OCR Interpretation


Sword and shield. (Clinton, Miss.) 1885-1888, August 15, 1885, Image 3

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065018/1885-08-15/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

I
«»««•
ot
is
fix
J. II. GAMBRELL, )
R. D.GAMBRELL, )
; Editors.
Editorial Corkksponhknt,
HIOS. DABNEY MARSHALL.
OFFICIAL ORGAN
—OK THE—
PROHIRITION UNION OF MISSISSIPPI.
CLINTON. MISS.
Saturday ..
. luy list li, LSSfi
JnJ the children ut I uni cl sii/hed
hit reason of their lmndai/e and then
cried, and their era came n/> unto (hal,
and (/od heard their qroaninq, and
God remembered his eoeenant , and
God looked upon the children of Is
rael and had respect unto them.
Ex. 11: 24, 27».
Aye, and God will
hear our groaning, brothers, and de
liver us also from the bondage with
which the whisky Pharaoh makes
our lives bitter.
Kill E IS.
Don't let the part '// fall into the
hands of the l/i/itor men.
How to help the Prohibition
cause: Listen to Prohibition speakers.
Mr. Harvey Sumrall, of Ellisville,
was killed by lightning last Monday.
♦ «*►
How to help the Prohibition
cause: Subscribe to Prohibition pa
pers.
Mr. Randall, it is said, will not be
a candidate for the Speakership <>t
the House.
Let as manii of our
Prohibition
Democrats as possible , /« in Jackson
bit the 1 Hth.
an,
and
in
Has
and
Do
on
How to help the Prohibition
cause: Inform yourself in temper
ance literature and statistics.
Lowry 188?
Featherston and
Darden 22 each, and Walker—well
Walker is consistent—he sticks to
the 8jf votes.
How to help the Prohibition
cause: Pray God to bless it.
as well as Mammon, is a power in
the land.
lie,
When you hear a man howling, 1
Don't mix morals in politics," !
watch that man right close. He !
has no morals to mix.
kk
I
j
the
any
and
its
were
could
forces
and highly
and
tes- were
day.
C.
one
talities
troying
fic.
effects
for
cate
As
is
ion
tion
somewhat only
loons
rummy
of our
and
Southern
such
men
bv
The liquor dealers have formed a
Protective Association. This is
now. we will have
Hope they will
soinething like
music in the air.
keep it out of politics.
To an anti-Proliibitionist : "Don't
You are
Don't
mix morals and polities ?"
light, to a certain extern,
mix such morals as yours with po
litical office in anv wav.
Mrs. Miller, an «»Id
respected lady of Clinton, died at
her residence in Clinton last Ta
We extend our svm
day morning,
patliy to the bereaved family.
Said Cromwell to his soldiers
1 rust in God and ke
»Say the Crotn
temperanee
Trust in God and distribute
perance tracts.
- Mf >--
It is said that Col. Fred. Grant
will go into the railroad business.
He has been offered the position of
engineer of the new railroad, which
is backed by the Baltimore A: Ohio
and the Wisconsin Central.
We expect to continue to give our
readers samples of
is Grinded" and will keep
up on "The Irrépressible Conflict,"
ami will from time to time make
note of "Some Methods of Om- Ene
mies."
be
fore battle,
your powder dry."
wells of the
44'P
ep
army,
tern
the Grist that
Maxwell, the St.
Louis trunk
murderer, has been brought to San
Francisco, and started East,
refuses to say anything about the
affair. Says his attorney told him
not to open his mouth, except to put
his food in it.
He
J
ance
in
in
strong
dian ;
Jackson
over
The first State Convention of the
W. C. J\ I . will be held in Meridian
Wednesday and Thursday, »Sept.
18 and 17, 1885.
extends a hearty welcome to the del
egates and visitors in attendance. In
order that it may be well advertised-,
we hope all papers friendly to the
cause will copy notice.
A Temperance Union was organ
ized the first part of this week at
Bear Creek church, .Hinds county
with Dr. E. F. Lowe as President.
It has the most flattering
and will doubtless become
large organization. Mr. J. II. Mar
tin, in reporting the organization,
said, "We will have all this end of
the county
time."
