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Sword and shield. (Clinton, Miss.) 1885-1888, April 11, 1885, Image 4

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WHAT CARE 11
What care 1 if I see her notv
It is enough
That I can gaze on the very sitôt
Where nestling lies her humble eot
In woodland rough
What care I if she knows not me!
At morn and eve
When she walks forth on the (lowered lea,
In glimpses oft her form I see,
Nor ask her leave.
What care 1 if she does not smile
When I come near?
Only to help her across the stile,
And with light speech an hour beguile,
Is ample cheer.
What care I if she seems so coy?
Jxtve her I will;
For though she calls me a foolish boy
That soon will crave some other toy,
She listens still.
What care I if she will not wed?
No greater bliss
Could be than when, as she softly said,
•'1 love you," and lowly bent tier head,
1 stole a kiss.
What care I if the world go wrong?
Now she is mine,
The days are sweet and the days are long.
All that was but an empty song—
This, joy divine.
— T. W. Stocknrd.
J h 1
iU]
FOR THE O R (! A NIZA T I OX
r no if IB j tj ox v a u h s
t ii noraw nr the
ST A TE.
A FORM S !'(/a ESTER BY
HY THE STATE PROHI
BITION EXECUTIVE
COMMITTEE.
IN UNION THERE IS STRENGTH.
CONSTITUTION. *
Akticli: 1. The name of this or
ganization shall be the [here insert
name].
Art. 2. The object of this organi
zation shall he to promote the cause
of Prohibition and Temperance and
a faithful execution of the Liquor
Laws in our country, and to secure
co-operation and concert of action to
this end. It shall be the work ofthis
organization to time such means as
may be deemed necessary or advisa
ble for the iceouiplishment of the gen
eral purposes of the organization to
save our community from the evils of
intemperance and the liquor traffic.
Art. 4. Any resident ofthis coun
ty over 12 years of age who approves
the general objects and purposes of
this organization and desires to aid
in the furtherance of the same may
heeome a member thereof by subscrib
ing to the following pledge :
etnnly pledge my word and honor
that I will use all honorable and law
ful means to promote the cause of
Prohibition, discourage intemper
ance and co-operate with all efforts
fo • the rigid enforcement of existing
liquorlawsor those that may be here
after enacted ; and I further pledge
myself to give — cents monthly to
this cause to be appropriated to local
or State purposes as the Executive
Committee may determine.
Art. 4. The officers of this club
shall consist of a President, one or
more Vice-Presidents, Treasurer, Re
cording and Corresponding Secreta
ry and an inside and outside Sentinel
who shall perfoum the usual duties
pertaining to said offices.
Art. 5, There shall he general
meetings of the club held from time
at such times and places as may he
designated.
Art. *i. There shall he an election
held for officers .f this club semi-an
nually on the nights of the [here in
sert names of months] of each year,
provided that the officers now elected
shall hold over until their successors
are duly qualified.
Art. 7. There shall be an Execu
tive Committe which shall consist of
five members, three of whom shall he
chosen at the semi-annual meetings
of the club for the election of officers,
and who shall together with the Pres
ident, Secretary and Treasurer of the
club (who are declared ex-officio
members of said committee) consti
tute the Executive Body of the club,
three of whom shall constitute a quo
rum.
Art. 8. It shall he the duty of the
Executive Committee. 1st, To pro
vide tor the raising of funds to defray
all necessary and legitimate expen
ses of this club. 2nd. To provide
suitable quarters m which the club
and Executive Committee shall he
held. 3d. To provide for the organ
i/.ation of such subordinate and aux
. diary clubs and committees in the
county as may be deemed advisable.
4th. To fill all vacancies in office
which may occur by death, resigna
tion or otherwise. 5th. To appoint
such standing committees as may he
deemed advisable and as may he pro
vided by the laws of this club. 0th.
