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Sword and shield. (Clinton, Miss.) 1885-1888, October 31, 1885, Image 3

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October 31, 18S5
for
to
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ises
men
over
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tion
a
has
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tor
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land
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along

dont
J. H. GAMBRELL,
R. D. GAMBRELL,
I Editors.
CLINTON, MISS.
Saturday.
if KIEFS.
The new College building of
Senatobia, will cost about $40.000.
Senator George and ex-Senator
B. K, Bruce, addressed the Colored
State Fair.
Dr. G. C. Andrews asks some per
tinent questions in "Prohibition Pro
hibiting" on our first page.
The Voice is matting a red hot
campaign in New York. It expects
the Prohibitionists to treble their
vote this year.
If the New Orleans Picayune keeps
on its present course it will get to
be a first rate Prohibition paper.
The question is agitating.
The Walkup case is developing a
nasty lot of evidence in regard to
Mr. Walkup's character. Mrs.
Minnie Walkup will most probably
be acquitted.
The New Y'ork Independent de
livers itself thuslv: "It is high time
that the government by the saloon,
of the saloon and for the saloon
should perish from the earth.
Rev. G. C. Andrews, Pastor of
the M. E. Church at Jackson, says
that not a single saloon in Jackson
could stand the test of law on the
petition question. Could they on
any question?
Woman as a reformer" is worthy
of a careful reading. Rev. W. C.
Black is a power in awakening sen
timent on the Prohibition question
and the vexed question of Women's
natural sphere.
The war cloud continues to grow
in Europe, but as European war
clouds are very shaddowy and unsub
stantial, it may only lesultin matters
being "a little stained." It willliardly
meterialize.
Eld. B. D. Gray, Pastor Baptist
church at Clinton, was to have hand
ed in the copy of the Central Asso
ciation minutes one day last week,
and failed to do so. Probable rea
son:—A fine boy at his house. He
is a proper subject lor congratula
tion.
We have been favored this last
week with a beautiful hoquet of
exquisite flowers from Misses Bettie
and Sue Robbins, two of Clinton's
nicest young ladies. Any one who
thinks we don't appreciate such
compliments—just let them try it
once.
Strenuous efforts are being made
to have the death sentence of Mur
phy and Ford, the Murphy murder
ers, commuted to life imprisonment.
The verdict of the jury was, to say
the least, very queer. It is to be
hoped that Gov. McEnery will give
the matter serious consideration.
It is time for President Cleveland
to shut up on the question of of
fensive partisanship. After all that
term seems to have a very vague
meaning. If a democrat has been
forward in carrying elections he is
summarily bared from appointment,
but the President himself, can give
$1.000, to carry New York.
Col. H. P. Andrews, the Stock
Attorney of the V. & M. R. R., was
in Clinton last Tuesday, and gave us
a pleasant call. Col. Andrews for
merly reflected honor on the Press
ofthe State, as Associate Editor of
the Meridian Observer, and laterly,
as Editor of the Newton Free Press.
We are glad to know that his present
position is a remunerative one.
Col. J. J. Williams tfho recited
his little speech at the liquor dealers
convention at Jackson is lndepend
. ent candidate for representative
from Grenada couty. We believe
he remarked on one occasion that
the Prohibition agitation will injure
the Democratic party—was gotten
up to put Independents in office,''
Wonder if he is a Prohibitionist.
We took a trip to North East Mis
sissippi a few days ago. At Okolona
we met some old friends and formed
some new and pleasant acquaintan
ces. We are indebted to Mr. Clifford
Savage and his excellent wife for a
pleasantliome while in the little city.
Okolona and that part of the county
needs more temperance education;
needs more temperance agitation;
needs more Prohibition literature
distributed; needs some Prohibition
speeches; needs to have our State
Executive committee look alter it
little, It is surrounded by a fertile
country, and it is important that it
be not neglected.
*'
44
(4
a
Pails
Try
LIQUID OFFICE SEEKERS.
It is a withering shame on this
civilization that men will drug each
other to secure votes and it is pass
ingly strange that men will allow an
office seeker to drug them. "Treat
ing" to secure votes is a palpable
violation of law : "If any candidate
for any public station shall treat or
bestow any vinous or spirituous li
quor upon any voter, with intend to
influence his vote he shall be liable
to indictment and on conviction,
shall be fined twenty-five dollars,
Sec. 111Ü, revised code 1880. Just
a short time since we saw a candidate
for the responsible position of sheriff,
leading numbers of his fellow-citizens
into a doggery "treating" with "bust
skull" whisky. That man asks and
expects decent law-abiding citizens
tovote for him. It goes without say
ing that such a violator of law ought
to be politically damned, without a
resurection. To vote for him is to
condone his crime, and more, it is to
endorse it. As long as such miser
able fellows are voted for by the
fathers and put in positions of pow
er and influence, it is virtually say
ing to the young men of the country
if you wish to reach positions, you
must not hesitate to perjure your
selvts, for many voters are like so
many beast lead by their appetites.
