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Sword and shield. (Clinton, Miss.) 1885-1888, July 04, 1885, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065018/1885-07-04/ed-1/seq-4/

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Saturday Afternoon.
I love to look on a icviie like this,
Of wild and eaivl.'ss play.
And persuade myself that l ntn not old,
And my leeks are tint yet jrttiy;
For It fetfrs the t>!o.;d in an old man's heart,
And it makes li is pulses fly,
To catch the thrill of a happy voice,
And the light of a pleasant eye.
1 have walked the world for fourscore years;
And they say that 1 am old,
And my heart is ripe for the reaper Death,
And my years are Well nijrh tolu;
It is viry true; it is very true;
I am old, and I hide my time.
But my heart will leap at a scene like this,
And I half teiiew my prime.
Play on, play on! I am with you there,
In the midst of your merry rinsr;
1 can feel the thrill ol the dinitm jump.
And the rush of the breathless swiair.
1 hide with you in the fragrant lmy, ;
And I whoop the smothered call:
And mv fot t slip up on the seedy lloor.
And I care not for the full.
1 am willing to die when my time shall coûte.
And I shall Ik* triad to go:
For iho world at ttost is a weary place.
And my pulse is trettintr low;
But the a rave is dark, and the heart will fail
In treading its triooiny way;
But it wiles my heart from its drearness
To see the younjr so gay.
N. P. Willis.
NI MBEB 4
Some years ago 1 was making a
sketching tour in the West country,and
found myself one September afternoon
on Dartmoor, a few miles from Princes
Town. I had been strolling lazily
about for some time, when I suddenly
came upon a bit of moorland, which I
decided it was imperatively my duty to
transfer to canvas, so 1 sat down on a
mossy bowlder, aud was soon diligent-«
ly at work, and absorbed in the task of
trying to represent the lovely autumnal
tints on stream, rock, aud heather. In
tent on my picture, I took no note of
time, till suddenly I perceived the
shadow getting ominously long; and
consulting my watch, 1 found it was
past live o'clock, and that, unless 1
made a speedy start, I should hardly
reach Princes Town before nightfall; so
I hastily packed up my traps, deciding
that I would come and finish the sketch
on the following day. I was just light
ing my pipe, preparatory to starting,
when 1 fancied that 1 saw something
move behind a large rock a few yards
away, and I heart! what sounded very
like a smothered cough. I was a bit
startled, as, save the birds, no living
thing had been near me for hours; but
I thought I would seo what it was, so
1 walked up tV> the spot, and pushing
aside the high bracken, was going to
examine the place, when suddenly a
ligure rose up and confronted me. I
am not a nervous man, but I must con
fess I got a start as I saw before me a
man clothed iu convict garb, bare
headed, wild, and dishevelled. Even
in my lirst alarm, I remember I no
ticed the number 402 on his clothes,
and I don't fancy I shall ever forget
that number. I grasped my stick firm
ly, and thought to myself that I was, ;
so to speak, in a very nice little lix.
Convicts are not pleasant neighbors at
any time; but a tetc-a-tetc with an es
caped convict on a lonely moor, miles
from any house, is decidedly an inter
view not to be desired. However, my
fears speedily subsided, for my convict
did not seem at all disposed to make
himself disagreeable, but merely stood
looking at me, trembling in every
limb, and from time to time coughing
in a way that shook his wasted frame
all over. Poor chap! he was a piteous
spectacle his checks all sunk and hol
low, and with his prison dress just
hanging about him, lie looked like a
living skeleton.
The situation was awkward to me.
As a law-abiding citizen, 1 felt that it !
was my duly to take some means
restoring him to the establishment at
Princes I'mvn, which he had evidently
quitted without leave: wlti e. as an or
dinary human being, 1 felt the sincèr
es t pity Lu* the haggard fellow who
stood there, gazing ni me with hollow,
feverish eyes. However, the contest
between duty ami compassion was
speedily put an end to by No. 492 him
self, for, aiti r a more than usually
racking cough, his legs gave way un
a
a
of to
ly
I
der him and lie roiled down among ihe
bracken. »Duty lied; co;iij)as-ion won
the day. I went and picked him up,
and propped him with his hack against
a rock, where he gasped and choked
till I really thought he would die then
and there. In a minute or two, how
ever, he revived, and in a very faint
and feeble voice said: "I'm nigh
starved, guv'nor; I guess it's about up
with me."
I went back to get some sandwiches
out of my case, and offered them to
him; he seized them eagerly, and be
gan to eat them ravenously; but again
a terrible lit of coughing came on, and
he sank back, saying: "It ain't no
use; I can't eat now; s'pose I'm gone
too far."
