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Sword and shield. (Clinton, Miss.) 1885-1888, March 07, 1885, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065018/1885-03-07/ed-1/seq-4/

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F
IX TIIK KAKKS.
MV SIXES L. cn.VXPl.f.R.
I lis death-blow struck him, therein the ranks—
There in the ranks, with his face to the foe:
Did his lips utter curses or thauks ?
No one will know.
Stil: he marohed on. he with the rest—
Still he marched on, witli his faee to the foe,
To the day's bitter business stemly%ldrest :
Dead—did they know?
W hen the day wasovor, the tierce light done.
His cheeks were red with the sunset '« glow,
And they crowned him with their laurels won;
Peart—Cil he know ?
Laurela or roses, ail one to him now—
"What to a dead man is glory or glow ?—
Rose wreaths for love, or a crown on his brow:
Dead—does he know ?
Aud yet you «111 see him march on with the rest—
No man of all them makes a goodlier show
in the thick tumult jostled and prest :
Dead—would yon know ?
TIIE LAST OF
TIIE NUGENTS.
®T THH Al'THOK OK "SWKBTI1KART8."
Chapter V.
"Yes, I am coming, sai«i Dolly, in an
swer to Jasper on the following morning.
A little later, the jmir went down the road
towards Culverton Royal, just as they had
gone ten years before—just the same,
I>olIy thought ; only there was such ajdif
ference—along the santly. dusty road, un
der the fierce glare of the sun, which
shone down on Dolly's white dross and
golden hair, as if it would fain turn her
from lier purpose.
"Oh. I am so tired!" said Polly plain
tively. when they got al out half way to
the Coppice.
"Can you keen up a little longer?" asked
Jasper douhtfubv. turning a face as white
as I folly's own towards her.
"I must." she an-werod. "Jasper, what
is tliat in front—there?"—as the gleam of
a yellow gown showed fora moment in the
opening of the tr»es; for they were off
the road then and in the meadows skirt
ing the two parks. "Does she always
\y ar yellow, Jh per?"
••To suit her black hair. Black and yel
low—his Satanic Majesty's own colors,"
answered Jasper bitterlv.
They plodded on a little farther in si
lence.
••Is it getting near the time?" she asked
at length.
••Ten minutes to eleven," he answered.
"Are you almost done, little one ?"
"Anno-.t"—with a gasp; "but I must
k- *•-» up."
She struggled on under the burning sun.
at <1 at In t they r -.ch«*d a hedge, from
behind which they could see into the Cop
Yiv he was there leaning against a
pice.
tr '* w : th a cigar in liis mouth.
A bitter jumg went through Dolly's
fait' fui iieart when she saw the look of
happiness on his face.
"There she is," saiil Jasper in a lonil
wl isjH*r. «
They saw Miss Fox enter the shade of
tin* Coppice, with her oja ii umbrella on
her shoulder, and walk straight up to
Lord Culverton. Tij«*y just saw him lift
his hat, ami then the umbrella shut the
two from view.
••Kissing her. I suppose." said .lasjier
scornfully, and putting Dolly's tortured
thought into pi. in language.
A moment later the yellow rol»es moved
a little and Lord Culverton's face came
<■** more into \ : ,*w. He appeared to be
Speaking very gravely, and Miss Fox was
g witli lient head, an idly moving
foot peeping out lielow the hem of lier
01
listein
gown.
••I am faint in
ly. tut .ii"g to Jasper.
To her h. i-ror. he drew a pistol from
hi breast a:.«l t*x>k deliberate aim at the
Lari. She tried to catch bis arm; but an
in. taut later a report rang out ujion the
still autumn air, and Loixi Culverton fell
to the ground. Doily sank half-fainting
upon her knees; a second report was
henni, and a dull tl«ud behind her told
her that the second imll-t had found its
mark as surely as the first.
Then a great da- kness closed in' upon
her, a uund of strange noises was above
her anil around her, und she knew no
more.
When she came to h«»r senses, she was
lying in the next field, her head jiillowed
on the knee of a woman who had been at
work among the corn, an.l who rushed
foi ward on hearing the jiistol shots.—
There were one or two harvest-laborers
near, and Culverton was bending over
her, with some water in a tin mug.
"I thought you were killed!" she sai.l,
as well as her trembling lips could frame
the words. "Was it all fancy ?"
"Not quite. I shall lie all right direct
ly. Drink some of this water, my dear
est," he answered.
Dolly struggled up into a sitting posi
tion.
.-aid Dolly despniring
"What made me faint? Why do you all
look so distressed? Oh, I remember—dear
H«»aven, I remember—Jasj»er!"
She 1 * 0 *e to her feet; but Culverton
caught her with his right hand and held
her liack.
"You must not go," he said firmly.
"Let me go!" she cried, struggling to re
lease herself.
"Oh, Miss Dolly dear." said the woman,
"his ana is broke and you'll hurt him!"
"Broken!" related Dolly, ceasing her
struggles instantly. "Did jasper do it?"
Culverton did not sjieak; he was fast
turning faint himself; and only his groat
love for her kept him up.
"Is he dead?" she asked.
"truite dead, dead, my darling. Shot
through the brain," he answered.
He let her go then, and leaned upon one
of the men; for his strength was fast de
serting him.
"Have some of this whisky, my lord,"
said one of the laborers, with rough kind
ness.
