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Sword and shield. (Clinton, Miss.) 1885-1888, March 28, 1885, Image 2

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LESBIAN ANTVERSARV.
On last Saturday night the mem
bers of the Lesbian Literary Society
delighted the heartsof the natives by
one of the most interesting and en
tertaining exhibitions ever given in
Clinton. It was the celebration ol
their twenty-ninth year of organi
zation. The stage was beautifully
decorated, and at 8 p. m. the exer
cises were opened with prayer by
Next on the
programme was that popular old
song "Darling Cloe," and then
essays, tableux, instrumental music
followed with recitations. Probably
the best enjoyed part Y>t the enter
tainment was that old Scotch melody,
Coming thro" the Rye." Miss Alice
Simms looked the ideal "Scotch
lassie," and her sweet voice doubtless
made more than one laddie wish that
he was coming thro' the rye.
'flie entertainment was good in
every part, but lack of space forbids
a more lengthy account. Every one
who went was charmed.
Mi.'S Sallie .Johnston and the
other Lesbians deserve great credit
and many thanks for this literary
treat.
POLITICIANS aViT THE LIQUOR
ISSUE.
I
in
he
on
it
Elder A. V. Rowe.
«>
of
a
is
It is well for the politicians to
understand that the alcoholic issue
is coining, and they will have to
meet it. The pecuniary, material
prosperity ot this country, not to
speak of morals, is involved in the
alcoholic traffic. We might safely
affirm that the wealth or poverty of
more people is concerned in the tem
perance question than in any other.
Politicians must consider this fact.
It is madness to ignore it. All the
politicians on cartli and devils in
hell can't defeat it.
LH}I OK DEALER'S ASSOC1AT10N.
The State Executive Committee
recommends "Prompt action and or
ganize clubs in your city, district or
county, and correspond with the
Secretary for needed information.
Earnest work is your duty,
ponement is victory for the fanatics,
immediate organization is indespen
The time has come for all
Post
sable.
interested in the State to take im
mediate action against the Prohibi
tion movement, which is guided only
bv fanaticism/'
The fanatics are all the women,
children, preachers, Christians, the
lovers of humanity, and good gov
eminent.
One Way of Looking at It.
Total abstinence and Prohibition
are not everything, and no enlighten
ed friend of this movement either says
or thinks that they are. But total
abstinence and Prohibition are both
good things and helpful to get high
The enlightened intelligence
and piety of the country are in short,
against the liquor traffic. We object
to the importation of criminals, pau
pers, wails, and blackguards, and we
do well in making an objection.
Why should it be thought strange
then that we object to the establish
ment of places for the manufacture
of all these, and that to a far more
formidable extent than could be ac
complished by importation in a cen
tury ?—Toronto Globe.
er.
Tilings that make us Tired.
Waiting to see
Butler will nominate himselt tor
next.
I
what office Ben
!
planatienä
Reading the different
of why the Republican party
defeated.
Hearing Republicans talk ol trai
if they hold
e.\
was
tors to their party,
voters m fee simple.
Waiting for some one to discover
that St. John's great-grandfather ate
potatoes with his knife.
Hearing the saloon-keepers prate
of personal rights as it the Goddess
t Liberty had been cradled in a
beer-keg.
Trying to find out the exact num
ber of years that the cause of Tem
" has been put back by the
as
o
perance
recent election.
How He Beca me Cit y Editor.
When the new reporter, just from
ni college, started out to write up a fire
the '*f el lows" who had for many years
been in the harness smiled, and the
managing editor, hearing the joke,
laughed and said: "Now we shall have
thrilling account of the burning of
Rome. It is a pity that our Greek font
of type is not in working order. He
could tell us of all the great fires of
Athens."
The young reporter
while, and, without running his lingers
through his hair or muttering any
Latin, sat down and wrote the follow
ing:
a
came in after a
"Last night about 11 o'clock an
. alarm of lire was souuded. The city
was not thrown into an intense state of
excitement; neither did any of ojir
brave firemen risk their lives. By tue
time the engines arrived at the house,
an old rat-nest situated in the eastern
part of the town was almost destroyed.