Here was a pleasant position. The
man was evidently in the last stage of
exhaustion; and even my uupraeticcd
eye could see that No. 492 had his
days, or even hours, numbered. I
moistened his lips with some brandy
out of my 11 ask, aud saw, to my satis
faction, that this produced a decided
improvement. But what in the world
i should do next perplexed me sorely,
so 1 repeated the dose of brandy, and
took counsel with myself as to the next
move.
I titler the inllueucc of the brandy,
nty patient propped himself up again,
and with great difficulty told me how
he had escaped from the convict prison
three days before, and had
over the moor, till want of food and
exposure had—to use his own words—
"spoilt his game," and he was going
back to prison to give himself up. (See
ing me sketching, and feeling his
strength almost gone, he had decided
to come and surrender himself to me;
•but when lie got near, the poor fellow's
courage failed him, aud he had crawl
ed away behind tiie rock where I had
discovered him.
"It ain't no use
I
had
sob
to
my
and
and
face
and
help
will
he
face
ly
I
stop
but
that
end.
on,
from
I;
ly,
a
time,
lips;
of
his
a
no
sir."
wandered
my trying to get
away, guv'nor." said'lie, sadly; "I'm
that weak 1 can't walk
couldn't escape now, not if
aud-four was waiting forme,
a miss to lift me tip into it.
die in quod after all."
I did not think he would die iu quod;
but I kept my thoughts to myself,.for I
felt sure that before the prison could
be reached, No. 492
enough away, and it would only be a
suit of convict clothes on a wasted
skeleton that would enter the gloomy
gate.
"Look here, my poor chap,
"You can't stop here; you must let
me carry you as well as I can, and I
must try aud get you back to the pris
1 felt rather mean as I said this,
for I did pity him heartily. I knew
nothing about his crimes. Ho might
have been the greatest villain; yet I
felt for him, having just tasted liberty
and having to go back to captivity; and
a single glance at him showed pretty
plainly that the prison would not hold
him long, even if we ever got there. I
a step. I
a earriage
l'd want
Guess I'll
would be far
11
said 1.
no
the
7 7
on.
i
<.
expected some attempt at resistance;
but, to my surprise, he quietly acqui
esced, saying: "All right, guv'nor; it
can't be 'elped. I've had my try, but
summat told as I wouldn't succeed."
It was now getting late, and the sun
was just down, so there was no time
to be lost, as we had a long way to go,
and I was rather doubtful about
powers of carrying him, for he was, or
had been, of a tolerable size and
weight; but now he looked such a mere
bundle of tones, that I thought 1 might
manage it. At any rate, there was
nothing to do but to try; so I hoisted
him up on my back and* started oil' in
the direction of Princes Town.
1 shall not easily forget that journey;
it soon grew quit« dark, as I toiled on
over tlie lonely road, with frequent
halts to rest, while poor No. 492 grew
weaker and weaker, and his terrible
cough more and more frequent. We
had gone, I suppose, about three miles,
when I began to feel that it was quite
impossible for me to accomplish the
remaining distance, as it was so dark
that 1 stumbled painfully over the
rough path, and at each stumble my
burden groaned with pain, and cough
ed so disuuvlly, that i felt my well
meant endeavors were only putting
him to complete lor.lire; so I stopped,
my
laid him down on the grass, and told
him that we would not try to go on till
the moon rose. "All right, guv'nor,"
said he, feebly, and fell back fainting;
so I administered the last few drops of
brandy l had left, covered him up as
well as I could with my coat, propped
lits head upon my sketching-case, sat
down by his side, aud wondered what
would he the end of my adventure.
I looked at my watch and saw that
it was nine o'clock. The moon. I
knew, would not rise till nearly mid
night, so we had three hours lo wait.
I think those three hours were the
longest 1 ever passed iu my life. The
silence and the loneliness of She moor
were terrible, and No. 492 lay with his
eyes closed, and, save for an occasional
groan, might have been dead. Once
or twice he tried to speak, but appar
ently it was beyond bis powers, aud he
fell back again exhausted. Once ho
put out his hand, caught mine, and to
my great surprise, carried it to his lips
and kissed it. I am not much used to
having my hand kissed at any time,and
should probably, under any circum
stances, feel the situation embarrass
ing; but to have it kissed by a dying
convict out on Dartmoor, in the middle
of the night, was a novel experience.