By giving them whisky you can get
their votes." By his oath of regis
tration every man is sworn to sup
port the constitution and laws of this
country and we affirm that the man
who lectioneers with whisky violates
this oath and to vote for him is to
endorse an unpunished perjured
criminal.
We desire Christian parents to
think seriously what their ballot en
dorsement of the liquid office seek
er means :
1. It means oblivion to the claims
of the majesty of the law upon
every citizen, "A don't care spirit
unworthy of any citizen and of which
no good citizen will be intelligently
guilty.
2. It means encouragement in the
violation of law and surely no loyal
citizen will, knowingly, contribute
to the infraction of the wholesome
laws of his goverument.
3. It means that it is the criminal
classes who are to have political
preferment in this government and
further, it means official corruption
for the man who will perjure him
self to get into office will, for profit,
perjure himself in that office.
Let the office-seeking perjurer, li
quor dispenser, be utterly forgotten
by decent men on election days.
This lawlessness demands severe and
immediate rebuke, and, reader, it is
your duty, for one, to administer
this rebuke. This matter deserves
and demands the attention of our
circuit Judges. Grand juries need
to have their attention called to this
matter and their duty in the prem
ises made so plain that they can't
avoid a performance of it without
being held up to the public execra
tion. We presume that in nearly
every saloon county in the State
men are debanclling manhood and
breaking the hearts of wives and
motheis to get themselves into office,
when the penitentiary would be a
more fitting place for them. Let
political shadows fall thick and fast
over the "treating" candidate, never
to be dispersed.
"This result will secure the elec
tion of a Republican United States
Senator and the early enactment of
a law regulating the liquor traffic.
Another very probable result ol the
election will be to eliminate third
party Prohibition from Ohio poli
tics."—Cleveland Leader (Rep.).
What, dead again, are we ? This
makes twice the Prohibition party
has died, according to Republican
diagonis, within eleven months.
Last fall it increased the rote for its
Presidential candidate to 150,000, as
compared with 10,000 four years be
fore. Prophets all over the country
promptly began to write obituaries
tor us, assuring us we were such a
dead corpse we never should be
heard from again. The other ddy the
party polled about 30,000 votes in
Ohio, as compared with 8,000 in the
election for Governor two years be
fore, 11,000 for St. John eleven
months before ; and ere the smoke
of the conflict has passed away we
hear the tuneful Cowles of Cleve
land singing another dirge over our
open grave. The old hymn speaks
of "living along at this poor dying
rate." It strikes us we are dying
along at a very good living rate.
Killusagain.—The Voice.
"The result (in Ohio.) ought to
convince the Prohibition that they
— we have heard that before, but it
dont convince.
a
of
>>
of
*■>
The best Ankle, Boot and Collar
Pails are made of zinc and leather
Try thrm.
a
EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES,
Not long since wc were sitting in
a court room when a young man was
arraigned for selling liquor on Sun
day. He plead guilty to the indict
ment and his lawyer, for him, plead
extenuating e ircumstances
which were these, "The saloon is
not his, but his brother's. He clerks
for his brother and sleeps in the sa
loon. His friends come on Sunday
for drinks and he could not well re
fuse them, therefore I hope your
honor will let him off as light. as
possible." The judge said, "let him
be fined twenty-five dollars and
cost.
V
u
>>
This is the minimum fine under
the statute. Was his honor justified
by the "extenuating circumstanc
es" in imposing the small fine for
desecrating the Sabbath ? We think
not. It is rediculous to say that an
unlawful sale is less unlawful because
the thing sold did not belong to the
seller, nor does it appear to us that
the fact that the fellow slept in the
saloon lessened his guilt in the
least, nor yet is there any extenua
tion in the fact that he was called
on for drinks on*8tj^lay, even by
his friends. Absolutely there is
nothing in such a plea and his hon
or ought to have just such a penalty
on the culprit as would have been a
warning to others. We heard that
the young man sâid, on leaving the
court-room, "I do not mind such
fines as that, I'll sell on any Sun
day." We candidly think there is
too much leniency on the part of the
Bench towards lawless characters
and this well meant leniency is con
strued into a license to commit fur
ther depudations upon the sanctity
of the Sabbath and the peace and
quiet of a community. We are de
cidedly of the opinion that some of
our judges are so afraid of doing the
liquor-dealers and other violators of
law injustice and are so much afraid
of being criticised for fancied sever
ity, that the laws and people suffer
in their hands. The law is intend
ed to visit severe pumishment upon
offenders and we would like to see
some of our judges "stiffen up
somewhat in the matter of adminis
tering justice, remembering that it
is not to be supposed for one moment
that transgressors, or their sympa
thizers will approve their judicial
acts. Let the judiciary "hew to the
line let the chips fall where they
may."
