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Sword and shield. (Clinton, Miss.) 1885-1888, April 04, 1885, Image 2

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065018/1885-04-04/ed-1/seq-2/

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Mexico as a Winter Resort.
Arriving at Cuautla, we found an ex
cellent hotel, the San Diego, directly
across the plaza from the railway sta
tion. The landlord was a German,and
had been in the country about thirty
years. The hotel was a one-story
structure, built around a large court,
the rooms opening upon a tile-roofed
veranda. In the court was a tall date
palm, with sprays of rich, orange-hued
blossoms rising among its graceful
plumes of dark green.
I hardly expected to meet in an ob
scure Mexican town a party of Ameri
can tourists passing the time in placid
ease, just as they might be encountered
at a nice Swiss inn in some Alpine val
ley. Vet we encountered at the San
Diego a most delightful company of
our compatriots. One, an eminent art
ist, who was something of an invalid,
was enthusiastic over the delicious air
and glorious scenery of the place.
These winter days in Cuautla were all
like our ideal June weather at home,he
said. There was no intense heat,while
cold and chilliness
strangers. Mexico he regarded as su
perior to Florida as a winter refuge.
In these warm lands, beside the endless
scenic variety, there was an unchang
ing climate all through the winter; at
least on the Pacilie side of the moun
tains.
"And then there are no mosquitoes
here," said another frie d.
never seen a land so free from them.
Tue few insects one meets here are
really contemptible; I feel inclined to
pity them for their feebleness."
It is. indeed, a great mistake for peo
ple to come to Mexico from the North
in the winter, and coniine themselves
to the capital. They experience the
thill}' weather which now and then vis
its tiie high regions of the central ta
bleland at that season, and with the
abrupt transitions of cold and heat
from morning to noon and night they
at times feel more discomfort than in
their wintry Northern homes, where
genial hearth-tires glow, until at last
they perhaps leave for Home in disgust,
anathematizing the whole country. All
this is a mistake, when on every hand
are pleasant places like Cuautla within
easy reach of the capital by rail, jour
ne} ing to which might till many weeks
with a round of health-giving pleasure,
novel scenes greeting the eye every
where. There is much of the greatest
interest to tourists to be seen in and
around the capital, but there are pleas
anter winter abiding-places nearby. It
is, ho .'ever, a good central point from
which to make agreeable tours all over
the country. Now that railway
munication with the United States is
completed, there will be many pleasure
travelers to Mexico. W en they come,
they should remember that there are
rich, warm valleys
at hand, where simple
a luxury, amid the delicious airs of
genuine tropical surroundings.— Syl
vester Harter , in March Atlantic.
were absolute
"I have
com
down below, close
existence'seems
Koine Reconstructed.
Since tbe establishment of the con
stitutional monarchy in Italy a double
problem has been working itself out—
how to make Rome a modern capital,
healthy, clean, and habitable, and how
to preserve the margin of recovered
ruins, and spread for the antiquary
(that epicure of decay) hik due table
of the broken victuals of tbe past.
Rome has been held in a double grasp
of "dead hands" for centuries. There
was the dead hand of tbe Roman Pon
titls, aud behind it the dead hand of
time. The Rome of tbe Papacy has
been disentangling itself from the mod
ern and from the ancient city. 4 he
great barracks of monkery aud the
faded palazzi, with their shadowy sar
cophagous courtyards and precincts,
where gloom and uncleanness strove
for mastery, are rapidly diminishing
from most quarters of the city. Mod
ern taste and everyday needs have
swept a large area into that struggling
rus in ttrbe patched ' by tracts of arid
desolation, the vineyard trailing over
leprous-looking rubbish, the ilex nod
ding on the moldered gatehouse, the
scraggy tufts of plane and cypress
clothing scantily the ruin mounds of
ages, and squalid cottages or limekilns
clustering fungus-like on the gray vil
la's walls. Through these the mdile of
to-day breaks his way with plummet
and trowel, and the faded remnants of
shabby grandeur recede as he invades.
Here and there the pioneer of utilitar
ianism unearths crumbled mosaics,
scraps of painted wall surface, decay
ed frescoes, fragmentary and chaotic
glimpses of the golden age of empire.