Culverton took a long draught of the
coarse raw spirit, and, though it burnt his
mouth, it gave him sufficient strength to
follow Dolly, who had gone in search of
Jasper.
It was a sad sight which they found.—
Dolly knelt beside her dead brother, her
white
which
tered arm ; anti near, transfixed with hor
ror. stood Hermione Cave-Fox, the cause
of it all.
"You must come away, Dolly," said the
Earl. "You can do no good here."
Dolly raised her eyes, tiret to him, and
then to Miss Fox, in mute agony ; and the
••Curse you ?" related Dolly with the
utmost calmness. "We Nugents curse
no one; but I think the last of them will
be a curse to you forever. Look at him,"
she said,
turned up _
gaze of death—"look at him! There he
lies, the last of an old name, slain by his
own hand—your work! Oh, what hail we
ever done to you or yours that you should
bring this dishonor upon us ?" she cried,
with pathetic reproach and an awful tear
less agony in her blue eyes,
look at me. Look at him—your work—
and yours!" turning suddenly to Lord
On 1 verton.
gown all stained with the bl«xxi
had flown from Culverton's shat
wretched woman shrieked out to her not
to curse her.
pointing to the fair young face
i tothe brilliant sky in the blank
"Oh, don't
"Minel v he echoed. "Good Heavens,
child, wliat are you saying??
"She" pointing to Hennione—"gave
your letter to him, and l>ade him to bring
me here to see her meet you, well know
ing that I should not hold you to your
engagement. Between you you have ac
complished your work well"—turning
from them and smoothing Jasper's fair
hair l«ack from his face.
"Dolly, I never wrote to her in my life,
he declared.
"There is the letter." said Dolly, throw
ing it contemptuously towards him.
It fell at his feet, and one of the men
still standing near, picked it up and hand
ed it to him.
At that moment Hennione moved as if
to leave them; but the man seized her
by the arm anti forced her liack quickly
enough.
"Just stand you still, young
he said with scant politeness,
to me as 'ow you'll 'ave to answer for this
job to other folk Tieside uzzen."
-Let me go!" she shrieked.
"Now stand you still," he rejieated
threatening, "or"—growing excited and
immediately going into much broader ver
nacular than he had hitherto used—"all'll
mump tha mouth !"
?

woman;
"It seems
"Where did you get this letter?" in
quired Lord Culverton sternly at that mo
ment.
He siK»ke in a voice of thunder. his in
juries utterly forgotten, and Miss Fox
shrank hack as if she had received a
blow.
••Dost ta 'ear?" asked the laborer, shak
ing her arm. "'Ow «lid'st ta c.vom by't ?
thing the hussey, is ta goatling to speak ?**
"You wrote it to her," put in Dolly
scornfully.
"I wrote this and another yesterday to
you." said Culverton tirmly. "I found I
could not get over to Dean Ella yesterday
morning; so I asked you to remain in this
afternoon ; afterwards I found I was free
this morning; so I wrote and asked you
to meet me hero at eleven—this very let
ter, in fact. I sent them over by Tom the
groom, who told me he had given them to
your maid; he told me too that you had
got a new maid, and that he thought she
was French; and I, knowing that you
had a French maid coming, never for an
instant doubted that you had got them
safely. Pray how did you get them?"—
turning fiercely to Hennione. "Did you
get the first one also?"
"Dost ta 'ear?" repeated the laborer,
with another shake.
"Yes," she faltered. "I—met—him—
and I—I—asked-''
"Get on," growled the laborer.
"I asked if that letter was for Miss Nu
gent, ami I told him—I—I was her maid
—her new maid," she stammered, her
teeth chattering with terror.
"She told Jasper," interposed Dolly
drearily, "that you were going to marry
her."
"I marry—that woman?** said ('ulver
ton proudly, "My darling, until she came
up and sjxike to me this morning, I have
never once sjxiken toiler since my mother
died."
"She told him she had !>een to meet you
yesterday morning."
"It is false. I was the whole morning
with my lawyer. 1 was not ont of the
house.''
"There's t' Squire and t' constable 'a- i
coming," said the woman anxiously.
'•Let me go!" cried Miss Fox fiercely.
"Ay, ma tine hussey," quoth the York
shireman gruffly, "if ta gets quit o' this j
business, thou'd lx*st not ta show tha face 1
i' Dean Ella village na more, or happen
thou'lt foiml tha sen i't' horse-jionii.
folk herealxiut doant wait fn a jury to
sattle owt; they moastly satt les for their
8**ls."
to
of
off
si
a
I
I
of
of
on
to
be
j
!
q" 1
I
!
j
j
J
*N*he'll la* wanted ta sjM*ak afore t' c«»r
oner," put in another.
"Sure—ly!" roturneil the first grimly.
As the Squire hurried along the path,
Dolly covered her face with her hands;
aud Culverton. his strength at last giving
way completely, fell headlong to the
ground in a swoon.
"Ah, yor hussey!" inutt«*rod the York
sliireman between his teeth savagely.
"What is it ?" cried the Hquire. "What
does all this mean? Is Jasj»er hurt.—
Dolly? Oh, merciful Heaven, he is not
dead! My la.l is not dead!"
"Thon'.i l»«*st take 'er whoam. We've
sent, to Cool vert on for t' doctor and a car
riage, and we'll bring him whoam safe,
sure—ly."