There are already one hundred
and fifty saloons in Lincipnati inhere
beer Is sold at three cents a glass
with the customary lunch thrown in,
and a Detroit brewing firm is ar
ranging to start a large number of
them.—State Ledger.
And yet, if you read one of their
defenses of our business," it will
be certain to say: "We only supply
a legitimate demand in the market.
It is hard for one not acquainted
with their methods to conceive of
the villinies resorted to by them
them to create the demand. The
The above method is one of the
most harmless.
General Manager Hudson, of the
East Tennessee system has issued an
order which has caused considerable
comment among the employes of the
road. The general manager in his
order forbids any employe ofthe sys
tem from entering a saloon when on
or off duty, and any one reported as
having taken adrink of liquor will be
immediately discharged. The order
is the strictest ever, issued.—Ad
vertiser.
It would have been much better
for the Vicksburg & Meridian Rail
road if a like order had been is
sued a few weeks ago.
The experiment of the Ohio pro
hibitionist ought to convince them
that they are powerless as a political
party.—Corinth Herald.
Think so ? Maybe the Republi
cans ought to be convinced that they
are powerless. The Prohibition
gain was as large as Foraker's plu
rality, and surely the Democrats
should retire. The Prohibitionists
gained in one year from 150 to 200
per cent and the Democrots lost
voters. Think again.
is
44
**
The Consequential Nine
making it right warm for Dr. Land,
of Attala, through the columns of
the Kosciusko Star. No man of
decency is bound to support him,
now that he vilifies ministers, church
men, women and morality and though
he was nominated by the Democrats
and we are a Democrat we will be
glad to see him beaten.
»»
.4
are
to
ing
The Ripley Sentinel hit him hard.
Hear :
"A young lady relative of Col. Bob
Ingersoll is creating quite a sensa
tion as an actress in the Madison
Square Theatre, of New York, Col
Bob's immoral teachings are calcu
lated to make ballet girls of his fe
male relatives and low commedians
of the boys.
Circulate the Sw«ri> and Shield.
A GOOD OPORTUNITV.
In
in
is
sa
re
as
him
and
The republican party has a good
opportunity now and the power
within its hands to complete destroy
the Prohib ition party as an organi
zation—by destroying the saloons.
In that case we will rejoice and say
well done.-AVooster (O.) Way de Co.
Herald. „
The Republican party won't do
that. It was put in power by the
saloonists and other liquor men and
it will subserve their interests, to
stay there. By the way, would that
not be a good way for the Demo
cratic party to kill off a seperate
Piohibition party in some Southern
States.
V
for
an
the
that
the
the
by
is
a
that
the
is
the
fur
and
de
of
the
of
see
it
the
The New York Voice has this to
say for the Toledo Blade: "We
want to say a word for the Toledo
Blade. It Jias not allowed the late
campaign in Ohio, and the policy of
its party in trying to get the saloon
vote, to silence its voice in behalf of
Prohibition_.lt has kept right along
making sentiment in behalf of the
pinciple, if if hasn't had the heart
to cut a loefee from the old party.
(Republican). So far, so good,
Nasby. But what next?"
-— —
The Republican party in Ohio
made its fight on the bloody-shirt
and whisky. The Democratic party's
platform was whisky and mixed
schools. Co»!d a southern man sup
port IIoadly'( Would he support
the Republicans ? Would he—could
he—have voted for either of the old
parties in Ohio?
one party m Ohi
citizens to «
old paptyhÄrat party.
is
of
in
of
a
are
an
his
all
not
in
and
a
There should be
reputable
iliute with and neither
ion Executive (Jom
roEHtAve challenged
ÄbfiPiepublican Ex
Hp to a deba te
H contest between
h*3s accept
ée Prolj
mittee of N<
the Demoeri
eeutive com
the issues 1
the ^artieÿfcj
ed. Tha tjl
not expecll
hibitiomstsS
on
ov
.1
L es
Prupport from' Pro
fill Davenport de
fend his business, tit the risk of
loosing votes,of Temperance Repub
licans? Well, hardly, at least he has
not as yet signified, his intention to
do so.