To call such special meetings of this
club or of the Executive Committee
as they may from time to time deem
necessary. 7th. And generally to
employ such means as to promote
the interest of this club and to ad
vance the purpose for which it is or
ganized. 8th. To suggest such by
laws as may be necessary.
Art. 9. This constitution may he
altered or amended after one week's
notice of such proposed amendment
or alteration at any regular meeting
on the vote of two
"I sol
*•
.tf
int.
thi
BY-LAW'S.
Hmm
•:*
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meetings shall be the., addresses, es
says, recitations, music, etc., and it
shall he the duty of the President to
select members to carry out the ob
jects ot this article in the by-laws.
Akt. *3. No indebtedness shall be
incurred by the club except through
the direction of the Executive Com
mittee.
À ht. 4. All reports of committees,
standing or special, shall be made in
the first instance to the Executive
Committee and shall be by it, at its
discretion report to any regular meet
ing upon any purposes of the club and
set forth in the constitution.
Art. 5. All money paid out to
sustain the work of the club shall be
paid by the Treasurer upon
drawn by the Recording Secretary
d countersigned by the club.
Art. fi. The meeting of the club
shall be conducted in accordance
with the rules governing pa rliament
tary bodies and shall he private un
less otherwise provided.
Art. 7 The by-laws may be alter
ed or amended at any regular meeting
of the Executive Committee by a ma
jority vote of the members present.
Art. 8. All applications for mem
bership shall be in writing, signed by
at least two members in good stand
ing, and said application shall lie
over until the next meeting for con
sideration and shall be voted on by
ballot, and two votes in the negative
shall constitute a rejection.
Art. 0. For any violation of the
stitution and by-laws of this club
or for any conduct inconsistent with
be ex
orders
at
con
its purposes a member may
polled by a two-thirds vote of all the
members present at any regular
meeting; Provided, That the party
charged shall have one week's notice
to make his or her defense.
Art. 10. The by-laws of this dub
may be suspended by two-thirds ot
the members present.
An America:! Audience.
The dominant characteristic of the
American audience seems to he impar
tiality. They do not sit in judgment,
resenting as positive offenses lack of
power to convey meanings or diver
gence of interpretation of particular
character or scene. 1 understand that
when they do not like a performance
they simply go away, so that at the
close of the evening the silence of a
deserted house gives to the manage
ment a verdict more potent than audi
ble condemnation. This does not ap
ply to questions of morals, which can
be, and are, as quickly judged here as
elsewhere. On this subject I give en
tirely the evidence of others, for it lias
been my good fortune to see our audi
ences seated till the linal falling of the
curtain. Again, there is a kindly feel
ing on the part of the audiences to
ward the actor as an individual, espe
cially if lie be not a complete stranger,
which is, I presume, a part of that re
cognition of individuality which is so
striking a characteristic in American
life and customs.
Many an actor draws habitually a
portion of his audience, not in conse
quence of artistic merit, not from capa
city to arouse or excite emotion, but
simply because there is something in
his personality which they like. This
sp rit forcibly reminds me of the story
told of the manager of one of the old
"Circuits," who gave as a reason for
the continued engagement of an im
possibly bad actor, that "lie was kind
to his mother." The thorough enjoy
ment of the audience is another point
to be noticed. Not only are they
quick to understand and appreciate,
but there seems to be a genuine pleas
ure in the expression of approval.
American audiences are not surpassed
in quickness and completeness of com
prehension by any that I have yet
seen, and no actor need fear to make
liis strongest or his most subtle effort,
for such is sure to receive instant and
full acknowledgment at their hands.
There is little more than this to be
said of the American audience. But
short though the record is, the impres
sion upon the player himself is pro
found and abiding. To describe what
one sees and hears over the footlights
is infinitely easier than to convey an
idea of the mental disposition and feel
ing of the spectators. The house is
ample and comfortable, and the audi
ence is well-disposed to be pleased.
