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Sword and shield. (Clinton, Miss.) 1885-1888, September 26, 1885, Image 2

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BUSINESS MENTION
All communications intended for publi
cation, should lie sent in Thursday morn
ing, and should be written on only one side
of paper. Everything intended for publica
tion should be written on separate pieces of
paper from the business communications.
1 lie columns of the Sword and Shield
will beepen to a limited number of reliable
advertisers at reasonable rates, but frauds
will not be advertised at any price. If,
however, one does creep in, it will be
romtly exposed when found out.
Address all communications to
SWORD AND SHIELD,
Clinton, Miss'
Entered at the Post-office at Clinton, Mitt.,
Second-class Matter.
un
«
TRAPPISTS IN CANADA.
Tlie Severity of Their DUcIptine Make«
Them Short-Live«!— The Cross of
Ashes.
A Trappist monastery is located at
Oka, a quaint Indian village on the
river about thirty-seven miles from this
city, says a Montreal correspondent iu
a letter to the New York l'un. The
Trappists are a Catholic religious order
little kuowu to the rest of the world,
though oue of the oldest orders of the
church. They are chiefly remarkable
for the extreme rigor and privations of
their rules aud discipline. There is no
other order of Christians that can at all
approach them iu this respect. Their
mission, as oue of them stoically said,
is the "glory of God aud the good of
sinners." The tirst glimpse of these
people and their devotion aud prac
tices is quite suflicicut to show that there
is at least one heartily sincere religious
organization iu the world.
The mon stcry is a two-story wooden
building, about UK) by 50 feet large;,
looking toward the river. Cloistered
here ut present are seven Trappist
priests, including the father superior
aud ten brothers and novices. As one
of the rules of the order is perpetual
sileuce, botli among themselves and to
strangers, some delà
ing communication with them after a
visitor reaches the monastery. Each
person approached raises his hand to
his mouth aud shakes bis head, show
ing that be either was uot allowed to
speak or could uot. This difficulty be
iug dually overcome, oae of the priests
is detailed to entertain the caller.
The sleeping apartments are made of
thin wooden panels to a height of about
six feet, and just big enough to admit a
single bedstead with a couple of feet
space iu front to move about iu.
father superior's be«l has about fourfect
space in front of it, and this is the
only difference between his comforts
and those of his brethren,
steads are all made of rough pine aud
hemlock slabs with the sharp edges
trimmed oft' a little. Each contains a
rude straw mattress and »straw pillow',
with common gray blankets for cover
ing. Over the foot of each bed is a
crucifix containing a small holy-water
font, from which is suspended a "disci
pline." The discipline is a "cat" of
live tails, made of coarse hemp lish-line
with three knots on each tail,
every Friday morning, on the signal of
the father superior, the Trappists, in
cluding the superior himself, strip to
the waist aud punish themselves on
the bare skin for a few minutes with
v occurs in obtaiu
The
The bed
At 4
the whip.
The little apartments arc placed two
abreast aloug the main hall partition,
leaving au opou promeuade between
them aud the outer wall and windows.
They occupy about half of one side of
the seeoud story, the maiu hall being
lengthwise iu the building. Opposite
to these are the novices' study aud the
library. The latter coutains all the
theological text-books uecessary for the
educatiou of priests, including the
works of St. Thomas.
The catering aud bill of fare are, per
haps, the most remarkable of anything
about the monastery. During the sea
son between Easter and the 14th of Sep
tember the Trappists eat two meals a
day—one at 11:30 a. m., and the other
at 6:80 p. m. On Mondays during this
period the meals consist of soup
cabbage, potatoes, aud bread; \
days, soup, beans, potatoes, and bread;
Fridays, soup, salad, potatoes, and
bread; Tuesdays, Thursdays, Satur
days, aud Sundays, soup, cabbage,
bread, and boiled rice and milk, but no
potatoes. With this they are allowed
cheese, salt, pepper, and some oils, but
neither tea, coffee, sugar, meat, lish,
fowl, eggs, uor butter is allowed, ex
cept iu case of sickness, when any art
icle of diet or medicine ordered by the
attending physician is allowed,
soup, which constitutes a daily dish, is
simply the water iu which the cabbage
has been boiled. It is poured over some
bread in the large plates and tin dishes
In this
, boiled
Vedues
The
iu which the soup is served,
country they are allowed the use of
milk as a beverage during tlie day, but
the luxury is uot generally used. In
Europe, instead of milk, they use wine,
beer, and cider.