They peep from the chasm for a mo
ment, catch the sunshine once again,
and then return to earth and resume
their thousand years of slumber. Yet
surprises and discoveries come thick
and fast, and, sifted from this refuse,
tho stock of monumental trophies
which adorns the Capitoline Museum
is said to have more than doubled in
less than ten years. A policy of artist
ic reconstruction of the known haunts
of classic interest wherever possible,
and of careful preservation of frag
ments where impossible, has for some
years prevailed; and the result is that
the eye of the well-read cognoscente
may reclothe those spots with their an
cient scenery, trace again the pave
ment of the Nia Sacra, and reconstruct
in imagination the temples and public
otlices which echoed the footsteps of
Horace .—The Edinburg Review.
Why the Baby Doesn't Walk.
One inquiry which is often asked the
physician is:*"Why does not my baby
walk?" In answer we may say, first
of all, that delay in walking does not
necessarily imply physical disease or
weakness. A child s disposition may
have much to do with it; courage and
self-confidence make the infant for
ward, while timidity will make him
backward. The example of other, es
pecially older, children stimulates the
enterprise of an infant; while, on the
other hand, too constant attention
from nurses relieves an indolent child
from the necessities of exertion. \V hen
the tardiness passes beyond the ordi
nary limits it may be due to some
weakness, either natural to the child
perhaps the result of some definite
disease. Any severe ailment may en
tail such debility as to interrupt the
natural development of the child
Even the process of
dentition may have such an effect.
■ - - ^ - T
The House of Representatives of
South Carolina consists of 124 members.
When in session we sent around a roll
to ascertain the number of children
each member could boast of. One mem
ber has fourteen. One has eleven, one
ten, three nine each, and so it runs on
until the total is 402. This is a small
average. One Senator, only 45 years
old, and who has been married only
once, is the happy father of sixteen liv
ing children .—Abbeville (S. V.) Medi
ptn.
or
in
this direction.
Charles O'Conor in Public 1,1 Te.
Hon.
John* Bigelow contributes
"Some Recollections of Charles O'Con
or" to the March Venturi/, from wlfeh
wc quote the following: "Mr. O'Conor
never understood nor became entirely
reconciled to his want of success in
public life. Why every one loved to
recognize and do homage to his pro
fessional and personal supremacy, and
so few cared to accept him as their
political gui.de, was a problem which
always puzzled him, and contributed
not a little, I think, to weaken his faith
in popular judgments. The true solu
tion of it probably is that the very
qualities which gave* him his preemi
nence at the bar in a corresponding de
gree unfitted him for the representative
duties of a statesman. H
e went so
deeply into the philosophy or the
rationale of every subject that he natur
ally had little respect for the superticial
and often puerile reasons which the
mass of mankind would
assign even
for the best inspired actions. He could
never pool his opinions in a committee
or in any representative body, and be
content, as every statesman, in a de
mocracy at least, is required to be,
with the resultant decisions of a ma
jority. Thus it happened that in the
Convention in 1846, to which he was
chosen more especially to secure bis
aid in remodeling our judiciary, be
usually voted alone on committees,
and opposed almost alone the Constitu
tion as tin ally adopted. The logic of
bis mind was so in xorable that he
could not bow to those subtle forces or
instincts which go to make up public
opinion, nor recognize the soundness
of Talleyrand's famou.4 saying that
'There is one person wiser than Any
body, and that is Everybody.' He was
thoroughly loyal to the conclusions of
his own mind when they had been de
liberately formed that it seemed to him
pusillanimous to surrender them to
mere numbers or because of any possi
ble consequences that might result to
himself or others from adhering to
them."
Points About Pauses.
Judge .Jeffrey, the editor of the Ed
inburgh Review, prided himself upon
his ability in punctuating. Lord Cock
burn said of him: There was no one of
the friends of bis later acquisition for
whom he had greater admiration or re
gard than Lord Macaulay. This Judge,
of 74. revised the proof-sheets of Ma
caulay's first volumes of the History of
England with the diligent and minute
care of a corrector of the press toiling
for bread, not merely suggesting
changes in the matter ami the expres
sion, but attending to the very commas
and colons—a task which, though hum
ble, would not be useless, because it
was one at which long practice had
made him very skillful; indeed, he used
to boast that it was one of his peculiar
excellencies. On returning a proof to
an editor of the Review, he says:
*'I have myself recti: ed most of the
errors, and made many valuable verbal
improvements in a small way. But
my great task has been with the punct
uation, on which I have, as usual, ac
quitted myself to admiration. And in
deed this is the department of litera
ture in which I feel that I most excel,
and on which 1 am therefore most will
ing to stake my reputatidb!"