»
on
The local Union
are
We
time
tion,
will he
depend
out for
the
17,
will
grander
complished
strong
Look
on the
there in
prospects
a very
organized in a short
•- '
THE STATE DEMOCIMTIC CON
VENTION.
I
1 his Convention meets on the 19th
ot -August, four days after this. It
is an almost universally conceded
fact that Robert Lowry will be
nominated for Governor and Geo. D.
iSbamls for Lieutenant-Governor.
The contest for other offices will be
close, for instance, Sykes will
probably stand the best chance for
Auditor, lie is backed by all the
whisky men of the party, while good
temperance men are somewhat di
vided in respect to the claims of
three or four very capable gentle
men. Be assured that the whisky
men will support Sykes. They will
meet in Jackson on the 17th and
will stay till after the Democratic
Convention adjourned. They will
fix up their ticket, and will work
hard to get it through. Sykes is
strong in their esteem, they will
work very hard tor him They will
try to capture the whole Democratic
party and drag it down in their ruin
it the two do form a part
nership the ruin of both is assured.
Shall they succeed ? Or will the
Democratic party prove itself tin
party for the people—capable of
giving the people a moral govern
ment—worthy the support of the
people—by discountenancing the
attempt to run in the candidate
"alter the Dummies own heart," and
capture the party machinery. It is
hoped that as many of our temper
ance men as can, will In* in Jackson
Wednesday and make the weight of
their influence he felt.
Since writing the above we have
received the following letter :
LSSfi
sii/hed
then
(hal,
and
and
Is
will
de
with
makes
for
the
pa
be
<>t
Sm ui TA, Miss., Aug. Id, 1885.
Whiskyites are marshalling their
forces to meet Jackson 17th, stay
over 19th to shape the Democratic
Convention. They are seeking to
form a combination and adopt as
their ticket : Lowry, Governor; Gow
an, See ; Hemingway, Treas ; Sykes
and Miller, Att'y-Gen'l; and Smith,
Sup't. Ed. We should meet on l.Sth
in Jackson and do all we can in the
interest of temperance n^*n. Their
committee is going over the State.
Has been to Columbus, Aberdeen
and West Point at Meridian to-day
Do all you can for a good number
on 1 Stli, at Jackson.
and
to
in
lie,
W. II. Patton.
1
!
He !
THE VY. C. T. 1. CON\ ENTION.
This Convention will be held in
I Merid ian next month,
j ment, as Miss Willard has said, is
the calm after-thought ot the Wo
man's Crusade. The Crusade had
any amount of zeal and enthusiasm,
and it had the principles of right on
its side, but beyond closing tempo
rarily a few of the many saloons and
greatly worrying the rest, its effects
were not permanent. It lacked or
ganization. It bad strength, but it
could not use it to advantage. Its
forces were all over that part of the
country, hut there was no effective
and effectual co-operation,
were enthusiastic, but steady,
iematic work was the need of the
day. All these deficiencies the W r .
C. T. U. has supplied. It is, to-day,
one of the most powerful instrumen
talities in Mississippi. Its subtle
influence is undermining the basis of
intemperance, and sapping and des
troying the strength of the liquor traf
fic. lts.soientificdepartment show s the
effects of alcohol on the body. Its
educational department is a power
for good among the children. Its
motto.seems so be, "Educate !
cate and eradicate !"
As a means of defeating saloons, it
is among the first. Let a local Un
ion start to circulate a counter-peti
tion against the saloons, and it is
only a question of time, and the
loons must go.
rummy dare insult the best
of our land on their errand of mercy
and justice —the manhood of our
Southern men would revolt from
such an outrage,
men would only injure themselves
bv sueli a course.
This move
is
ed
the
a
is
will
are
po
at
They
sys
ep
edu
sa
No saloonist or
A
women
the
mg
town
do
also
him.
the
I
on
they
effigy
ing
ville,
way
of
shows
the
it
saloons.
I the
and the whisky
J lie \\ oman s Christian Temper
ance l nion has scored
triumph
in Columbus; it has beaten a saloon
in Grenada;
its hand has been
strong for the right cause in Meri
dian ; it is agitating the question in
Jackson ; and it is organizing all
over the State, and the saloon
men
are shaking all over the State.
