more stock per
acre or will put on flesh better, and
no amount of grazing will kill it.
Then for hay we had red clover,
red top, Timothy, Bermuda, Japan
clover and Johnson grass, which
make a good lot ot nutritious hay.
Next we can grow the alfalfa, on all
dry lands as well as in any country,
For winter grazing we have Burr
clover, Bromer's Unioloides, rice,
barley, wheat, and winter oats,
which during our warm winters,
grows sufficiently to afford fair graz
ing all winter. Then, we have a
new grass that bids fair to be the
leading winter grass. That is the
Texas blue grass, that has been
ni.
m.
m
m.
Tem
and
hts
re
of
sofa
:
of
pre
of
on
or
for
its
and
to
for
his
ex
in
and
he
one
af
he
to
the
he
the
of
rt
in
in
of
no
tv as as
on
was
lately brought to notice by George
II. Hogan, of Ennis, Ellis county,
Tex. In his report of this grass to
the Department of Agriculture at
Washington, he said that he had
seen the Texas blüe grass grow ten
inches in ten days during a cold
winter. The grass is green, and
grows from the time the fall
set in until May, when it seeds and
dies down until fall again. All kinds
of stock like this grass and it fattens
as well as the Kentucky blue grass.
Now, with the me of plenty of good,
nutritious summer and winter grass
es upon which stock can graze all the
year, and cheap cotton seed to ripen
be u f cattle for market there is no
reason why the Cotton States should
not raise all the meat they consume
and all the horse and mules they need
and still have a large surplus for
port. The Cotton States can handle
with profit 75,000,000 sheep and
winter them on the cotton seed that
they now sell to oil mills
manure.
The one great reason why they do
not go into raising stock more gener
ally is a want of knowing how to do
it by the small farmers, and the want
of capital by the large ones, have not
the knowledge of how to profitably
handle stock. But there is, within
a lew years past, much interest be
ing taken in stock by all classes of
farmers, and a great interest in our
native grasses, and we are learning
that the South has plenty of native
grass that will answer for hay and
grazing is well as the best ot North
ern grasses ; and soon there will be
a great change among Southern Jar
mers. Then our Southern
will appreciate in value, and our
Southern country flourish as it has
never done before,
rains
ex
or use as
lands

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