Ladies and gentlemen alike are mostly
in morning dress, distinguished in ap
pearance, and guided in every respect
by' a refined décorum. The sight is
generally picturesque. Even in winter
Rowers "abound, and the majority of
ladies have bouquets either çarried in
hand or fastened on the shoulder or
corsage.
especially, where the larger proportion
of the audience is composed of ladies,
the effect is not less pleasing to the
olfactory senses than to the eye. Cour
teous, patient, enthusiastic, the Ameri
can audience is worthy of any effort
which the actor can make on its be
half, and lie who has had experience of
them would be an untrustworthy
chronicler if he failed, or even hesi
tated, to bear witness to their intelli
gence, their taste, and their generosity.
■—Henry Irving, in the Forthnightly
Review.
to
as
to
of
of
of
to
or
he
of
he
he
to
he
At matinee performances
•- • -,
The Quadruped's Superior Power.
tlio
One evening, many years ago,
writer of this attended a social gather
ing of young folks in a Wisconsin vil
lage, and, after various games had been
played, all involving more or less os
cillatory practice, there was a lull in
the exercises, and we all sat around
in the front parlor eating nuts and pop
A very tine Newfoundland dog
lay stretched out near the fire, and
Carrie, the lively daughter of the host
called Bruno to her, told him to
stand up, and amused us for some time
by placing kernels of corn on his nose,
and repeating: "One, two, three—
fire!" when the dog would toss the
corn up, catch it and eat it with much
relish. She then made him lie down
and roll over, and do various tricks,
finally closing by having him stand on
his head. As the noble dog resumed
his natural position, Carrie said to
Charlie W-: "There, Charlie, you
can't do that." Just at that moment,
when all eyes were still on the dog, he
dropped on his haunches, and com
meneed vii scratching his ear
with his hind foot, in the effort to dis
lodge a wicked Ilea. "No, J don't be
liere I can," said Charlie, "nör you
either." And then a cyclone of laugh
through the room, and Car
[syy. ere.the color of the red,
were the good old
Advertiser.
corn.
ess,
m
Saloons and Schools.
The Toledo Blade, which is doing
valiant service in its resolute efforts
to "pulverize the rum power,"
meriting upon the corrupting saloon
influence upon sehool-bovs, says:
"There are but few schools in the
United States that have not secret
rum-mills near them. . There is a
class of Feasts who open such places
near shools for the trade of the boy
The real purpose is always concealed,
for publicity would rum the game.
In back rooms,securely guarded, the
boys are trained in drunkenness and
the accompanying vices, and the
most promising young men are ruin
ed in the places where they should be
the most secure from harm. Brew
arid distillers are very sharp bus
iness men, and as making drunkards
is a business with them—a systema
tized business—they do not miss such
profitable openings as schools with
hundreds of boys, whose parents are
liberal with money. The hawk is
always hovering over pigeons.
"There is but one protection tor
bovs in school or out, and that is to
extirpate the traffic. It must not be
run away from, but it must be met
und destroyed. The whole traffic
must be killed, so that r.o teacher
shall be compelled to make wathful
ness against rum a part of his daily
business, it must not be sold any
where. In the interest of the boys
of the country who are preyed upon
by these pirates, for their safety, man
ufacture and sale of intoxicants of all
kinds must be prohibited.
"When this is done teachers will
no more advertise that there arc no
saloons in their vicinity, and parents
may entrust their boys out of their
sigiit with some assurance of safety.
They will then know that their son
while receiving his education is not
forming habits that make his educa
tion of no use."
com
ers
An Arab Household.