We hope to be in Meridian about
time it meets in its State Conven
tion, and we hope the Convention
will he largely attended. Much will
depend on the way the work' is laid
out for another year, and no doubt
the twelve months from Sept. 18and
17, 1885, to Sept. 18 and 17, 1888,
will witness greater victories and
grander work than ever before ac
complished by these noble
strong for the right.
Look out for the State Convention coed.
on the 19 th. The whiski/ifeg will be Walker,
there in full force.
women
CON
SOME METHODS OF THE ENEMY.
H VFFI A A' K UMMIE 8.—ARGUMENTS AN
S ft' ER I'D If ITU ROTTEN EGGS
BLOWS DASTARDLY
LENT THREATS RESORTED TO,
THE EVIDENCE OF SHAMELESS PER
JURERS PARADED HE FORE THE PUB
LIC.
An interesting;Document in Mississippi.
AN INSOLENT THREAT.
1 bornas McDougell declared in
his speech in Urbana Monday night
and his utterance is applauded by
the party organs, that if the Repub
lican party is defeated through the
agency of the political Prohibition
ists, in the coining election, it will
seek revenge upon the cause of
ligion and temperance, and the re
sult of the struggle will be the
practical crucifixion of Christianity
and destruction of true temperance."
Here are his very words as reported
in the Commercial-Gazette :
"It will bring confusion, bitter
ness, political hatred, ttrife. the dis
appointment and revenge of defeat
on the part of a great political party
against the cause of religion, and
which; in the conflict and struggle,
will result in the practical crucifix
ion of Christianity and destruction
of true temperance."—Delaware
(Ohio) Signal.
The above shows the spirit of our
Ohio "personal liberty" men who
co-operate with the "God and moral
ity party( v )." Before we criticise
Ohio tor being the native State of
such a blatant libel on humanity,
let us turn our eye to our own State
and see how they do it in Missis
sippi.
19th
It
conceded
be
D.
be
will
for
the
good
di
of
gentle
whisky
will
and
will
work
is
will
will
ruin
part
assured.
the
tin
of
govern
the
the
and
It is
temper
Jackson
of
have
AND
DEALT. — IN'SO
AND
re
THE 111 RANT BRUTALITY.
Our community has been in a state
of considerable excitement, the out
giow th of the w hisky traffic. Some
months ago the town voted for Pro
hibition. In a few weeks thereafter
license was taken to sell beer. This
their
stay
to
as
Gow
Sykes
Smith,
l.Sth
the
Their
State.
to-day
number
beer shop has been suspected of
ways that are dark" for some time.
On Saturday night a Mr. Monte fell
into the hands of these beer sellers,
and by "tricks that were mean" lost
all bis money.
He made affidavit against the
bouse for gambling and selling whis
ky without license.
On the next night while Mr.
Monte was sleeping in a packing
house near his home he was suddenly
seized, gaggel, and at the point of a
pistol was marched to the swamp
After having been told to pray, lie
was beaten cruelly with limbs and
was struck over the head with a pis
tol. On * of the number then said,
"If you are going to kill him, kill
bun ; but don't torture him this
This man
kk
in
is
Wo
had
on
tempo
and
effects
or
it
Its
the
the
W r .
of
des
traf
the
Its
Its
it
Un
is
move
way. I can't stand it.
then caught the torturer about the
waist, and said to Mr. Monte, "run."
Mr. Monte started oft', but having
become entangled in the cane and
vines fell, just as a pistol ball grazed
his head. The man who shot the
pistol, deeming him dead, said,
"We must be getting away from
here now !" In their haste on leav
ing, they took Mr. Monte's coat and
left one of their own, which was rec
ognized as belonging to Mr. Burns,
of the beer shop, and had in the
pockets papers belonging to him.
The other party, Mr. Twilly, re
ported the whole affair, corrobora
ting the statement of Mr. Monte,
Mr. Twilly was held in custody for
awhile, but escaped while at home
for his supper.
Burns has not been heard from
since the occurrence. A Mr. Gaily
who Injd been in the house and
whose name was in the affidavit, was
convicted in the magistrate's court
and paid his fine. The owner of the
shop is under bond to appear at Cir
cuit Court. The shop has been
shut up.
Mr. Anderson says that the fight
is not done, but victory, so far, is on
the right side.
Our citizens are th roughly arous
ed to the indignity which we have
suffered.
Durant, Miss., Aug. 8, 1885.