"Sure—ly!" echoed one or two rough
voices near.
"You don't mean that lie's dead?" rojieat
ed the Squire incredulously. "My lad is
not dead! I tell you he cannot lie dead!"
he asserteil passionatelv, kneeling down
h v his son's body and trying to arouse
him. "Great Heaven, why are you all
standing gaping like so many idiots? Can
you do nothing?"
"It's no good, Squire," said the woman
gently. "There is a bullet through his
brain. He were dead when we got tu 'im.
Get you back to t* Mistress, Squire; she'll
hae need o'thee."
The Squire rose to his feet in silence,
and Dolly too moved. !
••What's the matter with Culverton—is '
he dead?" he asked in a blank, dazed kind !
j
an
no
at
of a way.
"I doubt 'is arm's broke," replied tho
woman; "but ee's coming round now."
••Will nolxidy tell me how this lias liajM
pened?" cried the Squire passionately, as
f'ulverton struggled up again, whereupon
Jim Sykes acteil as spokesman once more.
"Well. Stpioire,*thou es ta thank this
hussey for t' whole business. Stand still,
wilta?"—as she made another effort to es
cape.
The story was soon told ; anti at the end
of it Culverton went into a dead faint
again; the jw.in and the loss of blood had
taken all the strength out of him. •
"There Is the carriage in the lane." said
iie Squire in a strange hanl voice,
you, Dolly, and you, Mrs. Roberts, get
Culverton to the House as so.m as possi
ble? No, not the Towers; take him to
the House. 1 will stay here and bring
my son home myself. As for that—wo
man, I should l>e glad if you would take
her out of my sight. Sykes. Perhaps you
had lietter set her at liberty."
"You'll lie wanted for t' inquest." put in
the constable.
Her lips moved .but no sound came from
them.
"Sjieak oop," said Sykes roughly.
"You know where to find me,
gasped.
So then they set her free, and the
wretched woman went unsteadily back
towaixls Dean Ella, the bright sunshine
streaming down with brave radiance up
on her golden yellow draperies as she
staggered blindly along the fields and
dusty roads.
The sun shone too upon the two ghastly
faces iu the carriage speeding towaixls
the House; ujion the Squire's set mouth
and tearless eyes as he busied himself
about, his only son; upon that still, dead
face without, disfigurement save for that
blue mark upon the light temple.
The villagers came hurrying in flocks
to meet the wul procession as it wound
Will
if
she
to
of
, ... . ..—_— — — -
through the village towards the great
house—the men hushed and silent, the
women weeping for sympathy for the tall
fair man who ha«l grown up amongst
them, their time friend and more than
| Squire, but now walking beside his dead
he paused, for the Vicar and his wife came
j hurrying out, Mrs. Camithers seizing the
Sqmre's hand.
'
Bon's l>ody,„with the age of twenty years
fallen ujion him in the last hour,
At the Vicarage the mournful train
uire," she cried with a burst of
teare—"oh, Squire!"
"Can you come up with me ?" he asked,
: with the same unnatural calmness as be
fore.
"Yes, surely."
Ay. the Mistress will bae need $f you,"
"Oh,
ITeaven
said a woman's voice behind,
help her! She come to me she did, when
1 lost rny lad, and she stayed all day, she
did ; and now she's i't' same bad 'ersen.—
It isn't the likes o' me that can do nowt
for 'er."
At the words the Squire tumed round.
"Is that you Susan Mills? You lost
your lad, and perhaps you'll know best of
any of us what won is will comfort her.—
As for me"—passing his hands across his
eyes—"I cannoteven—think !"
Chapter VI.
Three days had passed away, and prep
a rat ions were being made at the House
for the inquest, which had been delayed
in order that Lord Culverton might lie
present.
As yet the Earl had not left liislied;
but when the hour fixed for the inquest
approached, he appeared in the Squire's
study leaning on his valet and looking
very wan and weak.
The Squire who was leaning his head
upon his hands, rose when he entere«!,
and pulled a chair forward for him.
"Sit hero Culverton. until time to go
in," he said kindly. "You look very ill,
my boy. Will you have some wine?"
"The doctor forbade it; but I am so hor
ribly faint," he admitted.
"Never mind the doctors! Alphonse, go
and get some jx>rt out of the dining
No" romeinliering that the jury were al
ready assembling there—"ask James for
i
j
1
it."
When James came, the Squire told him
to ask Miss Nugent to come down—t he
Mistross was not n«>ed«*d as a witness. She
came in presently, looking like a ghost in
her black gown, and gave a cold hand in
greeting to Culverton.
"Could you go to mother for a moment?"
sh«* said to her father. "I am afraid for
her.
The Squire went hastily out of the room,
and Culverton turned tenderlv towards
DoHy.
"You look so ill, my darling!" lie said
"All this is so terrible for you!
gently.
And the poor mother—is sh«* very liail?"
"Very." said 1 lolly simply. "No. no;
don't kiss me**--putting up h«*r hands to
k«*ep him away. "You must never do
that again."
-Why?"
"1 give you
6wered with a choking sob.
your freetUmi," she an
"I—1 cannot
marry you !"
-Dolly, you don't think that I am to
blame for this sad business?" he asked
reproachfully.
"The blame is on our side." she an
"I cannot
Iwered with a vivid flush,
bring shame upon yon."