He was a grand-looking old man,and
looked all the more so in his pictur
esque Arab costume. Following him
through a small lobby we ascended a
dark and narrow wooden staircase. At
the top of it \\b found ourselves in an
arched gallery running round a small
court. Here a few goats were wander
ing about, and from behind curtained
doorways mimerons dark faces were
peeping at ns. The principal lady of
the household received us at the door
of the sitting-room, and soon we were
surrounded by at least a dozen women
and lots of children, not two of them
dressed alike. The poor children were
all perfectly laden with bracelets, ank
lets and nose-rings, while a few had
even nostril-rings. Indeed, many of
them looked queer little objects, with
patterns painted on their laces in scar
let, yellow or white. Some of the wo
men, too. had white spots painted round
their ears. 1 thought these extremely
ugly, for they strongly resembled rows
of teeth. One exceedingly smart baby
was dressed in a yellow silk dress with
a bright crimson border and a littlecap
surmounted liy a turf of feathers all
the colors of the rainbow.
His arms and legs were perfectly
laden with jewels, and his little neck
smothered by rows and rows of beads,
from which were suspended all sorts of
charms and talismans. Several of the
women were afraid to shake hands with
me, and one little fellow, with an enor
mous nose-ring, screamed most lustily.
This led to otir discovery that they were
afraid of my dark bauds, for I had on a
pair of brown gloves. It was the first
time that any of them had seen a pair
of gloves, and the whole party were
very much astonished when I took
them off to find that my hands were
white. Miss Alien produced a scrap
book, and handed it lir.-t to the old
•gentleman, lie commenced looking at
it at the wrong end, as Arabs always
do, and evidently enjoyed the pictures
quite as much as the children. Shortly
after our arrival the servants brought
in a gilt tray with two large green gob
lets full of sweet sirup, and we had to
drink a little of this, as well as three
small cups of coffee, the old gentleman
particularly wishing me to understand
"that it was Arab custom to dritik not
less than three."
Doubts the Report ot tlie Dentil of
Barrios.
New York, April 5. —I wish to en
ter my protest as to the acceptance
as a fact of the report of the death of
Gen. Barrios. 1 was killed precise
ly in the same manner in Salvador
during the war of 1870, i. e. on paper.
Be sure that when the sword of Gen.
Barrios is found on the field of battle
his right hand will he found firmly
grasping it. As Dr. Zoldiver is not
at present practicing medicine his
certificate as to the death of Gen.
Barrios is not evidence of the fact.
Unless marked and wonderful
changes have taken place in Salva
dor since 187G, it is not possible for
Salvador troops, unless in an
overwhelming majority, to defeat
Gautemala troops. When Gen.
Barrios dies Guatemala will have to
mourn greater than has ever happen
ed to her before. History will do
him more justice than is being done
him now. T. B. Bunting,
Late General of Division and Chief
. Artillery, Guatemala.
A Breach of rromiz e Case F ails.
a young woman in California recent
]y sued the young man she had been
engaged to for breach of promise,
Everything went on well. Her attor
ney read the usual lettcrs;read the gush
for the amusement of the audience in
the court-room, "ave the amatory
statistics—the usual nuember of times
he used "darling," the number of times
j u , -'wanted to kiss lier," "look in her
dear eyes," aud "hold lier in his arms
j n a f on d embrace." The lawyer was
sure that he had "caugut on" to every
man on the jury. The defendant was
an amateur photographer. His sole re
gponse was a photograph of the young
woman sitting on a sofa with another
fellow's arm about her waist. This
was unexpected. The amateur photo
graplier, suspecting all was not right,
pretended to go out of town one even
j B g t leaving his instrument properly
arranged with doc^v-work for taking a
picture in the girlDihouse. Verdict for
fkA defendant.— 1'woit Free Fress.
(Jouerai ((rant.
IS THE OLD HERO DYING BECAUS1
OF MEDICAL INTOLERANCE?
The American IlomœopathiM has
article on the treatment of Gen
eral Grant by the Allopaths, in
which it says :
' General Washington was murder
ed by his medical attendants ; but at
least they were heroically—too hero
ically endeavoring to extinguish the
disease Their brutality was of the
active sort, and in purpose common
able, through disastrous in result.