Dean Alford flattered himself that he
was able to punctuate. "1 have some
satisfaction in reflecting," he says,
"that in the course of editing the
Greek text of the New Testament I be
lieve I have destroyed more than a
thousand commas which prevented the
text being properly understood." To
this Mr. Washington Moon retorted that
the great enemy to understanding the
Dean's sentences was the want of com
mas .—Alt the Year Round.
A Queer Sort of Schoolgirl.
One of the most singular cases of
vision on record is found in the fourth
grade of our schools, in the person of
Belle Kinney, a little girl 12 years of
age. Shortly after entering school her
teacher, Miss Ella Ely, discovered that
she always read with her book upside
down, and that while writing she in
variably placed the copy in the same
position and wrote backward, with the
letters inverted and with her left band.
Not knowing whether to attempt acor
rection of tbe habit, the teacher sent
for Dr. I. N. Hamilton, one of ourprom
inent physicians and Pre ident of the
Board of Education, who tested her
thoroughly ve tent ay with figures, pict
ures, reading and writing, and discov
ered tlmt she was equally skillful w4th
her books in any position, although the
child herself had never particularly no
ticed her peculiarity, but expressed a
desire to use lier books as others do.
Tue doctor says it is the most remarka
ble case of the kind of which he ever
heard .—Marysville Let! er to the Cincin
nati Enquirer.
Society in the South.
Tiie society girl here has no more to
say than a northern belle, but she - ays
it better. Conversationally, as in
every other way, she is graceful, arch,
and in excellent taste. She is not
eloquent, but her eyes are. and the
thick play of light and shadow in Iter
face, the unobtrusive action of her sug
gestive little hands, and the ever
changing emphasis and inflection of
soft-syllabled words, put a world of
meaning into iter most ordinary re
marks. The only respect in which her
haste is questionable is her unlimited
use of cosmetics. I have yet to meet a
pretty girl who does not endeavor to
enhance iter beauty and succeed in
hastening its destruction, by the assist
ance of the powder puff— or a married
woman, or an old maid! They all do *
it. If you keep your face clean you
ire a Northerner and a barbarian.—
Sew Orleans Times-Democrat.
Just as the Baby Wore It.
Among the faded, moth-eaten but
priceless treasures displayed at the Ex
position in the Louisiana historical ex
hibit is a little child's dress with small
hand-bag to match, cap and linen-em
broidered mittens. It is an absurdly
old-fashioned thing with a long, point
ed waist, lots of gathers and full pufls,
and no one ever saw the like of the tiny
stitches; here and there the yellow bits
of thread lay upon the faded fabric like
fine powder of gold. There are
creases in tbe cap-strings—that quaint,
old-fashioned cap—and the embroider
ed mittens make one think a ion» time
ago they were tossed aside hastily for
the last time. And this is so.
years ago, the ticket on the dress re
ates, a little child, coming home from
church with her mother,suddenly died,
and ever since the mother has kept,
just as the baby wore it that last day,
the dainty frock and cap and bag and
~ ; *tens .—New Orleans tHcayune.
a
Fifty
Local Option by counties !
Steadman & Co.
in
to
de
1885. Sarins
HOT EUGERITED1!
That our stock this Spring is the
largest ever brought to Jackson.
That our prices arc lower than ever
known in the history of Dry Goods.
That we lead in styles and that we
dictate prices in this market.
Hear and be convinced and dupli
cate our prices when you can.
CLOTHING !
Genuine Middlesex Blue Flannel
Suits, in frocks and sacks, £8.00.
(See that tag is on collar and that it
is made of Middlesex Flannel, no
other is genuine.)
Kennebec Worsted Suits, braided
on collar, no other genuine, £12.00.
These suits come in gray, blue and
brown, is a doth exactly suited to
our climate, and was sold all last
season at £18.00.
We have suits at £2.25, £2.50,
£3.00, £3.50, £4.00, £5.00, and up to
£30.00.
We have the best assorted and
so
be
be
of
cheapest line of clothing ever shown
here, and we guarantee to shade any
price of any market.