Then the Squire 1
had to be taken into the room. Culverton
following close liehind them. His evidence
was taken first.
H«* was sworn, and deposed that during
twenty-ninth
•eturnt'd, and Dolly
the morning of Septeml*
he was waiting in the Coppice when Miss
(Give-Fox came up and stopped to speak
to him.
Here the solicitor watching the case on
behalf of Miss Cave-Fox asked if he did
not mean that he stoppe«! to speak to her.
"It was Miss Cave-F«>x who stopped.'
answered Lord Culverton. haughtily.
I was burning against tin* trunk of a tree,
I smoking."
••You had made no apj »ointment to ii« < t
Miss Cave-Fox there?"
-I
I had made an appoiut
who is en
Wo were to have
j "Certainly not.
! ment to meet Miss Nng. nt,
gaged to marry me.
been married next week."
Then his evidence was continued.—
1 Whilst s|M*aking to Miss Cave-Fox he
I Imard tin* rejM.it of a pistol, and felt hitn
! self woiin fed in the arm; heanl no second
j rejMirt: l.t.t, when he came to his senses,
j he found Mr. Jasper Nugent lying on his
J fact». They turned him oVer but li«' was
quite dead. Miss Nugent was also there,
but had fainted.
"Yon said *we' turned him over," inter
post'd (he solicitor.
"Certainly. Seveuil men and a woman
at work in the a«ljoirung fields ran up on
liearin r the reixuts."
••And you did not hear the second shot ?"
"I have already told you so," said the
Earl curtly.
Then Miss Cave-Fox was sworn, an.l
gave nearly the same testimony as Lorii i
Culverton; and at last it was poor little |
Dolly's turn to advance to the table.
Her father rose and put his arm round
her; and Culverton, also rising, though
with some difficulty, took her hand in his.
She tried to draw it away, but he held it
firmly. ,
Then the Coroner, seeing how trignt
ened an.l ill she was after she had been
sw«rrn. asked her very kindly to t«*ll tli»*
jury everything tliat had happened on the
morning of the twenty-ninth. Her story :
took some time to tell. Little by little,
they extracted the whole facts of the case
from her, even as to the treachery con- j
cerning the letter. ;
"Who has the letter?" asked one of the i
jurymen. |
"It is hero," answered Culverton, re
leasing Dolly's hand that he might take j
! the letter from his pocket. i
' The letter was then read, a murmur of ;
! synijuithy for the shrinking girl and her !
j noble lover rising from every one in the j
room except Miss Cave-Fox, who tried to
slipout nnjierceived.
••You will Ik: g«K«l enough to remain,"
said the Coroner severely, looking at her
over his glasses. "You wrote that letter,
Lord Culverton?" lie asked.
"I wrote it."
"To Miss Nugent?"
"To Miss Nugent." <
'•Thank you. 1 think we need not de
tain Miss Nugent longer.
The Squire and Culverton took Dolly
buck tothe study, where, for the tiret time
since the dreadful tragedy had hapjiened,
her pent-up feelings found the relief of
tears. The Squire left her with Culver
ton, believing that he could liest comfort
her, and went 1>ack to the dining-room to
hear the end.
The wine which had been brought in for
the Karl was still on the table, and as
soon as the door lia«l closed liehind the
Squirt*, Culverton poured out a glassful
and carrii*d it to Dolly.
••Drink this, my dearesi," he sai«l im
peratively.
"I don't want it," she answered leaning
her head back wearily against the high
b.u-k of her chair.
"I know that;" but yon must drink it,"
he urged. "Come. Dolly, you are keeping
me standing, and I am very tired.
She started and flush«»«!, hut took the
glass from him immediately.
"Good child!'* he said approvingly, pour
ing <mt a glass for himself.
••Culverton,'' said Dolly suddenly,
she put her glass down, "I meant what I
said."
"About what ?"
'•That 1 cannot many you. I cannot
r »ally. I should never Ik» happy!" she
exclaimed excitedly.
-oh. yes! You will think differently in
a few weeks, when the horror of all this
ha-« wor i away a little," he answered
t Kithing y.
"Indeed no." she said earnestly. "I
have lieen so proud of my name, so proud
of my family ; but I never thought shame
would fall upon us. Oh. think of po« r
Jasjier!"
"I do think of him answered Culverton
gravely, "jioor fellow! No shame lies up
on him!"
"He tried to kill you." said Doily in a
pained tone. "He would have murdered
you if 1 had not made his hand tremble."
"He thought I was false, and lie had
the old Nugent blood strong in him," re
plied Culverton. "So far from thinking
any shame of him, I honor him for that;
the only part that I can regret came af
terwards."
"I cannot do it," she persisted, "I can
not bring upon yon the shame of marry
in* thé sister <*f »would-he «nunlerer and
a suicide. Oh, Jusjier, Jas]**r, w»y uiu
you do it ?" She broke off' with wild sobs
and tears.
"Do you think I do not remembermy
father who broke Iiis promised word,
asked Culvertdn gravely—"my own fa
ther, who broke Dolly Nugent's heart ?
My child, who could class jxxir .lasjier s
momentary chivalrous madness with ton
offense so cruel and deliberate as that ?
The law would, perhaps. consider it
worse—yes, of course it does—but men
of honor, Dolly, could have but one
opinion." „
"The Culvcrton's ami the Nugents,
said Dolly, with an effort, "are fated not
not see that ?"
to marry—can you
"I cannot inneed.