From Sept. 14 to Easter is their Len
ten season. During this period they
have but one meal per day, and both
milk and cheese are excluded. Con
sidering the quality of the meal, and
the fact that the season deprives the
vegetables used of their fresh
much of their nourishment, this is ter
rible privation; but it is part of the vow
of the order, and it can uot be relaxed
for any cause except during actual
finement from the illness of which this
diet itself is the most frequent cause.
The Trappists are clean shaven, and
keep the hair cropped short. Next to
the skin they wear common gray flan
nel. Their drawers and long stockings
arc made of twilled white flannel. Over
this cömes a white gown made of the
same kind of material as the drawers
and stockings, and reaching down to
the heels. Over this again comes the
scapular and a large leather belt
buckled around the middle over all gar
ments for a girdle. The scapular
by those of the order who are priests is
a strip of black merino about sixteen or
seventeen inches wide, and made to go
the shoulders and long enough to
reach down to tho aukles, both front
and back. The scapular of the novices
is the same except that it is made of
brown material. The long white gown
has a mitered hood on it, which is the
only headwear of the Trappists either
in or out of doors. On some occasions
an additional outer garment, called the
This is a short white
uess and
con
wora
over
cowl, is worn,
gown aud hood made of the same ma
terial as the longer gown. When this
garment is worn the girdle is, of course,
removed and readjusted over it. The
hood of both gowns is lined with black
scapular. When working in the fields,
which is part of their duty, they weur
long bools and tuck up the lower part
O t the gown and scapular toward the
knees by means of leather straps. All
this, with She h *«,>.{ <>*1
an,! the
[icin'
big belt around tiw middle, gives tiiô
Trappist a very quoer Umk.
They retire at 8 p; m., but do not
dress, even iu sickness, except to re
move tho brogaus. They change un
derclothiug ouce a week.' They'rise at
2, r.nd immediately chaut the office of
the Blessed Virgin. This is followed
by meditations till 8, when the olliee of
the day is recited and chanted till 4.
At this moment all who are priests iu
the cloister begin to say their masses,
after which meditations and other pray
ers are continued till 7, when what they
call the community mass is commenced.
At 8 they fcurn out to work iu the fields
or about the monastery and other
buildings as may be required. After
the 11:30 meal they say vespers, and
then retire and sleep one hour. After
this they return to the fields again till
6. when they come home to
HU
supper,
after which they turu once more to
meditations and prayers uutil the hour
of retirement.
They educate then own priosts, and
have them ordained by the nearest
bishop. When the lay Trappist com
pletes his novitiate, which is two years,
and thinks he has a "vocation" for the
Trappist priesthood and Trappist life
generally, he is admitted to study and
preparation by the majority vote of the
cloister. If a candidate is already a
priest when he enters the order, he has
only to serve out the novitiate and ob
tain the majority vote iu order to be
come a Trappist priest.
Wbeb the hour of death is approach
ing any of the brethren, common ashes
are spread iu the form of a cross on the
floor of the room where the patient
lies. Then the dying man is lifted out
of his bed and laid over this cross on
the bare floor, without even a pillow,
and watched there uutil he is dead.
This is what is called dying a "public
penitent," and all Tr.tppisis must die
so. The remains are kept about a dav,
and then removed on a litter by four
brothers, aud buried without a eotlin.
The trappists hardly ever live to au
old age. Their deaths arc almost in
variably premature ou account of their
austerities aud privations, aud mauy
die within a few months after entering
the order.
The Great August Kail».
It is not easy for anybody to realize,
or even to correctly imagine, the vast
amount of water which is poured out
of the sky in a great raiu, like the one
which during the first three or four days
of August deluged so many and so
widely separated parts of the country.