1 did not mean to hurt the feelings
of No. 4If2, but I drew it away some
what hastily; and then, seeing his lips
move, as if he was trying to say some
thing, I bent over him to listen, and in
a voice little more than a whisper, he
said:- vBcg your parden. sir; but you
have been precious kind to me, and I
feels weak and silly; didn't mean no
offense."
I hastened with some compunction
to reassure him that I was not offend
ed; aud agaiu he closed his eyes; and
around us once more was silence.
At last, to my great joy. the sky
brightened up a bit; the outlines of the
trees became more distinct, and the
moon appeared over the hills, and shot
a llood of silver light all over the moor.
My spirits, which had fallen below
zero, revived considerably; darkness
has at all times a depressing inlluence,
and under my peculiar circumstances,
had reduced me to a most profound
melancholy. I felt quite glad to see
the moon rise, though, beyond the
fact of being able to see where we
not matorially nssist me
cic, it did
out of the fix I was in.
I looked at No. 492 and he seemed
to bo asleep. I did not like to wake
him, so I got up quietly, intending to
walk to the top of a hill close by, and
see if I could discover the lights of
Princes Town, or any house nearer, to
which I might direct my steps. I was
not gone long—perhaps half an hour;
and when I came back, I found No.
492 with his eyes wide open, and, to
my great surprise—though J don't
know why I should have been so sur
prised—tears running down his cheeks.
Really, my ideas about convicts were
becoming quite upset; one who furtive
ly kissed my hand, and who wept, was,
I thought, indeed an anomaly. I bent
over him and asked him if he was in
worse pain, or what was the matter.
Poor fellow! he lifted his wasted hand,
drew it across his eyes, aud said: "No;
I ain't in no pain now, sir: but I woke
from a bit of doze and saw that you
was gone; and 1 thought as how you
had left me; and somehow 1 felt lone
some and afeared; and then a great
sob shook him."
I assured him that I was not going
to leave him, and lie appeared com
forted. Then, after a pause, said:
ain't one as has been much afeared in
my time, sir; but, somehow, now I
can't 'elp.it: it seems all of a tremble;
and it looks awful dark ahead of me,
and I bo so weak I don't seem able to
face it nohow."
I longed truly to be able to help him,
and wished it with all my heart that I
could do it better; but feeling rather
ashamed, I tried to tell No. 492 some
thing about a strong Hand which will
help in the dark valley, and One who
will be near us when of ourselves, as
he said: "we don't seem to be able to
face it nohow." He listened attentive
ly and then closed his eyes, murmuring
something 1 couM not catch.
After a pause, I asked him if he
would try to go on again. "All right,
guv'nor; you knows best," was his an
swer, but very faint and feeble.
Well, I picked him op again, and off
I started. By this time the moon
high up, so we progresse l a good deal
faster than before, and had traversed a
considerable distance before I hail to
stop and put my burden down. Even
then, I could have gone a bit further,
but No. 492 whispered: "Stop, sir,
now; it ain't no use; I shan't get
further."
I laid him down, and saw at a glance
that our journey together was about to
end. In the moonlight he looked
ghastly and wan; and as I laid him
down, a violent lit of coughing came
on, and after it a red stream flowed
from his mouth. Poor fellow! thought
I; and yet I could hardly pity him real
ly, for to him death must have come as
a true friend. He lay quiet for some
time, and I wiped the blood from his
lips; then, just as the lirst gray streak
of dawn appeared, he raised himself on
his elbow and whispered: "I've been
a bad 'un, 1 knows; but I didn't 'ave
no chance. Say a bit of prayer forme,
sir."
"I
was
no
There was no refusing; and as I fin
ished, his face lighted up, and again
repeating his formula, "All right,
guv'nor," lie fell back—dead. He had
succeeded in his escape, after all.
I covered up the body-, and thinking
no one would be likely to come near
the spot, I drew it aside near the rock
which I should recognize again, and
started oil', walking briskly to Princes
town, considering many things bv the
1 went to the prison, amt came
way.
back with some warders to show them
the spot; and, as I was obliged to await
the imiuest, L attended the funeral of
9
poor ino. 4112.
1 trust that in the "Other Land" it
may be for him—as for many of us for
whom it has been ull wrong—"All
right."— Chambers' Journal.
WIT AND 111 T AIOI6.
People in search of a resilience in
Pittsburg never lind any trouble to soot
themselves.
a
A bicycler in this city declares that
1 e intends to go all over the earth on
his machine. If ho is a beginner lie
will probably succeed .—Roston Rust.
isod that
It has hitherto been sit
the word Iowa signilied "Here 1 rest,
but a writer iu the Iowa Historical Rec
ord asserts that it means "The sleepy
people."