General Garfield was maltreated for
months under an error of diagnosis,
and at last escaped beyond the reach
of his eminent torturers. 1 lore, also,
there was much medical heroism and
activity displayed, albeit misdirected.
Other illustrious patients have suffer
ed from eminence in the profession ;
but General Grant seems reserved as
shining example of cold-blooded
expectancy, To him the little group
of eminence have nothing to offer but
a diagnosis. For him they propose
no relief but in the grave. Ignoring
the only source of therapeutic salva
tion, they gather round his bedside
to observe his unaided struggle.
The fiat has gone fortn that nothing
can be done: and nothing will be
permitted to be'doue. Those who
question such a decision are quacks
and cranks : but who ought not to
be proud ot such designation from
such a source? Scholary, refined,
cultivated, earnest gentleman as they
of what avail are all these good
qualities in the presence of such ther
apeutic bankruptcy ? On the con
trary, while so-called scientific med
icine is to the fore, well may tin
daily papers announce in startling
headlines,
Grant—Seven doctors in
tion.'"
Yes, the hero of Appomattox is
dying!
He who knew no fear in war,
knows no fear in suffering,
quiet fortitude wins universal admir
ation.
President Lincoln, in visting a
hospital during the late war, noticed
a poor Confederate boy, mortally
wounded. Witlihi.Sj native tenderness
he put his arms around lus neck in
sympathy. The sight melted the
hospital to tears.
The heart of the American people
in like manner bleeds for Grant, the
silent sufferer. It would have him
get well, by any effective means.
His physicians say he can not re
cover. They fill him with anodynes
but despite their favorable bulletins
lie is daily growing worse.
A specialist who lias won reputa
tion in the treatment of cancer visits
his bedside. The opposition he en
counters from the attending physi
cians brings painfully to mind the
story ot the dog in the manger.
And General Grant, perhaps,
must die because of this intolerance !
Is it possible that there is no hope of
cure outside of the medical profes
sion ?
Preposterous!
For years medical men insisted
that certain fevers were incurable,
but Chincona proved the contrary.
For centuries they have protested
that certain renal disorders were in
curable and yet a special preparation
has cured and permanently cured the
very worst cases.
Why may it not be possible ju like
manner to cure a case of cancer?
B. F. Larrabee, of Boston, was doom
ed to death by many eminent Boston
j. B. Ilenion, M. D , of
was given up by
the best doctors of all schools.
J. 8. Prescot, of Cleveland, Ohio,
was gravely informed by them that
be could not live, and yet these men
and thousands like them have been
cured and cured permanently, of se
rious kidney disorders, by a remedy
not officiallyknown to the code.
What has been done may be done
again.
General Anson Stager died of
Bright s disease in Chicago last week.
Joe" Goss, the Boston pugilist,
died of it. Hundreds of thousands of
people perish of it every year, while
in their doctors hands. The dhuse
of death may be called blood poison
ing, paralysis, heart disease, convul
sions, apoplexy, pneumonia, or some
other common ailment, but the real
difficulty is in the kidneys. Physi
cians know it but they conceal the
fact from their patients, realizing
their inability to cure by any "au
thorized" means. The remedy that
cured Larrabee and Henion and
Prescott (i. e., Warner's safe cure) is
a special, independant discovery.
Its record entitles it to recognation,
and it gets it from intelligent peo
ple. Its manufacturers have an un
sullied reputation and are entitled
to as great consideration as any
school of phyiscians.
Professor R. A. Gunn, M. D.,
an
a
are.
A had day for General
consul ta
His
Rochester, N. YD,
physicians.
Eid.
Li
Dean of the United States Medical
College, ot New York City, rises
above professional prejudice and on
its personally proved merits alone
gives it several pages of the warmest
commendation in his published work
—the only instance on record of a
high professional endorsement of
such a preparation.
The unprejudiced people do not
want General Grant to die.
there is in all nature or anywhere in
the world a remedy or a man able
to cure his cancer, give them a
chance.
will they do it ?