"But I can,"
listen!
many feet sounded in the hall.
"They are leaving—it is all over,
swered Culverton.
"What is their decision?" she asked
"Oh. Bertie, I am afraid to
"And
t he t ramp of
slm said wearily.
What is that ?"—as
an
nervously.
hear!" * . „ ,
"They can give but one verdict, he
said reassuringly. "They would never
give the other against the Nugents."
I tollyshi vered, but «lid not sjieak; and
an instant later her father entered. She
shrank luick in her large chair, with her
face hiihlcn in her bands; but Culverton,
looking up. saw that the Squire's face was
almost bright; the groat bitterness in his
heari however betray«*«! itself in his tone.
"We've been here at Deane Ella since
Stephen's , time," lie said passionately—
"since Stephen's time, and I am the last of
the Nugent's; but I have hiid a blow this
day which will soon do away with the
Nugent family altogether."
Dolly's tears broke forth again, and
Culverton's face turne«! a shade paler.
"What is their verdict. Squire?" he
asked.
"Insanity, sir, and we've been here at
Deane Ella since Stephen's time?"
"But,Squire, you would not surely have
wished any other decision ?" remonstrated
Culverton.
"I don't know what I wish," answered
the Sijuire, leaning his arms on the chim
ney-shelf and hiding his face. "I'm a
broken-down ol«l man, with a taint of
madness upon him."
"Nonsense," returned Culverton prompt
ly—"only the taint of such madness as
makes "heroes—what in Stephen's time
would have been called chivalry."
"I think, Dolly," said the Squire for
lornly, "when all this is over, we will go
away somewhere where no one will know
us and our story."
"My <lear Squire," put in Culverton
hastily.
"Where no one will know that I am a
j»oor broken-down old man, the la«t of his
race, whose son lies in his dishonored
grave, a woul« 1-be murderer ami a suicide,
or, as twelve Deane Ella men, to spare our
feelings expressed it, *tqp\porarily insane.'
Good Heaven! Insane! There never
was a Nugent liefore who came within a
mile of insanity!" saiil the Squire fiercely.
"Yes, that was their verdict—'suicide
while suffering from temporary insanity,•*
and they finished up by expressing their
utter disgust at Miss Cave-Fox's comlurt
throughout the affair, and a strong recom
mendation to Lord Culverton to take steps
to punish her for the theft of the letter.—
As if that would tlo any go.nl !"
"None at all." Iiegan the Karl. "Why,
what is that ?" as a woman's seroain
sounded through th«*quii*t house.
The Squire throw open tin* door and
strode out to see what was the cause of
that «'ar-piercing shriek of terror.
"I dare not go. I t.*!I you!" seroamed a
terrified voice. -Titov will tear ;n<* to
pieces.
"Well, yon
rough v. »>.«..
|>ect it.'
aid t men's
Uv (a*
in't stop In 1
-.ï/» .•
-What i> this ?" a-k d tin* S.,uii «*. aji
pearing upon the .*
Tin* side «1. ».I* stood wide ojm*u, held so
by James. Tin* lawyer who had watched
the ease for Miss Cave-Fox. and tin* con
witli one country jm>! iceman, were
p«*rsuad«' her
with but scant j«iliten«*ss—to
ll«*.
stable,
endeavoring to
constabh
t he t wo
leave the lions«*.
insr that she was
door stood
It was not surpn
i afraid to go, for the garden
| open, aud without was waiting a crowd of
villagers, who. judging from their angry,
determined fa«*es. weie determined not to
let her jiass quietly through their midst,
They were quite silent, out <>f respect for
the dead man within : but now ami then a
hoarse whisjier suggested the horse jHind
j n a way which made the miserable wo
man shrink liack lieliiml the* fiolicenif.n in
a dire agony of fright.
"They wiH tear me into pieces!" she
: gasj.ed.
"Like enough," returned the »instable
unsymjiatiietically.
j "I will see you home." said the Squire
; coldly. "You have not done well by us,
i madam; but the Nugents have never
| lieen wanting in courtesy towards a wo
man. Give me iny hat, James."
j As the Squire ajijx arod at the garden
i door, the sulalued murmur from the crowd
; rose into a low but angry roar,
! "Let us pass," said the Squire impera
j tively.
For a moment there was no sign of ol>e
dience; the hard, tletermineti, ferocious
expression which anger had given to
many of their faces did not fade, and one
voice cried out—
"Give the liussey up to us, Stpioire, an'
hajijK-u we'll teach her to keep out o' Dean
Ella for t' future."
"Don't you think," asked the Squire re
proachfully, "that I have enough to hear
just now, without having to leave my
bouse to protect a woman from you ?"
They made way for him then, and the
pair j kissed through their ranks—the tall
sorrow-stricken mail and the guilty, terri
fied woman.
The Squire saw her safely to her own
gat«*, aud, lifting hi-« hat in all due courte
sy. he said gravely—
••Let rit» advise you to leave this neigh
Imrhnod at once. I cannot answer for the
further fnrbeunmce of my people."
Then he turned and left her, the wo
who had brought such bitter misery
aud shame to him and his. who had laid
the tirsf blot of dishonor upon the hitherto
untarnished name of Nugent, through
whom, struck down in the hey-«lay of
youth, the last of the Nugents lay «lead
under the roof of his ancestors, slain by
his own hand.