"One sees singular sights at sea,"
said a person who had just crossed the
Atlantic. "I saw t he ocean heave, a
passenger heave, and the ship heave
to ."—Roston Courier.
* V
A Boston man has invented a seaside
hotel with bunks and berths in place of
bedrooms, and all you need for a four
weeks' stay are $200 in cash and a but
ton-hook.— Detroit tree Cress.
"She cried for succor, and I went to
her aid," he said as he pulled out his
empty pockets. "Yes, and by the
looks of tilings I should think she found
one," was all the comfort lie got. — The
Judge.
The sign, "Positively No Admit
tance," over à saloon in Eureka, Cal.,
drew a large patronage. The people's
curiosity to know why they were refus
ed admittance was only grutilied by go
ing inside .—San Francisco Examiner.
Out in the boundless West, when a
young fellow gets married, the first
thing he receives is a serenade from the
local band. This generally reconciles
him to any sort of treatment, and he
settled down and is happy afterward.
The march of civilization has reach
ed Danville, 111., where at a recent
meeting of the local debating club the
following was found written on the
blackboard as the subject of discussion:
"Ot females to read tictisiius litera
toor?"
I
"Little hoy," said the teacher, "tell
me why it is that St. Peter and St.Paul
are so widely separated?" "Shaw,
that.» easy. St. Peter is in Rome while
St. Paulis in Minnesota." "Fifteen
minutes for recess," said the teacher.—
Evansville Argus.
A new paper in the South is called
the Epidemic. "The editor probably
thinks," observes the New York Jour
nal, "that everybody will take it.
But he has apparently lost sight of the
fact that an epidemic generally dies out
within a year .—Morristown Herald.
Little Minnie's mother had several
times spanked her for going out onto
the street. The other day as the gro
eeryman was leaving the house Minnie
called to him, and said: "Tome back
an' shut tlie gate."
can't get out ."—Arkansiw Traveler.
The ol her day a very iveeiit mother
over the bay said to her aeeomplice:
"O, William,
weighs « tily six pounds.
"Why are you glad?" g
band, disgusted at having received so
little for his money. "Because thu
fashion papers say 1 hat light kids are
all the rage again!"
A theatrical manager says about the
proper pronunciation of the word dra
ma: "It depends upon what part of the
countrv one is in. in Boston I call it
71
"Why?"
"So I
nurse says that baity
I'm so glad!"
growled the It us
o
drawtnah, in New York d rah ma, in
Philadelphia drama, in Chicago dram
mer, but iu St. Louis in order to make
myself solid with the citizens, I have to
talk about the dravmv.
as
do
of
n
Lgnn Tee.
Sometimes the women suffragists are
logical. What could excel this from
the recent speech of an English lady
agitator: "I have no vote,but my groom
has. 1 have great respect for that
man in the stables, but I am sure if I
were to go to him and say. 'John, will
you exercise the franchise?' he would
reply, 'Please, mum, which horse be
that?"
"Mr. Singleman," said a designing
widow to her bachelor boarder, "isn't
strange that in India it costs more to
get married than to die?" "They burn
widows in that country, 1 believe, ' was
his rather irrelevant reply. "Yes, so
I've heard." "Humph! if that were
the custom in this country it wouldn't
cost so much to get married," he
growled.— N. Y. Journal.
"Pray what do ladies lind to think
about besides dress and parties?" said
line-looking army officer who has
been doing guard duty iu Washington
for the past seventeen years. The re
mark was addressed to the Assembly,
but it was taken up by Miss Cleveland.
"They can think of the heroic deeds of
our modern army officers," she said,
smiling pleasantly. The officer sub
sided.— Washington Cor.
A newspaper man, who writes tiie
obituary notices and the financial arti
cles, went into a restaurant the other
day while suffering from a severe cold.
When a waiter handed him the menu
said: "Here, you have made a mis
take." The waited looked perplexed.
"You have put the carte before the
hoarse," explained the newspaper man,
and the waiter immediately struck for
higher wages. And no wonder!— Mor
ristown Heat'd.
ord
Mrs. Siimdict- "You seem to know
everything about horses. Won't you
explain to mo how to tell a horse's
age?" Thin boarder—"Certainly. Bv
teeth." -O. yes; I hud heard of
that, but I had forgotten it. Can ihe
ages of all animais bo known in the
same way?" "Yes: I can tell a chick
en's age by the teeth.'
no teeth." "No; but I have."—
Tkiladc'phia Cali.