No.
Why?
Is it not too often the case that
!
If
many excellent physicians who are
greatly devoted to the code, would
prefer that their patients should
die rather that they should recover
health by the use of any remedy not
recognized under their code ?
isroTioxa.
Commencing Wednesday, April
1st, and until further notice, the
Illinois Central Railroad will sell
tickets from Jackson, Miss., to New
Orleans and return, to parties of
three or more on one Solid ticket, at
rate of 85.00 per passenger. Tickets
good to return within ten days from
date of sale.
A. II. HANSON,
General Passenger Agent.
tf.
Railroad Time-1 ab le
Illiroi* Cent ral Railroad .
Going North —
Express—Leaves New Orleans 9:15 a m, ar
rives at Jackson 5:45 p m, leaves 6:( 5, ar
rives at Grand Junction at 3:10 a m.
Mail- Leaves New Orleans 5:30 p m, arrives
at Jackson 12:35 am, leavi s 12:40 a m,
reaches Grand Junction 8:55 a m.
Mixed—Leaves New Orleans 7:15 a m, reach
es Jackson 5:30 p in, leaves 6:15 p m,
reaches Grand Junction 1:15 a in.
Going South —
Express—Leaves Grand Junction 1:20 p m,
reaches Jackson 10:30 p m, leaves 10:35 p
m, reaches New Orleans 7 a ni.
Mail—L&ives Grand Junction 7:10 pui. ar
rives at Jackson.. 3:30 a m, leaves 3:35 a in
arrives at New Orleans 10:45 a in.
Mixed—Leaves Grand Junction 9:50 a in, ar
rives at Jackson 8:00 a m, leaves 9.50 a m,
arrives at New Orleans 5:20 p ni.
* ;.b*barK & Meridian Railroad.
Kant Bound Tra'ns.
Mail—Leaves Vicksburg 8:00 p ui. a-rive,
at Jackson 10:20 a d leaves at 10:35 p m,
arrives at Meridian at 4:20 a rn.
Express, < r Accommodation—Leave Jack
son 7:30 a ill, arrives at Vicksburg 9.'5
am. Leav« s Vicksburg 1:30 p m, and
a>~iv( s at Jackson 3:45 p ni.
Local Freight leaves Vicksburg 4:15 a to
arrives at Jackson at 8:35 and leaves at
9:10 a in, arrives at Merid an at 0:15 p m
West Bound Trains.
Mail, 1 ;• vi s Meridian 10:20 p ni. arrives In
J.wk M>n 3:20 and leaves at 3:49 a m, ar
r at Vicksburg 6:00 a in.
; oc d Fre'glit, leaves Meridian 6:00 a m, ar
ives in Jackson at 3:15 and leaves at 4:30
U m arrives in Vicksburg 9:00 p ui
Z4 tohez. Jackson and Columbus.
Eastward—Leaves Natchez dailv at 3:15 p
in, arrives at Jackson 9:30 p in.
•v < -tward—Leaves Jackson daily at 6:00 a
in, arriv. s at Natchez 11:50 a in.
Freiç Lt T ail, daily, Sunday excepted
Leaves JacKson 9:00 a m, arrives from
Natchez at 6:30 p in.
Yazoo and Mississippi Valley
Going North—Leaves Jackson 6:30 a in, ar
r've* at Yazoo City 10:20 a in.
Going South—1 .eaves Yazoo City at 1:30 p
ni, arriving at Jackson at 5:30 p ni.
M & O R- R.-At Meridian.
SOUTH.
No 1 Arrives 5:10 a in No 2 Arrive 10:25 pm
" 1 Leaves 5:15 a ni " 2 Leaves 10:30 p m
' 3 Arrives 7:25 p ui 4 4 Arrives7:32 a m
" 3 Leaves 7:40 p ml " 4 Leaves 7:52 a m
The Southbound passenger train leaving
Meridian at 7:52 a in, arrives in Mobile at
1:30 p m, and the train going
North leaves Mobile at 2 p in, and arrives at
Meridian at 7:25 i> m.