"I couldn't have brought myself to do
that." exclaimed Culverton. as the Sijuire
and Uerniione left the house.
♦•Nor 1. my lord," resjHinded James;
"but then the Squiie is different to other
people."
"They would have kill«*d lier," said Dolly
hi an awe-struck voice. "The I)«»ane Ella
people «ire all fond of us, and they would
have killed her."
"And serve her right too,'' muttered
JaiiK's vindictively
" *I)o unto others
man
she said gently.
Aye, but in he same lxx»k is writ, 'an
eye for an eye,' " retorted James; "and
that's the principle that Deane Ella folk
"0
go on
That is not the Squire's way, James,"
answered Polly proudly.

Continued.
R. G. CRAIG & CO.
-UKAI.KRS IN
GARDEN, GRASS & FIELD
SEEDS,
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS.
•V I«. N N.
M b:m i'll «>*.
R a {/ roaC l TÎWC- I Cible
Ill.rtit C eti i tlRailn» 1 .
Going North —
Mixed—I.eav. s New I ;rkan». 7:15 :i in reach-;
Express- Leaver* New I trleans Ü: 1 5 u m. ar
rives at Jackson à:-!" p ni leaves 6;i 5, ar
rives at Grand Junction at 3: 0 a in.
Mail Leaves New Orleans ;:3l p m, arrives
at Jack ' en 1 ':85 a m, eav s 12:1' a in,
reache Grand Junction 8:55 a m
es Jackson 5:30 p IP., leavi s 0:15 p in.
reaches Grand Junction 1:15a in.
j
Going South —
Exprès. —Leaves Grand Junction 1:20 p m,
reaches Jackson 10: 0pm leaves 10:35 p
m, reach«*« New Orleans 7 a ni.
Mail-- Loav«*s Grand Junction 7:10 p m. ar
rives at facksoi .. 3:3*i a in. leaves 3:35 a m
arrives at New Oileans 10:45 : m.
Mixed - Leaves («ru d Junction ;>::><> a rn, ar
(in leaves 0 50 a rn
|
j
Express,
rives at Jackson V; 0
arrives at New Orlen i 5:20 pm.
V !ii!c.n, ft b'or! «Gau V* 1 • .
Hound Tra ».<.
Mail—Leaves Vieksburç 8:< 0 p m arrive
at Jack-ou 10:2»' a d leaves at 10:35 p rn,
arrives at Meridian at 4:2<* a in,
er 1 eeoinmödation —leave Jx*(
son 7:30 a m, a-riv»« it Vick-burg 0:45
an Lea«'* s Vicksburg 1 3'» p m, and
arriv« s ai Jackson 3:45 p m.
Lo«*al Freight leaves Vicksburg 4 15 a m.
arrives at Jackson at 8.35 and leaves at
9:10 a m, arrive-at Me <1 an a 0:15 p m
WeM Hound Trail*.
Mail, leavi s Meridian 10:20 p m. arrives In
lacks, n 3:2t» and le ves at 3:4 ) a rn, ar
riv at Vicksburg 6:00 a in.
I oed Fre'ght leaves Meridian 0: 0 a in, ar
rives in Jacks«ll at 3: 5 and leaves at 4:30
p m arrives in Vicksburg 9:?J0 p in.
a
!
j
j
,
j
j
Vu 1 Arriv«
*• 3 Leaves
Natohei. Jackson and Colnmbun.
Eastward—I.eaves Natchez daily at 3:15 |
Jackson 9:3<i p in.
Westward I.-aves Jackson dai!\ at 6: <)
, arr'v. s at Natchez 11:50 a in.
Fiei.ht T a n. daily, Sunday excepted
Leaves Jacnson 9:00 a tn, a rives fr an
Natch« z at t :30 pm.
m,
Yac o *.nd pi Valley
Going ' orth-Leaves Ja«*kson 6:30 a m, ar
r ve at Yazoo < ity 10:20 a in.
Going South—Leaves Yaz.*o City at 1:30
111 , arriving at Jackson a 5:30 p in.
S'. & o :R- It--At S'eridiac
soulH.
t
MM I II.
5:10 a in No 2 Arrive 10: '5 p n
** 1 Leaves 5:15 a :s! *• 2 Leaves il :3() p t.
•* 3 Arri «
*2 a !■
:25 pm ' 4 Arrive
Jo p in " 4 Leaves
a 1 .
The Southbound puss«*rger train lea*, in:
« ridian at 7:52 a m, arrive» in Mobile
: .0 p in, and the irain g.
Girth leaves Mol i «■ at 2 p m. and arrives i*
■ridinn ;.t 7:25 p tu.
»•
•II.:
MANSFIELD'S
v o\JISI AJY 4
V CRE 0 LE^
;
!
«
c
i//
it
'jjf/fr
i
*
j
j
J
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VA"
\V X R K A N'T ED to restore gray hair to its orig
inal color, beauiv and softness; to stop it fr«»in
falling out: to restore n vigorouscir.-utatinn to t he
fluids : to give tone to the secretions of the scalp ;
and to keep the bead free from dandruff.
AS A HAIR DRESSING
It is Unsurpassed.
It is delightfully perfumed, pleasant to use, and
the
GEM OF HAIR RESTORERS.