Some Georgia farmers keep dogs
instead of sheep. It is considerable
trouble to shear sheep anil send the
wool to market.—N. (\ Picayune.
The same brilliant < eonomy (?) in
fluences some of our public men to
vote for a bill favorable to the dis
tillers, "It makes the transportation
of corn cheap.
-
An Example worthy of Imitation.
in,
ar
of
of
the
the
an
his
on
as
be
is
•;
Various plans and schemes have
been devised and suggested by our
local W. C. T. U's. and also by the
State, to defray the expenses of our
worthy President as she goes out
and around at the bidding of those
who wish her presence either to
form new Unions, or to strengthen
those already formed, I have a
plan that J think surpasses all those
suggessted. lean best portray it by
relating a little incident :
Early in the summer the ladies at
Bolton invited some of our ladies to
come over atül assist them in form
ing a Union j A uinttee of two
ladies were Sitit by our W. C. T. U.
These ladies accomplished their
work and were not only welcomed
and generally* entertained, but when
they were about returning, tickets
were given them and also the money
they had expended in the morning
was refunded. "A word to the wise
is sufficient.
**
of
the
up
half
The
ing
so
is
the
ity
is
into
the
men
sions
tom
sion
men
with
the
the
eacli
slick
ical
M. J. Webb.
Clinton, Miss., Oct. 29th '85.
A C< IT e Drunkard.
"What a bright-eyed man," said a
Philadelphia Press reporter who leaned
against tiie cashier's desk of a restaur
ant near the public buildings one day
last week. Tie man in question had
just paid a lU-idit check and slipped
out of the door with a jerky movement
and a swinging of the cane lie carried
which dt eld*ally endangered the peo
ple's peace.
• Bright-eyed? Yes," said tho cash
ier; --he's a coffee drunkard."
••What's a eoffoo drunkard?"
"A man who comes in here four
times in two hours, as that man has
tiiis morning and does every morning,
and takes a lalf-pint of coffee every
time, is a coffee drunkard. Bright
eyes! Well l should say so.
man's condition all tiie time is the
same as that uf a man who is getting
over a big 'batter.' 1 mean his nerves
are up in 'G,' his muscles are alia
quiver, and his mental vision abnor
mally clear. He is living at a 2:08f
rate.
That
of
of
in
we
Next
had
They
mule
sult
we
the
I
here
a
long
sharp
our
$200,
stone.
$
"Why does he do it?
"Has to. Must have a brace. Used
to drink rum. Had to quit that, and
now does worse. He never sleeps, he
tells me.
"Do you know many such?
"At least half a dozen."
II
M
The two officers of the Moorish army
and their interpreter, who Iiave been
instructed four months in gun repair
ing at tiie Winchester Armory, in New
Haven, have sailed for Morocco. They
will teach the Moors how to use and
repair American firearms.
• *<
If you want to avoid a rush, call
early at
Laz Kahn'0
Trunks and Valises at
Laz Kahn's.
a woMi KKi c i, tunn::l.
Eight Thiuuuml IVr*piriuj; Miin- in—D rill
ing :» Hug« Hole Through Tw •nty
«Iglit Miles of Solid Koclc.
Deep down under the rustling corn
fields, green meadows, and peaceful
woods by the faint yellow light of in
numerable smoky lamps, and the inter
mittent cold gleaming from white
electric lights, six thousand grimy
men are toiliug night aud day so that
the water supply of Now York may
flow through twenty-eight miles of
solid rock. It tiovor causes, this grind
ing and cranking and whirring and
dull booming of powder explosions,
save for two hours out of the twenty
four, when three thousand men drows
ily crawl out of the dim shafts on the
surface of the earth to eat their bread
and meat and go to sleep, while three
thousand other men take tneir places.
Since the first of the year those cold,
trickling caverns and shafts iiave been
drilled and blasted continuously. Hun
dreds of powerful steam drills driven
by streams of compressed air, from
wonderful, shining engines, eat iirto.
the hard rock like so mail)- steel par-*
asites, and mountains of torn gneiss
and shining mica have been piled up
around the shafts as the work went on.