It is not easy to understand iu the
"realiziug" souse, however fully we
may comprehend the fact intellectually,
how so much solid water can be sus
pended in the form of invisible vapor
in the air. True, it is no longer invis
ible, when it lias been condensed iu the
form of heavy raiu clouds, but it was
all there, invisibly—somewhere in the
wide realm of air—before it became
thus condensed. Take the ending part
of that great storm, for an example—
what must have been the actual amount
of water that was poured down, from
Chicago to Maine, from Maryland and
the Ohio to the White Mountains? It
rained seemingly as never before, in al 1
those regions. Throughout the greatei
part of the Middle States it made de
structive river floods. In the regio«,
about Chicago it amounted to a pro
cipitation of about live and one-hal
inches. Iu Maryland it was not muck
less, and New York State received its
share of the general drenching. Here
iu Southern New England the down
pour was such as was uever exceeded—
if iudeed it was ever equaled. Iu this
immediate region the raiufall in on«
continuous raiu, from Mouday after
noon to 8 o'clock Tuesday morning,
amounted almost to fl inches,
great October rain, of the 1st and 2d of
October, 1808, Mÿhich did such ruinous
work throughout Connecticut (chiefly
by the immense precipitation on the
second day), did uot exhibit such a
steady aud tremeudous downpour as
that of Tuesday, August 4, 1885, be
tween the hours of 1 and 3 o'clock in
the morning. The volume of this Au
gust rain is shown iu the flooded
streams, which everywhere continue to
be flooded long after the usual time
for rain floods to disappear. The Con
necticut river itself has kept rising for
a day and a half after the storm, the
raiu having added about six feet to its
height. It was a heavy rain iu the
White Mountains, the gauge at the Sig
nal Service station on the summit show
ing four and one-half inches.
This great raiu came inland from the
Gulf of Mexico. Following the Missis
sippi valley northward, tho storm was
central on Mouday at Detroit. It ex
tended eastward all tho way from the
Mississippi river to tho Atlantic sea
board—pouring ns huge a flood upon
New England as upon most of the great
intermediate breadth of country.
It is impossible to estimate any such
quantity of water. Even of tho amount
that was poured out upon our own lit
tle State, it is impossible to got any
adequate idea. If we were to imagine
the area of Connecticut to be a perfect
ly flat, level surface, aud the average
amount of rain for that one ptorm
be not live, but not quite three inchet ±
what, then, would bo the aggregate
quantity of water that was emptied
from the clouds upon our atfea of not
quite 5,000 square miles? Who can get
jmy adequate conception of it? Emp
tied in the same time into the world s
oreatesi river, it would affect the vol
ume of the Amazon. And this for only
one little spot iu the area of the actual,
downpour. Couuecticut, compared
with that area, covers less relafive
space than a dinner-plate on a big din
ner-table. It was almost as if tho
great lakes had burst their bounds and
simultaneously emptied themselves
upon the country on this side.
ford {Conn.) Times.
To appearances, now, the tornado
cloud has two heads, one on the sur
face of the earth anil the other in the
sky, the bodies of each joining iu mid
air and tapering both way» with Ibo
smallest diameter at their junction. In
other words, the cloud now assumes the
shape of au hour-glass, and the lower
portion displays extraordinary destruct
ive violence. 'This last and most fatal
form of tho tornado cloud is, fortunate
ly, not a const-nt feature of the storm.
The tornado cloud is constantly chang
ing from the hour-glass form to that of
the upright funnel, or some other in
termediate shape previously referred to.
— « o nvited from (h.lierai H<vj<s' Jle
!■orl.
The
Uart

In length of life Geu. Graut f,-li six
teen years short of bis fain« f aiid tvte
ty-one years short of his motif V.* " _
father «'lied iu 1873, his mother iu 1883
Both tire buri- «1 m Spriug Grdvc Gcine
ZJ..C (Jiuci
• 11 -
llis
I WANT A GOOD PRINTER—ONE TUAT
4s t j n -
R. I). Gambrell.
don't drink.
Lincoln's Assassinution.
"The darkest day of my life,
eral Grant once said to a friend, "was
the day 1 heard of Lincoln's assassina
tion. I did not know what it meant.
Here was the rebellion put down in the
field and starting up again in the gut
ters. We had fought it as war, now
we had to light it as assassination. Lin
coln was killed on tho evening of tho
14th of April. I was busy sending out
orders to stop recruiting, the purchase
of supplies, and to muster out the army.
Lincoln had promised to go to the thea
ter and wanted me to go with him.
While I was with the President a note
came from Mrs. Grant saying that she
must leave Washington that night. She
wanted to go to Burlington to see her
children. Some incident of a trifling
nature had made her resolve to leave
that evening. 1 was glad to have it so
as I did not want to go to the theater,
so I made my excuse to Liucolu and at
the proper hour we started for tho train.