It is not believed that the fire was the
work of an incendiary; neither does the
impression that it resulted from a de
fective flue prevail to any great ex
tent. , ,
The managing editor, when he reau
the paragraph, turned to the new im
porter and said: "You will make > ol iy
mark, sir. Come into this room,
pointing, "lake the position of city
editor. "—Arkansaw Traveler ,
IT
A CRUEL WINTER.
Tlie Wholesale Drummer's Last Trip.—
Closing Out it Job Cot.
great, gruff-looking man stepped
into a wholesale house on Michigan
avenue and threw open his coat that
was made of a bufl'al
the boss of this here shebang, ain't
you?" lie asked of one who was dozing
over his market reports. "I am one of
the firm; yes, sir. Who is it you
want?"
"Ef you're the man you say you are
I reckon you're the one I want. I came
in to tell you some news. I am from
sixty-nine miles t'other side of the cold
est spot in Dakoty. I left there thir
teen days ago in the blindest blizzard
you ever see, and hev come here to tell
you some news."
"Are you a country merchant?
"No; 1 ain't nothin' to bank on. I'm
just a plain mountaineer. But I must
tell you the news. You bed a man
travelin' for your shebang, or lirm, I
believe you call it. His name was
Henry—somethin'. I have it here as
he wrote it."
The big, rough hand went into a
pocket and out came a bundle that was
wrapped with a cord. This was undone
and several papers were unwrapped
until a small fragment was taken out
on which was the name. He handed
it to the member of the firm, who said:
"Yes, that's his name; he is one of our
traveling men and one of the best on
We haven't heard from him
A
o robe. "You're
h
is
on
t
the ro:u
since the blockade.
Are yon a friend
of his?
"1 can't say that I am that,
great rough-looking man.
ain't his enemy. I'm g;ad to hear you
say that he were a good man on the
road, though, cause I think he thought
you thought that. But I'm bettin' he is
jest as good a man off the road. I
won't keep you waiting'. Une night
when the wolves an' the wind an' the
blizzard all got mixed up, as they do
whar I come from, I thought I heard
somethin' that was louder than the
wind, somethin' that was hungrier than
the wolf's cry, an' somethin' solemner
than the blizzard. And I went out ov
the cabin and went looking around to
see what it was. I found him a-lyin'
in a drift ov snow an' sand an' a-pray
in' to somebody to let him git in his
last order. I picked him up, an' his
samples, an' carried him to the cabin
an' lit the candle an' punched up the
fire an' laid him down on the robes.
After a while he sez to me, jest as ef
he'd know'd me all his life, sez he:
•This is a job lot, an' you kin hev it at
cost. It closes me out, an' I want to
git the order in an' git back home. I'm
goin' in,' sez he, 'betöre my time is up,
an' I'll go up to the house and supprise
the little woman an' the babies,'sez he.
The blizzard blow'd open the door
then, an' great sheets of snow come in
an' the tire went out jest like that. Of
course, mister, in our rough part ov the
country we ain't got no bury in'ground
litten for a white man to git into, l'ts
a big buryin' ground for that matter,
for it lays in the mountains and the
prarys. * But we ain't got no sexton
'eept the Clod Almighty hisself, an' you
kau't never tell one grave from anoth
er out thar. The dead with we'uns
is like the livin'— all of a size, so to
speak. I hope I ain't a tirin' you. I've
got his body at the de-put. I feteht it
here myself, an' I thiuk you'll tind his
samples jest as he left'em with me.
ennything's missin' I'll make it good.
I'll take his job lot, whatever that is.
Now, ef you will tell me how to find
that little woman and the babys that he
spoke of, I'll go an' try to break the
news to Iter an' to them ez I hev tried
to break it to you. But I'm afeerd
I'll make a botch ov it, so ef you'd
take the job I'll pay the expenses.
Poor things, I don't know how he left
'em, hut I'm afraid you didn't give him
enough so he coijd lay up ennything
for 'em, so here's a stockin' full ov as
good Californy stuff as ever was dug up,
an' I wish you'd take it to the widder
and her babys an' say ez how it's hern
and thars."