In two years a tunnel of thirty-one
miles will stretch from Croton lake to
the reservoir
the brick and
will gush a body of crystal water more
than enough to supply the metropolis
pleuteously. For ail these blessings
and the proud distinction of owning
the longest rock tunnel iu the fworld,
the city will have to pay at least $33,
good
say
Co.
do
the
and
to
that
a
if
a
is
a
to
"We
late
of
of
the
heart
good,
Ohio
sup
old
in Central park, tbrotyal?
stone lining of which
000,000 or perhaps $60,000,0 0. Tue
Mount Cenis tuunel is 7J mges long,
and cost about $15,000,U00, while the
Gothard tuunel is 9J miles long, and
cost very little more. Few peopie in
the city have any idea of the marvelous
rapidity with which the aqueduct
tunnel is being mafic. Indeed, the
speed which is kept up has attracted
attention of miners'all^^^ the coun
try, for nothing eVèn «r^Piehing to it
has ever been seen before. The work
is divided into two parts. 1
Bridge to Tarry town it is*îu
of O'Brien & Clatk^üae co^raptors,
and from thence to Crotonrfete i$»be
longs to Brown, Howat#f
contractors farm out
subcontractors,
there are twenty
shafts are buncht'j?
two or three shafts each, and the sub
contractors are under agreement to
tunnel out the rock in their respective
sections at so much a yard, and #o
build the brick and stone waterway in
side of it at set prices. Over eight
thousand men are employed in the
work—six thousand underground and
two thousand on the surface. At the
bottom of each' shaft the miners work
in two directions, so that while one set
of men are drilling southward tiiere is
a set of men in another shaft drilling
northward to meet them. These shafts
are about a mile apart, and yet so del
icate and accurate are the plans of the
engineers that in no case, they declare,
will the line of the tunnel be more than
an inch out of the way when the
miners iu the different tunnels meet
each other underground.
The reporter put on a rubber suit
and descended the shaft with Engineer
Parker. Water rained down the rocky
walls from all sides until it poured
from the rubber hats. Then picking
his way over little pools of water and
huge, scattered masses of rock, the
engineer led the reporter along the
tunnel southward. Electric lights
were hung froyi the roof of the cavern
all along the way, but even they could
not dispel the thick gloom that dwelt
in tho damp place. Here and there
were little ligms suspended iu line by
wires from tlie roof so that the fore
men might sight from one to the other,
and so keep driiiing out tho tunnel in a
straight course. At the end of the
cavern was a crowd of men working at
"slugger" drills which emitted such a
terrific sound that the hearing became
dulled and the sledge-hammer blows
which a brawny miner showered upon
a hand-drill sounded iike tho strokes
:h
als
be
i'heso
tunneling to
ite whole line
These
into sections of
Oa:1
-«X* shafts.
(Jom
Ex
on
L es
Pro
de
of
has
to
dogs
the
in
to
dis
have
our
the
our
out
to
a
by
at
to
two
U.
their
wise
of a velvet hammer upon a featherbed.
Perspiration poured down tho faces of
the men as they hung to tiie drill or
poured cups of water down the drill
holes lo keep the dust from blinding
them. Each drilling-machine emitted
such powerful snorts of cold air that at
timas th«jt-#i v.itoil a xtron g breeze,
which swept away the smoke cui-ling
up from the oil lamps on tho miners'
hats.
"There you see our method of work
ing," said Mr. Parker. "The upper
half of the tunnel is drilled before the
lower half. It is called the heading.
The lower half is called the bench.
First, two holes arc drilled in the head
ing from the side of the tunnel. The
holes slant inward toward each other,
so that when the powder put in them
is fired a wedge is blown out of tho
headiug. The holes are drilled straight
along the sides, and the remainder of
the rock, forming the we Ige-like cav
ity is blasted out. When the headiug
is tunneled ont twenty or thirty feet a
gang of men drill holes straight down
into the lower half, or bench, and
clear that out. The heading is always
fifteen feet ahead of the bench. When
the holes are charged with powder the
men carry the electric light to the
shaft, and go up to tiie surface them
selves. The charges are fired by elec
tricity from the surface, aud the explo
sions are sometimes so powerful as to
twist up the iron tracks laid in the bot
tom of the tunnel. After tho explo
sion a gang of men called muckers go
down and remove tho wreck. The
men at the drills have nothing to do
with this work.
Contractor Farwell, a sinewy, clear
headed young western man, took
the reporter down shaft No. 21, whole
the tuunel was bored two hundred feet
eacli way. Here everything was in
slick shape, aud almost every mechan
ical contrivance known to miners was
c
b
is
to
er
to
ly
as
the
in
glc
her
on
in
like
us
ular
a
day
had
has
the
n
in use.
"We have over $25,000 worth of ma
chinery and appliances exclusive of the
slugger drills," said Mr. Farwell, "and
we are getting iu more every day.