Again, we give an account from
the Voice, of an outrage that illus
trates the chivalry of our "personal
liberty" men. It is
They
sys
edu
A. V. R.
sa
or
A PARALLEL TO THE NAPERVILLE
AFFAIR.
In pursuance of the provisions of
the Kansas prohibitory laws
a
it
on
the
requir
mg county attorneys to prosecute
liquor sellers, the attorney of Lynn
county, Kan., recently took steps to
abate the drug-store nuisance in the
town of Pleasanton. He wasted to
do this by the encouragement ot the
ladies of the local W. C. T. U., who
also employed attorneys to assist
him. A number of the customers of
the drug-stores were called to testify.
I his aroused the wrath of the liquor
element, and they gathered in groups
on the streets and "cursed and
blackguarded all day." At night
they made a bonfire and burned in
effigy Miss Amanda W. Way, the
President of the W. C. T. U. This
episode affords a parallel to the egg
ing of the President of the Naper
ville, 111., W. C. T. U., while on her
way home from a St. John meeting.
And now we give a letter from
Aberdeen, which shows the working
of the saloon men in this State. It
shows how they intend to capture
the Democratic machinery and turn
it against all temperance, in favor of
saloons. It will be a bad day for
I the party when those saloonites
in
to
was
to
to
like
coed. Luckily, our friend, Mr. mend
Walker, js a delegate to tfie State )vill
Convention and he will look out for be
suc
Wo
the best interests ot the party,
will have more to say about this
hereafter :
AN
PER
PUB
in
night
by
Repub
the
will
re
the
reported
bitter
dis
defeat
party
and
struggle,
crucifix
our
who
moral
criticise
of
State
Missis
AND
IN'SO
INTER KST IN » i DOCUMENT.
AND
This writer accidentally got a
glimpse of a remarkable document
yesterday, which had been mailed to
a party at this place. The privilege
ot seeing it was purely accidental,
and strenuous efforts subsequently
made have been ineffectual in get
ting either that particular copy or
any one of several which we know
must have been received here. In
substance, it is about as follows, so
far as we can give it from memory :
It is a circular printed letter from
some officers of the "Liquor Dealers'
Protective Association," signed of
ficially by one "George Lemon" and
dated at Jackson, Miss. It is ad
dressed to liquor dealers and "earn
estly" implores them to send repre
sentatives ot their business from
each town in the State to meet in
Jackson on the 17th of this month,
"for the purpose of getting ready tor
the Democratic Convention on the
19th," and to consider of means "to
thwart the treachery of those par
ties (Prohibitionists) in the next
Legislature." It warns the liquor
dealers that "the Prohibitionists are
active and on the alert, and may at
tempt to carry the question into pol
itics, and hence the necessity for their
attending to the matter'
above. It also warns them that "if
they want to remain liquor dealers
they must be vigilant," and gave as
surance that "Jackson would not be
surpassed in interest in the matter."
These are the points in the circu
lar most prominent in our memory,
and we have tried to give as nearly
the language as possible.
The party whose circular we saw
promised to give it to us after a few
hours, but when we called on him
for it, it was lost and could not he
found.
We think the above rather sii/uiji
Bajax.
re
named
state
out
Some
Pro
This
j
I
I
cant.
Aberdeen, Aug.'12
'These illustrate some of the meth
of
time.
fell
sellers,
lost
the
whis
Mr.
of a
swamp
lie
and
pis
said,
kill
this
man
ods, hut by far the most welcome
way—a way after the heart of saloon*
ists and their flunkies—-is to have
some man write that he is a mayor
and magistrate in a Prohibition tow n
and that whisky is openly sold, and
it will surprise the readers of this pa
per to'know how the evidence of such
perjurers is flaunted before the pub
lic. Here a man says, "I am a Jus
tice of the Peace; when 1 took the j
oath of office I swore that 1 would
enforce the laws in my district. Pro
hibition laws have been passed, but
Prohibition don t prohibit because I
won't carry out my oath of office."
What weight should such testimony
have ? And to what standard of
spcctahility or morality do those
pers rise which republish these
statements and give them their
quasi endorsement ?
the
"run."
having
and
the
said,
from
leav
and
rec
the
re
ns, 1 reach out the fi«,Y of renewed
for fellowship,
home
from
and
was
the
Cir
on
re
j>a
AT PEACE,
Bro. J. II. Martin, editor Hinds
County Comet, in a letter to us,
says :
Mr: Halstead, editor, is very bad
ly needed in Copiah county, Miss.,
to assist in carrying on the fight
against Prohibition in that locality.