Life must bo very pleasant on the
Congo. Instead of a man having to
rush homo at 4 p. iu. to give his wife
four hours' time to prepare for the
opera, and then wait another half hour
the front steps until thc2(J0 and odd
forgotten things are found and arrang
tiie Congo husband strolls home°a
minutes before tiie performance be
gins and simply says: "Sarah, adjust
your hairpin. We will goto the opera."
Cittsburg Lhroucicle.
safe
The
has
"A chickeu
the
lects
"Now, then," said the cashier to his
wife, "are you dressed for the journey,
dear?" "All ready, my love!"
"Got the boodle safe?"
bat kind ot a dress is that von have
on?" "It is a pull-back."
back! Gootl heavens!
your thinking we ean escape to Cana
while you wear a dress 1 ke that!
t you sec I ve got on a cut-away
coat? Go and put on a dress with
sloping train, and your hat
away feather. We must take
precaution setting out on such
"— Roston Courier.
ney
er's
it
can
tried
by
"All safe."
"A pull
The idea of
sense
the
a
with a lly
every
a jour
i
ni
IT
I ci
IjiHIUFj Ml
I)
r ! 1/
i
li I
.
DOES .1 SIMILAR DA XORR THREA
TEN EVEYOSE OF US.
HOW IM'IIMP ATTENTION IS DIRECTED
TO PERSONAL PERILS.
"Judge," said a young lawyer to
tell me
n
a very successful senior,
the secret of your uniform success at
the bar.
"All, young man, that secret is a
life study, but I will give it to you
on condition that you pay all
my bills during this session
>?
a
of
V
**
court.
Agreed sir," said the junior.
"Evidence, indisputable evi
dence.
At the end of the month the judge
reminded the young man of his prom
ise.
U
>7
a
"I recall no such promise."
"All, but you made it.
"Your evidence, please?"
And the judge, not having any
witness, lost a case for once !
The man who can produce indis
putable evidence wins public favor.
I bad an interview yesterday with
the most successful of American
advertisers, whose advertising is most
successful because always backed by
evidence.
"What
you use?"
Esq.
11
styles of advertiseing do
1 asked H. II. Warner,
"Displav reading matter and par
agraphs of testimonials."
"Have you testimonials ?"
In answer he showed me a large
"We have
cabinet chock-full,
enough to fill Boston, New York,
Chicago, St. Louis and Phildelphia
. 1
morning papers.
Do you publish many of them ?"
"Not a tithe. Wonderful as are
those we do publish, we have thous
ands like them which we can not
u
'Why not?'
Let me tell you.
use.
'Warner'ssafe cure'has probably been
the most successful medicine for fe
male disorders ever discovered,
have testimonials from ladies of the
highest rank, but it would be indel
icate to publish them,
many statesmen, lawyers, clergymen,
doctors of worldwide fame have been
We
Likewise
I
cured, but we can only refer to
such persons in the most guarded
terms, as we do in our reading arti
cles.''
"Are thesq reading articles suc
cessful ?"
"When read they make such an
impression that when the 'evil days'
f illji/oalth draw nigh they are re
membered, and Warner's safe cure is
o
?.
used.
"No, sir, it is not necessary now,
as at first, to do such constant and
extensive advertising. A merito
rious medicine sells itself after its
merits are known. We present just
evidence enough to disarm skeptics
and to impress tLe merits of the
remedies upon new consumers,
feel it to be our duty to do this.
Hence, best to accomplish our mis
sion of healing the sick, we have to
use the reading-article style. Peo
ple won't read plain testimonials.
Yes, sir, thousands admit that
had they not learned of Warner's safe
cure through this clever style they
would still be ailing and still impov
erishing themselves in fees to un
successful 'practitioners.' It would
do your soul good to read the letters
of thanksgiving we get from mothers
grateful for the perfect suceesss
which attends Warner's safe cure
when used for children, and the sur
prised gratification with which men
and women of older years and im
paired vigor, testify to the youthful
feelings restored to them by the same
means,"
We
••
u
Arc these good effects jierma
u
nent?"
Of all the cases of kidney, liver,
uninary and female diseases we have
cured, not two per cent, of them re
port a return of their disorders.
Who else can show such a rec
ord ?"
"What is the secret of Warner's
44
safe cure permanently reaching so
many serious disorders ? '
"1 will explain by an illustration :
The little town of Plymouth, Pa.,
has been plague-stricken for several
months because its water supply was
scarcely poisoned. The kidneys and
liver are the sources of physical weU
lf polluted by disease, all
being.
the hi cod becomes poisoned and
every organ is affected and this great
danger threatens everyone , who neg
lects to treat himself promptly. I was
nearly dead myself of extreme kid
disease, but what is now Warn
ney
er's safe cure cured me, and I know
it is the only remedy in the world that
can can cure such disorders , tor I
tried everything else in vain. Cured
by it myself, I bought it and, from a
of duty, presented it to the
Only by restoring the
sense
world.
kidneys and liver can disease leave
the blood and the system."