As wo were driving along Pennsylva
nia avenue a horseman drove past us
on a gallop and back again arouud our
carriage, looking into it. Mrs. Grant
said: "There is the man who sat near
us at lunch to-day with some other men
and tried to overhear our conversation.
He was so rude that we left the dining
room. Here he is now riding after us.'
I thought it was only curiosity, but
learned afterward that the horseman
w*s Booth. It seems that I was to
have been attacked and Mrs. Grant's
sudden resolve to leave changed the
plans. A few days afterward I re
ceived an anonymous letter from aman
saying that he had been detailed to kill
njc, that he rode on my train as far as
Havre de Grace, and as my car was
locked he failed to get iu. lie thanked
God that he had failed. 1 remember
that the conductor had locked our car,
but how true the letter was I can not
say. 1 learned of the assassination as
I was passing through Philadelphia. 1
turned arouud, took a special train and
came on to Washington. It was the
gloomiesi day of my life."—.Vein York
Commercial Adicrti,er.
i »
Gen
stum; spear-head has
been uui-artlieii iu Northern Italy,
is too large to have boon used iu war,
and arciia' )
A
r? I
It
ts conjecture that the
primitive people of the stone age em
ployed it as a religious emblem.
There arc men aud women who make
as great a mockery of the marriage ro
latious as the Mormons do, aud who
are protected iu it by the law, though
they are perjurers aud debauchees.—
Chiattjo hcruid.
Railroaa 7 iwe-1 able
Illiaoia Central Railroad.
Going North —
Express—Leaves New Orleans 9:13 a m, ar
rive? at Jackson 5:43 p m, Laves 0:05,
rives at Grand Junction at 8:10 a m.
Mall—Leaves New Orleans 3:30 p ni, arrives
at Jackson 12:35 am, leaves 12:40
reaches Grand Junction 8:53 a m.
Mixed—Leaves New Orleans 7:1« a m. reacn
es Jackson 5:30 p m, leaves 0:15 p
reaches Grand Junction 1:15 a m.
Going South —
Express—Leaves Grand Junction 1:20 p
reaches Jackson 10:30 p in, leaves 10:35 p
m, reaches New Orleans 7 am.
Mail—Leaves Grand Junction 7.T0 p m,
rives at Jackson- 3:30 a m, leaves 3:35 a in
arrives at New Orleans 10:45 a in.
Mixed—Leaves Grand Junction 0:50 a m, ar
rives ut Jackson S:< 0 a m, leaves 9:50 a m
arrives at New Orleans 5:20 p m.
ar
m.
m,
ar
7i?ksbnr& &. Meridian Railroad.
Et st Bound Tain it.
Mail—Leaves Vicksburg S.CO p m. arrive,
at .Jackson 10:20 and leaves at 10:35 p tn,
arrives at Meridian at 4:20 a m.
Express, or Accommodation—Leave Jack
son 7:30 a in, arrives at Vicksburg 9:45
am. Leaves Vicksburg 1:30p m, and
ar:1v< s at Jackson 3:45 p m.
Local Freight leaves Vicksburg 4:15 a m
arrives at Jackson at 8:35 and leaves at
910 a m, arrives at Meridian at 6:45 p ra
West Bound Trains.
Mail, leavts Meridian 10:20 p m, arrives In
Jackson 3:20 and leaves at 8:40 a m, ar
ri\ at Vicksburg 6:00 a in.
Local Freight, loaves Meridian 6:00 a m, ar
rives iu Jackson at 3:45 aud leaves at 4:30
p m arrives in Vicksburg 9:00 p m.
Natchez. Jaokaon aud Columbus.
East ward—Leaves Natchez daily at 3:15 p
m, arrives at Jackson 9:30 p m.
Westward—Leaves Jackson daily at 6:00 a
ui, arrives at Natchez 11:50 a m.
Freight Train, daily, Sunday exempted,
I eaves JacKSon 9:00 a m, arrives from
Natchez at 6:30 pm.
co an«l Mississippi Valley
Going North—Leaves Jackson 0:30 a m, ar
rives at Yazoo City 10:20 a m.
Going South—Leaves Yazoo City at 1:30 p
m, arriving at Jackson at 5:30 p m.
M- & O R- R-—At Meridian
NORTII.