-
"Over the dark and bloody chasm
of warfare, which has stretched its
black waste so inexorably between
y '
And here is our 4*6"' too, Bro.
Now let us weep proud
Ma rtin.
and happy tears.
—Delaware (Ohio) Signal.
That s very true, hut the mention
of one of Copiah county's whisky cit
izens (J. L. Meade,) would make it
unpleasant for lum to work with
them.— Sword and Shield, of Clin
ton, Miss.
The law regarding affinities would
soon settle things on a basis of har
mony.—Delaware (Ohio) Signal.
to
that
cial
with
moral
the
ers
would
tacked
it is
tariff
until
is
Dem.
Too late! J. L. Meade and his
whole clique have been ignominious*
ly "set down on,
ol sound anti-whisky men all the
way round, for both county offices
and legislature.
by the nomination
of
Nasby, of the Toledo Blade, is "in
a strait betwixt two': Whether to
get men in the Legislature who will
vote to submit the constitutional
amendment on the Prohibition ques
tion, and who will vote for a Repub
lican Senator &>r Congress. He
says that Prohibitionists must take
it out in choosing between candi
dates for the Legislature, and vote
on that plan, and yet he says that
the election of a U. S. Senator is the
question and as members of the Le g
islature have that in hand, Prohibi
tion Republicans must give that the
preference in voting. Well, where
does Prohibition come in?
to
lt is rumored that the British
government will not receive James
Whelan, recently appointed Consul
to Fort Erie, Canada. Formerly it
was the custom for the government
to appoint the consuls, and he went
to the government to which he was t }, an
appointed. Now it begins to look
like the President could only recom
mend the appointee, subject to the
)vill of t)je power to which he is to
be sent.
offiees
Wo
THE IRHEPBESIBLE CONFLICT, j
this
BUGLE NOTES FROM PROHIBITION BAT
TLE-FIELDS—DR. T Df WITT TALMAUE
SPOKEN OF AS A CANDIDATE FOR GOV
ERNOR OF NEW YORK ON THE PROHIBE
TION PLATFORM—PROF. A A HQPKIN'S
VIEWS—GREAT GAIN IN KENTUCKY
a

to ;
i
On the evening of July .'JO, the
} Prohibitionists of the 21st assembly
! district of New York organized in
the parlors of the Madison Avenue
get- Hotel, New York, by electing that
or gram! old patriot and Prohibition
know ist, Horace Waters, the great New
In York music man, President, and T.
J. Daly Secretary. They instructed
for T. DeWitt Ta linage for Gov
so
:
from
of
and
ad
"earn
repre
from
in
month,
tor
the
"to
par
next
liquor
are
at
pol
their
"if
as
be
circu
nearly
saw
few
him
he
ernor.
Prof. A. A. Hopkins says he can
not and will not he the candidate of
the Prohibition party in New' York
this year. lie says the abuses heap
ed upon the Temperance people had
only strengthened their back-bones
and stiffened their knees.
CHAIRMAN WHEELER ON ORGANIZA
TION.
Mr. Wheeler, in his conversation
with the Tribune correspondent, sunt
that before the Estate Convention
meets we shall have every county
equipped with its local committees,
and that we shall enter the campaign
with much better political machinery
than ever before He alluded to the
Free Lecture Bureau as a great fac
tor in both the preliminary and the
active campaign agitation, and said
with regard to finances that he is
confident of raising at least $15,000.
Last year the Committee hail only
$11,900.— Voice.
The following dispatch to a Balti
more paper, dated July 21st, shows
how the other side propose to keep
this great moral question out of
politics.
named
LOXACONINU, MD.
The Liquor Dealers' Association
ol Alleghany county met here to
day. After making a tour of the
place, they assembled at the hall of
the American House for consulta
tion. The object of the meeting is
to draw up a programme for the
coming campaign, and to aid in the
election of members to the House of
Delegates, who will be favorable to
their interests irrespective of party
affiliation. ' I
It now seems highly probable that !
the Voters' Union, a very powerful .
organization in Ohio, will avenge
the snubbing it received from the
j Republican party bv voting fov the a
I Prohibitionists. * *
I . ........