Next week we will have our mules. I
had a gray mule offered to me very
cheap, but 1 wouldn't have it as a gift.
They aro unlucky. We bought a gray
mule once and put it on one of onr
Mississippi river steamboats. Tho re
sult was tiiat the boat was sunk and
we had a strike among the men. For
the sake of the safely of the aqueduct
I wouldn't put a gray mule to work
here for any sum of money."
After an inspection of the work Mr.
Farwell said:
"The rock which is excavated is, in
a great many cases, very Iqje. It be
long to the city, and 1 tell you it was a
sharp dodge to reserve that right, for
our dump alone will bo worth at least
$200, ÜUU for concrete and building
stone. Wo would be glad to buy it for
$ 150 , 000 .
he
At une point in llie tunnel a stream
of water spurted through the roof.
"We don't mind water," he said,
"for at present we are lighting a cur
rent of twenty-three miles in
agura river, iu our own work there,
aud it gives us an appetite for streams.
Another good thing about water is
that men work quickly to get out of
A'. J. Ucra.d.
rill
in
of
the
up
to
it.
Centipede« and Tarantulas.
. to
There is an eating station on the
Southern Pacific railroad, and stands
well out on the great Prison plain, ^
about midway between El Paso and 92
Del Rio. Old Itoy Bean, who former
ly dispensed frontier justice of a de- oa
ciilediy original and peculiar kind
while acting as magistrate at Murder
ville during the building of the rail
road, owns the eating privilege at San
derson and the liquid refreshing bu
rcau connected therewith. This bus- t
iness is rather monotonous, and to a ro
man of old Roy's temperament not be
altogether pleasant. Latterly ho has
found time hanging heavily on his p
hands, and to assist him in whiling
away the lagging hours that creep by
so slowly out on this dreary plain, he e(
lias taken up the study of natural his- f
tgjy. His collection, as yet, is small,
but it is decidedly a unique one, and
he is adding specimens every day. It
is, his hope and ambition to be the very a
ploud possessor of a living specimen
of every manner of creeping and crawl- _
iug thing, and all those that hop, skip,
jump, run or fly in the Lone Star state.
In the largo glass case in the rear of Q f
his saloon he has caged more concen- -
tratet! venom than can be found any
where outside of a poison factory.
First on the list is a family of centi- tbe
pedes, consisting of a giant neat y en
inches in length, the oui fe ow s son
and daughter, and a numerous pio
geny of babies. I he centipede is not ^
a pretty insect, lie runs too much to
legs. Once I thought them no use, F
but after seeing a lot of little Chirica
hua Indian papooses pulling centi
pedes from their holes and greedily de
vouring them, legs, poison and all, I
no longer doubted the wisdom and be
neficence of their creation. In the
course of my checkered career I have
had several adventures with centipedes,
and always came out second best. A
centipede can raise a blister on a man's
body quicker than a red hot iron. If
you don't immediately apply a reme
dial poultice of pounded prickly pear
and dose yourself inwardly with post
whisky—which latter is warranted to
kill anything but an army mule—the
résultat) t effects may be serious. Cen
tipedes usually attack their victim at
night when he is asleep and can't de
fend himself. They are armed with
about two hundred little lances con
venient!}' las hed to the too of each foot,
—of which^ÉPf 4 iave several—and at
the base of each lance is a tiny sack of
venom. If a centipede crawls across
your body, which he'll most likely do
if you will lie down anywhere within
half a mile of him—you'll have no dif
ficulty in following his trail, and you'll
rerftinber his visit for weeks. No
man ever died from the bite of a centi
pede, but I've kuowu oue to mako a
man wish he were dead.
In the cage adjoining that occupied
by the centipedes was a den of tarantu
las, whose scientific name is lvcosa.
The den contained two lycosas, but
whether they were brother and sister,
mother and daughter, father aud son,
or husband and wife, I am unable to
declare. They were about the size of
a common saucer, and were as hairy
as Esau. Their rnoqths were blood
red, and they each had four sharp
teeth, which from time to time they
snapped viciously. I was bitten by a
tarantula once, mid 1 felt thankful that
these two were caged. 1 suggested to
old ltoy that it would be a good idea
to pull out their teeth, and he kindly
gave me permission to operate on them
dentally. 1 declined. Thu tarantula
is an exaggerated spider, with teeth
and hair. Tnov are always ready for
a li-iit, mid wid tackle anything, not
excluding a buzz-saw. l:i days gone
by 1 have often amused myself by teas
ing one with a red-hot ' coal. At first
they w-niid tight shy, but after they
: mad thov would attack that
in
it
to
#o
is
a
a
this
of
of
*have
saw
was
was
the
so
six
fork
had
ed
was
to
as
years
It
Then
rings
when
half
and
for
top
over
rings,
er
River
years
apart.