We are agents for Messrs. Rettet
& Co., Merchant Tailors of New
York. We guarantee fits and goods
as represented.
bTEDMAN & CO.
MILLINERY.
We liaye received all the new
Spring shapes in the various straws
and braids out .this year : Porcu
pine, Pearls, Cantons, Milans, Le
horns, etc. Crowns are taller and
brims narrower than last year; but
the styles are very pretty and becom
ing. We lead in Millinery,
house in the State carry the line
we do, and our prices speak for
themselves.
<r
o
No
ST EDM AN & C< >.
GENERAL DU Y GOODS.
Ginghams, all brands, ten cents.
Calico, four, five and six cents. Fruit
of Loom and Lonsdale yard wide
Domestic eight cents. Yard wide
Broom Domestic, six cents. Shirting
width Broom Domestic, five cents.
Our celcbraled Linen DcTnde wc
will sell this year at six cents. Look
over our Lace counter, Parasols,
Fans, Dress Goods, etc.
STEDM AN & CO.
ANY ONE WISHING
A MU!
( l
0 ft
M
I
Will do well to address fills OF
FICE. They will get such terms as
will enable almost any family to pos
sess some one of the best makes.
g^PISt^^E^E^FcT^'cATA^RH jfll
Easy to use. A certain cure. Not expensive. Tbre«
months' treatment In one package. Good for Cold
tu the Head, Headache, Dizziness. Hay Fever, Ac.
Fifty cents. By all Druggists, or by mail.
E. T. HAZELTINE.
*
is
Warren, Pa.
-A
£ Z
THE
Tfe.
4P
'A
iCjt 4
rest gr
CU MATt %.c
ha.
*
VS I
*mW i
ilj
0
anal Street, New Orleans.
135
NOW IN USE—36,989.
if
m
iVÜ.k
m
All persons say their t'omis are the best. We ask you to el
nine our Improved Kcltrr l*o»ltIvc Force FeedÆrn hi*
- M-d und Fertilizing Drill «n.t our lluy Kakt ». Tl y
are as good as the liest, and can !*e sold a ; cheap AU are war
ranted. Circulars mailed free. Newnrk Machine COm
N ewark* Ohio. HasteruBranch House, lUger»lowu : M&.
• -x
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id
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ipH
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Jpciis Tucc'ay, rccciitbcr IS, 1334,
' i the !'rc*cnre oft he ;v»c,,V n ts of the Amer
r:in Rcnnlilirs, viz: Atihur, of the United
.-suite
Mexico ; lUmu s, of Guatemala;
. oi j Iou.lu; :isi,
••■»•Til
.0 Colossal Exhibit
cf all Time!
UL-Llcu (1C) Immense IZ.UiiLi
tlou Buildings:
One—thi; largest ImiUling ever erected, another
—the largest Conservatory in the World.
it
cf Space Undercover!
Ac,
r
-atOon Rnlf*» from nil
au !•;«% AccotRi.Hi '.il lout &t
cuAtiniible LLatrs for nil Vi«i
w Tr
)in r A.
Purin-» ti-e perioJ of the E-position, from
i, iSo$ the tempera
The
i ami shrubbery rein in crecn, flowers
m trulls -i tn, anil all kinds' of vegetables
...id i k .e.
II formation promptly furnished. f '
„ A. E L F.X Director <:er.
Ken Orleans. —..
r i'i, is:q, to ]
. P
,i:,c at New Orleans averages 05 Fi.hr.
LATEST AND BEST,
HAVE YOU SEEN THE NEW IMPROVED
SINGER
Sewing Machine
WITH HIGH ARM?
It is very light runnin
-AND
makes tiie finest stitcii of any machine made.
CALL, EXAMINE & BE C( )N YINCE1),
Singer needles 15 cts per doz., two doz. 25 ets., Shuttles 25ets, Oil 5 cts bottle.
MlTALhS'S BAZIK PATTERNS.
the
we
it
no
to
to
or
O
The Singer Manufacturing Co.
183 Washington St., Vicksburg, M'ss.
ATTACHMENT.
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h 310H-NO.LJ.nS HAIM
Louis Grünewald.
USTe'w Orleans,
p
La.
luim
nr
M1 1 «
Pianos
& Organs
Leading Pianos of the World,
i
M
»
FisoDer.