It will not stain the skin, or soil the «nest linen,
and will cause the hair to grow where it has suf
fered injury or decay by neglect or diseuse.
NONE GENUINE
without the trade mark of the inventors. Ask
your Druggist for it.
MANSFIELD MEDICINE COMPANY
MEMPHIS, TESTS.
SOLE MANUFACTURERS.
T
IjAZ.
1
t
State Street,
- Miss.
J ackson,
- DEALER IN—
Dry Goods,
Ready-Made.
CLOTHING,
IYInIioh I « Hose o» 1 *»?»»*<«< ? -
of FI 1 « Winter Chdliing, and
•»ffera il al priées €■ rentI y Ke
dneed.
fO
I \Tn
iJn
.Ifl
in? •
:u
I I
%n«l If YOU ivant t» get jour
mil are. €30 TO
THE CHEAT CASH STORE (IF
La/,. Kalji).
I'HOTOGRAI'IIS.
1
We claim the lead in all the latest
! styles of Pictures The
1 throughout the county say so.
in ins '!■} cents
o»r
Pricer arc as follow
Tard Photographs^
Cabinets, $8.00 per half doz. painting
the same, Large work in propotion,
Weare Head-quarters for all kinds
1 of frames, all Sizes and Styles.
. It you dont helievt what wi* are
saying, try us and if we fail will
Lighten again.—Yours, Iviand & Co.
! Planter s Louse place ot liusint ss.
LT'» I er halt doz.
;
p
\j /
.• i i , i
: - • r
• i,! '
t .
!
j
I
Slilend— '■
1
Dressmakers and the most eminent I
I
I
fits ai* :
j
Ht ! I' Vi AVI ED—i'cmales.
- r tAINTH i)
in
to\' fi
( very
u I Vi an liitclii. nt, «•! •
iiUilri'ss and sou
m ss ubiliiy, t
.!l!i
ï i
is ,\; \ii . * i
;;:i<
iie
j (T:i.bRAn;ii Spinal Sr ppdrtjm;
I Corset, Remits at *1.00
J idiy iidviTti>e<!: highly
recommend- '
ed i>y the leading Modiste,fashion;«.!
»!e
Physicians of tin* l u.p. d
Europe,
making ' t
"•tales
a o
Liberal
A
pay.
veei ÏV.
\ddi
b >
Lmvin Sriun.K A Co.
3! H» *• .
ay. v. y
,
s
fik-M
p-y - ^
%%>.
V
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aTsT^TZ
M KM I'll IS, TEN N
Dealer in all k'mls <.f Marlih
Work, such as Tombstone*. Monu
j incuts, Mantles, etc., <'te. All ot
whicli will be sobl at extremely
LOW FKU HES.
Write for what wou want and
estimates. It will be to vour inter- j
j
1
1 ID»'«
M \ Y DWELL,
\
M.
i. :
mint!.*,
CMi
!
■STOg.a^gy-.rTrrBr-c-rr-Trtrr-iar«. r.
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ViviSf
I
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This is nature's great restorer <1 ..
and is the ou.y nrepiiration of Iro
co n.iiuosall of iisgii'Ml qualiiies. v> ■
pro>lucing the uaiileasaiu al.«r .
which character zeail other prep .rat
It is pleasant ami aar«*i
h«* taken and l
hN
,r
a
» 1 « *
11
I
til*
of Iron,
the taste, and o
t.v the most delicate stomach,
oiiiv preparation of iron that will t«
eo.is! ipate the bowels, or blacken an.l <•
strov the teeth. It is easily and reatlii.v •, .«
taker, up and assimilate.! by the lilo«.!. B
and is, therefore, the greatest remedy jih.
known for L n
(■eneral Deiiility, Dyspepsia, l.i-iiaes-.^
tinn. Verrousness, Female Disease*. Ijja j
Scr.d'ala, ( hr.mir Rlieumatiam. «'.m jgjj
valcsrenre from typhoid an.l Ralari !!»►
Fevers, and all Diseases an.l Ini pu ri- j
ties of file Blond. !*;*
PREPARED ONLY BY j ■■■
S. MANSFIELD & CO., I
M f'gChemists. Memphis, Tenn.. U.S.A.
PRICE, St.00 PER BOTTLE.
ï*
s
il i
iis'
;
•3
3
«fl
;
!
:a
! '?
f8
I 1
*
3
f-, * irî.utne lias a deep It! tie wrapper with win
letter. aaJ .lie abevc picture aa the label.
.
:-.« 3 BBESganBBMfiflEg£ 81 Ü
J
■ if .**•
vmn'
■ ê y' hAdX.
*>
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ÜsJ
Opens Tuesday, December 16 , 1884 .
Tn the preserve i»f 1 he PrcfiiVnts of t he Amer
ican lii publics, viz: Arthur, cf the United
Stated; Diaz of Meric® ; Barrio», cil Guatemala J
!>o*rran, of ilomlur
%Jh M
i s
. a am
bo Colossal Exhibit
of all Time!
:
ELvtceis (1C) Immense IZxLibi-
t Ion I>uil(liii£s ;
-the largest luuivlin^ wer erected, another
he largest Con.-ervatory in the \VoriiL
On:
SO Acres of Spaca Under Cover!