No 1 Arrives 5:10 a m
" 1 Leaves 5:15 a m
" 3 Arrives 7:25 p m
" 3 Leaves 7:40 p ru "4 Leaves 7:52 a m
The .Southbound passenger train leaving
Meridian at 7:52 a in, arrives in Mobile at
1:30 p m, and the train going
North leaves Mobile at 2 m, and arrives at
Meridian at 7:25 d m.
SOUTH.
No 2 Arrive 10:25 pm
" 2 Leaves 10:80 p m
" 4 Arrives7:32 a m
gjg
o.w.
r
4
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MEMPHIS, TENN.
Dealer in all kinds of Marble
\Vork, such as Tombstones, Monu
ments, Mantles, etc., etc. All ot
which will be sold at extremely
LOW FIGURES.
Write for what won want and get
estimates. It will be to your inter
est to do so.
THOMAS MAYDWELL,
Memphis, Term
~
jScXlo,
*• ~ - *
Sted
(il ,
W<
*
RED STAR STORE
-sr
STRICT LÏ.OÀSH AND ONE
PRICE.
The only house in the State who
keep buyers the year round in New
York, watching the markets, buying
from first hands in case lots, payiiq
cash down, attending every force«
sale—the trade sales and auction sales
We stand to-day beyond competitiop
in prices, quantity and variety of
stock, and in'styles.
SHIRTS.
Men's unlaundried shirts, rein
forced bosom, linen colar band and
cuffs, a good shirt, 50 cents.
Wamsuta Mnslin, 2100 Linen, re
inforced thronghout, all the patent
stays in back, and in sfeaves—the
usual $1 shirt—75 cts.
Percale shirts, all the latest fash
ions two collars, extra cuffs, a shirt
that is usualy sold at $1.25 —90 cts.
Extra quality linen collars lOcts.,
about as good as any 25c collar.
Half Hose.
Regular made hose, solid colors,
15 cents, worth 25c.
Full regular made Brittish hose,
solid colors, white heels and toes,25c
worth 50c anywhere.
Half-bleached Brittish hose 20c.,
usual price 25c.
Extra gauge'Brittish hose 25 c,
usually sold at 85c.
Balbriggan Hose in extra quality,
25c. worth 85c.
Imperial Lisle Hose, extra quality
35c, worth 75c. The hose are from
the underwriters sale of Townsand
& Montant, some were slightls dam
aged by water. One of our advan
tages in having a buyer always in
New York
HANDKERCHIEFS,
Ladie?' colored bordered, i,eat
patterns, 5c, worth 10c.
• White, Medium and Fxtra size,
5c.
Linen Lawn, 10c.
Pure Linen Cambric, 15c.
Price and quality will astonish
you, but our buyer picked them up at
the auction sale of Field Chapman &
Fenner.
Just Received,
Union Lawns at 4e.
Lonsdale Domestic ot 7ic.
Forget-me-not, yard wide, 7c.
10-4 sheeting 18c, worth 25c.
Steelman & Co.
The Year ef JnhiLe. all Creation Happy
and BayiH Pianos and Orps.
Unusually Easy Installment Terms
Now Offered by Ludden Sc. Bates
Sonthorn Mutio House,
Savannah, Ga
A Square Talk with Purchasers, Giving
Sjteciai Information About Our New
And Easy Methods of Selling
Pianos and Organs.
"It's a Long Time Between Drinks.'
So remarked the Governor of South Car
olina to the Governor of North Carolina
many years ago, bfore the temperance wave
had swept over the South. He probably
spoke his honest convictions, and so do we
when we say
lx's a Long Time Between Crops.
And to this the thousands of family "bread
in the South who are waiting un
winners
til tiie next crop is garnered before they buy
Pianos or Organs will say amen. But we
sav why wait, when you can buy now on
such very easy terms ? Only think of it,
PIANOS, $25.00 CASH AND $10.00 MONTHLY.
ORGANS, $ 10.00 CASH AND $5.00 MONTHLY.
\V%y. it's almost a sin to deprive your
self aiid family of an Instrument when one
can be had so easily. And to those who
cannot meet monthly Installments, we offer
these Special Summer Terms :
PIANOS $50 CASH AND BALANCE NOV. 1.
ORGANS, $20 CASH AND BALANCE NOV. 1.
And if crops turn out poor, so that when
Nov. 1st comes the entire balance cannot be
paid, we will accept one-half of it, ana wait
until Nov. 1, 1886, fortheother half.
Now, come up, buyers. Our instruments
lead the world. Our Brices are the lowest,
our Terms the easiest, and we offer every
inducement that can be honestly lived up to.