NOhTH.
pis dm RENii
Easy to use. A certain cure. Not expensive. Three
months* treatment in one package. Good for Cola
In the Head, Headache, Dizziness, Hay Fever, Ac.
Fifty centn. B^» T ?SffiÄfwlirrenV
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Opens Tuesday, December 16,1884.
In the presence of the Presidents of the Amer
ican Republics, viz: Arthur, of the United
States ; L)iaz of Mexico ; Harries, of Guatemala;
IJcgran, ot Honduras.
lie Colossal Exhibit
cf all Time!
Sixteen (10) Immense Exhibi
tion Buildings :
One—the largest building over erected, another
—the largest Conservatory in the World.
90 Acres cf Space Under Cover I
I.o,r Transportation Rato* from all
I'oint*. Ample At-eonuiiorlntfonaa(
Iteaiouabl« State» fur ail Vialiora.
During the period of the Exposition, from
December 16, 1SS4, toj une 1, tSSS the teiujiera
ture at New Orleans averages 05 Fahr. Ihe
lawn and shrubbery rem.in green, flowers
bio. m, fruits rii en, and all kinds of vegetables
grow and mature.
Full information
dress,
promptly furnished. A*
13. A. EWE, Director «eacrai,
Ke* Orleans, La.
I'HOTOGItAlMIS.
We claim the lead in all the latent
'fhe people
sav so. Our
styles of Pictures
throughout the county
Prices are as follows: Gems 25 cents
Gard Photographs $1.75 per half doz.
Cabinets, 84.00 per half doz. painting
the same, Large work in propotion,
We are Head-quarters for all kinds
of frames, all Sizes and Styles.
If you don't believe what
we are
saying, try us and if we fail will
Lighten again.—Yours, Eiland & Co.
Planter's House place of Business.
HELP WANTED—Females.
ttt ANTED—In
W and county
getic lady of good address and some
business ability, to introduce to the
trade and e v usumers Madam Deans
every town city
, an intelligent, euer
Celbrated Spinal Supporting
Corset. Retails at 81.50 Splend
idly advertised: highly recommend
ed by the leading Modiste,fashionable
Dressmakers and the most eminent
Physicians of the United States and
Europe. Liberal pay. Agents are
making 815 to 805 weekly. Address
Lewis Schiele & Co.
391 ) Board way, N. Y.
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MEMPHIS, TEXX.
Dealer in all kinds of Marble
Work, such as Tombstone?, Monu
ments, Mantles, etc., etc. All ot
which will be sold at extreme!v
LOW FIGURES.
Write for what won want and get
estimates. It will he t<> your inter
est to do so.
THOMAS MAYDWELL,
Memphis, Tenu
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This is nature's great restnrerof health,
and is the onIv preparation of Iron that
combines ail of its good qualities, without
producing the unpleasant after eftects
which characterize all other preparations
of Iron. It is pleasant and agreeable to
the taste, and can be taken and retained
by the most delicate stomach. It is the
only preparation of Iron that will not
constipate the bowels, or blacken and de
stroy the teeth. It is easily and readily
taken up and assimilated by the blond,
and is. therefore, the greatest remedy
known for
General Debility, D)spepsia, Indiges
tion, Nervousness, Female Diseases,
Scrofula, Chronic Rheumatism. Con
valescence from typhoid and Malarial
Fevers, and all Diseases and Impuri
ties ofthe Blood.
PREPARED ONLY BY
S. MANSFIELD & CO
M'f'gChemists, Memphis, Tenn., U.S.A.
PRICE, SI.00 PER BOTTLE.
The genuine has a deep blue wrapper with white
letters aud the above picture on the label.
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Farqmiar's Iinurovea totîca liante?