A celebrated sanitarian physician
once said to me. "The secret of the
wonderful success of Warner's safe
cure is that it is sore reign over all
kidney, liver and uninary diseases,
which primarily or secondarily make
up the majority of human ailments.
Like all great discoveries it is remark
ably simple."
The house of H. II. Warner k Co.
stands deservedly high in Rochester,
and it is certainly matter of congrat
ulation that merit has been recog
nized all over the world, and that
this success has been unqualifiedly
deserved.— Pkn Point, Rochester
(N. Y.) Correspondence Indianap
olis Sentinel.
SHUQUALAK
FEMALE COLLEGE
1 t
The Sixth Annual Session opens
Sept 9th, next.
The location is in the beautiful,
healthy and moral town of Shuqua
lak, on the M. k O. Railroad, 52
miles north ot Meridian.
Rev. L. M. Stone, Pi cs't, is assist
ed by experienced and first-class
The
teachers in every department,
grade ot scholarship, the literary
character and all the appointments
of the College, are unexcelled in our
State. The religious tone of the
school and community is of a good
character. The advantages for a
finished literary and musical educa
tion are all that may reasonably be
desired. Terms low. Board and
Tuition for the Session, $150.
sie per session $47. No incidentals.
Apply for catalogue.
E. F. Nun.v,
Bres t Board Trustees.
Mu
Railroad Finie -1 able
Illiuoii Central Railroad.
Going North —
■Leaves New Orleans 9:15 a m, ar
rives at Jackson 5;45 p tn, leaves 6:05, ar
rives at Grand Junction at 3:10 u m.
Mail - Leaves New Orleans 5:JO p m, arrives
at Jackson 12:35 am, leaves 12;40 a m,
reaches Grand Junction 8:55 a m.
Mixed-Leaves New Orleans 7:15 a m reach
es Jackson 5:30 p m, leaves 6:15 p in,
reaches Grand Junction 1:15a in.
Going South —
Express—Leaves Grand Junction 1:20 p tn,
reaches Jackson 10:30 p m, leaves 10:30 p
in, reaches New Orleans 7 a rn.
Mail—Leaves Grand Junction 7:10 pm, ar
rives at Jackson.. 3:30 a ni, leaves 3:35 am
arrives at New Orleans 10:45 a ni.
Mixed—Leaves Grand Junction 0:50 a m, ar
rives at Jackson 8; 0 a rn. loaves 9:50 a ni
arrives at New Orleans 5:20 p m.
Expre.
ViokwburK & Meridian Railroad.
East Round Trains .
Mail—Leave» Vicksburg 11 ni « rive,
ut Jackson 10:20 teul Icavœ ist 10:35 p tu,
arrive* ut Meridian ut IriO a ni.
Exprès», or Accommodation—Louve Jack
son 7:30 a m, arrive» at Vicksburg 9:45
am. Leaves Vicksburg I:30p m, and
arrivt » at Jackson 3:45 p m.
Local Freight louve» Vicksburg 4:15 a m
arrive» at Jackson ut 8:85 and leaves at
910 a m, arrives at Meridian at 6:45 p m
West Round Trains,
Mail, leavts Meridian 10:20 p ro, arrives In
Jackson 3:20 and leaves at 3:40 a m, »F
riv at Vicksburg 6:00 a m.
Local Freight, loaves Meridian 6:00 a in, ar
rives in Jackson at 3; !5 and leaves at 4:30
p m arrives in Vicksburg 9{00 p in.
Natohei. Jaekiou and Columbus.
Eastward—Leaves Natchez dailv at 3:15 p
m, arrives at Jackson 9:30 p m.
Westward—Leaves Jackson daily at 6:00 a
m, arrives at Natchez 11:50 a tn.
Freight Train, dwly, Sunday excepted.
Loaves Jacason 9;00 a m, avives from
Natchez at 6:30 p in.
Yasoo and Mississippi Valley
Going North—Leaves Jackson 6:30 a m,
rivas at Yazoo City 10:20 a m.
Going South—Leaves Yazoo City at 1:30 p
m, arriving at Jackson at 5:30 p m.
ar
M. & O R-R -At Meridian
SOUTH.