See These Special Summer Bargains.
Only *210 for Bn elegant Rosewood
Piano, large size; all improvements; sweet
tone ; guaranteed a superior and durable Piano.
Thousands sold. Best Piano sold in America at
the Price. „ , _
A new upright Piano for only *150, on
very Easy Terms._ , ,
The Silver toned Ifathushek Piano, *300>
$325, $350. . 4 .
JÏ 3 S SfeVfeSte« Stm.
Only *85 for a beautiful Parlor or Çhurcn
Oman ; Solid Walnut Cm p, with high Top
of rich design ; 4 8eta Reedi, 10 Genuine Stops.
Greatest Bargain ever offered.
The incomparable Meson and Hamlin
Orirans from $24 up to $750. Rented until
pahffor. 'Nearly three years given for payment.
and
Fine Stool, Embroidered cover, Instruc
tor and Book of Music with Pianos; and
Stool, Instructor and Music Book with
Organs. All Freight Paid on both.
Fifteen days trial, and we pay freight both
if Instruments don't suit.
And Just One Last Word.
ways
If you are thinking of buying an Instru
ment, write us, and we will make terms to
suit your convenient. Ask for Summer
Terms, 1885. Mention this Advertisement
and Paper.
Lndieii k Bates Sontbera Music House,
Savauuali. Gra.
The Great Wholesale Piano and Organ
Depotof the South.
The White
«' — IS—
«ft £ •. H 9
1233
:
('/' rW'li
v.
■ ■■■ tr
V
V.
r «
i.
v n *
i
* fP-'H
m
A
THE EASIEST SELLING;
THE BEST SATISFYING
Sewing Machine.
Its introduction and world-renowned reputa
tion was the death-ldow to high-priced machines
There are no Second Hand White Machines in
the market.
This is a very important matter, as It is a well
known and undisputed fact that many of the so
colled Drstr-class machines which are offered s.
cheap now-a-days are those that have been repos
sessed (that is, taken back from customers aft<jr
use) and rebuilt and put on the market as 'new.
The White is the peer of any sewing machine
now upon the market.
It is much larger than the family machines of
the Singer, Howe and Weed make.
It costs more to manufacture than cither of the
aforesaid machines.
Its construction is simple, positive and dura
Its workmanship is unsuipassed.
hie.
Do Not Buy any Other
Before Trying
r IIIK WHITE.
AGENTS WANTED!
While Saving Machine Co.,
CLEVELAND, O.
SHUQUALÄK
FEU
l COLLEGE.
L
The Sixth Annual Session opens
Sept 9th, next.
The location is in the beautiful,
healthy and moral town of Shuqua
lak, on the M. «fc 0. Railroad, 52
miles north ot Meridian.
Rev. L. M. Stone, Pres't, is assist
ed by experienced and first-class
teachers in every department. The
grade ot scholarship, the literary
character and all the appointments
of the College, are unexcelled in our
State. The religious tone of the
school and community is of a good
character,
finished literary and musical educa
tion are all that may reasonably be
desired. Terms low. Board and
Tuition for the Session, 8150, Mu
sic per session 847. No incidentals.
Apply for catalogue.
The
advantages for a
E. F. Nunn,
Pres't Board Trustees.
eJ
1
Corn*l»tt?d with Vanderbilt Inlrmltj. Highest
advantage# in every Department. Splendid new build
ing. Ample I acuity. Music, Art, Caliithenics. Health.
Accessibility. For Catalogue, address
Rby* GEOiW.Fi PRICE, D. 1>., JPrt«., Nashville.TeoB*
THE
pUP„
BEST
ro« THIS
Cl
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135 Canal Street, New Orleans.
FREE TO ALU
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UR U1 ultra tad Floral
Catalog«« of 90 page«,
□tain ing description and
cas of the boat rarietiaa of
PUnU, Garden and Plow
a H Seeds. Belbe, lUeta,
Irak«, gull FratUni
Trau will be milled Free tol
«U applicant*. Ten Rom
mailed for One Dollar to aar
retail.
^■place. Wholesale aod^H
NANZ à NEUNER, Louisville, Ky.