ORGANS FROM ALL TIIE LEADING FACTORIES—
Slioninger, Clough and Warren ,
Ml SIC and MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS at Wholesale and Retail.
Everything in music line at lowest rates.
Catalogues mailed free upon application.
Address
Louis Grünewald.
Under Grünewald Opera House, New Orleans, La.
Lnddcn cj' Bates
Southern Music Home.
THE STANDARD COUGH REMEDY
CONVERTED INTO AN INCOR
PORATED STOCK COM
PANY, WITH £200.000 CASH
CAPITAL.
\ «
0
(
TH HU»: TKEtlENDOl* 1*1,'R
»II AMIS rillt Uns SEA
80 V* TRAUE.
1: ,m
$50,0..0 Worth of ('liickerng Pianos at one
Purchase, 8'jn,ii<)0 Worth of Imported
Musical Merchandise at One Pur
chase, 75,000 pieces of Sheet
Music at One Purchase.
?
,
K
I i
m
/
Head this, Musicau and Music Lover. Busi
ness lias rushed us the past year so that we could
not post you, as usual, through our advertise
ments, and to make amends, we here give a few
solid facts well worth taken in.
IiUddnn & Bat«« Snuthsra Mn*io
House is a Household W'ord from the Potomac
to the Rio Grande. Who has not heard of if? It
is a Mammoth Music Emporium, from which a
Solid Musical South draws its supplies. Eleven
large Branch Houses, and over -200 wide-awake
Agents distribute its goods through every South
ern State, and its yearly sales are nearly half a
million dollars.
Founded fifteen years since, on the Solid Bed
Rock of Large Capital, Enterprise and Square
Trade, it has stood unshaken, amid financial
pani s, pestilence, cyclone, and fires, and to in
sure its permanency'for generations to come, it
has been incorporated as a Co-operative Stock
Company, with a paid up Cash Capital of $200,
ooo, which is owned solely by the Officers and
Employers. The Officers are: W. Ludden,
Prestdentt .1. A Bates. Treasurer and Manager,
and.I. D Murphy, Sec'y.
Patrons are, therefore as safe in dealing with
this House 8s with any Bank, and need have no
fears as to its Permanency, Responsibility, or
Guarantees. It is Solid. Now notice these
BALSAM
Coughs, Colds, Con
sumption, Croup, Ca
! tarrh, Influenza, Bronchitis,Whoop
j ing Cough, Diseases of the Lungs,
I Throat, and Bronchial Tubes.
CURES
IT LEADS ALL LUNG REMEDIES.
Get the genuine from your Drug
gist. Prepared only by the
:j
'"IK '»!?'.
-.•nopp «•
:r
r~ r r
• JHTC
\ -
TRADE ITEMS FOR 1884-85.
'sar.Tar.a i~. -j
More Pianos and Organs sold year. y
than by all other southern dealers com- !
bitted. $70,(K 0 worth of ('bickering Pianos
bought at one purchase in October last.
Largest purchase tna !e by any S iHuern •
House. Sjiecial Bargains. Elegant P.a ios
only £21), with handsome JEmbroi lered
(âiver, Su...', Inst) ucîor, and ..Mns'c Book.
Organs, §24, t 5(>, $75, $1' 0, with Stool, in
structor, and Mt sic B iok. All Freight
Paid. Easy Installne.it Terms. One |
Price to All, and that the lowest known.
Write us, and we will save von money.
$.0,00 I worth of Imported Musical Mer
chandise, such as Violins, Guitars, Banjos,
Accordéons, Strings, etc., bought at one
purchase, from tiie Estev Organ Co., Atlan
ta, Ga., at one-half the cost of Importation.
Immense bargains now offered Retail Boy- |
ers. Accordéons, 75 cents each; Richter!
Harmonicas, 10 cents; Banjos. $1; Violins,!
$1: Guitars $ 5; Paganini Italian Strrings,
20 cts. each, per set; Clear Grit Italian, 15
cts., 60 cts. per set; Orguinettes, with 5
tunes, $6.
Privilege of returns, or exchange, giveu
if goods are not satisfactory. Revised Cat
alogue Jan. 1. 1885, free to all.
CHEAP MUSIC DEPOT,
-: THE >
O.W. Miller Carriage Co.