per
:h
to
of
mean
er
land
This
saw
have
feet
to
ly
up
face
eral
seen
ing
ion
(and
like
the
a
now
an
kill
that
can
om e go
c al, an : never surrender until they
were burned to a crisp. 1 never heard
of anyth.ng «-ating a tarantula. If one
b u s you, une ». oue remedies as pre
scribe : fur centipede sting, only more
is Cm. t udaddpiua Times.
so.— t
Ab ioiiu.l Animats.
The expedition undertaken by Mr.
Caldwell (who was aided in ids equip
ment by funds from the Government
Grant Committee of tlicR >yal Society)
is perhaps tiie most inti resting, be
cause the animals which lie has gone
to study are of largo size and already
more or less ■ familiar. The Ornithor
hynchus and the Echidna are hairy
quadrupeds (mammals) peculiar to
Australasia, which differ from all oth
er hairy quadrupeds in having, like
birds, but a single aperture to tiie ex
terior for the intestine and the ruimo
genital canals, and in having the skel
eton of the shoulder girdle and some
other features of structure are similar
to those of reptiles. Like those of
reptiles, their bodies are comparative
ly cold, instead of being kept in a defi
nite "blood heat" (100 degrees Fahr.)
as are those of all other mammals. It
had often been reported, and some
kind of evidence had been given to
support the statement, that those
strange beasts lay their eggs like birds
and reptiles, instead of retaining the
-like structure within the body and
allowing it to develop to a certain con
dition of maturity as do all otiier hairy
miadrupeds. Quo of Mr. Caldwell's
objects was definitely to ascertain
whether these animals lay eggs or not,
and, of more importance than that, to
examiue minutely the whole history of
the growth in the egg, and to com
pare it on tho one hand with the cor
responding development of birds and
reptiles, on tho otiier with that of or
dinary hairy quadrupeds or mammals.
Mr. Caldwell has found out all
about these auimals and collected them
in quantities. Tiie Echidna lays a sin
glc egg, which she then carries about
her iu a pouch formed by a fold of skin
on the ventral surface of the body,
similar to the kangaroo's pouch.
The duck-mole, on the other hand,
lays two eggs at a time and does not
carry them about, but deposits them
in her nest, an underground burrow
like that of the mole. Naturalists are
awaiting with great interest Mr. Cald
well's account of what goes on inside
these eggs while the young one is
growing there; that is to say, an ac
count of the differences and resem
blances between the structures which
gradually arise in these mammal's
eggs and those which ni-o familiar to
us as occurring in tho case of the com
mon fowl.— E. It ay Lankesler, in Pop
ular Science Monthly for September.
egg
So
you,
ploma
ty?
as
sion
the
A.
friend?
B.
sare
B
me
met
iciau
and
feet
"That
so
therein
the
no
from
FOKIîST tkicks.
rh« Kings or Crowtl. Showing Their Ag< *.
Eleven ye: rs ago I examined the
stumps of two white oaks and the
grave of a third, which told this singu
lar storv by circumstantial evidence
gtron* that it could not be doubted. In
the year 1502 an acorn fell about one
and a half miles from where I am now
writing (Rockville, Ind.), and by fa
vorable chance sprouted and grew in
In J594 another acorn
so
to au oak. , . .. .
sprouted about twenty feet distance
from it. It may have grown on the
^ rec beforo mentioned, as it was then
92 years old. In 1731 a tornado from
the northwest blew down a still older
oa fc which, in its tall, »truck against
and greatly damaged the top of the
onc born in 1502. There is to-day the
well-marked grave of ti*o fallen giant,
piled upon the southeast side
t j ie bole, and a long depression in
t be g rount i where the trunk fell and
ro tted till not a vestige of its wood can
be geen to-day (though some traces of
bark of the roots can). This de
p ress i 0 n points to the stump of the
damaged oak. The two younger had
been fleshly cut down when I examin
e( j them. The stumps were about four '~>v
f eet across> a nd there was not over au ' -
difference between their diame
terg> though ninely-lwo years differ
enca in t heir ages* The younger had
a j aro . ej healthy lop, no broken or dead
limb " and it had put on rings of
_ rowth from the beginning of more
than average size. The older one had
been iu j ured in j ts branches by the fall
Q f tbe st jjj 0 ; dcr one before mentioned
- 1731) and for fif t y_ SCV en years had
t ou ver y siuu ;i rings of growth
(about twenty-five to thirty years to
tbe j nc jj j n9 t ca( j 0 f twelve to fifteen as
s b 0 uld), when a new set of branches
developed to take the place of the
imaged ones, and the rings began to
^ increase in size and gradually attained
to the average. 1 examined their
F °
tops, which coincided with what has
one before. There were the peculiar
nots in the top of the older one where
dead limbs had rotted oil" and were
healed over. (Any expert timberman
will readily recognize them.) During
this delay the younger oak caught up
with the older one in size. The size
of a tree is a very uncertain indication
of its age.