No 1 Arrives 5>10 a m|Xo 2 Arrive 10:25 pm
" 1 Leaves 5:15 a m , 2 Leaves 10:30 p ni
" 3 Arrives 7:25 p rn ' 4 Arrives 7:32 a m
3 Leaves 7:40 p mj " 4 Leaves 7:52 a m
The Southbound passenger train leaving
Meridian at 7:52 a in, arrives in Mobile at
1:30 p m, and the train going
North leaves Mobile at 2 p m, and arrives at
Meridian at 7:25 p in.
feoRTIt.
tt
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THE
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130 Canal Street, New Orleans',
Recipe and note,
liow to harmless
ly, effectually
and rapidly eure
_obesity without
semi-starvation dietary,etc. European Mail,Pet.24th
says;
CORPULENCY
fteiiu-iitui vauuif uictoiy ,vw. .....
prvs ; "Its effect is not merely to reduce iho ajno#n£ pr
fat, buf by affecting the source of obesity to indue« ft
radical pure of the disease. Mr. R. makes no charge
whatever; any person,rich oi poor,can obtain his worlf
gratis.by sending & cts. to cover postafre to F.C. KI'SfiiEIJ»,
EN«* VVoburi* Mouse, Slur* fil.» Bedford S<|., LwmIm, Knit.**
have you a CARDEN?
SEEDS
And will want (be Beet at th» leatt mon»
mv new Seed Catalogue will aurprise you. _
where you have been dealing il will ta re money. It ia
mailed Free lo »11, aud you ought to h»we It
before buying anywhere.
WM. H. MAULE.
199 & 131 Front 8t., Philadelphia.
IF YOU HAVE
YOU WILL NEED
Tum
%
..-n ■
HELP WANTED—I emnl.s.
iTT ANTED—In
W andcounty
every town city
, an intelligent, euer
getic lady of good address and some
business ability, to introduce to the
trade and c, nsumers Madam Deans
Oelrratkd Spinal Supporting
Corset. Retails at 81 . 1)0 Splend
idly advertised: highly'recommend
ed by the leading Modiste,fashionable
Dressmakers and the most eminent
Physicians of the United States and
Europe. Liberal pay. Agents are
making$15 to$05 weekly. Address
Lkwis Sennas & Co.
390 Boatilway, N. V.
fa
<•/
LT v
LI r •
j
EL
MEMPHIS, TENN.
Dealer in all kinds of Marble
Work, sueh as Tombstones, Monu
ments, Mantles, etc., etc. All ot
which will be sold at extremely
LOW FIGURES.
Write for what wou want and get
estimates. It will be to your inter
est to do so.
THOMAS MA YD WELL,
Memphis, Term
».
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This la nature's great restorer of health,
«lui i» the only preparation of Iron that
Cpinfoinesall of Its good qualities, without
ßfiajuujng tt)« unpleasant after effect*
which oharaetepwl i*U a.i.ot prut,neeituti*
of Iron. It is pleasant at)d agreeable to
the taste, and can be taken and retained
by.the most delicate stomach. It is the
only preparation of Iron that will not
constipate the bownsls, or blacken and de
stroy the teeth. It 1» easily aud readily
tqfepp up and assimilated by the blood,
at,a IS, thefefoFb. {lie ïfeatwq remedy
known tot
(Jetterai llehility. Dyspepsia, l;nllue*>
tien, XerTOUSttets, le male Disease*.
Scrofula, Chronic Rheumatism, Con
valescence from tvphobl and Malarial
FfU'prs. ant) all Disease» and Impuri
Mus of Mi*
PREPARED ONLY BY
S. MANSFIELD & CO.,
M'f'gChemists, Memphis. Tenn., U.8.A.
PRICE, SI.00 PER BOTTLE.
JUe geu<)lif« * t|*5 STj
tetter» aj)4 ffci' pfjfyfv p& »R»
R. 6 . CRAIG & CO.
-JtKAl.K.Krf IX
GARDES, CrR ASS & FIELD
SEEDS,
AûRICUL TUSÂL MPUVMfS
M 16M I'll I*. •> » S N.
FREE TO ALL.
O Uf.sewillunwM rural
Catsloaue of W psgei,
Containing deuiription snd
brloea of th, bent Tarletta, of
Plants, Carden tnd Mow.
Trees will tw mailed Free to
_Ul applicant». Tea Row,
V" 1 mailed for One Dollar to aajr
. place. Wkolcaale and retail.
NANZ ft NEUNER. Louisville. K
CARDEN 1
HAVE YOU A
SEED
|f YOU HAVE
V0Ü Will NEED
And will vraut the Best at the leaat money,
mv new Seed Catalogue will eurprUe you. No
wnora you hare been dealing it will tare Money. It it
mailed Free to »II, aud you su«ht to haw* It
before buying anywhere.