Drops
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Very Simple ::
UnioU&l Seed
Hi
nrkahle reg
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with
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£ if 3
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the Cheapest,
most Kelinblo
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SEM» H'.R I'ATALOtiC
Address. A. C. FAllOlflAE, Vor
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I'a.
FREE TO ALL.
UR nt*w illustrated Floral
Catalogue of 90 page*,
_ ontaining description and
jMKS&jtpriceg of the best varieties of
ftggär Plants« Garden aud Flow
HBp er Seed», liulbs. Roots«
KlN Shrub*« Small Fruits and
Trees will be molted Free to
njjtll applicants.
for One Dollar to anv
** pince. Wholesale and retail.
fcANZ & NEUNER, Louisville. Ky.
0
Ten Roies
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CARDEN?
HAVE YOU A
SEEDS
IF YOU MVt
YOU WILL NEED
Aud will want (be iMt at the !e»t money. Then
my new Seed Catalogue will surprise yon. No matter
where you have been dealing it will lave money. It ia
mailed Free to all, and you ought to bave It
""'""wmTh. maule,
129 ft 131 Front St. PhiadelpMa.
BUY ONE
R|CHT
%ÿ5l V Mf-feed, 8TRA W is
1AY CUTTER.
The knifi is 9tel, and tempered.and
is fastenei tojever with three bolts,
and can b* eady taken off to sharpen.
The length ofhut is regulated by the
lever to vhi<j the knife is bolted.
••'The higher $e lever is raised, the
longer it will cut. All fe warranted. Send for
circular which will b^mailed FREE.
.NEWARK MAt flfcECO., Newark, O.
fw
M
LAZ. KAHN.
Stats Street,
Jackson, - - Miss.
-DEALER IX
IDr-y OOOds,
Ready-Made.
CLiOTHIKTG,
WLlies loelotte out UNNloefi
of Fine Wittier ( lolliiiig, and
offers it at price« Cireatlj Ke
diiccd.
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Ami il' VOF Want (a get your
''hare. CJG TO
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I/ax. Kalin.
A Complete Medical Work tor
Women, handsomely bouun in doth
and illustrated. Tells how to pre
vent and cure all diseases of the sex,
by a treatment at home. Worth its
weight in Gold to every lady suffer
ng from any of these diseases. Over
0,000 sold already. Postpaid
50 Cents.
one
il Note or 2-tl
ps. A » fies NUNDA l'l B
1SH IN C ( < .. Nunda, N. Y,
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MANSFIELD'S
.OUISI4A a
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EUR RESTORER!
WARRANTED to restore gray hair toits orig
inal color, beauty and softness: to stop it from
falling out: to restore a vigorous circulation to the
fluids ; to give tone to the secretions of the scalp;
and to keep the head free from dandruff.
AS A HAIR DRESSING
It is Unsurpassed.
It is delightfully perfumed, pleasant to use, and
the
GEM OF HAIR RESTORERS.
It will not stain the skin, or soil the finest li o en.
and will cause the hair to grow whe re.lt_m ^mi«
fered injury or decay by n "fr l< y Q f-fihMT
non:
INUINE
without ttv? trade mark of the inventors Ask
vw. Druggist for it.
MANSFIELD MEDICINE COMPANY
MEMPHIS, TEX\.
sole Manufacturers.
COLEMAN
COMEGE, NEWARK, ■ ■
Orcnples three Buildings. Largest and^S, 8 *?•
positfons for graduates than all other sebsh. Wor «
Dined. Life Scholarship, »do. Write for V* 0,,m '
COLEMAN, PALMS ft Ca,P? 5 prT^ rs '
Â
,31000 REWARD
fw any auohin. bulling .„a eleantnw Bt far ,
market « mueh Clour SmJ in on. Xi
«^^DAÏatb. " Ä
Vlura
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VICTO
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OK
IUOSTRATID
Pâmphîet me led FRÏB.
NEWARK MACHINE CO.'
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