Ijut Tran*i»r rtaflun Bnlr» from nil
roin'K. Ain|tle Atfoinmoilalion* Al
for ail %
Durin? the prrio.i of the K- i>o<ition, from
Di * ~m)n r io, iS.'vf, toj tine i, iV'f the tern jie'ii
lure at Xcw Orit cns averages 05 Fî b
l.Ava ami shrubbery rein in
b!o m, fruits v t tn, anil all kimls of vcy;ci\.
tu re.
ration promptly '
, rirr^loï '**•'
Xvw -

ï-.
r recn
»•v a
yt .
w
.. a. :
COLEMAN
COIXEGE, NEWARK, NEW JERSEY.
Occupies three Buildings, and Best. More
positions for graduates than all other school's com
bined. Life Scholarship. *40. Write for circular*.
COLEMAN. PALMS & CO., Proprietors.
•a "ivrcadfirj -a *v **««ppy
• a.isoiviTJ «oi axa» —
MJOJÎNJY-YIIJ 93XüîV V Xtl
XOUOt)#-Vfl|p%|»K
î*..»y j»or t ■; rff '' figSßkt&f.
•fn-'P'I iwm I
•jfc0clvj' h '3
■i h -iu. o
-me poj'dap XmJ V
-Iffuaj jo poiiwa/i _ . „
•dojQ oof)«J9do «1 «I J pov oint nig Liz \ ^
«woo paAOidrai
8 3
g|sf i
9 irJ I
? ata»
2* B ,
? £ I
TH r
'Ï RtfilEOY
Disease in ,s8 Tiiroa! and Lima
Ayers
In disc:!
■snf the cut
lnonary organs a safe
and reliable remedy is
invaluable.
C«ii:i:i:v I'i < tokai. is
such a remedy, and no
( otliersoemiiientlynier
'/fiWl, its the eontidence of
the public. It is a sei
t-f entitle combination o'
CHERRY the lnedicinal princi
ples and curative vir
tues of the finest drugs,
chemically united, of
such pow< r as to insure
W the great«
A v k it's
\

possible
^efficiency and uniform
brCTADAT ity of results. ItstriUes
riA ' AV/KI-kG. at Uie foundation of all
pulmonary diseases, affording prompt relief
aiijl rapid cures, and is adapted to patients of
any age or either sex. Being very palatal»!«,
the youngest children take it readily. In
ordinary Coughs, Colds, Sore Throat,
Bronchitis, Influenza, Clergyman's
Sore Throat, Asthma, Croup, and Ca
tarrh, the effects of Avi it's Cheukv Pec
toiui. are magical, and multitudes are au
»'"adv preserved from serious illness by its
timely aud faithful use. It should be kept
at hand in every household for the pro
tection it affords in sudden attacks. Ia
Whooping-cough and Consumption
,lier !'. is no other remedy so efficacious,
soothing, and helpful.
Low prices are inducements to try some of
the many mixtures, or syrups, made of cheap
and ineffective ingredients, now offered,
which, as they contain no curative qualities,
«'an afford only temporary relief, and are
sure to deceive ami disappoint the patient.
Diseases of the throat and lungs demand
active ami effective treatment; and it »dan
gerous experimenting with unknown and
• heap medicines, from the great liability that
these diseases may. while so trifled with,
become deeply seated or incurable. Use
AVer's Cherry Pkctorai., and you may
confidently expect tin* best results'. It is a
.standard medical prépara! ion. of known ami
acknowledged
cheap as its <
ingredients « i!
kumt ina if- *
curative power, and is as
:o>*ful preparation and fin«*
! v!>>Eminent physicians.
scribe i't in their
•ï.
:
■! !
practice
proven it -
monarv . *
re.Tch <•! i.
act a century ha
iniy to cure all pul
i.«ca.lv lievoml the
Prepared by L*r. J. C. Ayer £4 Co.,
I'lai tic::.!
an.l Aualv tirai Clions'»,
Lowe: 1 , Mast.
* 01 . 1 » by ah. rn::-<.i.!'t- i:vi it\ vvii;:«:e
THE LIGHT RIHIK 1 NL
bür 1
n
i P
ï! 1 H
hlMjum
i I
SEWING MACHINE
SIMPLE
j C» M.
1
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*

If-K
1 M
til
[I
V
<1. '
! 0)
i

1
K. ;• saBU;
x«*
!
"OKLY SEWING MACHINE .1
H AT GIV ES __ J!
HAS NO EQUALS
• \
!
I I w
Ï
'hi
$
>
I
.*
Tvery
I
SEWING MACHINE CO
ORANGE MASS.
30 UNION SQ N Y. CHICAGO ILL.
ST. LOUIS MO. ATLANTA G A.
F OAJS ALEJBY-fe_
J
. .»inplcte Mmlicul YY oi k f r
li:ui(lso:noly bonun in do h
1 .1 lit stratud- Tolls how to j.ic
.• 1 s 1 :ii.(l cure all diseases of the sex,
. a tr-atincnt at home. Worth its
hi in (»old to every lady sufft r
r iioin any of these diseases. Over
Postpaid ot.e
V» I'.nts. 1'os'al Note or - il
N I N D A Pl'B
IS MINO CO., N unda, N. Y.
v , .
■u,
■i
'. ;*<"t sold alreauv.
Add 10 :
iff! 1
w
s
wmz%
A
-, T .
fegst
Lg
[K
•\ j. 1», iN UÜiliöU-» ,
ra Winona, Mds.,
F i
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