And that is wliy the window blinda
in a great store on Michigan avenu,
were pulled down the other day before
closing time.. And that is why an apol
ogy had to be made to a bank the next
day. And that is why the black ribbon
on the door knob of a little house on
one of the snow bound avenues of the
the city fluttered in the glistening frost,
and that is why a woman wept as if
her heart was breaking and why the
babies' cries were hushed by strangers.
Oil, it has been a cruel winter.
laid the
'Nor I
&
as
of
Kf
I
A Broken-Hearted Bird.
A correspondent thus writes: Nearly
twenty years ago I owned a pair of
! beautiful canaries—tha male being a
fine fellow, with a rich musical note.
Having furnished them with the out
side rough form of a nest in straw,
leaving them to complete its comforts
with b?ts of soft woof, down, and small
feathers, they were shortly in the happy
In due course
a
possession of four eggs,
four young ones presented themselves,
to the evident delight of the parents,
who fed them from daylight to dark,
their favorite food being the yolk of
hard-boiled eggs. Time brought round
the period when, instead of raw, naked,
helpless creatures always "asking for
more," four full-fledged young birds
frisked about the cage like so many
pretty yellow balls of fine soft wool.
They orew to be very fine birds; and
first one friend and then another
coveted them, until all had gone but,
one little youngling, which remained
as the only solace ot the parents,
last of the family was the delight of
their hearts; thev fondled it, and
played with it as we have seen auaflec
tionate mother do with her child, and
seemed to exert themselves to amuse it
in every way their fancy prompted.
Probably a happier little family
never existed. But, alas! the spoiler
came Another friend coveted the last
of the little flock, and it was taken
awav. And from that moment the
joyous song of the male bird gave place
to a painfully feeble little chirp. He
sat on the perch with a drooping heart
broken, spiritless aspect; his wings
hunf down as if all power and vitality
had left him; and within twenty-four
hours from the time of his bereave
ment he fell dead from the perch. Ine
affectionate creature had evidently
dii d of «rief for the loss of his "one
ewe lamb." The cage was given away
with the remaining bird; and no induce
ments could tempt me again to run
the risk of perhaps unconsciously be
in^ the cause of so much unhappiness
and misery.— Chambers' Journal.
The
fire
the
of
He
of
any
a
an
city
of
ojir
tue
the
the
de
ex
,
reau
im
ol iy
city
The theory that there must be open
seas at the poles is based on the as
sumption that the flattening of the
earth brings those points thirteen miles
nearer the centre of the sphere than
any other portion of its surface.
Steadman & Co.
1885 . spri n « 1885 .
HOT EUGERITf D t (
That our stock this Spring is the
largest ever brought to Jackson.
That our prices arc lower than ever
known in the history of Dry Goods.
That we lead in styles and that
dictate prices in this market.
Hear and be convinced and dupli
cate our prices when you can.
we
CLOT III NO :
Genuine Middlesex Blue Manuel
Suits, in frocks and sacks, $8.00.
(See that tag is on collar and that it
is made of Middlesex Flannel, no
other is genuine.)
Kennebec Worsted Suits, braided
on collar, no other genuine, $12.00.
These suits come in gray, blue ami
brown, is a cloth exactly suited to
our climate, and was sold all last
season at $18.00.
have
suits at $2.25, $2.50,
$3.00, $3.50, $4.00, $5.00, and up to
$30.00.
\Xc have the best assorted and
cheapest line of clothing ever shown
here, and we guarantee to shade any
price of any market.
We are agents for Messrs. Pettet
& Co., Merchant Tailors of New
We guarantee fits and goods
We
York,
as represented.
STEDMAN & CO.
MILLINERY.
We haye received all the new
Spring shapes in the various
and braids out this year : Porcu
pine, Pearls, Cantons, Milans, Leg
horns, etc.
brims narrower than last year; but
the styles are very pretty and becom
We lead in Millinery.
straws
Crowns are taller and
No
mg.
house in the State carry the line
we do, and our prie*.» speak for
y
themselves.
STEDMAN & CO.
oexeral dry noons.
Ginghams, all brands, ten cents.
Calico, four, five and six cents. Fruit
of Loom and Lonsda'e yard wide
Domestic eight cents.