>n
WM, H. MAULE,
199'# \n front St.. PMladslphU,
'IU Buy ONE
iIMfSL-v-i jG y STWA'V a
* IWYCPTTEB.
The knife I« Stscl. and tempered.and
I is fastened tt> lever with three bolts,
I and can be easily taken off to sharpen.
T I The length of cut Is regulated by the
r lever to which the knife is bolted,
higher the lever Is raised, the
longer It will cut. All are warranted. Send tor
circular which will be mailed FREE.
IXEWAIIK MACHINE CO.. Newark. O.
t:
B
Has a Pad different from
others, is cup shape, with Self
Adjusting Ball!a center, adapts
Itself to allposltions of the body
( ■hile the ball in the cup
irpsMs back the intes
floas witn tne Tinjfer? Vttfiïight p* ss^retî^^î
niai» held securely day and night, and-a radical cure
— Itts easy, durable and cheap. Sent bv^nalU Cif
1
Imsibic
TRUMi
»
NOTICE.
Commencing Wednesday, April
1st, and until further notice, the
Illinois Central Railroad will sell
tickets from Jackson, Miss., to New
Orleans and return, to parties of
three or more on one solid ticket, at
rate of $5.00 per passenger. Tickets
good to return within ten days from
date of sale.
A. H. HANSON,
General Passenger Agent.
tf.
The White
IS
I é rc ÉiiiüÉidr * I
3H
m vsffl
m
-»■
R
-
rrt;
THE EASIEST SELLING;
r I • J : SATISFYlhC
Sewing Machine.
Its iiitroiliictiou sikI world-ivnimni'd n*|mta
j lion was the ileutli-blow to higli-prici-il inarhiiii-s.
There are no Second Hand White Machines in
the market.
This is u very Important matter, as it is a well
known and undisputed fact that many of the so
colled lirst-class machines which are" ottered so
cheap now-a-days are those that have been repos
sessed (that is, taken bark from customers alter
use) and rebuilt and put on the market as new.
The White is the peer of any sewing machine
now upon tin' market.
It Is much larger titan the family machines of
the Singer, Ilowe and Weed make
It costs more to manufacture than either of the
aforesaid machines.
Its construction is simple, jwmitivc and dura
it» workmanship is unsurpassed.
hie.
Do Not Buy any Other
Before Trying
THE WHITE.
Puces aud Terms Made Saiisfactoiy
AGENTS WANTED!
Mil* Saving .Machine Co.,
CLEVELAND, O.
A Complete Medical Work Ur
Women, haud-soiucly bouun in cloth
and illustrated. Tells how t<
vent and cure all diseases of the sex,
by a treatment at home. W orth its
weight in Gold to every lady sutler
ng from any of these dise. is
0,000 sold already.
50 Cents. !
pre
ij
1 > ,•
Postpaid
one
2 ii
Postal Note
Addles:
I .SUING Co,, N uiida, N. Y,
or
MM»A PUB
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T. 1), ANDERS
Winona, M
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W lltKANTEDto restore gray luur toits orii;.
i mal eolor, beauty mid softness; to stop it from
(alliu : out; to restore a vigorous circulation to t lie
llui ls : lo Kive tone to the secretions of the sculp;
u:i : to keep the head free from damlrutr
ÄS Â HAIR DRESSING
It is Unsurpassed. .
It is delightfully perfumed, pleasant to use, and
t:.
Q m OF HAIR RESTORERS.
It wilt not stain the skin, or soli the finest linen,
mid will cause the hair to grow where it has suf
fered injury or decay by neglect or disease.
NONE GENUINE
without the trade mark of the inyentPK. Asjf
vour Druggist for It.
MAtSFIELD MEDICINE COMPANY
MEMPHIS, TENN'.
:0L£ MANUFACTURERS.
ot Tri*v 'liujr,
î^.rtd.
E mployment—
Jt *:©., 204 ©corse SK J.i
Ich
K
Farquiiar's Improved CcU.cn Planter
4 Very arjl i'erl.
•*. la it« Opcratiou ; Drupf
Uurolled .Seed or FerijRr
isr with remarkable reg.
/ÿ ularity in any
« !& tlvsu cil am.
ouiit. It ii
the Cheapest,
H I _ moat Reliabld
jy f r# aud Boot
i «^WC ottoN
bPLÂNTKK iu existence.
8K\D Hilt CATALOCL'E.
Addrvuu A. li. FAiiClTM |{. York. I*a,
Ij
fais;
fells
âT

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