Loth parties m \ irgima have put !
local option planks m their platforms. ,
But it is only a limited local option ;
—some of the lighter drinks being!.
left out by the provision and can not !
be prohibited by that law. This, of!
course, is not altogether satisfactory "
té Prohibitionists. Of course, it was ;
like pulling eye-teeth to get the j °
plank in. but the Third Party mania
was about to set in, and something
had to be done to set it back. :
Whetlur it will succeed in setting! ",
back the fever or not, remains to he | ..
!
!
U'
meth
have
mayor
n
and
pa
such
pub
Jus
the j
Pro
but
I
these
their
re
j>a
«een.
In North Carolina some of the
newspapers are advocating a Prohi
bition State Convention on the
Third Party platform.
us,
-,**4,
"For God's sake keep education
out of politics. Education is too
good to he mixed up in politics."
We only wait for some blare-mouthed
ignoramus from the camp of the
whiskyites to hear that Prof. Frost,
one ol the most scholarly men in
Ohio, is nominee for Lieutenant
Governor on the Prohibition plat—
form, to hear that we are going to
fearful depths of wickedness when
, * , . .
our educated, refined men descend
the
and
its
good
*Fo * muddy pool of politics
it
the
Gin
753
like
price
its
We publish this week "A Little
Romance," which is none the less
interesting because one of the prin
cipal actors is an old friend, and
known to many of our readers,
always thought that when John
Wesley Johnson made up his mind
to give up his "boyish freedom," he
would put the affair through, in
spite of fate. We congratulate friend
Johnson, and can assure his bride
that what he lacks in size, he more
than makes up in worth.
Don't mix moral questions and
politics, you say?
elude you have already acted on
that policy for some time from the
number ot embezzlements and dis
honesties and imoeachments in offi
cial life.
Credit Mobilier ring and Boss
Tweeds didn't mix moral questions
with politics. Oh, no! don't mix
moral questions and politics, or else
the Attorney-General and jail keep-
ers might lose their jobs, and that
would be too bad, wouldn't it?
- .—
When the Democratic party is at
tacked in the rear by the Mugwump
deserters from the Republican camp,
it is time for Democrats to drop the
tariff issue, and every other issue,
until the great issue of whether the
Democratic party is to be wiped out
is settled.—St. Louis Republican,
Dem.
year.
We
the
give
cause
the
show
Well,
we con
The Star Routers and *°
tion
at
every
wishes
We
on
tion
the
the
clubs.
get
ganize
Well, really! What other issue
t }, an t j ie g! . eat j 8SUe 0 f whether
Democratic party is to have the
We
tion
and
forming
cause
want
and
the
offiees is in the Democratic party ?
• *
»Shall it be a Democratic
mycratic party.
: or a rum
j THE (FRIST THAI IS GRINDED.
!
BAT
GOV
OF MURDER AND CRIME, MISERY, DEGRA
DATION AND BRUTALITY BY THE GIN
MILLS OF THE COUNTRY AND THE
TOLL WE PAY
At a negro dance, Palestine, Tex.,
Geo. Ta) lor shot Abe Carter through J
the neck, inflicting a probably fatal !
wound. Both parties were drunk.
'
the
in
that
New
T.
Gov
Joseph Johnson, a colored barber
of Utica, was fatally cut while under
the influence of liquor. Ordinari
ly lie was quiet and accommodatin
and had no enemies.
Sarbee Bcarhead, a Muscogee In
dian, and a celebrated out-law has
been recently executed, lie was
for years the terror of that part of
the country. He started on his
career of out-lawing by killing a man
while drunk.
can
of
York
heap
had
Mr. John Cagle, one of the best
men in Lincoln county, left Brook
haven in company with a friend—
both the worse for drink—and got
into a quarrel. Result, Mr. Cagle
was wounded five times and the citi
zens of Lincoln county, not the citi
zens of Brookhaven who put up the
saloons, will hare to foot the bill for
a law case.