In all the cases of the hundreds I
*have examined of the oaks (the oldest
trees of the forest I think), I never
saw but one that was here when Col
umbus discovered America. That one
was by far the largest I ever saw, and
was over 600 years old, about twice
the age of the other largest ones. I
could not get its exact age as it was
so decayed near the heart I could not
distinguish the rings. It was between
six and seven feet in diameter, and
forked about sixty feet tip, and ««öl.
fork was as large as the other largest
trees. It was not sound enough to
make good lumber, being what in this
region is called "doughty," a state be
tween soundness and rottenness. It
had been down a year before I examin
ed it (being out of the country when it
was cut), so that it was very difficult
to examine it. I have mislaid my mem
orandum of it, but it would be about
as follows: At the age of about 200
years it had some misfortune which
caused it to form about 100 small rings.
It then regained its health and formed
normal rings for about 140 years.
Then another mishap caused small
rings till within the last fifty years,.
when it was putting on fair growths
again. This tree was about one and a
half miles southeast of Rockville, Ind., j
and was noted among hunters and
woodmen. It was a disagreeable, I
showery day when I examined it, and
for that reason I did not examine its
top to see if dead, aud lost, and healed
over limbs coincided with the small
rings, but I have often done so in oth-!
er cases, and found them to coincide, i
Last May (1884) I examined a syca
amore and water elm in the Wabash
River bottom, the former six feet in !
diameter and the latter five, each 180
years old. They stood about 150 feet I
apart. They were standing on the up- ;
per end of a newly-made bottom (I
mean new as compared with the high
er and older bottoms a little more in
land from the river, say 200 years old).
This was the largest sycamore I ever
saw that was sound to the heart. I
have seen hollow ones nearly eight
feet in diameter. This tree seems never
to have met with any mishap till the
logman came «long, as the ring3 of
growth were all unusually large.
These trees very probably sprouted
twelve to fifteen feet below the present
surface of the bottom. They general
ly begin life on tiie lower end of river
sandbars, and as sedimentation builds
up the surface they put out new sur
face roots at every t« o or three feet of
•elevation. Such trees, with their sev
eral sets of surface roots, arc often
seen in drift piles, and also still stand
ing on tho verge of a sleep river bank
where onc side is exposed by the eros
ion of tiie river. Their roots arc often
hollow like their trunks, the hollow
(and root, too) decreasing in diameter
downward till it terminates in a point,
like a cone standing on its point. In
the southwest corner of this county is
a hollow cottonwood stump on what is
now a high bottom of the Wabash in
which the hollow extends downward
twelve feet. Mr. Joseph J. Daniels,
an int lligont. observing man, on
whose land it stands, told me so. Such
silting up over the surface roots would
kill most of the upland trees, or those
that grow from the seeds on the high
bottoms .—John T. Cum, bell in Ameri
can Naturalist for September.
Pretty Cousin (to young doctor)—
So you are a full-fledged doctor, arc
you, Tom?
Young Doctor—Yes. I got my di
ploma last week.
Pretty Cousin—Have you any special
ty?
Young Doctor—Yes. 1 shall mako
children's diseases a specialty.
Pretty Cousin—Ah, yes, 1 see; and
as you gain experience in your profes
sion you will bu able to attend older
people. That's light,Tom; begin at
the bottom aud work your way up.—>
Drake's Magazine.
A. —What physician iiave you, dear
friend?
B. —Tho Prof. S.
A.—WhaM that charlatan!
sare you to he same come?
B- Ihrough my wife, who him upon
me in a manner forced iias, that I him
absolutely not again offshake can. She
met him, before he yet our family phys
iciau was, onc time with a friendess,
and asked him why she always so cold
feet had, whereupon he answered:
"That comes about because your feet
so small are that not enough blood
therein place has." Therewith was
the evil done, and my wife will have
no otiier doctor now."— Translated
from Der Omnibus.
How

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