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This Is nature's great restorer of heal th,
and Is the only preparation of Iron that
combines allot its good qualities, without
producing the unpleasant after effects
which characterize all other preparations
ot Iron. It is pleasant and agreeable to
the taste, and can be token and retain, d
by the most delicate stomach. It is the
lv Dronaration of Iron that win noi
constipate the bowels, or blacken
stroy the teeth. It is easily and readily
taken up and assimilated by the blood,
and is, therefore, the greatest remedy
known for ,,
General Debility, Dyspepsia, Iiid.gos
tion, Nervousness, female Diseasi »,
Scrofula, Chronic Rheumatism, Obn
valescenee from typhoid * B 4*J* *Jj , V
Fevers, aud all Diseases aud Impari
ties of the Blood.
PREPARED ONLY BY
S, MANSFIELD & CO.,
M'f'aChemists, Memphis, Tenn., U.S.A.
PRICE, *1.00 PER BOTTLE.
The genuine bu s deep blue wrapper «
letters the above picture on the label.
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Oil
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LATEST AND BEST
HAVE YOU SEEN THE NEW IMPROVED
SINGER
Sewing Machine
i
WITH HIGH ARM?
It is very light running
-AND
MAKES THE FINEST STITCII OF ANY MACHINE MADE.
CALL, EXAMINE & BE CONVINCED
Singer needles 15 cts per <loz„ two doz. 25 cts., Shuttles 25cts, Oil 5 cts bottle
MCCAÏXS'N BAZAR PATTERNS.
The Singer Manufacturing Co.
188 Washington 8t., Vicksburg, Miss.
G " I
ATTACHMENT.
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t- 310H-N0ima HXiM
Louis Grünewald.
xsTe'w Orleans,
'La
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& Organs
Pianos^
Leading Pianos of the World,
Steiiway. Knabe, Solmer, Belli Bn.. &
Fisolaer.
ORGANS FROM ALL THE LEADING FACTORIES—
Shoninger, Clough and Warren ,
:o:
MUSIC and MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS at Wholesale and Retail.
Everything in music line at lowest rates.
Catalogues mailed Irec upon application.
Address—
Louis Grünewald.
Under Grünewald Opera House, New 0/*leans, L
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Manufacture a large variety tf
LIGHT and HEAVY CARRIAGES, PHAETONS,
CARTS, BUGGIES, WAGONS, &C.,
Alter the most approve,! ilesiims at the very lowest
prices cousistent with good workmanship.
—30,000 voMolee—
of onr manufacture are now in use in this an<l
foreign countries and attest the excellence of
our co«>ds by the universal satisfaction which they
give.—Every vehicle is WARRANTED.—Special
attention will be given to mail orders.
CATALOGUES FREE.
D. W. Miller Carriage Co«,
' E. Fifth St., Culvert St. and Eggleston Ave.,
CINCINNATI# O,
1
THE STANDARD COUGH REMEDY
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BALSAM
Coughs, Colds, Con
sumption, Croup, Ca
! tarrh, Influenza, Bronchitis,Whoop
ing Cough, Diseases of the Lungs,
Throat, and Bronchial Tubes.
CURES
IT LEADS ALL LUNG REMEDIES.
i
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Get the genuine from your Drug
gist. Prepared only by the
Mansfield Medicine Company
MEMPHIS, TENN.
80LE MANUFACTURERS.
HELD WANTED- emales.
W ANTED—In every town city
ami county, an intelligent, oner
getic lady of good address and some
business ability, to introduce to the
trade and consumers Madam Deans
Cei.ijkated Spinal Supporting
Corset. Retails at 81.50, Splend
idly advertised: highly recommend
ed by the leading Modiste,fashionable
Dressmakers and the most eminent
Physicians of the United States and
Europe. Liberal pay. Agents are
making 815 to 805 weekly. Address
Lewis Schiele «st Go.
390 Boardway, X. Y.
Uegffi
r 15,

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SIOOO REWARD
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fee mj mMhlM buUiQ* Ud eleaalu U Or yflfl
-- UrketumuebCInwSMd lu m. Æ JT
VICTOR^H
$100
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ILLUSTRATED _
Pamphl#t mailed FR1I.
NEWARK MACHINE CO.
' NEWARK. O.
ur
iiH'iîï? wanted beautiful Electric
v ' 't f Iu I \ Corsets. Sample free to those be
Kll bl* IU coming agents. No risk, quick wile».
Territory given, satisfaction guarantee«!. Address
DR.SCOTT.842 Broadway 8t.,M.Y,

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