At Waterbury, Conn., Peter Hig
gins brutally assaulted the wife of
a prominent Naugatuck mer
chant, while she was driving
home alone. He entered her
carriage and goaded the horse
to a fearful rate of speed. The lady
is very ill, and the man is in jail to
await trial.
sunt
county
the
fac
the
said
is
only
Balti
shows
keep
of
A crowd of drunken hoodlums
who have been making it dangerous
and disagreeable to walk along Pal
myra and Dorgerois streets, New
Orleans, beat a very respectable and
peaceable colored preacher while he
was returning from church last Sun
day, and wound up then sport by
stabbing him in the stomach.
on
ted
are
but
to
old
are
lie
way
ed
deny
to- An Associated Press
the dated Chicago, Aug. 10,
of Three wagons full of people,
ing from
is suburban town of Jefferson last night,
the A race ensued and the horses were
the lashed into a run. Suddenly a drunk
of en man in one of the wagons arose
to and snatched the lines from the
party driver. The wagon was overturned
I and the occupants thrown out. The
that ! driver " as instantly killed, falling
. un ' el 0,10 °* t " e horses, while a
baby was knocked out of its mother's
the arnis a, id mangled to death. Sever
the a ' ot her people were badly injured.
The locality is remote from tele
phone connections and the names of
put ! the victims have not been learned,
,
; . .....
being!. J al |? 'y'son, a \voman noted Jbr
not ! .' dissolute haoits, living at <12
of! Sycamore Street, Camden, N. J.,
" a ? ar vested a,| <l place*i in the comi
was ; J ,u ' charged witn cruel treatment
the j ° an adopted son. It seems that
Line this woman became in
bixieated she took delight in beating
: Hie boy over the head and shoulders
", 1 Lie heel of her shoe. 1 hen,
he | .. e ." , 0 "°VV , taus Iil:, de were
! iresh, she would throw liandsful of
! salt into them, thus adding to the
torture. Sympathetic neighbors who
witnessed the fiendish acts of the
woman caused the arrest.— N. Y.
dispatch,
says :—
return
picnic, came near tin*
TOKIT RING A CHILD.
the
the
World.
too
in
to
A .MADMAN WITH A KNIFE.
Aug. 9, George
Miller, a victim of mania-a-pota, es
caped fi om Ii is home on the »South
»Side this evening, and, with a large
dirk knife which lie had secured in
some way, created a panic on the
streets by attacking the pedestrians.
After slightly cutting three persons,
the insane man went up into the
second story of a house and jumped
from the window, falling
knife which he still held in his hand
and inflicting a fatal wound in the
abdomen.—Timcs-Dcmocrat.
At Pittsbur
&5
on the
judge
oldest
sonic
city,
of
war
of
speech
House,
him,
lie
good example of Copiah county and
J udge
years,
the
ty-three
in
For such as the above
the various parties who run the
Gin Mills something like 82,485,-
753 per day, or 8900,000,000 per
How do Temperance men
like the grist that is ground and the
price we pay for the grinding?
- «»•** -!—
Copiah county has acted nobly in
its selection of candidate and put in
upright, honorable
we Da v
year.
men. Will not
State Convention follow the
the
give a ticket worthy of support.
How to help
cause : Listen to the arguments of
the whhkyitc politely,
show him his argument's essential
shallowness and fallacy.
the Prohibition
ami
In
hau
and then
ed.
HEAD IIILS
He
voted
dent
to the
vember
land
the
spect
yune.
Counties and committees desiring
*° secure the services of a Prohibi
tion speaker, can do so by applying
at this office. W c hope to hear from
every county and community that
wishes the benefit of an address
Prphibition.
We are also prepared to furnish
on application a copy of the Constitu
tion and By-laws, recommended by
the State Executive Committee for
the organization
clubs. Send a two-cent stamj
get one immediately. We must
ganize without delay.
on
speeches
correspond
in
always
her this.
munity
will
of Prohibition
»•and
or
' tf
A HKtJl EST.
We want some friend of Prohibi
tion and temperance in every town
and county in the State to write, in
forming us of the condition of the
cause in that county or town. We
want to see where our strength is
and where our work is needed.
Publisher.
We
specimen
like to
friends
tion
the
Sword
!
Tff/i -«►
m
m
GIN
I was called 11:5 mib.
iway, to
install the officers o{ a Good Tem
J P' ar lodge, at Oak Ridge, W'arren
! county, Miss., Aug. i. I lectured
:l church full of Temperance peo
' pie and friends. They also had a
fine support. Free for all.