CAR,
lift!
Ill;
Si
fm'ÏÆi
i
Manufacture a large variety if
LIGHT and HEAVY CARRIAGES, PHÄET0NS,
CARTS, BUGGIES, WAGONS, &C.,
After the most approved designs at the very lowest
prices consistent with good workmanship.
—50,000 vehicle^—
of onr manufactnre are now In nso in this and
foreign conntriea and attest the excellence of
ass^tts*^ïSSS!JïSiS
attention will be given to mail orders,
CATALOGUES FREE.
D. W. Miller Carriage Co
E. Fifth St., Culvert St. and Eggleston Ave„
CINCINNATI, O.
$75,000 pieces of Sheet Music, bought at
one purchase, offered only at JO cts. a copy.
All new and best Music, same as usually
sold for 30 cents to $1.50 pef piece. Send
for Catalogue of Ten Cent Music,
send North for cheap Music..
Headquarters. - All Music at Reduced
Rates.
Come on buyers, we are with you in
prices, every time. We know bow to buy,
how to sell, and how to please. Times are
hard ar.d money must buy more goods than
it used to. The most for the money can al
ways be had at
Zrndden dta Bates SOUTH
ERN MUSIC HOUSE,
Don't
This is
W ANTFil ladies and gentlemen «ho
rtm I ■_ Wwish to make to *4 a day easily at their
own homes. Worjc sent by mail.No canvassing. Address
with stamp Crown M 't'g. Co., 294 Vine St.. Cin'ti.O.
month. AU EXPÊKÎf.S
adrmn
SAVANNAH, GA.
A CO., 294 George »
SWORD & SHIELD.
W FOR 1885, JW
This paper was issued for two years l»v Dr. W. A. Hurt, under the
name of
THE ARGUS.
But the time came when a more vigorous and agressive paper was need
ed, than the editor of the ARGUS, with his extensive business in other
directions, could give.
Therefore, the paper was sold to the present
Company, and the SWORD and SHIELD takes up where the Argus
left off. (Vol. III.)
The SITOT/) and SHIELD.
Will be issued
weekly, will contain the best thoughts of some of
rubiest and most prominent Tempera nee n.cn ; will be chock full of
good Iemperanev literature and news, ami, in addition, will have five or
six columns of general news
on
PROHIBITION
Will be the best plank in the platform of the SWORD ant SHIELD,
but it will advocate all the interests of the people,
be found articles from professional educators of the highest reputation.
In its columns will
THE AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT
\\ ill be filled with articles by practical Mississippi farmers and with se
leetion from a wide range of abfe Agrietiltural exchanges. It is tho de
termination of the Publisher make the department of the paper espec
ially worthy of ttie perusal of the intelligent formers of the South.
Tb.e Home
This Department will be filled with choice thoughts from commu
nications and exchanges. The publication of one or two short serials is
also contemplated.
)b
I
I'1D
f
ll
(I
(
(I
The SWORD and SHIELD is prepared to do all kinds of Job Work
PAMPHLET WORK
from visiting cards to pamphlet work,
a specialty. Write and get our terms before giving your work else
where.
FOB SALE.
A $150.00 ESTEY ORGAN.
Will be sold oil easy terms, and shipped
DIRECT FROM THE FACTORY.
Warranted to bs PERFECTLY S0UN0 throughont.
Po? Particulars, Address
Tills Office.
When the word Eatery or the
word Organ is mentioned, they
each suggest the other, so wideD
known and so popular sun the in
struments and the makers.
Five letters in each of the two
words are reminders of enjoyment
in multitudes of homes. Illustra
ted Catalogue mailed free tc id 1
N applicants.
Groan. Co.
leBoroyt
77
PT
y
il
T. A. ILER,
to t '<» pit.» 1 Stute lit» nie, Jackson. Miss.
IN«'X
AT cif
Jewelry
Fine Watches,
Co
e
».
e
/- CAW
M
Silverware, s™* >
7 l\U Ai, .1 IL'TA/
v
DIAMONDS,
hu
Sji
Eye Glases,
CLOuES !
Spectacles,
CLOCKS !
CLOCKS!
-: 0 ;
Prices as low as Reliable Goods can be
bought. Goods sent on approval
to responsible parties.
Refers to the Editor of this Paper. <^31

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