Broom Domestic, six cents. Shirting
width Brooip Domestic, five cents.
Our celebrated Linen Delude we
will sell this year at six cents. Look
Lace counter, Parasols,
Yard wide
over our
Fans, Dress Goods, etc.
STEDMAN & CO.
The Maintenance of Plant-Life.
"Hard times" come to most living
things. Plants as well as animals have
periods when they need to conserve all
their energies, husband all their vital
ity. All vegetation obeys the injunc
tion to multiply and replenish the earth,
but with the greatest determination
when there are present suffering and
impending death. A drought hastens
the processes of reproduction, and in
sufficient nourishment encourages an
early if not an abundant fruitfulness.
In a climate where hot and cold, or wet
and dry, seasons regularly sueceod
each other, many of our most common
economic plants have adapted them
selves to^these stated changes of out
ward conditions, and run their course
during a single growing season. Such
plants constitute that large portion of
vegetation known as the annuals.
The great sunflower, that grows into a
giant in a single season and defies the
summer sun and storm, falls an easy
victim to the frosts of autumn. It,
however, prepared the way for many
successors, in the ripened seeds, each
one of which when given favorable con
ditions will germinate, grow, repro
duce its kinds, and thus finish another
cvcle in the realm of vegetable life.
The bean-plant, in a different way,
climbs its appointed pole, enjoys the
same sunshine and showers, produces its
blossoms, fills long pods with ripened
se^ds, and gives up its life like all its
fellows in the field. A corn-plant com
pletes its growth in not far from a hun
dred days, and leaves its accumulated
vitality stored up in the grains upon
the ear. The prospective life and
activity of a whole field of waving corn
may be considered as stored up in a
few pecks of apparently lifeless seed
safely housed in the granary.
We thus see that in the annual plants
the life of the species is, so to speak,
carried over from one growing season
to another in the ripened seed. The
seed is also the form in which plant life
is easily transported from place to
The seed of some hedgerow
our
it
run
be
corn
place.
weed, as it becomes loosened from its
attachment upon the lifeless mother
plant, and is blown for rods or even
miles over the surface of the incrusted
snow,is a familiar and perhaps striking
example that may enforce the meaning
to be here conveyed. The young
plantlet in the seed, snugly packed
within thick coats, is preserved from
death, and at the same time is carried
far from the place where it was pro
duced. The seed is the offspring of the
plant and the childhood of its kind,
though so fashioned and protected that
it can pass safely through a period of
drought or cold when its parent would
have" succumbed .—From "How Fungi
Live in Winter ," by B. I). Halsted, in
Popular Science Monthly for March.
"She dresses quietly," is the comment of
of the fashion journals on a well
knowri belle. It is an absurdity. When a
woman dresses there is more rattling
round of shoes and corsets, and banging
about of wash-bowls and pitchers, and
calling for this and for that, and slamming
off bureau knobs, and—and—and we have
often wondered how the mirror stood it so
well. We don't believe that a woman ever
dressed quietly, but of course we don't
know—how should we?
one
as
the
LATEST AND
have You seen the new improved
SINGER
Sewing Machine
WITH HIGH ARM?
It is very light running
makes the finest stitch of any machine made.
CALL, EXAMINE & BE CONVINCED.
Singer needles 15 cts perdoz., two doz. 25 cts., Shuttles 25cts, Oil 5 cts bottle.
MCCALLS'* BAZAR PATTERNS.
The Singer Manufacturing Co.
183 Washington St., Vicksburg, Miss.
m
ATTACHMENT.
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Louis Grünewald.
La.
ISTe^w Orleans,
liront
il
T,
Jk
jk
& Organs
Pianos
Leading Pianos of the World,
&
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» !IV.
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•«
*
»
Fisclaer.
ORGANS FROM ALL THE LEADING FACTORIES—
Shoningcr, Clough and Warren ,
MUSIC and MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS at Wholesale and Retail.
Everything in music line at lowest rates.
Catalogues mailed free upon app lica tion.
Louis Grünewald.
- Under Grünewald Opera House, New Orleans, La.