J. I. Garrett.
In
has
of
his
Polk ville.
We organized a Prohibition club
here about three weeks ago, with 25
members; now we have about forty
members. The writer was selected
Chairman and President, and W. D.
All the leading
candidates in this county are Prohi
bitionists in principle
pledged themselves to vote, if elect
ed* h >r local option.
Ileslip Secretary.
and have
of
to
A. S Laugh.
Enterprise.
Mr. Geo. G.
for the Knights of Pythias in this
State, was in our town a short time
since, and I found him to be a vio
lent anti-Proliibitionist. He claimed
to take his position in the interest of
business, as he was just from Vero
na, a much nicer place than Tupelo,
and the best business men there told
him that their former customers in
and around there were now going to
Tupelo to trade, as they can gtt
whisky there. Would like to hear
from you : what you know about tin
trade of Verona.
Manlove, lecturer
M. W. Buckley.
Homer, La.
Am truly glad to see that the good
people of Meridian have come out
victorious. Have passed through
that city threg times, and I remem
ber some speculation as to its ever
being carried by the Prohibitionists,
and it is conceded by some that all
cities or large towns must have
siderable aid to vote Prohibition.
We*ire in the midst of war in this
parish. We held election for parish
on Dec. 2, 1884. Whisky, carried
parish by 80 majority on poll of
We think we can beat
the w hisky men next election, which
will be when one year has elapsed
from date of last one. We had car
ried five of eight wards in parish -
some five years since, and if we had
worked zealously, we would have
carried parish at last election. We
have had several suits with grocery
men in last five years ; got them
down once or twice, but it appears
that the whisky men usually get the
benefit of the doubt. 1 think the
signs are more hopeful at present
than ever before.
< >ur Temperance Council^ of Uni
ted Friends of Temperance are all
dead. We used to
Councils in North Louisirna.
are a few W. C. T. Unions in this
parish and also in adjoining parishes,
but while our Councils have ceased
to work, as councils, there are a
great many of the members of the
old Councils who are as active as
ever. So that the Temperance fires
are not out by a long ways ; * they
have just ceased to crackle as they
burn. If one thinks they are out,
lie should just pay attention to the
way a whisky candidate is slaughter
ed in a general election and see how
bitterly candidates and their friends
deny the imputation of drinking
against them.
We hold a State Temperance Con
vention on the I9th of this month.
John W. McFarland.
-- •»•«« -:
Judge James Oarilehl of Virginia.
a
con
about 200*1.
have about fifty
There
Lynchburg, Ya.. Aug. 9.—Judge
James Garfield, probably the oldest
judge in the world, and it is believed,
oldest member of the
sonic fraternity in the United
States, died, at his home in this
city, last night, in the 90th
of his age.
He served as a volunteer in the
war of 1812 and was twice elected to
Congress. During Gen. Jackson's
Administration he was a warm friend
of the President and made a notable
speech in defense of the latter m the
House, for which Jackson thanked
him, both in person and by letter,
lie was Prosecuting Attorney of
Lynchburg for nearly twenty years,
J udge of the Circuit Court for fifteen
years, and has been, altogether, at
the bar and on the bench for seven
ty-three years, having only retired
in 1883, in his ninety-second
Ma
year
year
ami after he had become total v blind.
In all of his official life lie
hau hut two ot his decisions re Vers
never
ed.
He became a Mason in 1*22. He
voted for James Madison for Presi
dent and for every nominee of the
Democratic party since, bavin
the polls in a carriage last No
vember and east his ballot for Cleve
land and Hendricks. The bells of
the city are tolling to-day out of
spect to his memory.—N. O. Pica
yune.
g gone
ic
Persons desiring
speeches on Prohibition, will pleas
correspond with me here some days
advance.
one or more
My engagements are
always days ahead. Please
this. 1 want to visit every com
munity possible, in which speaking
advance the
remem
cause.
J. II. Gamrrell,
Cor. Sec., Executive Com.
SPECIMEN COPIES.
We will take pleasure in sending
specimen copies to any who would
to work for the paper. The
friends of temperance and Prohibi
could not do a better thing for
cause than to circulate" the
Sword and Shield.
tf

xml | txt