Address
w
.THE STANDARD COUGH REMEDY
I
VA
ÆT-;
,*s Issä*
;
bj
k\
S^l/NGARV^
BALSAM
Coughs, Colds, Con
sumption, Croup, Ca
tarrh, Influenza, Bronchitis,Whoop
ing Cough, Diseases of the Lungs,
Throat, and Bronchial Tubes,
CURES
IT LEWS ALL LUNG REMEDIES.
Get the genuine from your Drug
gist. Prepared only by the
Mansfield Medicine Company
MEMPHIS, TENN.
SOLE MANUFACTURERS.
i
: THE
D.W. Müler Carriage Co.
I CAR RIAGÇ.S
II«
I
m
lirai
A
ss
m
\
it:
i
Manufacture a large varkty rf ^
LIGHT and HEAVY CARRIAGES, PHAETONS,
CARTS, BUGGIES, WAGONS, &C-,
Xfter the most „pprove* ^eslg^s at the very lowest
prices consistent with good workmanship.
—BO.OCO volxlcloE
of our manufacture aro bow in use in this arnl
give.-Every vehicle is WAB BA »1 h l».— »peciat
attention will be given to mail orders.
CATALOGUES FREE.
0. W. Miller Carriage Co
E. Fifth St., Culvert St. and Eggleston Ave.,
CINCBNNATI, O,
•>
a
AIITmitlHES ANI> «ENTLEMEW -ho
Mil I tUwisli to make to *-$ a day easily at their
:nt by iuail.Nocanvassing. Address
MCo., Vine St.. Cin'ti.O.
MMMNPK «MM •
__t»OC A L«. Tr»v ÜH4B.
State which w' vruo.
W
own homes. Work s
with stamp Crown
•£--£*3
Ueurg* »«-,
A Im»
•dvt
Ludden Of Bates
Southern Music House.
' CONVERTED INTO AN INCOR
PORATED STOCK COM
PANY, WITH $200,000 CASH
CAPITAL.
TIIRE»:TREqE\DOIJSPVR
CII4SES FOB THIS SEA»
NO V* 'I RABE.
$j0,0.J0 Worth of Chickerng Pianos at one
Pun
•hase, $20,000 Worth of Impo
Musical Merchandise at One Pur
chase, 75,000 pieces of Sheet
Music at One Purchase.
rted
Bead this, Musican and Music Lover. Busi
ness has rushed us the past year so that we could
not jKist von, as usual, through our advertise
ments. aiid to make amends, we here give a few
solid facts well worth taken in.
Sc Bat»« Southern Musio
Household Word from the Potomac
Ludden
House is a
to the Rio Grande. Who has net heard of it? It
is a Mammoth Music Emporium, from which a
Solid Musical S< ith draws its supplies. Kleven
large Branch Houses, and over -'00 wide-awake
Agents distribute its goods through every South
ern State, and its yearly sales are nearly half a
million dollars.
Pounded fifteen years since, on the Solid Bed
Rock of Large Capital, Enterprise and Square
Trade, it lias stood uashaken, amid financial
pani s, pestilence, cyclone, and fires, and to in
sure its permanency for generations to come, it
1 has been incorporated as a Co-operative Stock
I Company, with a paid np Cash Capital of $200,
I ihn», which is owned solely by the Officers and
i Employers. The Officers are: W. Ludden,
! Pres,dent; J. A Bates, Treasurer and Manager,
and.I D Mnrptay, Sec'y.
Patrons are, therefore as safe in dealing with
this House as with any Bank, and need have no
fears as to its Permanency, Responsibility, or
Guarantees. It is Solid. Now notice these
TRADE ITEMS FOR 1884-85.
More Pianos and Organs sold yearly
than by all other southern dealers com
bined. $50,$$0 worth of (.'bickering Pianos
bought at one purchase in October last.
Largest purchase made by any Southern
House. Special Bargains. Elegant Pianos
only $210, with handsome Embroidered
Cover, Stool, Instructor, and Music Book.
Organs, §24, $50, $75, $100, with Stool, In
structor, and Music Book. All Freight
Paid. Easy Installment Terms. One
Price to All, and that the lowest known.
Write us, and we will save you money.
$*0,#0J worth of Imported Musical Mer
chandise, such as Violins, Guitars, Banjos,
Accordéons, Strings, etc., bought at one
purchase, from the Estev Organ Co., Atlan
ta, Ga., at one-half the cost of Importation.
Immense bargains now offered Retail Buy
ers. Accordéons, 75 cents each; Richter
Harmonicas, 10 cents; Banjos, $1; Violins,
SI: Guitars $3; Paganini Italian Strrings,
20 cts. each, per set; Clear Grit Italian, 1»
cts., GO cts. per set; Orguinettes, with 5
tunes, $6.
Privilege of returns, or exchange, given
if goods are "hot satisfactory. Revised Cat
alogue Jan, 1. 1885, free to all.
CHEAP MUSIC DEPOT.
arnl
$75,000 pieces of Sheet Music, bought at
one purchase, offered only at i0 cts. a copy.
Ail new and best Music, same as usually
sold for 80 cents to $1.50 per piece. Send
for Catalogue of Ten Cent Musi«. Don't
send North for cheap Music. This is
Headquarters. All Music at Reduced
Rates.
(jorue on buyers, we are with you in
prices, every time. We know how to buy,
how to sell, and how to please. Times are
hard and money must buy more goods than
it used to. The most for the money can al
wavs be had at
Xj-u.cAd.oxi. «As Bates SOUTH
ERN MUSIC HOUSE,
•>
-ho
their
Address
Cin'ti.O. #

ÜH4B.
vruo.
SAVANNAH. OA.
SWORD & SHIELD.
FOR 1883, -s*
was issued for two years by Dr. W. A. Hurt, under the
This paper
name of
THE -A-RX3-TTS.
was need
other
But the time came when a more vigorous and agressive paper
ed, than the editor of the ARGUS, with his extensive business in
was sold to the present
Therefore, the paper
SHIELD takes up where the Arou*
directions, could give.
Company, and the SWORD and
left off. (Vol. III.)
The SWORD and SHIELD.
the best thoughts of some of
will be chock full of
good Temperance literature and news, and, in addition, will base fisc oi
six columns of general news
Will 1 >e issued weekly, will contain
ablest and most prominent Temperance men ;
our
PROHIBITION
Will be the best plank in the platform of the SWORD anc SHIELD,
but it will advocate all the interests of the people,
be found articles from professional educators of the highest reputation.
In its columns will
THE AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT
Will be filled with articles by practical Mississippi farmers and with se
lection from a wide range of able Agricultural exchanges. It is th» de- .
termination of the Publisher make the department of the paper espec
ially worthy of the perusal of the intelligent formers of the South.
Tlie "Eïonae
This Department will be filled with choice thoughts from commu
The publication of one or two short serials is
nications and exchanges,
also contemplated.
ill toils of Plan ami Ornamental
Ci
(iKi
The SWORD and SHIELD is prepared to do all kinds of Job Work
PAMPHLET WORK
from visiting cards to pamphlet work,
a specialty. Write and get our terms before giving your work else
where.
FOR SALE.
A $150.00 ESTEY ORGAN.
Will be sold on easy terms, and shipped
DIRECT FROM THE FACTORY'.
Warranted to be PERFECTLY SOUND throughout.
Po? Particulars, Address— -
Ttcis OfQ.ee.
T. A. ILER,
Nextto Capital State Bank, .Jackson. IVfiss.
«
Jewelry
Fine Watches,
DIAMONDS,
Silverware, §
©
*>
M
Eye Glases,
CLOCKS!
Spectacles,
CLOCKS! CLOCKS!
: 0 :
Prices as low as Keliable Goods can be
bought. Goods sent on approval
to responsible parties.
BSS* Refers to the Editor of this Paper.
Whan the word Esta? or tha
word Organ is mentioned, they
eaoh suggest the other, so widely
known and so popular are the in
j
i
I
Èstey Ornan, Co.
[gran eBoroyf
•trnmenta and the mafrwi.
Five letters in eaoh of the two
words are reminders of «afoymsat
in maltltndM ef
ted Catalogue mailed fire# to all
applicants.
lUuatra-

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